UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

 

[X] ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2020

or

 

[  ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the Transition Period from ____________ to ____________

 

Commission File Number 001-36453

 

SUPERIOR DRILLING PRODUCTS, INC.

(Name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Utah   46-4341605

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

1583 South 1700 East

Vernal, Utah

  84078

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Issuer’s Telephone Number: 435-789-0594

 

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:

 

Title of each class:   Trading Symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered:
Common Stock, $0.001 par value   SDPI   NYSE American

 

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. [  ] Yes [X] No

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange. [  ] Yes [X] No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. [X] Yes [  ] No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 229.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). [X] Yes [  ] No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer [  ] Accelerated filer [  ]
Non-accelerated filer (Do not check if a smaller reporting company) [  ] Smaller reporting company [X]
  Emerging growth company [  ]

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). [  ] Yes [X] No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report [  ]

 

The registrant had issued and outstanding 25,762,342 shares of its common stock on March 12, 2021.

 

Documents incorporated by reference: NONE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUPERIOR DRILLING PRODUCTS, INC.

FORM 10-K

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

PART I    
ITEM 1. BUSINESS 4
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES 24
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 24
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES 24
     
PART II    
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES 25
ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA 26
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 26
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 33
ITEM 8. CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 34
  NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 40
ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE 56
ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES 56
ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION 56
     
PART III    
ITEM 10. DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE 57
ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION 59
ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDERS MATTERS 63
ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE 64
ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES 64
     
PART IV    
ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES 65
  EXHIBIT INDEX 65
  SIGNATURES 74

 

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Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K includes certain statements that may be deemed to be “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Statements contained in all parts of this document that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties that are beyond the control of Superior Drilling Products, Inc. (the “Company” or “SDPI”). You can identify the Company’s forward-looking statements by the words “anticipate,” “estimate,” “expect,” “may,” “project,” “believe” and similar expressions, or by the Company’s discussion of strategies or trends. Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, no assurances can be given that these expectations will prove to be correct. The forward-looking statements contained in or incorporated by reference into this Form 10-K are largely based on our expectations, which reflect estimates and assumptions made by our management. These estimates and assumptions reflect our best judgment based on currently known market conditions and other factors. Although we believe such estimates and assumptions to be reasonable, they are inherently uncertain and involve a number of risks and uncertainties that are beyond our control, including:

 

  the continued impact of COVID-19 on domestic and global economic conditions and the future impact of such conditions on the oil and gas industry and the demand for our services;
     
  the volatility of oil and natural gas prices;
     
  the cyclical nature of the oil and gas industry;
     
  availability of financing, flexibility in restructuring existing debt and access to capital markets;
     
  our reliance on significant customers;
     
  consolidation within our customers’ industries;
     
  competitive products and pricing pressures;
     
  our ability to develop and commercialize new and/or innovative drilling and completion tool technologies;
     
  fluctuations in our operating results;
     
  our dependence on key personnel;
     
  costs of raw materials;
     
  our dependence on third party suppliers;
     
  unforeseen risks in our manufacturing processes;
     
  the need for skilled workers;
     
  our ability to successfully manage our growth strategy;
     
  unanticipated risks associated with, and our ability to integrate, acquisitions;
     
  current and potential governmental regulatory actions in the United States and regulatory actions and political unrest in other countries, specifically the Middle East region;
     
  the potential impact of the coronavirus, variants of the coronavirus or other major health crises on our business and results of operations;
     
  terrorist threats or acts, war and civil disturbances;
     
  our ability to protect our intellectual property;
     
  impact of environmental matters, including future environmental regulations;
     
  implementing and complying with safety policies;
     
  breaches of security in our information systems and other cybersecurity risks;
     
  related party transactions with our founders; and
     
  risks associated with our common stock.

 

Many of these factors are beyond our ability to control or predict. These factors are not intended to represent a complete list of the general or specific factors that may affect us.

 

In addition, management’s assumptions about future events may prove to be inaccurate. All readers are cautioned that the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are not guarantees of future performance, and we cannot assure any reader that such statements will be realized or that the forward-looking events and circumstances will occur. Actual results may differ materially from those anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements due to factors described in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” included elsewhere in this prospectus and in the documents that we include as exhibits to this Annual Report, and our subsequent SEC filings. All forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made. We do not intend to update or revise any forward-looking statements as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law. These cautionary statements qualify all forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf.

 

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PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

Our Company

 

Superior Drilling Products, Inc. (the “Company”, “SDPI”, “we”, “our” or “us”) is an innovative drilling and completion tool technology company providing cost saving solutions that drive production efficiencies for the oil and natural gas drilling industry. Our headquarters and manufacturing operations are located in Vernal, Utah. Our drilling solutions include the patented Drill-N-Ream® well bore conditioning tool (“Drill-N-Ream tool”) and the patented Strider™ Drill String Oscillation System technology (“Strider technology” or “Strider”). In addition, the Company is a manufacturer and refurbisher of PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) drill bits for a leading oil field services company. We operate a state-of-the-art fabrication facility, where we manufacture solutions for the drilling industry, as well as various customers’ custom products in other industries.

 

We were incorporated on December 10, 2013 under the name SD Company, Inc. in order to facilitate (a) the reorganization of the entities that are now our consolidated subsidiaries and (b) the subsequent acquisition of Hard Rock Solutions, LLC (“HR”). We changed our name from SD Company Inc. to Superior Drilling Products, Inc. on May 22, 2014 in conjunction with closing of that reorganization and our initial public offering, which occurred on May 23, 2014 (“Offering” or “IPO”). Our corporate headquarters and manufacturing operations are located in Vernal, Utah. Our common stock trades on the NYSE American exchange under the ticker symbol “SDPI”.

 

Our subsidiaries include (a) Superior Drilling Solutions, LLC (previously known as Superior Drilling Products, LLC), a Utah limited liability company (“SDS”), together with its wholly owned subsidiary Superior Design and Fabrication, LLC, a Utah limited liability company (“SDF”), (b) Extreme Technologies, LLC, a Utah limited liability company (“ET”), (c) Meier Properties Series, LLC, a Utah limited liability company (“MPS”), (d) Meier Leasing, LLC, a Utah limited liability company (“ML”), and (e) HR.

 

COVID-19

 

Our business and operations have been, and continue to be, adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic greatly reduced global oil demand as social distancing and travel restrictions were implemented across the world. Although there have been recent improvements, the overall timeline and potential magnitude of the COVID-19 outbreak and its consequences are currently unknown. The continuation or amplification of this virus could continue to more broadly affect the United States and global economy, including the demand for oil and gas.

 

Further disrupting the oil and gas industry was the lifting by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (“OPEC”) of supply curtailments. This resulted in an increase in the global supply of oil in an environment of rapidly contracting demand. As a result, the price of oil declined significantly in April 2020 as storage capacity became limited.

 

Overall, the significant decline in oil demand due to COVID-19 coupled with a global over supply of oil drove down oil prices. This resulted in our upstream oil and gas customers significantly reducing their capital expenditure budgets for 2020. This is evidenced by the significant decline in U.S. onshore rig counts from the beginning of the year. As of December 31, 2020, U.S. onshore rig count was 351 rigs compared with 796 rigs as of December 31, 2019. Oil and gas related markets began to recover modestly in August 2020 and we expect that improvement to continue through 2021 although not recovering to the level of operating rigs seen in 2019.

 

Even as we expand our market reach internationally, the reduction of the U.S. onshore rig count has negatively affected our results of operations as our business is highly dependent upon the vibrancy of the oil and gas drilling operations in the U.S. In an effort to offset the reduction in revenue resulting from the weakened macroeconomic environment, we implemented certain cost reduction measures during 2020. These measures included, but were not limited to, the following:

 

  20% reduction of the base salary beginning in April 2020 and a 40% salary deferral beginning in October 2020 for the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Operating Officer, and Chief Financial Officer;
     
  20% reduction in the base salaries beginning in April 2020 and a 20% deferral of base salaries beginning in October 2020 of certain non-executive officers of the Company;
     
  20% reduction in fees to be paid beginning in April 2020 and a 40% deferral of fees beginning in October 2020 to the independent directors on the Board for their service as directors;
     
  5% to 10% reduction in salaries beginning in April 2020 and a 10% deferral of salaries beginning in October 2020 of other members of the management team and salaried workforce;
     
  43% reduction of the Company’s workforce; and
     
  Closure of our West Texas repair facility in July 2020.

 

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We also entered into amended agreements with certain of our customers that reduced our rates by 10%, reduced our planned capital expenditures and decided to defer further investment in new technology development, including our Strider technology, for the foreseeable future. Management is working diligently with vendors to achieve amended price concessions and terms of our payables. While we believe the Drill-N-Ream tool can continue to further penetrate the global oil natural gas drilling industry, we believe global activity will remain at depressed levels compared with activity prior to the COVID-19 pandemic through 2021 and well into 2022. We will continue to actively monitor the situation and may take further actions altering our business operations that we determine are in the best interests of our employees, customers, partners, suppliers, and stakeholders, or as required by federal, state, or local authorities.

 

We have placed a priority on protecting our employees during this pandemic while continuing to provide essential services to our customers. We operate under an emergency response plan specific to the global pandemic. This plan is reviewed and revised quarterly based on the latest federal and state government information provided, best practice, and consultation with local health departments. This plan includes disinfecting on a regular basis, the elimination of overlap between shifts, and a strict procedure for handling potential cases within the processes outlined in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Employees are also required to perform self-health evaluations at the start of every shift. These measures continue to act as a barrier to the spread of the virus on company property and among its employees. To date, these precautions have had an immaterial impact on the normal costs associated with our operations.

 

The Company received loan proceeds of $891,600 under a promissory note from its existing commercial bank (the “PPP Loan”). The PPP, established as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”), provides for loans to qualifying businesses for amounts up to 2.5 times the average monthly payroll expenses of the qualifying business. The loans and accrued interest are forgivable after eight weeks as long as the borrower uses the loan proceeds for eligible purposes, including payroll, benefits, rent and utilities, and maintains its payroll levels. In December 2020, the Small Business Administration approved forgiveness for the full amount of the Company’s PPP Loan.

 

On December 7, 2020, the Company closed a sale-leaseback agreement for its headquarters and manufacturing facilities. Under the terms of the transaction, the Company sold the property for $4.5 million and simultaneously entered into a 15-year lease. After fees, the Company netted approximately $4.2 million in proceeds of which $2.5 million was used to repay in full the outstanding mortgage on the property. Under the lease agreement, the Company has an option to extend the term of the lease and to repurchase the property.

 

Background of Business

 

We innovate, design, engineer, manufacture, sell, and repair drilling and completion tools in the United States, Canada, Middle East and Eastern Europe.

 

We currently have three basic operations:

 

  Our PDC drill bit and other tool refurbishing and manufacturing service,
     
  Our emerging technologies business that manufactures the Drill-N-Ream tool, our innovative drill string enhancement tool, the Strider technology and other tools, and
     
  Our new product development business that conducts our research and development, and designs our horizontal drill string enhancement tools, other down-hole drilling technologies, and drilling tool manufacturing technologies.

 

Our strategy for growth is to expand our global market penetration of our current drill tool technology and to leverage our expertise in drill tool technology and precision machining in order to broaden our product offerings and solutions for the oil and gas industry, as well as other industries that require precision machining and quality. We believe through our patented technologies, as well as technologies under development, that we can offer the oil and gas industry the solutions it demands to improve drilling efficiencies and reduce production costs.

 

Our co-founder, Troy Meier, developed the first commercially-viable process for refurbishing PDC drill bits after a successful 13-year career with a predecessor of Baker Hughes Inc. He was also co-inventor of the patented Drill-N-Ream® well bore conditioning tool (“Drill-N-Ream tool” or “DnR”). We made a major strategic shift in 2016 to focus on our core competencies of innovation in manufacturing technologies, creation of solutions for the upstream oil and gas industry, drilling tool fleet maintenance and repair and the development engineering and manufacture of new tools and technologies.

 

Major Customers

 

The Company has Vendor Agreements with Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations LLC (“Baker Hughes”), Drilling Tools International (“DTI”), Weatherford U.S., L.P. (“Weatherford”), Odfjell Drilling and National Energy Services Reunited Corp. (“NESR”).

 

Baker Hughes: We have manufactured and refurbished PDC drill bits exclusively for Baker Hughes’s oilfield operations in the Rocky Mountain, California and Alaska regions as well as other areas as needed for the past 26 years. In 2018, we re-negotiated our agreement with Baker Hughes whereby we now refurbish PDC bits for all of Baker Hughes’s U.S. geographic areas. In 2020, we further re-negotiated our agreement whereby we can now refurbish PDC bits for any PDC bit supplier.

 

5
 

 

DTI: We have been working with DTI since 2016. DTI purchases our Drill-N-Ream tool for their rental tool business. We receive revenue from DTI for tool sales, tool repairs and a royalty fee based on the tools usage. Pursuant to our original agreement, DTI was required to achieve certain market share requirements in order to maintain exclusive marketing rights for the Drill-N-Ream in the U.S. and Canada, both onshore and offshore. DTI did not achieved the defined market share goals in 2020 and, therefore, no longer has exclusive rights to market the Drill-N-Ream. As a result, the Company can work with other customers to expand the market reach of the Drill-N-Ream in the U.S. and Canada and has initiated efforts to do so.

 

International: We are working with Weatherford, Odfjell Drilling, and NESR to introduce and gain exposure of our Drill-N-Ream tool to large Middle East operators in Kuwait.

 

Our Products

 

Drill-N-Ream Tool. The Drill-N-Ream tool is a dual-section wellbore conditioning tool which is located approximately 150 feet behind the bottom hole assembly, also known as BHA. Concurrently as the well bore is being drilled, the Drill-N-Ream tool conditions the well bore. It smooths and slightly enlarges the well drift in all sections of horizontal or directionally-drilled wells, in both oil and water-based mud. It reduces tortuosity resulting from the geo-steering drill bit, and the overcorrections and formation interactions that occur during directional drilling. With the well bore conditioned by the Drill-N-Ream, the drill string is then able to move through the conditioned well bore with less friction and stress.

 

In effect, the Drill-N-Ream accelerates drilling speed and extends the horizontal distance of the well bore by:

 

(a) Smoothing out ledges and doglegs left by the bit, which allows the drill string to move through a conditioned well bore with less friction and stress,

 

(b) Reducing tool joint damages and trip time (i.e. the time required to remove and reinsert the drill string),

 

(c) Enhancing the power available to drive the drill bit assembly,

 

(d) Extending the horizontal distance that can be drilled during a run,

 

(e) Improving the running of casing in the completed well much easier, and

 

(f) Tripping out of the hole on elevators, rotation not required.

 

The number of “trips” required by the operator, or the number of times the drill string has to be removed and reinserted in the wellbore, is reduced as a result of the performance of the Drill-N-Ream. Each time a drilling operator has to trip the drill string and replace a bit or other drill string component, it costs the operator substantial time and money, so we believe anything that allows each run to extend further without additional tripping is of great value to our customers. Traditional methods for conditioning the well bore entails removing the drill string and running a dedicated reamer through the well bore, typically in two separate runs. The Drill-N-Ream tool eliminates the need for dedicated reamer runs, and therefore reduces the cost of drilling a horizontal well.

 

The Drill-N-Ream tool is available in multiple sizes and can be custom manufactured to accommodate most drill hole sizes.

 

6
 

 

We believe that the Drill-N-Ream’s rapid adoption and continued use by operators validates its effectiveness and industry acceptance. In fact, leading operators have begun to standardize their drilling assembly with a Drill-N-Ream tool. In addition, we understand that a number of customers have rented the Drill-N-Ream tool after first trying competitive products. We expect the above factors to support increasing interest in, and revenue from, the Drill-N-Ream tool over the next several years as more well operators’ reports of its effectiveness are transmitted through word-of-mouth by an increasing user base to other well operators globally.

 

Strider Technology. The Strider technology utilizes its unique patented design to reduce drill string friction on horizontal wells, resulting in improved rates of penetration and cost savings. The Strider technology is designed to help dissipate the inertial drag of a horizontal drill string by generating rhythmic pulses that break the frictional connection between the drill strings and well bore greatly enhancing drilling rates. Its revolutionary engineering provides a cost-effective alternative to conventional downhole vibration tools.

 

The Strider technology is composed of two main parts, a hydraulic channeling chamber (“HCC”) and a rhythmic pulsation chamber (“RPC”). The RPC contains a precisely engineered, high speed pulse-valve that systematically restricts flow area. During flow restriction, or “closure”, the ideal amount of fluid is allowed to continue down hole. This perfectly controlled hydraulic flow produces an optimal pulse frequency, which is preferred for bottom hole assembly equipment. The optimal pulse frequency also allows for placement of the Strider technology closer to the bit than typical oscillation tools.

 

We believe that our Strider technology is at the forefront of drill string tool technological development for horizontal drilling. We also believe our Strider technology offers significant advantages over our competitors drill string stimulation tools.

 

V-Stream advanced conditioning system (“V-Stream”). The V-Stream tool is an integral spiral blade stabilizer and is engineered to combine stabilization with reaming. A cavity or plenum in the middle of the blades facilitates enhanced fluid flow for cuttings transport and reduces torque when compared with typical stabilizers with similar overall blade length. Non-active cutters at gauge enable the V-Stream to remove formation and condition the hole while controlling deviation. With these unique features, the V-Stream will stabilize the bottom hole assembly and condition the hole simultaneously to optimize the drilling operations.

 

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Our Strategy for Growth

 

Our strategy for growth is to expand our global market penetration of our current drill tool technology and to leverage our expertise in drill tool technology and precision machining in order to broaden our product offerings and solutions for the oil and gas industry, as well as other industries that require precision machining and quality. We believe through our patented technologies, as well as technologies under development, that we can offer the oil and gas industry the solutions it demands to improve drilling efficiencies and reduce production costs. Specific examples of this strategy include:

 

Leverage highly advanced tool technologies. We currently have two highly differentiated advanced drilling tool technologies (the Drill-N-Ream tool and the Strider technology) that address challenges encountered in the oil and gas drilling marketplace.

 

Expand our channels to market and geographic reach. We are leveraging existing distribution channels in the exploration and production industry. As noted earlier, in May 2016, we entered into an agreement with DTI, establishing DTI as the distributor of our patented Drill-N-Ream tool in the United States and Canada onshore and offshore markets. As a result of this agreement, our technology has penetrated the market more efficiently leveraging DTI’s long-term relationships with end users. We are also evaluating opportunities to further our reach into the North American market.

 

We are expanding our channels to market and our geographic presence, especially in the Middle East as evidenced by agreements that we entered into with Weatherford in December 2017, Odfjell Drilling in November 2018 and NESR in 2019. We expect to add additional distributors as we expand our tool offering and geographic reach. We also expect to leverage our distributor and customer relationships to identify needs for new tool development and to use these channels to market a broadened product offering as it is developed.

 

Strengthen and support our employees. Our experienced employees and management team are some of our most valuable resources. Attracting, training, and retaining key personnel, has been and will continue to be critical to our success. To achieve our goals, we intend to remain focused on providing our employees with training, personal and professional growth opportunities, as well as adding performance-based incentives, including opportunities for stock ownership, and other competitive benefits. We are also working with the local university and high school to develop and teach local programs in machining and engineering expertise and technical resources.

 

Seek strategic acquisitions to enhance or expand our product lines. While our focus is on organic growth, we may identify new technologies to add to our arsenal of tools for the exploration and production industry. In analyzing new acquisitions, we intend to pursue opportunities that complement our existing product line and/or that are geographically situated within our current market. We believe that strategic acquisitions will enable us to exploit economies of scale in the areas of finance, human resources, marketing, administration, information technology, and legal, while also providing cross-marketing opportunities among our drill tool product offerings. With our recent AS9100D with ISO 9001:2015 certification there is opportunity to expand into new revenue streams that are decoupled from the upstream oil and gas industry, which can leverage our operating assets and help to mitigate the impact on our results of operations that is caused by the ongoing and unpredictable cyclic nature of energy markets.

 

New Product Development and Intellectual Property

 

Our sales and earnings are influenced by our ability to successfully provide the high-level service and state-of-the-art products that our customers demand, which in turn relies on our ability to develop new processes, technology, and products. We have also historically dedicated additional resources toward the development of new technology and equipment to enhance the effectiveness, safety, and efficiency of the products and services we provide. We expect that with our extensive knowledge and experience in the oilfield industry, we can identify additional challenges with directional drilling, and then design and develop tools that will help our customers with their drilling challenges. Further development of additional drill string components will become increasingly important to our business as we continue to grow through both organic expansion and strategic acquisitions.

 

Research and development costs were approximately $790,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared with $1,427,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019. Costs included in research and development included payroll for engineers, materials for the Strider technology, legal costs relating to our patents, and third-party engineering costs. Research and development costs represented 8% of our 2020 revenue as we continued to maintain our commitment to new product development.

 

Although we highly value our proprietary products and technology, we also depend on our technological capabilities, customer service-oriented culture, and application of our know-how to distinguish ourselves from our competitors. We also consider the services and products we provide to our customers, our customer relationships, and the technical knowledge and skill of our personnel, to be more important than our registered intellectual property in our ability to compete. While we stress the importance of our research and development programs, the technical challenges and market uncertainties associated with the development and successful introduction of new and updated products are such that we cannot assure investors that we will realize any particular amount of future revenue from the services and related products resulting from our research and development programs.

 

Suppliers and Raw Materials

 

We acquire supplies, component parts, products and raw materials from suppliers, including steel suppliers, foundries, forge shops and original equipment manufacturers. The prices we pay for our raw materials may be affected by, among other things, energy, industrial diamond, steel and other commodity prices, tariffs and duties on imported materials and foreign currency exchange rates. Certain of our component parts, products or specific raw materials are only available from a limited number of suppliers.

 

Our ability to obtain suitable quality raw materials and components, such as PDC’s, steel and flux, solder and heating elements, is critical to our ability to remanufacture Baker Hughes drill bits, and to manufacture the Drill-N-Ream tool and Strider technology tools and other future drill line products. In order to purchase raw materials and components in timely and cost-effective manner, we have developed both domestic and international sourcing connections and arrangements. We maintain quality assurance and testing programs to analyze and test these raw materials and components in order to assure their compliance with our rigorous specifications and standards. We generally try to purchase our raw materials from multiple suppliers, so we are not dependent on any one supplier, but this is not always possible.

 

The price and availability of commodities and components, in particular steel, can have an impact on our operations. We have no assurance that we will be able to continue to purchase these raw materials on a timely basis or at historical prices.

 

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Proprietary Rights

 

We rely primarily on a combination of patent, trade secret, copyright and trademark laws, confidential procedures, and other intellectual property protection methods to protect our proprietary technology. Mr. Meier currently has U.S. patent applications pending, and related international patent applications pending as co-inventor, and individually with respect to the Strider technology and other pending drilling tools. There is no assurance that our patent applications will result in issued patents, that the existing patents or that any future patents issued to us will provide any competitive advantages for their products or technology, or that, if challenged, the patents issued to us will be held valid and enforceable. Despite our precautions, unauthorized parties may attempt to copy aspects of our products or obtain and use information that we regard as proprietary. Existing intellectual property laws afford only limited protection and policing violations of such laws is difficult. The laws of certain countries in which our products are or may be used by our customers do not protect our products and intellectual property rights to the same extent as do the laws of the United States. There is no assurance that these protections will be adequate or that our competitors will not independently develop similar technology, gain access to our trade secrets or other proprietary information, or design around our patents.

 

We may be required to enter into costly litigation to enforce our intellectual property rights or to defend infringement claims by others. Such infringement claims could require us to license the intellectual property rights of third parties. There is no assurance that such licenses would be available on reasonable terms, or at all.

 

In February 2019, the Company filed a patent infringement lawsuit in the United States District Court for the Western District of Louisiana Lafayette Division asserting Stabil Drill Specialties, LLC (“Stabil Drill”) infringed on our patent that covers the Company’s well bore conditioning tool, the Drill-N-Ream. The lawsuit was subsequently moved from Louisiana to the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division. The court ordered the Company to serve discovery requests upon Stabil Drill and gave Stabil Drill deadlines to respond and produce documents and permit product inspection. Stabil Drill filed a motion for summary judgement and the Company responded and cross-moved for patent infringement. The parties are awaiting the judge’s decision. On October 1, 2020, Superior Energy Services, Stabil Drill’s parent company, filed for bankruptcy, which may result in a delay in the resolution of this litigation. Superior Energy Services announced on February 2, 2021 that it has successfully completed its financial restructuring and has emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Additionally, on May 20, 2019, Extreme Technologies, LLC sued Short Bit & Tool Co. and Lot William Short, Jr. (“Defendants”) in the Northern District of Texas - Dallas Division. Extreme sued for patent infringement based on the same patents discussed in the Stabil Drill litigation. On December 23, 2019, the Court stayed Extreme’s patent infringement claim against Defendants pending resolution of the Southern District of Texas Stabil Drill case.We cannot predict the outcome of these matters, but our legal costs could have a material effect on our financial position or results of operations in future periods.

 

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Competition

 

Drill Bit Refurbishing. The primary competitors for our drill bit refurbishing services are the in-house units at Hughes Christensen, the division of Baker Hughes responsible for drill bits. Other drill bit manufacturers also have in-house refurbishing units and are now competitors given the removal of the exclusivity clause under our contract with Baker Hughes.

 

Drilling Enhancement Tools. The primary competitors for our Drill-N-Ream tool are several single-section reaming tool manufacturers, including Baker Oil Tools (a division of Baker Hughes), NOV, Schlumberger and Tercel, and one dual-section reaming tool manufactured by Stabil Drill (which is the subject of the lawsuit described above). We believe that the Drill-N-Ream tool is the only patented dual-section or dual cutting structure drill string reamer on the market today. We believe that distinction will allow us to continue building on the Drill-N-Ream tool’s first-mover advantage.

 

We believe that our Strider technology is at the forefront of drill string tool technological development for horizontal drilling. There are existing tools that would compete with the Strider, such as the Agitator tool marketed by NOV. However, we believe our Strider technology offers significant advantages over the Agitator.

 

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Customers

 

Our customer concentration of revenue is dependent upon a limited number of customers. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, two customers represented 80% and 92% of our total revenue, respectively.

 

Manufacturing

 

We manufacture our solutions, as well as custom products, in our state-of-the-art drill tool fabrication facility where we operate a technologically-advanced PDC drill bit refurbishing facility, as well as a state-of-the-art, high-tech drilling and completion tool engineering design and manufacturing operation. We manufacture our drill string enhancement tools, including the patented Drill- N-Ream tool and the patented Strider technology, and conduct our new product research and development from this facility.

 

We employ a senior work force with specialized training and extensive experience related to drill bit refurbishing and drill and completion tool manufacturing. They produce our products and services using a suite of highly technical, purpose-built equipment, much of which we design and manufacture for our proprietary use. Our manufacturing equipment and products use advanced technologies that enable us to increase efficiency, enhance product integrity, improve efficiency and safety, and solve complex drilling tool problems.

 

In December 2020, we were awarded the AS9100D with ISO 9001:2015 certification for our quality management systems (QMS) and for meeting QMS requirements specific to the aviation, space and defense industries.

 

We believe that we can leverage our certification as well as our precision machining and manufacturing expertise to produce other products for customers in a variety of industries.

 

Cyclicality

 

We are substantially dependent on conditions in the oil and gas industry, including the level of exploration, development and production activity of, and the corresponding capital spending by, oil and natural gas companies. The level of exploration, development and production activity is directly affected by trends in oil and natural gas prices, which has historically been volatile, and by capital spending discipline imposed by customers. As previously noted, these levels were seriously impacted in 2020 due to the COVID pandemic.

 

Declines, as well as anticipated declines, in oil and gas prices could negatively affect the level of these activities and capital spending, which could adversely affect demand for our products and services and, in certain instances, result in the cancellation, modification or rescheduling of existing and expected orders and the ability of our customers to pay us for our products and services. These factors could have an adverse effect on our revenue and profitability.

 

Seasonality

 

Our business is not significantly impacted by seasonality, although our fourth quarter has historically been negatively impacted by holidays and our clients’ budget cycles. A small portion of the revenue we generate from selected operations may benefit from higher first quarter activity levels, as operators take advantage of the winter freeze to gain access to remote drilling and production areas. In the past, some of our revenue in Alaska and Canada has declined during the second quarter due to warming weather conditions that resulted in thawing, softer ground, difficulty accessing drill sites and road bans that curtailed drilling activity.

 

Environmental, Health and Safety Regulation

 

Our operations are subject to numerous stringent and complex laws and regulations governing the discharge of materials into the environment, health and safety aspects of our operations, or otherwise relating to human health and environmental protection, and we have put a strong focus on these issues.

 

We designed and built our Vernal facility as a fully-contained business park, except for the city sewer connection. Underlying our entire facility, including parking lots and runoff storage areas, is a complete capture and containment field that collects all building drainage and ground run off in isolated tanks. Captured drainage and runoff, as well as all hazardous waste generated in our manufacturing processes is regularly removed from our facility by a certified hazardous waste disposal company. Any changes in environmental laws and regulations or in enforcement policies that result in more stringent and costly waste handling, storage, transport, disposal, or remediation requirements could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial position. Moreover, accidental releases or spills of regulated substances may occur in the course of our operations, and we cannot assure you that we will not incur significant costs and liabilities as a result of such releases or spills, including any third-party claims for damage to property, natural resources or persons. Failure to comply with these laws or regulations or to obtain or comply with permits may result in the assessment of administrative, civil and criminal penalties, imposition of remedial or corrective action requirements, and the imposition of orders or injunctions to prohibit or restrict certain activities or force future compliance.

 

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The following is a summary of the more significant existing environmental, health and safety laws and regulations to which our business operations are subject and for which compliance could have a material adverse impact on our capital expenditures, results of operations or financial position.

 

Hazardous Substances and Waste. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (“RCRA”) and comparable state statutes, regulate the generation, transportation, treatment, storage, disposal and cleanup of hazardous and non-hazardous wastes. Under the auspices of the EPA, the individual states administer some or all of the provisions of RCRA, sometimes in conjunction with their own, more stringent requirements. We are required to manage hazardous and non-hazardous wastes in compliance with RCRA and its state counterparts.

 

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (“CERCLA”), also known as the Superfund law, imposes joint and several liability, without regard to fault or legality of conduct, on classes of persons who are considered to be responsible for the release of a hazardous substance into the environment. These persons include the owner or operator of the site where the release occurred, and anyone who disposed or arranged for the disposal of a hazardous substance released at the site. We currently own, lease, or operate numerous properties that have been used for manufacturing and other operations for many years. We also contract with waste removal services and landfills. These properties and the substances disposed or released on them may be subject to CERCLA, RCRA and analogous state laws. Under such laws, we could be required to remove previously disposed substances and wastes, remediate contaminated property, or perform remedial operations to prevent future contamination. In addition, it is not uncommon for neighboring landowners and other third parties to file claims for personal injury and property damage allegedly caused by hazardous substances released into the environment.

 

Water Discharges. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act (the “Clean Water Act”) and analogous state laws impose restrictions and strict controls with respect to the discharge of pollutants, including spills and leaks of oil and other substances, into “Waters of the United States,” including wetlands. The discharge of pollutants into regulated waters is prohibited, except in accordance with the terms of a permit issued by the EPA or an analogous state agency. A responsible party includes the owner or operator of a facility from which a discharge occurs. The Clean Water Act and analogous state laws provide for administrative, civil and criminal penalties for unauthorized discharges and, together with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, impose rigorous requirements for spill prevention and response planning, as well as substantial potential liability for the costs of removal, remediation, and damages in connection with any unauthorized discharges. Further, proposed revisions to the definition of “Waters of the United States” have been subject to judicial challenges and administrative action, resulting in uncertainty as to the scope of the regulatory definition. Our obligations under the Clean Water Act could be expanded when the definition of “Waters of the United States” is ultimately resolved.

 

Employee Health and Safety. We are subject to a number of federal and state laws and regulations, including OSHA and comparable state statutes, establishing requirements to protect the health and safety of workers. In addition, the OSHA hazard communication standard, the EPA community right-to-know regulations under Title III of the federal Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act and comparable state statutes require that information be maintained concerning hazardous materials used, stored, produced or released in our operations and that this information be provided to employees, state and local government authorities and the public. Substantial fines and penalties can be imposed and orders or injunctions limiting or prohibiting certain operations may be issued in connection with any failure to comply with laws and regulations relating to worker health and safety.

 

In addition, on January 20, 2021, the Biden Administration came into office and immediately issued a number of executive orders related to environmental matters that could affect our operations and those of our customers, including an Executive Order on “Protecting Public Health and the Environment and Restoring Science to Tackle the Climate Crisis” seeking to adopt new regulations and policies to address climate change and suspend, revise, or rescind, prior agency actions that are identified as conflicting with the Biden Administration’s climate policies. The Biden Administration has also issued other orders that could ultimately affect our business and the business of our customers, such as the executive order rejoining the Paris Agreement, and could seek, in the future, to put into place additional executive orders, policy and regulatory reviews, and seek to have Congress pass legislation that could adversely affect the production of oil and gas assets and our operations and those of our customers. However, the status of recent and future rules and rulemaking initiatives under the Biden Administration remains uncertain.

 

Insurance and Risk Management

 

We maintain insurance coverage of types and amounts that we believe to be customary and reasonable for companies of our size and with similar operations. In accordance with industry practice, however, we do not maintain insurance coverage against all of the operating risks to which our business is exposed. Therefore, there is a risk our insurance program may not be sufficient to cover any particular loss or all losses.

 

Currently, our insurance program includes, among other things, general liability, umbrella liability, sudden and accidental pollution, personal property, vehicle, workers’ compensation, directors and officers and employer’s liability coverage. Our insurance includes various limits and deductibles or retentions, which must be met prior to or in conjunction with recovery.

 

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Employees

 

As of December 31, 2020, we had 41 full-time employees compared with 63 full-time employees at the same time in December 2019. We generally have been able to locate and engage highly qualified employees as needed. None of our employees are covered by an ongoing collective bargaining agreement, and we have experienced no work stoppages. We consider our employee relations to be good.

 

Available Information

 

We are required to file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and certain other information with the SEC.

 

The SEC maintains a website at www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding registrants that file electronically with the SEC. Any documents filed by us with the SEC, including this Annual Report, can be downloaded from the SEC’s website at www.SEC.gov.

 

Our principal executive offices are located at 1583 South 1700 East, Vernal, Utah, 84078, and our telephone number at that address is (435) 789-0594. Our website address is www.sdpi.com. Our periodic reports and other information filed with or furnished to the SEC are available, free of charge, through our website, as soon as reasonably practicable after those reports and other information are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC. Information on our website or any other website is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report and does not constitute a part of this Annual Report.

 

ITEM 1A. Risk Factors

 

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

 

The outbreak of COVID-19 has had, and is expected to continue to have, depending on the duration of the pandemic, a significant impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations due to its effect on the oil and gas industry.

 

The impact of COVID-19 and measures to prevent its spread are expected to continue to impact our results, operations, cash flows and liquidity.

 

We expect the impact of these disruptions, including the extent of their adverse impact on the oil and natural gas drilling industry and, subsequently, our financial and operational results, will be dictated by the length of time that such disruptions continue.

 

Demand for our products and services declined through the third quarter of 2020 as our customers continue to revise their capital budgets downwards and swiftly adjusted their operations in response to lower commodity prices. Beginning in August 2020 and into the first quarter of 2021, we began to see an increase in our U.S. business as the drilling rig count increased, which was driven by improving oil prices. However, even with the recent improvement in our market, our activity levels are still significantly below pre-COVID levels. To address the situation, we have been forced to take several actions, including reductions in salaries for officers and fees for independent directors, a reduction in our total workforce and the indefinite postponement of the development of new technology by us and elimination of any activity not necessary to conduct our business. Such a further spread or outbreak could also negatively impact the business and operations of third-party service providers who perform critical services for our business.

 

Given the uncertainty around the extent and timing of the potential future spread or mitigation of COVID-19 and around the imposition or relaxation of protective measures, we cannot reasonably estimate the impact on our future results of operations, cash flows or financial condition.

 

A decline in expenditures by the oil and gas industry could impact our revenue and income and result in an impairment of our assets.

 

Our business depends upon the condition of the oil and gas industry and, in particular, the willingness of oil and gas companies to make capital expenditures on exploration and development, drilling and production operations. The level of capital expenditures is generally dependent on the prevailing view of future oil and gas prices, which are influenced by numerous factors affecting the supply and demand for oil and gas, including:

 

  worldwide economic activity, including as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic;
     
  the level of exploration and production activity;
     
  interest rates and the cost of capital;
     
  new tariffs by the United States or other countries;
     
  environmental regulation;
     
  federal, state and foreign policies regarding exploration and development of oil and gas;
     
  the ability of OPEC to set and maintain production levels and pricing;
     
  governmental regulations regarding future oil and gas exploration and production;
     
  the cost of exploring and producing oil and gas;
     
  the cost of developing alternative energy sources;
     
  the availability, expiration date and price of leases;
     
  the discovery rate of new oil and gas reserves;
     
  the success of drilling for oil and gas in unconventional resource plays such as shale formations;
     
  technological advances;
     
  weather conditions.

 

We expect continued volatility in both crude oil and natural gas prices, as well as in the level of drilling and production related activities. Even during periods of high prices for oil and natural gas, companies exploring for oil and gas may cancel or curtail programs, seek to renegotiate contract terms, including the price of our products and services, or reduce their levels of capital expenditures for exploration and production for a variety of reasons. These risks are greater during periods of low or declining commodity prices. Continued significant or prolonged declines in hydrocarbon prices have had, and may continue to have, a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

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We may be unable to maintain adequate liquidity and make payments on our debt.

 

At December 31, 2020, we had working capital of approximately $1,300,000. Our principal uses of cash are operating expenses, working capital requirements, capital expenditures and debt service payments. Our operational and financial strategies include lowering our operating costs and capital spending to match revenue trends, managing our working capital and debt to enhance liquidity.

 

While we believe that our borrowing capacity and cash generated from operations will be sufficient to fund our operations for 2021, our operational and financial strategies include managing our operating costs, working capital and debt to enhance liquidity. We will continue to work to grow revenue and review additional cost containment measures in order to be cash flow positive in 2021. If we are unable to do this, we may not be able to, among other things, (i) maintain our current general and administrative spending levels; (ii) fund certain obligations as they become due; and (iii) respond to competitive pressures or unanticipated capital requirements. We cannot provide any assurance that financing will be available to us in the future on acceptable terms.

 

On May 6, 2020, certain subsidiaries of the Company amended and restated the outstanding note (the “Hard Rock Note”) with the seller in our acquisition of Hard Rock Solutions, LLC. As amended, the Hard Rock Note accrues interest at 8.00% per annum and matures and is now fully payable on October 5, 2022. Under the amended terms of the Hard Rock Note, we are required to make the following payments: accrued interest on each January 5, April 5, July 5, and October 5 in 2021 and 2022; and $750,000 (plus accrued interest) on July 5, 2021 with the remaining principal balance of $750,000 plus accrued interest on the Hard Rock Note due on October 5, 2022. If we are unable to make the payments required, we could lose our rights to market the Drill-N-Ream.

 

Our Credit Agreement is comprised of $1,000,000 Term Loan and $3,500,000 Revolving Loan. As of December 31, 2020, we had $666,664 outstanding on the Term Loan and $198,838 outstanding on the Revolving Loan. If we are unable to make required payments under the Credit Agreement, we would be in default thereunder, which would permit the holders of the indebtedness to accelerate the maturity thereof, unless we are able to obtain, on a timely basis, a necessary waiver or amendment. Any waiver or amendment may require us to revise the terms of the Credit Agreement which could increase the cost of our borrowings, require the payment of additional fees, and adversely impact the results of our operations. Upon the occurrence of any event of default that is not waived, the lenders could elect to exercise any of their available remedies, which include the right to not lend any additional amounts or, in the event we have outstanding indebtedness under the Credit Agreement, to declare any outstanding indebtedness, together which any accrued interest and other fees, to be immediately due and payable. If we are unable to repay the outstanding indebtedness, if any, under the Credit Agreement when due, the lenders would be permitted to proceed against their collateral, and this could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

 

Failure to generate sufficient revenue to make payments on the Hard Rock Note could result in our loss of the patents securing such note.

 

The Hard Rock Note is secured by all of the patents, patents pending, other patent rights, and the Drill-N-Ream trademark purchased in the Hard Rock acquisition (the “Drill-N-Ream Collateral”). If we do not have the funds necessary to make the future payments under the Hard Rock Note and fail to make any payments as required thereunder, and we are unsuccessful in amending or restructuring the payment terms, the holder of the Hard Rock Note could conduct a foreclosure sale on the Drill-N-Ream Collateral in order to apply the proceeds thereof toward repayment of the Hard Rock Note and all foreclosure costs, and our subsidiary Superior Drilling Solutions, LLC would be liable for any shortfall or receive any excess from the sales proceeds. The failure to retain and use the Drill-N-Ream Collateral in our business could cause a significant loss of our investment and might have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operation, as well as our ability to grow our drill string tool business.

 

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Our level of indebtedness could adversely affect our future ability to raise additional capital to fund growth, limit our ability to react to changes in our business or our industry and place us at a competitive disadvantage.

 

We are required to make payments on the Hard Rock Note of $750,000 (plus accrued interest) in 2021. In addition, we are required to make monthly payments of approximately $46,000 on our other indebtedness.

 

Our level of debt and debt service requirements could have important consequences. For example, it could (i) result in a foreclosure upon our key assets, (ii) increase our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions, (iii) limit our ability to fund future capital expenditures and working capital, to engage in future acquisitions or development activities, or to otherwise realize the value of our assets and opportunities fully because of the need to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to payments on our debt, (iv) increase our cost of borrowing, (v) restrict us from making strategic acquisitions or causing us to make non-strategic divestitures, (vi) limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business or industry in which we operate, placing us at a competitive disadvantage compared with our competitors who are less leveraged and (vii) impair our ability to obtain additional financing in the future.

 

There may be significant annual and quarterly fluctuations in our operating results.

 

Significant annual and quarterly fluctuations in our results of operations may be caused by, among other factors, our volume of revenue, the timing of new product or service announcements, releases by us and our competitors in the marketplace of new products or services, seasonality and general economic conditions. There can be no assurance that the level of revenue achieved by us in any particular fiscal period will not be significantly lower than in other comparable fiscal periods. We believe quarter-to-quarter comparisons of our revenue and operating results are not necessarily meaningful and should not be relied on as indicators of future performance. Our operating expenses are relatively fixed in the short term and are based on management’s expectations of future revenue. As a result, if future revenue is below expectations, net income or loss may be disproportionately affected by a reduction in revenue, as any corresponding reduction in expenses may not be proportionate to the reduction in revenue.

 

Our customer base is concentrated and the loss of, or nonperformance by, one or more of our significant customers could cause our revenue to decline substantially.

 

We had two large customers that comprised 80% of our total revenue in 2020 and 92% in 2019. It is likely that we will continue to derive a significant portion of our revenue from a relatively small number of customers in the future. If a major customer decided not to continue to use our services or has a significant reduction in its business, our revenue would decline and our operating results and financial condition could be harmed. In addition, we are subject to credit risk due to the concentration of our customer base. Any increase in the non-payment of and non-performance by our counterparties, either as a result of changes in financial and economic conditions or otherwise, could have a material effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition and could adversely affect our liquidity.

 

We must continue to develop new technologies, methodologies and products on a timely and cost-effective basis to satisfy the needs of our customers.

 

The drilling industry is driven primarily by cost minimization, and our strategy is aimed at reducing drilling costs through the application of new drill bit assembly and drill string tool technologies. Our continued success will depend on our ability to meet our customers’ changing needs, on a timely and cost-effective basis, by successfully enhancing our current products and processes; developing, producing and marketing new products and processes; and responding to evolving industry standards and other technological changes.

 

We cannot assure you that our products will be able to satisfy the specifications of our customers or that we will be able to perform the testing necessary to prove that the product specifications are satisfied in the future, or that the costs of modifications to our products to satisfy their requirements will not adversely affect our results of operations. Failure to meet our customer’s demand for services may adversely affect our business. We may encounter resource constraints, competition, or other difficulties that may delay our ability to expand our bit remanufacturing services to the level desired or required by our customer. If our products are unable to satisfy such requirements, or we are unable to perform any required testing, our customers may cancel their contracts and/or seek new suppliers, and our business, results of operations, cash flows or financial position may be adversely affected.

 

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Our related party transactions with the Meiers and their affiliated entities may cause conflicts of interests that may adversely affect us.

 

We have entered into, and may, in the future, enter into various transactions and agreements with the Meiers and their affiliated entities. We believe that the transactions and agreements that we have entered into with the Meiers are on terms that are at least as favorable as could reasonably have been obtained at such time from third parties. However, these relationships could create, or appear to create, potential conflicts of interest when our board of directors is faced with decisions that could have different implications for us and the Meiers or their affiliates. The appearance of conflicts, even if such conflicts do not materialize, might adversely affect the public’s perception of us, as well as our relationship with other companies and our ability to enter into new relationships in the future, which may have a material adverse effect on our ability to do business.

 

Our customers’ industries are undergoing continuing consolidation that may impact our results of operations.

 

The oil and gas industry is rapidly consolidating and, as a result, some of our largest end users of our product have consolidated and are using their size and purchasing power to seek economies of scale and pricing concessions. This consolidation may result in reduced capital spending by some of our customers or the acquisition of one or more of our primary customers, which may lead to decreased demand for our products and services. We cannot assure you that we will be able to maintain our level of sales to a customer that has consolidated or replace that revenue with increased business activity with other customers. As a result, the acquisition of one or more of our primary customers, such as Baker Hughes and DTI, may have a significant negative impact on our results of operations, financial position or cash flows. We are unable to predict what effect consolidations in the industry may have on price, capital spending by our customers, our market share and selling strategies, our competitive position, our ability to retain customers or our ability to negotiate favorable agreements with our customers.

 

We may be unable to successfully compete with other manufacturers of drilling equipment.

 

Several of our competitors are diversified multinational companies with substantially larger operating staffs and greater capital resources than ours and which have been engaged in the manufacturing business for a much longer time than us. If these competitors substantially increase the resources they devote to developing and marketing competitive products and services, we may not be able to compete effectively. Similarly, consolidation among our competitors could enhance their competing market share, product and service offerings and financial resources, further intensifying competition.

 

We are dependent on key personnel who may be difficult to replace.

 

Our success is dependent to a significant degree upon the business expertise and continued contributions of our founders and senior management team. In particular, we are dependent upon the efforts and services of our founders, Mr. Troy Meier, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”), and Ms. Annette Meier, our President and Chief Operating Officer (“COO”), because of their knowledge, experience, skills, and relationships with major clients and the other members of our management team. Our future success also depends on our ability to identify, attract, hire, train, retain and motivate other highly skilled technical, managerial, marketing and customer service personnel. Competition for such personnel in is intense, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to successfully attract, integrate or retain sufficiently qualified personnel. Our inability to retain these types of individuals could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Increases in the cost of raw materials used in our manufacturing processes could negatively impact our profitability.

 

We rely on the availability of volume and quality of synthetic diamond cutters for drill bit refurbishment and manufacturing and for our drill string tool manufacturing business. In addition, we must have a reliable source of steel available for manufacturing which is both of sufficient quality, and available at a cost-effective price. We do not have fixed price contracts or arrangements for all of the raw materials and other supplies that we purchase. Baker Hughes provides the diamond cutters for our drill bit refurbishment. However, sourcing cost-effective supplies of quality steel in the relatively low volumes that our tool manufacturing requires can be challenging. Shortages of, and price increases for, steel and other raw materials and supplies that we use in our business may occur. Future shortages or price fluctuations in synthetic diamond cutters or steel could have a material adverse effect on our ability to conduct either our drill bit refurbishment or our drill tool manufacturing in a timely and cost-effective manner.

 

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We depend on third-party suppliers for timely deliveries of raw materials, and our results of operations could be adversely affected if we are unable to obtain adequate supplies in a timely manner.

 

Our manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining adequate supplies of raw materials from third parties. Events beyond our control may impact the ability of these third parties to deliver raw materials. Any interruption in the supply of raw materials needed to manufacture our products could adversely affect our business, results of operations and reputation with our customers.

 

We may be exposed to unforeseen risks in our product manufacturing and processes which could adversely affect our financial conditions and results of operations.

 

We operate our business from our Vernal, Utah headquarters. A natural disaster, extended utility failure or other significant event at our facility could significantly affect our ability to manufacture sufficient quantities of key products or otherwise deliver products to meet customer demand or contractual requirements which may result in a loss of revenue and other adverse business consequences. In addition, the equipment and management systems necessary for our operations are subject to wear and tear, break down and obsolescence, which could cause them to perform poorly or fail, resulting in fluctuations in manufacturing efficiencies and production costs. Significant manufacturing fluctuations may affect our ability to deliver products to our customers on a timely basis and we may suffer financial penalties and a diminution of our commercial reputation and future product orders. Additionally, some of our business may in the future be conducted under fixed price contracts. Fluctuations in our manufacturing process, or inaccurate estimates and assumptions used in pricing our contracts, even if due to factors out of our control, may result in cost overruns which we may be required to absorb. Any shut down of our manufacturing facility, reductions in our manufacturing process or efficiency, or cost overruns could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

 

We may be unable to employ enough skilled and qualified workers to sustain or expand our current operations.

 

Our operations require personnel with specialized skills and experience. The supply of skilled and experienced personnel may not be sufficient to meet current or expected demand. Any significant increase in the wages paid by competing employers could result in a reduction of our skilled labor force, increases in the wage rates that we must pay, or both. If any of these events were to occur, our capacity could be diminished, our ability to respond quickly to customer demands or strong market conditions may be inhibited and our growth potential impaired, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

If we are not able to manage our growth strategy successfully, our business, and results of operations may be adversely affected.

 

Our growth strategy includes acquisitions and the development and implementation of new product designs and improvements, which presents numerous managerial, administrative, operational, and other challenges. Our ability to manage the growth of our operations will depend on our ability to develop systems and services and related technologies to meet evolving industry requirements and at prices acceptable to our customers to compete in the industry in which we operate. Our ability to compete effectively will also depend on our ability to continue to obtain patents on our proprietary technology and products. Although we do not consider any single patent to be material to our business, the inability to protect our future innovations through patents could have a material adverse effect. In addition, our growth will increase our need to attract, develop, motivate, and retain both our management and professional employees. The inability of our management to manage our growth effectively or the inability of our employees to achieve anticipated performance could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

Acquisitions and investments may not result in anticipated benefits and may present risks not originally contemplated, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Our growth strategy includes acquiring other companies that complement our service offerings or broaden our technical capabilities and geographic presence. From time to time, we evaluate purchases and sales of assets, businesses or other investments. These transactions may not result in the anticipated realization of savings, creation of efficiencies, offering of new products or services, generation of cash or income or reduction of risk. In addition, acquisitions may be financed by borrowings, requiring us to incur debt, or by the issuance of our common stock. These transactions involve numerous risks, and we cannot ensure that:

 

  any acquisition would be successfully integrated into our operations and internal controls;
     
  the due diligence conducted prior to an acquisition would uncover situations that could result in financial or legal exposure;
     
  the use of cash for acquisitions would not adversely affect our cash available for capital expenditures and other uses;
     
  any disposition, investment, acquisition or integration would not divert management resources from the operation of our business; or
     
  any disposition, investment, acquisition or integration would not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

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Our inability to integrate acquisitions successfully could impede us from realizing all of the benefits of the acquisitions which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

If we are unable to successfully integrate future acquisitions, we could be impeded from realizing all of the anticipated benefits of those acquisitions and could weaken our business operations. The integration process may disrupt our business and, if implemented ineffectively, may preclude realization of the anticipated benefits expected by us and could harm our results of operations. In addition, the overall integration of the combining companies may result in unanticipated problems, expenses, liabilities and competitive responses, and may cause our stock price to decline. The difficulties of integrating an acquisition include, among others:

 

  unanticipated issues in integration of information, communications, and other systems;
     
  unanticipated incompatibility of logistics, marketing, and administration methods;
     
  maintaining employee morale and retaining key employees;
     
  integrating the business cultures of both companies;
     
  preserving important strategic client relationships;
     
  coordinating geographically separate organizations; and
     
  consolidating corporate and administrative infrastructures and eliminating duplicative operations.

 

Even if the operations of an acquisition are integrated successfully, we may not realize the anticipated benefits of the acquisition, including the synergies, cost savings or growth opportunities that we expect. These benefits may not be achieved within the anticipated time frame, or at all. Failing to realize the benefits could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

Conditions in the global financial system may have impacts on our business and financial position that we currently cannot predict.

 

Uncertainty in the credit markets may negatively impact the ability of our customers to finance purchases of our products and services and could result in a decrease in, or cancellation of, orders or adversely affect the collectability of our receivables. If the availability of credit to our customers is reduced, they may reduce their drilling and production expenditures, thereby decreasing demand for our products and services, which could have a negative impact on our financial position. Additionally, unsettled conditions could have an impact on our suppliers, causing them to be unable to meet their obligations to us. Although we do not currently anticipate a need to access the credit markets in the short term, a prolonged constriction on future lending by banks or investors could result in higher interest rates on future debt obligations or could restrict our ability to obtain sufficient financing to meet our long-term operational and capital needs.

 

In addition, the global financial system may be impacted by the effects of global health epidemics and concerns. Weakness or deterioration of the global economy could reduce our customers’ spending levels and could impact our revenues and operating results. We are unable to predict the effect of this on our business and results of operations.

 

18
 

 

A terrorist attack or armed conflict could harm our business.

 

Terrorist activities, anti-terrorist efforts and other armed conflicts involving the United States or other countries may adversely affect the United States and global economies and could prevent us from meeting our financial and other obligations. If any of these events occur, the resulting political instability and societal disruption could reduce overall demand for oil and natural gas, potentially putting downward pressure on demand for our services and causing a reduction in our revenue. Oil and natural gas related facilities could be direct targets of terrorist attacks, and our operations could be adversely impacted if infrastructure integral to our customers’ operations is destroyed or damaged. Costs for insurance and other security may increase as a result of these threats, and some insurance coverage may become more difficult to obtain, if available at all.

 

Materials and minerals used in our manufacturing process may become subject to laws and regulations that may expose us to significant costs and liabilities.

 

The diamonds comprising the diamond cutting discs used in our operations are synthetic and manufactured in the United States, South Africa and China. Neither those diamond cutters nor any other minerals used in our operations are currently identified as “conflict minerals” in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. However, we cannot predict or control if the United States Secretary of State will or will not identify one of the minerals used in our manufacturing process as a conflict mineral. Should the materials used in our manufacturing process be designated as a conflict mineral, we will be required to file Form SD with the SEC and conduct the required diligence to determine the source of the conflict mineral in connection with such disclosure. Any increased costs and expenses associated with this could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

The use and protection of our proprietary technology will affect our success. There are limitations to our intellectual property rights in our proprietary technology, and thus our right to exclude others from the use of such proprietary technology.

 

Our success will be affected by our development and implementation of new product designs and improvements and by our ability to protect and maintain critical intellectual property assets related to these developments. Although in many cases our products are not protected by any registered intellectual property rights, in other cases we rely on a combination of patents and trade secret laws to establish and protect this proprietary technology.

 

We currently hold multiple U.S. patents and have multiple pending patent applications for products and processes in the U.S. and certain non-U.S. countries. Patent rights give the owner of a patent the right to exclude third parties from making, using, selling, and offering for sale the inventions claimed in the patents in the applicable country. Patent rights do not necessarily grant the owner of a patent the right to practice the invention claimed in a patent, but merely the right to exclude others from practicing the invention claimed in the patent. It may also be possible for a third party to design around our patents. Furthermore, patent rights have strict territorial limits. Some of our work will be conducted in international waters and therefore may not fall within the scope of any country’s patent jurisdiction. We may not be able to enforce our patents against infringement occurring in international waters and other “non-covered” territories. Also, we do not have patents in every jurisdiction in which we conduct business and our patent portfolio will not protect all aspects of our business and may relate to obsolete or unusual methods, which would not prevent third parties from entering the same market.

 

We attempt to limit access to and distribution of our technology by customarily entering into confidentiality and/or license agreements with our employees, customers and potential customers and suppliers. Our rights in our confidential information, trade secrets, and confidential know-how will not prevent third parties from independently developing similar information. Publicly available information (e.g. information in expired issued patents, published patent applications, and scientific literature) can also be used by third parties to independently develop technology. We cannot provide assurance that this independently developed technology will not be equivalent or superior to our proprietary technology.

 

Our competitors may infringe upon, misappropriate, violate or challenge the validity or enforceability of our intellectual property and we may not able to adequately protect or enforce our intellectual property rights in the future.

 

19
 

 

Our businesses and our customers’ businesses are subject to environmental laws and regulations that may increase our costs, limit the demand for our products and services or restrict our operations.

 

Our operations and the operations of our customers are also subject to federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations relating to the protection of human health and the environment. These environmental laws and regulations affect the products and services we design, market and sell, as well as the facilities where we manufacture our products. For example, our operations are subject to numerous and complex laws and regulations that, among other things, may regulate the management and disposal of hazardous and non-hazardous wastes; require acquisition of environmental permits related to our operations; restrict the types, quantities and concentrations of various materials that can be released into the environment; limit or prohibit operation activities in certain ecologically sensitive and other protected areas; regulate specific health and safety criteria addressing worker protection; require compliance with operational and equipment standards; impose testing, reporting and record-keeping requirements; and require remedial measures to mitigate pollution from former and ongoing operations at our facilities or at facilities where wastes generated by our operations have been disposed. Sanctions for noncompliance may include revocation of permits, corrective action orders, administrative or civil penalties or other enforcement, and criminal prosecution. We are required to invest financial and managerial resources to comply with such environmental, health and safety laws and regulations and anticipate that we will continue to be required to do so in the future. In addition, environmental laws and regulations could limit our customers’ exploration and production activities. These laws and regulations change frequently, which makes it impossible for us to predict their cost or impact on our future operations. For example, there has been a wide-ranging policy debate, both nationally and internationally, regarding the impact of greenhouse gases and possible means for their regulation. In addition, efforts have been made and continue to be made in the international community toward the adoption of international treaties or protocols that would address global climate change issues, such as the annual United Nations Climate Change Conferences. Following a finding by the EPA that certain greenhouse gases represent a danger to human health, the EPA has expanded its regulations relating to those emissions and has adopted rules imposing permitting and reporting obligations. The results of the permitting and reporting requirements could lead to further regulation of these greenhouse gases by the EPA. To date, there has been no significant legislative progress in cap and trade proposals or greenhouse gas emission reductions. The adoption of legislation or regulatory programs to reduce greenhouse gas emissions could also increase the cost of consuming, and thereby reduce demand for, the hydrocarbons that our customers produce. Consequently, such legislation or regulatory programs could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. It is too early to determine whether, or in what form, further regulatory action regarding greenhouse gas emissions may ultimately be adopted or what specific impact a new regulatory action might have on us or our customers. Generally, the anticipated regulatory actions do not appear to affect us in any material respect that is different, or to any materially greater or lesser extent, than other companies that are our competitors. However, our business and prospects could be adversely affected to the extent laws are enacted or modified or other governmental action is taken that prohibits or restricts our customers’ exploration and production activities or imposes environmental protection requirements that result in increased costs to us or our customers.

 

Environmental laws may provide for “strict liability” for damages to natural resources or threats to public health and safety, rendering a party liable for environmental damage without regard to negligence or fault on the part of such party. Some environmental laws and regulations provide for joint and several strict liability for remediation of spills and releases of hazardous substances. In addition, we may be subject to claims alleging personal injury or property damage as a result of alleged exposure to hazardous substances, as well as damage to natural resources. These laws and regulations also may expose us to liability for the conduct of or conditions caused by others, or for our acts that were in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations at the time such acts were performed. Any of these laws and regulations could result in claims, fines or expenditures that could be material to results of operations, financial position and cash flows.

 

New government regulations could have an impact on our business and the business of our customers.

 

On January 20, 2021, the Biden Administration came into office and immediately issued a number of executive orders related to environmental matters that could affect our operations and those of our customers, including an Executive Order on “Protecting Public Health and the Environment and Restoring Science to Tackle the Climate Crisis” seeking to adopt new regulations and policies to address climate change and suspend, revise, or rescind, prior agency actions that are identified as conflicting with the Biden Administration’s climate policies. Among the areas that could be affected by the review are regulations addressing methane emissions and the part of the extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing. The Biden Administration has also issued other orders that could ultimately affect our business and the business of our customers, such as the executive order rejoining the Paris Agreement, and could seek, in the future, to put into place additional executive orders, policy and regulatory reviews, and seek to have Congress pass legislation that could adversely affect the production of oil and gas assets. However, the status of recent and future rules and rulemaking initiatives under the Biden Administration remains uncertain.

 

20
 

 

Our failure to implement and comply with our safety program could adversely affect our operating results or financial condition.

 

Our safety program is a fundamental element of our overall approach to risk management, and the implementation of the safety program is a significant issue in our dealings with our clients. Unsafe job sites and office environments have the potential to increase employee turnover, increase the cost of a project to our clients, expose us to types and levels of risk that are fundamentally unacceptable, and raise our operating costs. The implementation of our safety processes and procedures are monitored by various agencies and rating bureaus and may be evaluated by certain clients in cases in which safety requirements have been established in our contracts. If we fail to comply with safety regulations or maintain an acceptable level of safety at our facilities, we may incur fines, penalties or other liabilities, or may be held criminally liable. We may incur additional costs to upgrade equipment or conduct additional training, or otherwise incur costs in connection with compliance with safety regulations. Failure to maintain safe operations or achieve certain safety performance metrics could disqualify us from doing business with certain customers, particularly major oil companies.

 

Our products are used in operations that are subject to potential hazards inherent in the oil and gas industry and, as a result, we are exposed to potential liabilities that may affect our financial condition and reputation.

 

Our products are used in potentially hazardous drilling, completion and production applications in the oil and gas industry where an accident or a failure of a product can potentially have catastrophic consequences. Risks inherent to these applications, such as equipment malfunctions and failures, equipment misuse and defects, explosions, blowouts and uncontrollable flows of oil, natural gas or well fluids and natural disasters, on land or in deep water or shallow-water environments, can cause personal injury, loss of life, suspension of operations, damage to formations, damage to facilities, business interruption and damage to or destruction of property, surface water and drinking water resources, equipment and the environment. In addition, we provide certain services that could cause, contribute to or be implicated in these events. If our products or services fail to meet specifications or are involved in accidents or failures, we could face warranty, contract or other litigation claims, which could expose us to substantial liability for personal injury, wrongful death, property damage, loss of oil and gas production, and pollution and other environmental damages. Our insurance policies may not be adequate to cover all liabilities. Further, insurance may not be generally available in the future or, if available, insurance premiums may make such insurance commercially unjustifiable. Moreover, even if we are successful in defending a claim, it could be time-consuming and costly to defend.

 

In addition, the frequency and severity of such incidents could affect operating costs, insurability and relationships with customers, employees and regulators. In particular, our customers may elect not to purchase our products or services if they view our safety record as unacceptable, which could cause us to lose customers and substantial revenue. In addition, these risks may be greater for us because we may acquire companies that have not allocated significant resources and management focus to quality, or safety requiring rehabilitative efforts during the integration process. We may incur liabilities for losses associated with these newly acquired companies before we are able to rehabilitate such companies’ quality, safety and environmental programs.

 

Our information systems may experience an interruption or breach in security.

 

We rely on our proprietary production management technology which has changed how users connect to our knowledge and other information technology (“IT”) systems to conduct our business. Despite our security and back-up measures, our IT systems are vulnerable to computer viruses, natural disasters and other disruptions or failures. The failure of our IT systems to perform as anticipated for any reason or any significant breach of security could disrupt our business and result in numerous adverse consequences, including reduced effectiveness and efficiency of our operations and those of our customers, inappropriate disclosure of confidential information, increased overhead costs, loss of intellectual property and damage to our reputation, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. In addition, we may be required to incur significant costs to prevent or respond to damage caused by these disruptions or security breaches in the future.

 

Cybersecurity breaches and other disruptions could compromise our information and operations, and expose us to liability, which would cause our business and reputation to suffer.

 

In the ordinary course of our business, we collect and store sensitive data in our data centers and on our networks, including intellectual property, proprietary business information, information regarding our customers, suppliers and business partners, and personally identifiable information of our employees. The secure processing, maintenance and transmission of this information is critical to our operations and business strategy. Despite our security measures, our information technology and infrastructure may be vulnerable to attacks by hackers or breached due to employee error, malfeasance or other disruptions. Any such breach could compromise our networks and the information stored there could be accessed, publicly disclosed, lost or stolen. Any such access, disclosure or other loss of information could result in legal claims or proceedings, liability under laws that protect the privacy of personal information, regulatory penalties, disruption of our operations, damage to our reputation, and loss of confidence in our services, which could adversely affect our business.

 

Our information technology infrastructure is critical to the efficient operation of our business and essential to our ability to perform day-to-day operations. Breaches in our information technology infrastructure or physical facilities, or other disruptions, could result in damage to our assets, safety incidents, damage to the environment, potential liability or the loss of contracts, and have a material adverse effect on our operations, financial position and results of operations.

 

Possible tariffs could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

The United States has in the past announced the implementation of tariffs on imported steel and could in the future consider tariffs on additional items. If this were to occur, it could result in the adoption of additional tariffs by other countries as well. Any resulting trade war could negatively impact the global market for oil field products and services and could have a significant adverse effect on our business. While we cannot predict how any future enacted tariffs el will impact our business, the imposition of tariffs on items we import from other countries could increase our costs and could result in lowering our gross margin on products sold.

 

21
 

 

Risks Relating to Our Common Stock

 

As a smaller reporting company, we are subject to scaled disclosure requirements that may make it more challenging for investors to analyze our results of operations and financial prospects.

 

Currently, we are a “smaller reporting company,” meaning that our outstanding common stock held by non-affiliates had a market value of less than $250 million as of June 30, 2020. As a “smaller reporting company,” we are able to provide simplified executive compensation disclosures in our filings; are exempt from the provisions of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requiring that independent registered public accounting firms provide an attestation report on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting; and have certain other decreased disclosure obligations in our SEC filings, including, being required to provide only two years of audited financial statements in annual reports. Consequently, it may be more challenging for investors to analyze our results of operations and financial prospects.

 

As long as we are substantially controlled by the Meiers, the ability of our stockholders to influence the outcome of matters will be limited.

 

The Meiers continue to own a substantial portion of our outstanding common stock and serve on our Board of Directors. As long as they have substantial voting control of our company, SDPI will have the ability to take many stockholder actions, including the election or removal of directors, irrespective of the vote of, and without prior notice to, any other stockholder. As a result, the Meiers will have the ability to influence or control all matters affecting us, including:

 

  the composition of our board of directors and, through our board of directors, decision-making with respect to our governance and business direction and policies, including the appointment and removal of our officers;
     
  any determinations with respect to acquisitions of businesses, mergers or other business combinations and change of control transactions;
     
  our acquisition or disposition of assets; and
     
  our capital structure.

 

22
 

 

The market price of our common stock has been and may continue to be volatile.

 

The trading price of our common stock and the price at which we may sell common stock in the future are subject to large fluctuations in response to any of the following:

 

  limited trading volume in our common stock;
     
  quarterly variations in operating results;
     
  general financial market conditions;
     
  the prices of natural gas and oil;
     
  announcements by us and our competitors;
     
  our liquidity;
     
  changes in government regulations;
     
  our ability to raise additional funds;
     
  our involvement in litigation; and
     
  other events.

 

We do not anticipate paying dividends on our common stock in the near future.

 

We have not paid any dividends in the past and do not intend to pay cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. We currently intend to retain any earnings for the future operation and development of our business. In addition, under Utah law no distribution may be made if, after giving it effect: (a) we would be unable to pay our debts as they come due, or (b) our total assets would be less than our total liabilities. We can provide no assurance that those restrictions will not prevent us from paying a dividend in future periods.

 

We may issue preferred stock whose terms could adversely affect the voting power or value of our common stock.

 

Our articles of incorporation authorize us to issue, without the approval of our shareholders, one or more classes or series of preferred stock having such designations, preferences, limitations and relative rights, including preferences over our common stock respecting dividends and distributions, as our board of directors may determine. The terms of one or more classes or series of preferred stock could adversely impact the voting power or value of our common stock. For example, we might grant holders of preferred stock the right to elect some number of our directors in all events or on the happening of specified events or the right to veto specified transactions. Similarly, the repurchase or redemption rights or liquidation preferences we might assign to holders of preferred stock could affect the residual value of the common stock.

 

Certain provisions in our organizational documents could delay or prevent a change in control.

 

The existence of some provisions in our organizational documents could delay or prevent a change in control of our company, even if that change would be beneficial to our shareholders. Our articles of incorporation and bylaws contain provisions that may make acquiring control of our company difficult, including:

 

  provisions regulating the ability of our shareholders to nominate directors for election or to bring matters for action at annual meetings of our shareholders;
     
  limitations on the ability of our shareholders to call a special meeting and act by written consent;
     
  the authorization given to our board of directors to issue and set the terms of preferred stock; and
     
  establishment of a classified board of directors.

 

Our common stock could be delisted from the NYSE American due to a failure to satisfy their continued listing standards.

 

On November 18, 2020, the Company received notification from the NYSE American to the Company indicating that, as a result of the Company’s stockholders’ equity of $4.7 million as of September 30, 2020, and reported losses for each of the last five fiscal years, the Company is not in compliance with the stockholders’ equity standards for continued listing on the NYSE American. On January 28, 2021, the Company received notice from the NYSE American that they had accepted the Company’s plan that was submitted on December 18, 2020, to regain compliance with the continued listing standards of the NYSE American. The Company has been granted a plan period through May 18, 2022 to regain compliance.

 

NYSE American Regulations staff will review the Company quarterly for compliance with the initiatives outlined in the plan. If the Company is not in compliance with the continued listing standards by May 18, 2022 or if the Company does not make progress consistent with the plan during the plan period, NYSE Regulation staff will initiate delisting proceedings as appropriate.

 

Significant short sales of our stock, or the perception that such sales could occur, could depress the market price of our common stock and impair our ability to raise capital.

 

If there are significant short sales of our stock, the price decline that could result from this activity may cause the share price to decline more so, which, in turn, may cause long holders of the stock to sell their shares, thereby contributing to sales of stock in the market. Such sales also may impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional equity securities in the future at a time and price that our management deems acceptable, if at all.

 

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ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

Not applicable to smaller reporting companies.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

The Company operates out of five buildings as part of its Vernal, Utah offices, which are used for manufacturing and executive offices. On December 7, 2020, the Company closed a sale-leaseback agreement for its headquarters and manufacturing facilities. Under the terms of the transaction, the Company sold the property for $4.5 million and simultaneously entered into a 15-year lease. After fees, the Company netted approximately $4.2 million in proceeds of which $2.5 million was used to repay in full the outstanding mortgage on the property. Under the lease agreement, the Company has an option to extend the term of the lease and to repurchase the property. The Company’s management believes its current manufacturing and office facility is sufficient for its current operations.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

We are subject to litigation that arises from time to time in the ordinary course of our business activities. In February 2019, the Company filed a patent infringement lawsuit in the United States District Court for the Western District of Louisiana Lafayette Division asserting Stabil Drill infringed on our patent that covers the Company’s well bore conditioning tool, the Drill-N-Ream. The lawsuit was subsequently moved from Louisiana to the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division. The court ordered the Company to serve discovery requests upon Stabil Drill and gave Stabil Drill deadlines to respond and produce documents and permit product inspection. Stabil Drill filed a motion for summary judgement and the Company responded and cross-moved for patent infringement. The parties are awaiting the judge’s decision. On October 1, 2020, Superior Energy Services, Stabil Drill’s parent company, filed for bankruptcy, which may result in a delay in the resolution of this litigation. Superior Energy Services announced on February 2, 2021 that it has successfully completed its financial restructuring and has emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Additionally, on May 20, 2019, Extreme Technologies, LLC sued Short Bit & Tool Co. and Lot William Short, Jr. (“Defendants”) in the Northern District of Texas - Dallas Division. Extreme sued for patent infringement based on the same patents discussed in the Stabil Drill litigation.  On December 23, 2019, the Court stayed Extreme’s patent infringement claim against Defendants pending resolution of the Southern District of Texas Stabil Drill case. There has been no discovery in this case, including no damage discovery. Until damage discovery occurs, Extreme cannot estimate the damages in this case. We are not currently involved in any other litigation which management believes could have a material effect on our financial position or results of operations.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Approximate Number of Equity Security Holders

 

As of March 10, 2021 there were 3,855 stockholders of record and 3,855 beneficial owners of the Company’s common stock.

 

The Company’s common stock trades on the NYSE American market under the symbol “SDPI”.

 

Dividends

 

The Company does not presently pay dividends on its common stock. The Company intends for the foreseeable future to continue the policy of not paying dividends and retaining earnings, if any, to finance the development and growth of its business.

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

    Equity Compensation Plan Information  
Plan Category  

Number of

restricted

shares and

securities to be

issued upon

exercise of

outstanding

options,

warrants and

rights

(a)

   

Weighted

average exercise

price of

outstanding

options,

warrants and

rights

(b)

   

Number of

securities

remaining

available for

future issuance

under equity

compensation

plans

(excluding

securities

reflected in

column (a))

(c)

 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders (1)     2,295,174 (1)   $ 0.89       1,578,709 (2)
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders     -       -       -  
Total as of December 31, 2020     2,295,174               1,578,709  

 

(1) Consists of 2,295,174 shares under the 2015 Employee Stock Incentive Plan.
   
(2) Consists of 1,578,709 shares remaining available for future issuance under the 2015 Employee Stock Incentive Plan. The 2014 Employee Stock Incentive Plan was frozen by the Board of Directors such that no future grants of awards will be made and the 2014 Employee Stock Incentive Plan remains effective only with respect to awards outstanding as of June 15, 2015 until they expire according to their terms.

 

Stock Performance Graph

 

As a “smaller reporting company,” as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act, we have elected scaled disclosure reporting and therefore are not required to provide the stock performance graph.

 

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ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

As a “smaller reporting company,” as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act, we have elected scaled disclosure reporting and therefore are not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Overview

 

Superior Drilling Products, Inc. is an innovative drilling and completion tool technology company providing cost saving solutions that drive production efficiencies for the oil and natural gas drilling industry. Our headquarters and manufacturing operations are located in Vernal, Utah. Our drilling solutions include the patented Drill-N-Ream® well bore conditioning tool (“Drill-N-Ream tool”) and the patented Strider™ Drill String Oscillation System technology (“Strider technology” or “Strider”). In addition, the Company is a manufacturer and refurbisher of PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) drill bits for a leading oil field services company. We operate a state-of-the-art drill tool fabrication facility, where we manufacture solutions for the drilling industry, as well as customers’ custom products.

 

Our strategy for growth is to leverage our expertise in drill tool technology and precision machining in order to broaden our product offerings and solutions for the oil and gas industry. We believe through our patented technologies, as well as technologies under development, that we can offer the industry the solutions it demands to improve drilling efficiencies and reduce production costs.

 

With our recent AS9100D with ISO 9001:2015 certification there is opportunity to expand into new revenue streams that are decoupled from the upstream oil and gas industry, which can leverage our operating assets and mitigate the impact on our results of operations that is caused by the ongoing and unpredictable cyclic nature of energy markets.We believe that with this certification, and our history of supplying high quality parts to research and development departments operating in the aerospace industry, we can effectively execute our industry diversification strategy.

 

Industry Trends and Market Factors

 

The significant decline in oil demand due to COVID-19 coupled with a global over supply of oil drove down oil prices. This resulted in our customers announcing significant reductions to their capital expenditure budgets for 2020. This was evidenced by the significant decline in U.S. onshore rig counts. As of December 31, 2020, U.S. onshore rig count was 351 rigs compared with 796 rigs as of December 31, 2019. We expect oil and gas related markets to continue to experience significant weakness in 2021. Despite these current challenges, the oil and gas industry is beginning to experience slight improvements including an increase in the number of active rigs in the U.S. from 2020 lows, and we expect additional rig count improvement to occur throughout the year, although likely not to pre-COVID levels.

 

Worldwide military, political and economic events have contributed to oil and natural gas price volatility and are likely to continue to do so in the future. Although the Company has seen demand for its oil and gas related products and services in the United States and Canada impacted by these industry conditions, we continue to aggressively market our drilling products. The oil and gas industry is increasingly using directional (e.g., horizontal) drilling in their exploration and production activities because of significantly improved recovery rates that can be achieved with these methods. With the rise of this type of drilling, traditional drill string tools used for vertical drilling do not necessarily provide the best performance or are not well suited for directional drilling. In addition, current and expected oil and natural gas prices combined with more technically challenging horizontal drilling has driven the demand for new technologies. We believe the value of our Drill-N-Ream tool has proven to provide significant operational efficiencies and costs savings for horizontal drilling activity and, combined with our low market penetration, provide us sales opportunities in soft as well as robust markets.

 

How We Generate our Revenue

 

We are a drilling and completion tool technology company. We generate revenue from the refurbishment, manufacturing, repair, rental and sale of drill string tools. Our manufactured products are produced in a standard manufacturing operation, even when produced to our customer’s specifications. We also earn royalty fees under certain arrangements for certain tools we sell.

 

Tool sales, rentals and other related revenue

 

Tool and Product Sales: Revenue for tool and product sales is recognized upon shipment of tools or products to the customer. Shipping and handling costs related to tool and product sales are recorded gross as a component of both the sales price and cost of the product sold.

 

Tool Rental: Rental revenue is recognized upon completion of the customer’s job for which the tool was rented. While the duration of the rents vary by job and number of runs, these rents are generally less than one month. The rental agreements are typically based on the price per run or footage drilled and do not have any minimum rental payments or term.

 

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Other Related Revenue: We receive revenue from the repair of tools upon delivery of the repaired tool to the customer. We earn royalty commission revenue when our customer invoices their customer for the use of our tools.

 

Contract Services

 

Drill Bit Manufacturing and Refurbishment: We recognize revenue for our PDC drill bit services upon transfer of control, which we have determined to be upon shipment of the product. Shipping and handling costs related to refurbishing services are paid directly by the customer at the time of shipment. We also provide contracting manufacturing services to customers.

 

Costs of Conducting Our Business

 

The principal elements of cost of sales for manufacturing, repair, rental and sale of tools (“product”) are the direct and indirect costs to manufacture, repair and supply the product, including labor, materials, utilities, equipment repair, lease expense related to our facilities, supplies and freight.

 

Selling, general and administrative expense is comprised of costs such as new business development, technical product support, research and development costs, compensation expense for general corporate operations including accounting, human resources, risk management, etc., information technology expenses, safety and environmental expenses, legal and professional fees and other related administrative functions.

 

Other income (expense), net is comprised primarily of interest expense associated with outstanding borrowings net of interest income, gains (losses) of disposed assets and recovery of related party note receivable.

 

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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The following table represents our condensed consolidated statement of operations for the periods indicated:

 

    For the Years Ended December 31,  
(in thousands)   2020     2019  
Tool revenue   $ 7,051       67 %   $ 12,116       64 %
Contract services     3,420       33 %     6,881       36 %
Total revenue   $ 10,471       100 %   $ 18,997       100 %
Operating costs and expenses     14,293       137 %     19,899       105 %
Loss from continuing operations     (3,822 )     (36 )%     (902 )     (5 )%
Other income     508       5 %     (16 )     (0 )%
Income tax expense     (115 )     (1 )%     (18 )     (0 )%
Net loss   $ (3,430 )     (32 )%   $ (936 )     (5 )%

 

Material changes of certain items in our statements of operations included in our financial statements for the comparative periods are discussed below.

 

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Revenue. Our revenue decreased approximately $8,526,000, or 45%, to $10,471,000. The decrease was a result of the COVID-19 pandemic induced decline in the demand for oil and gas which resulted in a significant reduction in drilling activity globally. Despite the decline in drilling activity, International revenue increased $565,000 or 43% to $1,880,000.

 

Tool revenue was $7,051,000, down 42% or $5,066,000, from the prior-year period. Contract services revenue decreased approximately $3,461,000, or 50%, to $3,420,000.

 

Operating Costs and Expenses. Significant cost management efforts led to total operating costs and expenses declining approximately $5,605,000, or 28%, during 2020 compared with 2019.

 

  Cost of revenue decreased approximately $3,077,000 and was driven by a decrease in sales and the impact of cost savings resulting from the Company’s reduction in force and the closing of our Abilene DNR tool repair center. As a percentage of revenue, cost of revenue was 49% for the year ended December 31, 2020, and 43% for the year ended December 31, 2019.
     
  Selling, general and administrative expenses decreased approximately $1,916,000 during 2020 compared with 2019. The decrease was primarily due to cost reduction measures implemented by us in 2020 in an effort to offset the reduction in revenue. These measures included headcount reductions, salary reductions and the deferral of new product development initiatives.
     
  Depreciation and amortization expenses decreased approximately $612,000 to $2,816,000 for year ended December 31, 2020. Depreciation expense decreased due to lower amortization expense as a result of fully amortizing a portion of intangible assets in May 2019.

 

29
 

 

Other Income (Expenses). Other income and expense primarily consists of interest income, interest expense, loan forgiveness and gain/loss on disposition of assets.

 

  Interest income for the years 2020 and 2019 was approximately $6,000 and $61,000, respectively.
     
  Interest expense for the years 2020 and 2019 was approximately $575,000 and $765,000, respectively. The decrease in interest expense was due primarily to the reduction in the balance outstanding on the Hard Rock Note.
     
  The Company recognized $933,000 of loan forgiveness for the year ended December 31, 2020. Approximately $892,000 was related to the Company’s PPP Loan and $41,000 related to an SBA equipment loan that was forgiven as part of the CARES Act.
     
  The Company recorded a loss on asset held for sale of $30,000 in 2020 and $6,000 in 2019.
     
  The Company recorded a gain of approximately $174,000 on assets disposed in 2020, and a gain of approximately $16,000 in 2019.
     
  The Company recognized a recovery of related party note receivable in 2019. Effective August 2017, the Company fully reserved the related party note receivable of $6,979,043, which reduced the related party note receivable balance to $0. In 2019, the Company received consideration on the related party note receivable in the form of a non-cash payment given in lieu of making an annual restricted stock unit award to the CEO and COO and recorded a recovery of the loan. The Company will continue to record recovery of related party note receivable when consideration or payments on the loan are made in the future.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

At December 31, 2020, we had working capital of approximately $1,300,000. Our principal uses of cash are operating expenses, working capital requirements, capital expenditures and debt service payments. Our operational and financial strategies include lowering our operating costs and capital spending to match revenue trends, accelerating collections of international receivables, and managing our working capital and debt to enhance liquidity. We will continue to work to grow revenue and manage costs to minimize negative net cash flow in 2021. If we are unable to do this, we may not be able to, among other things, (i) maintain our current general and administrative spending levels; (ii) fund certain obligations as they become due; and (iii) respond to competitive pressures or unanticipated capital requirements. We cannot provide any assurance that financing will be available to us in the future on acceptable terms.

 

In addition, the significant decline in oil demand due to COVID-19, the instability of oil prices caused by geopolitical issues and over supply have resulted in the announcements by our customers and end users of our tools and technology of significant reductions to their capital expenditure budgets. Our expectation is that demand for our products and services will continue to be impacted in 2021 and potentially beyond; however, we are currently unable to estimate the full impact to our business, how long this significant drop in demand will last or the depth of the decline. We have minimal planned capital expenditures for 2021 of $1,500,000 and we will further defer investment in new technology development, including our Strider technology.

 

The Hard Rock Note had a remaining balance of $1,500,000 as of December 31, 2020, accrues interest at 8.00% per annum and is fully payable on October 5, 2022. Under the amended terms of the Hard Rock Note, we are required to make the following remaining payments: accrued interest on January 5, April 5, July 5 and October 5 in 2021 and 2022; plus $750,000 in principal on July 5, 2021 with the remaining balance of principal and accrued interest on the Hard Rock Note due on October 5, 2022.

 

Our Credit Agreement is comprised of $1,000,000 Term Loan and $3,500,000 Revolving Loan. As of December 31, 2020, we had $666,584 outstanding on the Term Loan and $198,838 outstanding on the Revolving Loan. Amounts outstanding under the Revolving Loan at any time may not exceed the sum of: (a) up to 85% of accounts receivable or such lesser percentage as AFS in its sole discretion may deem appropriate if it determines that there has been a material adverse effect (less a dilution reserve as determined by AFS in its sole good faith discretion), plus (b) the lesser of (i) up to 50% of inventory or such lesser percentage as AFS in its sole discretion may deem appropriate if it determines that there has been a material adverse effect, or (ii) the inventory sublimit, minus (c) the borrowing base reserve as may be determined from time to time by AFS. Amounts outstanding on the Revolving Loan as of December 31, 2020, may not exceed $314,517, which is based on a calculation applying 85% of accounts receivable and 50% of inventory. A collateral management fee is payable monthly on the used portion of the Revolving Loan and Term Loan. If our borrowings are less than $1,000,000, we still pay interest as if we had borrowed $1,000,000. At December 31, 2020, we had approximately $8,700 of accrued interest.

 

The interest rate for the Term Loan and the Revolving Loan is prime plus 2%. At December 31, 2020, the interest rate for the Term Loan was 8.85%, which includes a 3.6% management fee rate. The effective interest rate for the Revolving Loan for the year ending December 31, 2020 was 11.35%. The obligations of the Company under the agreement are secured by a security interest in substantially all of the tangible and intangible assets of the Company, other than any assets owned by the Company that constitute real property (and fixtures affixed to such real property), certain excluded equipment, intellectual property, or aircraft. The Credit Agreement matures on February 20, 2023.

 

On December 7, 2020, the Company closed a sale-leaseback agreement for its headquarters and manufacturing facilities. Under the terms of the transaction, the Company sold the property for $4.5 million and simultaneously entered into a 15-year lease. After fees, the Company netted approximately $4.2 million in proceeds of which $2.5 million was used to repay in full the outstanding mortgage on the property. Under the lease agreement, the Company has an option to extend the term of the lease and to repurchase the property. Due to this repurchase option, the Company was unable to account for the transfer as a sale under ASC Topic 842, Leases, and as such, the transaction is accounted for as a financing transaction.

 

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Contractual Obligations

 

The following table presents our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2020. Our obligations to make payments in the future may vary due to certain assumptions including the duration of our obligations and anticipated actions by third parties according to the following table (in thousands):

 

    2021     2022     2023     2024     2025     Thereafter     Total  
                                           
Debt (1)   $ 1,384     $ 1,299     $ 156     $ 119     $ 4     $           -     $ 2,962  
Operating leases     82       15       8       -       -       -       105  
Financial obligation (2)    

312

     

316

     

321

     

326

     

331

     

1,432

     

3,038

 
                                                         
Total   $ 1,778     $ 1,630     $ 485     $ 445     $ 335     $ 1,432     $ 6,105  

 

(1) Amounts represent the expected cash payments of principal and interest amounts associated with our long-term debt obligations.
   
(2)

Relates to the sale-leaseback transaction the Company completed in December 2020. The contractual obligation does not include the residual value of this property of $2,160,242. See Note 10 – Financing Obligation to our consolidated financial statements.

 

The aggregate outstanding balance of our notes payable obligations net of discounts as of December 31, 2020, was approximately $2,848,000 with interest rates ranging from 0% to 8.85%.

 

Cash Flow

 

Operating Cash Flows

 

For 2020, net cash provided by our operating activities was approximately $575,000. The Company had approximately $3,430,000 of net loss, an approximately $2,505,000 decrease in accounts receivable, depreciation and amortization expense of approximately $2,816,000, which were offset by an approximately $1,042,000 increase in inventories and $933,000 gain on forgiveness of the PPP loan and SBA equipment loan.

 

Investing Cash Flows

 

For 2020, the Company used approximately $222,000 in investing activities for property, plant and equipment purchases primarily to increase tool repair capacity to support product expansion in the Middle East. This was offset by proceeds from the sale of fixed assets of approximately $150,000.

 

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Financing Cash Flows

 

For 2020, net cash provided by our financing activities was approximately $241,000 and primarily related to proceeds from the PPP loan and proceeds from the sale-leaseback transaction, which was offset by principal payments on debt.

 

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

None.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The discussion of our financial condition and results of operations is based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with GAAP. During the preparation of these financial statements, we are required to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue, costs and expenses, and related disclosures. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates and assumptions, including those discussed below. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances. The results of our analysis form the basis for making assumptions about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. While we believe that the estimates and assumptions used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements are appropriate, actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions, and the impact of such differences may be material to our consolidated financial statements. Our estimates and assumptions are evaluated periodically and adjusted when necessary. Described below are the most significant policies we apply in preparing our consolidated financial statements, some of which are subject to alternative treatment under GAAP. We also describe the most significant estimates and assumptions we make in applying these policies. See Note 1 to our consolidated financial statements.

 

Segment reporting is not applicable to us as we have a single, company-wide management team that administers the Company as a whole, rather than by discrete business units. While we have three business product lines and report the revenues by product line internally and externally, we do not capture expenses by product line and as such, we do not maintain complete separate financial statement information by product line. We evaluate our business performance as a single segment and we report as a single segment. We operate in the United States and the Middle East. Approximately 82% of our revenue is from the United States and approximately 18% is from the Middle East for the year ended December 31, 2020. For the year ended December 31, 2019, approximately 93% of our revenue was from the United States and approximately 7% was from the Middle East.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

We are a drilling and completion tool technology company and we generate revenue from the manufacturing, repair, rental and sale of drilling and completion tools. Our manufactured products are produced in a standard manufacturing operation, even when produced to our customer’s specifications. We earn royalty commission revenue when our customer invoices their customer for the use of the tools.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

Stock-based compensation is measured at the grant date, based on the fair value of the award, and is recognized ratably as an expense over the vesting period of the award. Determining the appropriate fair value model and calculating the fair value of stock-based payment awards require the use of subjective assumptions, including the expected life of the stock-based payment awards and stock price volatility. Management uses the Black-Scholes option pricing model to value award grants and determine the related compensation expense. The assumptions used in calculating the fair value of stock-based payment awards represent management’s best estimates, but the estimates involve inherent uncertainties and the application of management judgment. As a result, if factors change and management uses different assumptions, the Company’s stock-based compensation expense could be materially different in the future. The Company expects to continue to grant stock-based awards in the future, and to the extent that the Company does, its actual stock-based compensation expense recognized in future periods will likely increase.

 

Concentration of Credit Risk

 

Substantially all of our revenue is derived from our refurbishing of PDC drill bits for Baker Hughes and from DTI when we 1) sell the Drill-N-Ream tool, 2) repair the DNR tool, and 3) earn royalty on our customer’s rental of the DNR tool to the end user.

 

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Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

Accounts receivable are generally due within 60 days of the invoice date. No interest is charged on past-due balances. We grant credit to our customers based upon an evaluation of each customer’s financial condition. We periodically monitor the payment history and ongoing creditworthiness of our customers. An allowance for doubtful accounts is established at a level estimated by management to be adequate based upon various factors including historical experience, aging status of customer accounts, payment history and financial condition of our customers. The allowance for doubtful accounts was $0 and $9,288 at December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

Intangible Assets

 

Annually, and more often as necessary, we will perform an evaluation of our intangible assets for indications of impairment. If indications exist, we will perform an evaluation of the fair value of the intangible assets and, if necessary, record an impairment charge. As of December 31, 2020, the Company performed an evaluation of the intangible assets. Based on this assessment, we have determined no impairment was needed.

 

Valuation of Inventories

 

Inventories consist of raw materials, work-in-process and finished goods and are stated at the lower of cost, determined using the weighted-average cost method, or net realizable value. Finished goods inventories include raw materials, direct labor and production overhead. The Company regularly reviews inventories on hand and current market conditions to determine if the cost of finished goods inventories exceed current market prices and impairs the cost basis of the inventory accordingly. The Company wrote off $4,800 and $79,200 related to slow moving inventory in 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

Property, Plant and Equipment

 

Property, plant and equipment is stated at cost. The cost of ordinary maintenance and repair is charged to operating expense, while replacement of critical components and major improvements are capitalized. Depreciation or amortization of property, plant and equipment, is calculated using the straight-line method over the asset’s estimated useful life as follows:

 

Buildings and leasehold improvements   2-39 years
Machinery, equipment and rental tools   18 months -10 years
Office equipment, fixtures and software   3-7 years
Transportation equipment   5 - 30 years

 

Property, plant and equipment is reviewed for impairment on an annual basis or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of an asset or asset group may not be recoverable. Indicative events or circumstances include, but are not limited to, matters such as a significant decline in market value or a significant change in business climate. An impairment loss is recognized when the carrying value of an asset exceeds the estimated undiscounted future cash flows from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition. The amount of impairment loss recognized is the excess of the asset’s carrying value over its fair value. Assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of the carrying value or the fair value less cost to sell. There were no impairment losses related to fixed assets during 2020 and 2019. Upon sale or other disposition of an asset, the Company recognizes a gain or loss on disposal measured as the difference between the net carrying value of the asset and the net proceeds received.

 

Related Party Note Receivable

 

In January 2014, we entered into a Note Purchase and Sale Agreement under which we agreed to purchase a loan made to Tronco Energy Corporation (“Tronco”), a party related to us through common control, in order to take over the legal position as Tronco’ s senior secured lender. That agreement provided that, upon our full repayment of the Tronco loan from the proceeds of our initial public offering, the lender would assign to us all of its rights under the Tronco loan, including all of the collateral documents. On May 30, 2014, we closed our purchase of the Tronco loan for a total payoff of $8.3 million, including principal, interest, and early termination fees.

 

The Meier Guaranties were determined not to be substantive based on GAAP that states that the substance of a personal guarantee depends on the ability of the guarantor to perform, the practicality of enforcing the guarantee, and the demonstrated intent to enforce the guarantee. Since the Company did not demonstrate intent by either enforcing the redemption of collateral or the guarantees by the borrowers to repay the loan when the related party note receivable was due and payable on December 31, 2017 and instead modified the loan by extending the payment term, the Company determined the guarantees are not substantive and therefore should not serve as the basis for concluding the loan is well secured and collateralized. As a result, the Company fully reserved the related party note receivable effective August 2017. The Company continues to hold the 8,267,860 shares of the Company’s common stock as collateral. The Company will record a recovery of the loan upon receiving repayment of the note, but there is no guarantee a full recovery of the loan will occur.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.

 

We do not maintain any derivative instruments such as interest rate swap arrangements, hedging contracts, futures contracts or the like.

 

Concentration of Credit Risk — We are dependent on a limited number of significant customers. The Company had two significant customers that represented 80% of our revenue for the year ended December 31, 2020. These customers had approximately $436,000 in accounts receivable at December 31, 2020. We had two significant customers that represented 92% of our revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019, and had approximately $2,920,000 in accounts receivable at December 31, 2019.

 

Developing new products and tools and selling more existing products to additional customers continues to be a strategic initiative which we believe will broaden our customer base, which should have a positive effect on diversifying our concentration of credit risk.

 

The Company had one vendor that represented 13% of our purchases for the year ended December 31, 2020. This vendor had approximately $61,000 in accounts payable at December 31, 2020. We had one significant vendor that represented 12% of our purchases for the year ended December 31, 2019, and had approximately $252,000 in accounts payable at December 31, 2019.

 

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ITEM 8. CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

SUPERIOR DRILLING PRODUCTS, INC.

 

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

  Page
   
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 35
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets – December 31, 2020 and 2019 36
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations – for the Years Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 37
   
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity – for the Years Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 38
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows – for the Years Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 39
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 40

 

34
 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

To the Shareholders and the Board of Directors of

Superior Drilling Products, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Superior Drilling Products, Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders’ equity and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the consolidated financial statements). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures to respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

Critical Audit Matters

 

The critical audit matters communicated below are matters arising from the current period audit of the financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. The communication of critical audit matters does not alter in any way our opinion on the consolidated financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matters below, providing separate opinions on the critical audit matters or on the accounts or disclosures to which they relate.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

As described in Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company’s contracts with customers typically contain a single performance obligation to provide agreed-upon products or services. Revenue is recognized when control of the distinct performance obligation is transferred. For example, tool revenue is recognized at the time of shipment or upon completion of the customer’s job for which the tool was rented and contract services are recognized upon shipment.

 

We identified revenue recognition as a critical audit matter. Although contracts with customers typically contain a single performance obligation, auditing the Company’s revenue recognition is complex due to the identification and determination of distinct performance obligations and the timing of revenue recognition of the numerous revenue streams.

 

The primary procedures we performed to address this critical audit matter included:

 

· Obtaining an understanding as well as evaluating the design and implementation of the Company’s process and internal controls to identify and determine the distinct performance obligations and the timing of revenue recognition.
· Testing the identification and determination of the distinct performance obligations and the timing of revenue recognition which involved reading the executed contract and purchase order to understand the contract, identifying the performance obligation(s), and determining the distinct performance obligations for a sample of revenue transactions.
· Evaluating the timing of revenue recognition for a sample of individual sales transactions which included reviewing invoices, bill of ladings, and cash receipts.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has incurred losses since inception, and expects to continue to incur losses for the foreseeable future. At December 31, 2020, the Company believes its borrowing capacity and cash generated by operations will be sufficient to fund the Company’s operations for at least a year beyond the date of the issuance of the consolidated financial statements. We identified liquidity and capital resources as a critical audit matter due to the subjectivity and judgments required by management to conclude the Company would have sufficient liquidity to sustain itself for at least a year beyond the date of the issuance of the consolidated financial statements. This in turn led to a high degree of auditor subjectivity and judgment to evaluate the audit evidence supporting management’s liquidity and going concern conclusions. 

 

The primary procedures we performed to address this critical audit matter included:

 

  Evaluating the amount and timing of management’s forecasted revenues and expenses along with the respective cash receipts and payments, including scheduled debt payments, over the next twelve-months. This includes a consideration of current market information available at the time of preparation of the forecast. In addition, evaluating audit evidence in connection with management’s liquidity assessment.
  Retrospectively evaluating management’s prior forecasted timing of cash receipts and payments and comparing to actual results from the most recent twelve-month period in order to consider management’s potential bias in preparing estimates.
  Finally, evaluating the clarity and adequacy of the Company’s disclosure of the circumstances which led to initial doubt regarding the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern and the factors that alleviated the initial doubt included in the consolidated financial statements.

 

/s/ Moss Adams LLP  
Dallas, Texas  
March 16, 2021  

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2017.

 

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SUPERIOR DRILLING PRODUCTS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

DECEMBER 31, 2020 and 2019

 

    2020     2019  
ASSETS                
Current assets                
Cash   $ 1,961,441     $ 1,217,014  
Accounts receivable, net     1,345,622       3,850,509  
Prepaid expenses     90,269       139,070  
Inventories     1,020,008       924,032  
Asset held for sale     40,000       252,704  
Other current assets     40,620       252,178  
Total current assets     4,497,960       6,635,507  
Property, plant and equipment, net     7,535,098       8,045,692  
Intangible assets, net     819,444       1,986,111  
Right of use assets     99,831       -  
Other noncurrent assets     87,490       93,619  
Total assets   $ 13,039,823     $ 16,760,929  
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY                
Current liabilities                
Accounts payable   $ 430,014     $ 945,414  
Accrued expenses     1,091,519       683,832  
Customer deposits     -       61,421  
Income tax payable     106,446       15,880  
Current portion of operating lease liability     79,313       -  
Current portion of financial obligation     61,691       -  
Current portion of long-term debt, net of discounts     1,397,337       4,102,543  
Total current liabilities     3,166,320       5,809,090  
Operating lease liability     20,518       -  
Long-term financial obligation, less current portion     4,178,261       -  
Long-term debt, less current portion, net of discounts     1,451,049       3,848,863  
Total liabilities     8,816,148       9,657,953  
Commitments and contingencies (Notes 8, 9, 10 and 11)                
Shareholders’ equity                
Common stock - $0.001 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized; 25,762,342 and 25,418,126 shares outstanding, respectively     25,762       25,418  
Additional paid-in-capital     40,619,620       40,069,391  
Accumulated deficit     (36,421,707 )     (32,991,833 )
Total shareholders’ equity     4,223,675       7,102,976  
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity   $ 13,039,823     $ 16,760,929  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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SUPERIOR DRILLING PRODUCTS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 and 2019

 

    2020     2019  
       
Revenue                
Tool revenue   $ 7,050,536     $ 12,115,926  
Contract services     3,420,262       6,881,088  
                 
Total Revenue     10,470,798       18,997,014  
                 
Operating cost and expenses                
Cost of revenue     5,105,677       8,182,546  
Selling, general, and administrative expenses     6,371,337       8,287,832  
Depreciation and amortization expense     2,816,396       3,428,403  
                 
Total operating costs and expenses     14,293,410       19,898,781  
                 
Operating loss     (3,822,612 )     (901,767 )
                 
Other income (expense)                
Interest income     5,803       60,996  
Interest expense     (575,306 )     (764,754 )
Recovery of related party note receivable     -       678,148  
Impairment on asset held for sale     (30,000 )     (6,143 )
Gain on disposition of assets     174,234       15,647  
Gain on loan forgiveness     933,003       -  
Total other income (expense)     507,734       (16,106 )
                 
Loss before income taxes     (3,314,878 )     (917,873 )
Income tax expense     (114,996 )     (18,550 )
                 
Net loss   $ (3,429,874 )   $ (936,423 )
                 
Basic loss per common share   $ (0.13 )   $ (0.04 )
Basic weighted average common shares outstanding     25,515,166       25,090,283  
Diluted loss per common share   $ (0.13 )   $ (0.04 )
Diluted weighted average Common shares outstanding     25,515,166       25,090,283  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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SUPERIOR DRILLING PRODUCTS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

          Additional     Restated     Total  
    Common Stock     Paid-in     Accumulated     Stockholders  
    Shares     Par Value     Capital     Deficit     Equity  
Balance - December 31, 2018     25,018,098     $ 25,018     $ 39,440,611     $ (32,055,410 )   $ 7,410,219  
                                         
Stock-based compensation expense     400,028       400       628,780       -       629,180  
Net loss     -       -       -       (936,423 )     (936,423 )
                                         
Balance - December 31, 2019     25,418,126     $ 25,418     $ 40,069,391     $ (32,991,833 )   $ 7,102,976  
                                         
Stock-based compensation expense     344,216       344       550,229       -       550,573  
Net loss     -       -       -       (3,429,874 )     (3,429,874 )
                                         
Balance - December 31, 2020     25,762,342     $ 25,762     $ 40,619,620     $ (36,421,707 )   $ 4,223,675  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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SUPERIOR DRILLING PRODUCTS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

    2020     2019  
Cash Flows from Operating Activities                
Net loss   $ (3,429,874 )   $ (936,423 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by operating activities:                
Depreciation and amortization expense     2,816,396       3,428,403  
Share based compensation expense     550,573       629,180  
Impairment on asset held for sale     30,000       6,143  
Amortization of deferred loan cost     18,525       14,942  
Loss on disposition of rental fleet     23,649       37,568  
Gain on loan forgiveness     (933,003 )     -  
Gain on disposition of assets     (174,234 )     (15,647 )
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:                
Accounts receivable     2,504,887       (1,577,320 )
Inventories     (1,041,683 )     (680,904 )
Prepaid expenses and other current assets     266,488       (299,373 )
Accounts payable and accrued expenses     (85,630 )     257,533  
Income tax payable     90,566       12,240  
Other long-term liabilities     (61,421 )     61,421  
Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities     575,239       937,763  
Cash Flows From Investing Activities                
Purchases of property, plant and equipment     (221,639 )     (509,055 )
Proceeds from sale of fixed assets     149,833       -  
Net Cash Used in Investing Activities     (71,806 )     (509,055 )
                 
Cash Flows from Financing Activities                
Principal payments on debt     (2,350,783 )     (4,746,145 )
Principal received from debt borrowings     72,520       1,150,000  
Proceeds received from Paycheck Protection Program     891,600       -  
Payments on revolving loan     (1,179,768 )     (1,924,939 )
Proceeds received from revolving loan     1,185,319       2,118,226  
Proceeds from financing obligation     1,622,106       -  
Debt issuance costs     -       (73,603 )
Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Financing Activities     240,994       (3,476,461 )
                 
Net Change in Cash     744,427       (3,047,753 )
Cash at Beginning of Period     1,217,014       4,264,767  
Cash at End of Period     1,961,441     $ 1,217,014  
Supplemental information:                
Cash paid for Interest   $ 576,854     $ 856,012  
Non-cash payment of other long-term liabilities and interest by offsetting related-party note receivable     -       678,148  
Inventory converted to property, plant and equipment     945,707       760,495  
Acquisition of equipment by issuance of note payable     -       559,304  
Debt retired from financing obligation     2,638,773       -  
Long term debt retired with proceeds from sale of airplane     211,667       -  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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SUPERIOR DRILLING PRODUCTS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Organization and Nature of Operations

 

Superior Drilling Products, Inc. (the “Company”, “SDPI”, “we”, “our” or “us”) is an innovative drilling and completion tool technology company providing cost saving solutions that drive production efficiencies for the oil and natural gas drilling industry. Our headquarters and manufacturing operations are located in Vernal, Utah. Our drilling solutions include the patented Drill-N-Ream® well bore conditioning tool (“Drill-N-Ream tool”) and the patented Strider™ Drill String Oscillation System technology (“Strider technology” or “Strider”). In addition, the Company is a manufacturer and refurbisher of PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) drill bits for a leading oil field services company. We operate a state-of-the-art drill tool fabrication facility, where we manufacture solutions for the drilling industry, as well as customers’ custom products.

 

Our subsidiaries include (a) Superior Drilling Solutions, LLC (previously known as Superior Drilling Products, LLC), a Utah limited liability company (“SDS”), together with its wholly owned subsidiary Superior Design and Fabrication, LLC, a Utah limited liability company (“SDF”), (b) Extreme Technologies, LLC, a Utah limited liability company (“ET”), (c) Meier Properties Series, LLC, a Utah limited liability company (“MPS”), (d) Meier Leasing, LLC, a Utah limited liability company (“ML”), and (e) Hard Rock Solutions, LLC (“HR” or “Hard Rock”).

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The Company’s consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”). The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Superior Drilling Products Inc. and all of its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany accounts have been eliminated in consolidation. The Company does not have investments in any unconsolidated subsidiaries.

 

Segment Reporting

 

We operate as a single operating segment, which reflects how we manage our business. We operate in North America and the Middle East. See Note 14 – Geographical Operations Information.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Significant items subject to estimates and assumptions include the carrying amount and useful lives of property and equipment and intangible assets, impairment assessments, share-based compensation expense, and valuation allowances for accounts receivable, inventories, and deferred tax assets.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

We account for revenue in accordance with Topic 606, which we adopted on January 1, 2019, using the full retrospective method. The adoption of Topic 606 did not have a material impact on the timing or amounts of revenue recognized in our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and therefore did not have a material impact on our financial position, results of operations, equity or cash flows as of the adoption date for the year ended December 31, 2019. The Company did not record any adjustments to opening retained earnings as of December 31, 2017 or for any periods previously presented. Furthermore, the impact of the adoption of the new standard is immaterial to our revenue and gross profit on an ongoing basis.

 

Tool sales, rentals and other related revenue

 

Tool and Product Sales: Revenue is recognized upon shipment of tools or products to the customer. Shipping and handling costs related to tool and product sales are recorded gross as a component of both the sales price and cost of the product sold.

 

Tool Rental: Rental revenue is recognized upon completion of the customer’s job for which the tool was rented. While the duration of the rents vary by job and number of runs, these rents are generally less than one month. The rental agreements are typically based on the price per run or footage drilled and do not have any minimum rental payments or term.

 

Other Related Revenue: We receive revenue from the repair of tools and recognize revenue upon delivery of the repaired tool to the customer. We earn royalty commission revenue when our customer invoices their customer for the use of our tools.

 

Contract Services

 

Drill Bit Manufacturing and Refurbishment: We recognize revenue for our PDC drill bit services upon transfer of control, which we determined to be the shipping point. Shipping and handling costs related to refurbishing services are paid directly by the customer at the time of shipment. By contract, we can only refurbish and manufacture oil or gas drill bits for Baker Hughes, but we are not contractually prohibited from manufacturing drill bits for the mining industry.

 

See Note 3 – Revenue.

 

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Cash and cash equivalents

 

Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on deposit. We maintain cash deposits with financial institutions that may exceed federally insured limits at times. We have chosen credible institutions and believe our risk of loss is negligible.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company’s financial instruments consist of cash and cash equivalents, receivables, payables, and bank debt. The Company believes that the carrying values of these instruments on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets approximate their fair values.

 

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

Accounts receivable are generally due within 60 days of the invoice date. No interest is charged on past-due balances. We grant credit to our customers based upon an evaluation of each customer’s financial condition. We periodically monitor the payment history and ongoing creditworthiness of our customers. An allowance for doubtful accounts is established at a level estimated by management to be adequate based upon various factors including historical experience, aging status of customer accounts, payment history and financial condition of our customers. The allowance for doubtful accounts was $0 and $9,288 as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories consist of raw materials, work-in-process and finished goods and are stated at the lower of cost, determined using the weighted-average cost method, or net realizable value. Finished goods inventories include raw materials, direct labor and production overhead. The Company regularly reviews inventories on hand and current market conditions to determine if the cost of finished goods inventories exceed current market prices and impairs the cost basis of the inventory accordingly.

 

Assets and Liabilities Held for Sale

 

The Company classifies disposal groups as held for sale in the period in which all of the following criteria are met: (1) management, having the authority to approve the action, commits to a plan to sell the disposal group; (2) the disposal group is available for immediate sale in its present condition subject only to terms that are usual and customary for sales of such disposal groups; (3) an active program to locate a buyer or buyers and other actions required to complete the plan to sell the disposal group have been initiated; (4) the sale of the disposal group is probable, and transfer of the disposal group is expected to qualify for recognition as a completed sale, within one year, except if events of circumstances beyond the Company’s control extend the period of time required to sell the disposal group beyond one year; (5) the disposal group is being actively marketed for sale at a price that is reasonable in relation to its current fair value; and (6) actions required to complete the plan indicate that it is unlikely that significant changes to the plan will be made or that the plan will be withdrawn.

 

A disposal group that is classified as held for sale is initially measured at the lower of its carrying amount or fair value less any costs to sell. Any loss resulting from this measurement is recognized in the period in which the held for sale criteria are met.

 

Subsequent changes in the fair value of a disposal group less any costs to sell are reported as an adjustment to the carrying amount of the disposal group, as long as the new carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount of the asset at the time it was initially classified as held for sale. Upon determining that a disposal group meets the criteria to be classified as held for sale, the Company reports the assets and liabilities of the disposal group for all periods presented in the line items assets held for sale and liabilities held for sale, respectively, in the consolidated balance sheets.

 

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Property, Plant and Equipment

 

Property, plant and equipment is stated at cost. The cost of ordinary maintenance and repair is charged to operating expense, while replacement of critical components and major improvements are capitalized. Depreciation or amortization of property and equipment, is calculated using the straight-line method over the asset’s estimated useful life as follows:

 

Buildings and leasehold Improvements   2-39 years
Machinery, equipment and rental tools   18 months -10 years
Office equipment, fixtures and software   3-7 years
Transportation equipment   5 - 30 years

 

Property, plant and equipment is reviewed for impairment on an annual basis or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of an asset or asset group may not be recoverable. Indicative events or circumstances include, but are not limited to, matters such as a significant decline in market value or a significant change in business climate. An impairment loss is recognized when the carrying value of an asset exceeds the estimated undiscounted future cash flows from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition. The amount of impairment loss recognized is the excess of the asset’s carrying value over its fair value. Assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of the carrying value or the fair value less cost to sell. Upon sale or other disposition of an asset, the Company recognizes a gain or loss on disposal measured as the difference between the net carrying value of the asset and the net proceeds received.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

We review the recoverability of long-lived assets, such as property and equipment, when events or changes in circumstances occur that indicate the carrying value of the asset or asset group may not be recoverable. The assessment of possible impairment is based on our ability to recover the carrying value of the asset or asset group from the expected future pre-tax cash flows (undiscounted) of the related operations. If these cash flows are less than the carrying value of such asset, an impairment loss is recognized for the difference between estimated fair value and the carrying value. We concluded there were no indicators evident or other circumstances present that these assets were not recoverable and accordingly, no impairment charges of long-lived assets were recognized for 2020 and 2019.

 

Intangible Assets

 

The Company’s intangible assets with finite lives consist of developed technology, customer contracts and relationships, and trade names and trademarks.

 

The cost of intangible assets with finite lives is amortized using the straight-line method over the estimated period of economic benefit, ranging from 5 to 9 years. Asset lives are adjusted whenever there is a change in the estimated period of economic benefit. No residual value has been assigned to these intangible assets.

 

Intangible assets with finite lives are tested for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. These conditions may include a change in the extent or manner in which the asset is being used or a change in future operations. The Company assesses the recoverability of the carrying amount by preparing estimates of future revenue, margins, and cash flows. If the sum of expected future cash flows (undiscounted and without interest charges) is less than the carrying amount, an impairment loss is recognized. The impairment loss recognized is the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the fair value. Fair value of these assets may be determined by a variety of methodologies, including discounted cash flow models.

 

Leases

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), which requires assets and liabilities that arise from all leases to be recognized on the balance sheet for lessees and expanded financial statement disclosures for both lessees and lessors. We adopted the new standard effective January 1, 2020 and elected the modified retrospective transition method and as such, the comparative financial information will not be restated and will continue to be reported under the lease standard in effect during those periods. The adoption of this standard resulted in approximately $270,000 of additional assets and liabilities on our consolidated balance sheet representing the recognition of operating lease right-of-use assets and operating lease liabilities. Right-of-use assets represent the Company’s right to use an underlying asset for the lease term and lease liability represents the Company’s obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease, both of which are recognized based on the present value of the future minimum lease payments over the lease term at the commencement date. Leases with a lease term of 12 months or less at inception are not recorded on the condensed consolidated balance sheet and are expensed on a straight-line basis over the lease term in the condensed consolidated statement of operations. The interest rate implicit in lease contracts is typically not readily determinable. As a result, the Company utilizes an estimate of its incremental borrowing rate to discount lease payments, which reflects the fixed rate at which the Company believes it could borrow on a collateralized basis the amount of the lease payments in the same currency, for a similar term, in a similar economic environment. See Note 8 – Leases.

 

Research and Development

 

We expense research and development costs as they are incurred. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, these expenses were approximately $790,000 and $1,427,000, respectively, and are included in the selling, general, and administrative expenses in the statement of operations.

 

Earnings (Loss) Per Share

 

Basic earnings (loss) per common share is calculated by dividing net income (loss) available to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted earnings (loss) per share is calculated by dividing net income (loss) attributable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding, including potentially dilutive common share equivalents, if the effect is dilutive. Potentially dilutive common shares equivalents include stock options and warrants.

 

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Income Taxes

 

The Company recognizes an asset or liability for the deferred tax consequences of all temporary differences between the tax basis of assets or liabilities and their reported amounts in the financial statements that will result in taxable or deductible amounts in future years when the reported amounts of the asset or liabilities are recovered or settled and for operating loss carry forwards. These deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the enacted tax rates that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse and the carry forwards are expected to be realized. Deferred tax assets are reviewed periodically for recoverability and a valuation allowance is provided as necessary.

 

Debt Issuance Costs

 

Costs related to debt issuance are capitalized and amortized as interest expense over the term of the related debt using the straight-line method, which approximates the effective interest method. Upon the repayment of debt, the Company accelerates the recognition of an appropriate amount of the costs as interest expense. Debt issuance are presented as a direct reduction from the carrying amount of the note payable. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the amortized debt issuance costs were $18,524 and $14,942, respectively.

 

Share Based Compensation

 

Share based compensation expense for share based payments, related to stock option and restricted stock awards, is recognized based on their grant-date fair values. The Company recognizes compensation expense on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award.

 

Concentrations and Credit Risk

 

The Company has two significant customers that represented 80% and 92% of our revenue for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. These customers had approximately $436,000 and $2,920,000 in accounts receivable at December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

The Company had one vendor that represented 13% of our purchases for the year ended December 31, 2020. This vendor had approximately $61,000 in accounts payable at December 31, 2020. We had one significant vendor that represented 12% of our purchases for the year ended December 31, 2019, and had approximately $252,000 in accounts payable at December 31, 2019.

 

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Reclassifications

 

Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to the balance sheet to conform to the current year presentation. The reclassifications were within accounts payable and accrued expenses and did not impact net income.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

There are no recently issued accounting pronouncements that we have not yet adopted that we believe will have a material effect on our financial statements.

 

NOTE 2. LIQUIDITY

 

The significant decline in oil demand due to COVID-19, the instability of oil prices caused by geopolitical issues and production levels, and the limited availability of storage capacity, have together resulted in our customers announcing significant reductions to their capital expenditure budgets for 2020 and 2021. Demand for our products and services has been severely impacted as a result, and management expects this to continue into 2021 and potentially beyond; however, we are currently unable to estimate the full impact to our business, how long this significant drop in demand will last or the depth of the decline.

 

In an effort to offset the reduction in revenue resulting from the weakened macroeconomic environment, we have implemented certain cost reduction measures during 2020. These measures included, but were not limited to, the following:

 

  20% reduction of the base salary beginning in April 2020 and a 40% salary deferral beginning in October 2020 for the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Operating Officer, and Chief Financial Officer;
     
  20% reduction in the base salaries beginning in April 2020 and a 20% deferral of base salaries beginning in October 2020 of certain non-executive officers of the Company;
     
  20% reduction in fees to be paid beginning in April 2020 and a 40% deferral of fees beginning in October 2020 to the independent directors on the Board for their service as directors;
     
  5% to 10% reduction in salaries beginning in April 2020 and a 10% deferral of salaries beginning in October 2020 of other members of the management team and salaried workforce;
     
  43% reduction of the Company’s workforce; and
     
  Closure of our West Texas repair facility in July 2020.

 

During the year, we entered into amended agreements with certain of our customers, reduced our planned capital expenditures and deferred further investment in new technology development, including our Strider technology, for the foreseeable future. On April 14, 2020 we entered into an unsecured promissory note under the Paycheck Protection Program (the “PPP”), with a principal amount of $891,600. The PPP was established under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”) and is administered by the U.S. Small Business Administration (the “SBA”). The SBA approved our Forgiveness Application in full in December 2020. On December 7, 2020, the Company closed a sale-leaseback agreement for its headquarters and manufacturing facilities. Under the terms of the transaction, the Company sold the property for $4.5 million and simultaneously entered into a 15-year lease. See Note 10 – Financing Obligation.

We believe that our borrowing capacity, cash generated from operations will be sufficient to fund our operations for the next 12 months. To enhance liquidity, our operational and financial strategies include managing our operating costs, accelerating collections of international receivables, and reducing working capital requirements and restructuring our debt. If we are unable to do this, we may not be able to, among other things, (i) maintain our revised general and administrative spending levels; (ii) fund certain obligations as they become due; and (iii) respond to competitive pressures or unanticipated capital requirements. COVID-19 has also led to a significant disruption in the equity and debt capital markets, which could hinder our ability to raise new capital or obtain financing on acceptable terms. We cannot provide any assurance that financing will be available to us in the future on acceptable terms, if at all.

 

Additionally, in July 2020, the Company filed a Form S-3 Shelf Registration that will allow the Company to offer and sell, from time to time, up to $20,000,000 of securities.

 

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On November 18, 2020, the Company received notification from the NYSE American to the Company indicating that, as a result of the Company’s stockholders’ equity of $4.7 million as of September 30, 2020, and reported losses for each of the last five fiscal years, the Company is not in compliance with the stockholders’ equity standards for continued listing on the NYSE American. On January 28, 2021, the Company received notice that the NYSE American had accepted the Company’s plan that was submitted on December 18, 2020, to regain compliance with the continued listing standards of the NYSE American. The Company has been granted a plan period through May 18, 2022 to regain compliance.

 

NYSE American Regulations staff will review the Company periodically for compliance with the initiatives outlined in the plan. If the Company is not in compliance with the continued listing standards by May 18, 2022 or if the Company does not make progress consistent with the plan during the plan period, NYSE Regulation staff will initiate delisting proceedings as appropriate.

 

NOTE 3. REVENUE

 

Our revenue is derived from short-term contracts. Revenue is recognized when we satisfy a performance obligation by transferring control of the promised goods or services to our customers at a point in time, in an amount that reflects the consideration the Company expects to be entitled to in exchange for those goods or services. We also assess our customer’s ability and intention to pay, which is based on a variety of factors including our customer’s historical payment experience and financial condition. Payment terms and conditions vary, although terms generally include a requirement of payment within 30 days.

 

Revenue generally does not include right of return or other significant post-delivery obligations. Revenue is recognized net of any taxes collected from customers, which are subsequently remitted to governmental authorities. We elected to treat shipping and handling costs as a fulfillment cost instead of as a separate performance obligation. We recognize the cost for shipping and handling when incurred as an expense in cost of sales.

 

Performance Obligations

 

A performance obligation is a promise in a contract to transfer a distinct good or service to the customer under Topic 606. A contract’s transaction price is allocated to each distinct performance obligation and recognized as revenue when, or as, the performance obligation is satisfied. The majority of our contracts with customers contain a single performance obligation to provide agreed-upon products or services. For contracts with multiple performance obligations, we allocate revenue to each performance obligation based on its relative standalone selling price. In accordance with Topic 606, we do not assess whether promised goods or services are performance obligations if they are immaterial in the context of the contract with the customer.

 

All of our contracts are less than one year in duration. We do not disclose the value of unsatisfied performance obligations for (i) contracts with an original expected length of one year or less and (ii) contracts for which we recognize revenue at the amount to which we have the right to invoice for services performed.

 

Disaggregation of Revenue

 

Approximately 82% of our revenue is from the United States and approximately 18% is from the Middle East for the year ended December 31, 2020. For the year ended December 31, 2019, approximately 93% of our revenue was from the United States and approximately 7% was from the Middle East.

 

Revenue disaggregated by revenue source are as follows:

 

    December 31,  
    2020     2019  
             
Tool Revenue:                
Tool and product sales   $ 971,520     $ 3,930,619  
Tool rental     2,058,329       1,379,072  
Other related revenue     4,020,687       6,806,235  
Total Tool Revenue     7,050,536       12,115,926  
                 
Contract Services     3,420,262       6,881,088  
                 
Total Revenue   $ 10,470,798     $ 18,997,014  

 

Contract Costs

 

We do not incur any material costs of obtaining contracts.

 

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Contract Balances

 

Under our sales contracts, we invoice customers after our performance obligations have been satisfied, at which point payment is unconditional. Accordingly, our contracts do not give rise to contract assets or liabilities under Topic 606.

 

NOTE 4. INVENTORIES

 

Inventories were comprised of the following:

 

    December 31,
2020
    December 31,
2019
 
Raw material   $ 733,734     $ 800,662  
Work in progress     50,631       75,235  
Finished goods     235,643       48,135  
    $ 1,020,008     $ 924,032  

 

The Company wrote off $4,800 and $79,200 related to slow moving inventory in 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

NOTE 5. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property, plant and equipment are comprised of the following:

 

    December 31,
2020
    December 31,
2019
 
Land   $ 880,416     $ 880,416  
Buildings     4,764,441       4,758,832  
Leasehold improvements     755,039       755,039  
Machinery and equipment     11,298,642       10,343,486  
Office equipment, fixtures and software     628,358       615,357  
Transportation assets     265,760       350,871  
      18,592,656       17,704,001  
Accumulated depreciation     (11,057,558 )     (9,658,309 )
    $ 7,535,098     $ 8,045,692  

 

In 2019, the Company decided to sell the Company airplane and related hangar. Accordingly, these assets were reported as assets held for sale on our balance sheet as of December 31, 2019 at their carrying value, which is lower than the expected fair value less costs to sell. In February 2020, the Company sold the airplane for a gain of approximately $142,000. The Company recorded a $30,000 impairment related to the hangar in March 2020. In February 2021, the Company sold the hangar for a gain of $4,000 which will be recorded in the first quarter of 2021.

 

Depreciation expense related to property, plant and equipment for the year ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 was $1,649,729 and $1,728,403 respectively.

 

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NOTE 6. INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

Intangible assets are comprised of the following:

 

    December 31,
2020
    December 31,
2019
 
Developed technology   $ 7,000,000     $ 7,000,000  
Customer contracts     6,400,000       6,400,000  
Trademarks     1,500,000       1,500,000  
      14,900,000       14,900,000  
Accumulated amortization     (14,080,556 )     (12,913,889 )
    $ 819,444     $ 1,986,111  

 

Amortization expense related to intangible assets for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 was $1,166,667 and $1,700,000, respectively.

 

These intangible assets will be amortized over their expected useful lives using the straight-line method, which is a weighted-average amortization period of 6.3 years. As of December 31, 2020, the Company will recognize the following amortization expense for the respective periods ending December 31 noted below:

 

2021     583,333  
2022     166,667  
2023     69,444  
Total   $ 819,444  

 

During the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, there were no impairments recognized related to other intangible assets.

 

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NOTE 7. RELATED PARTY NOTE RECEIVABLE

 

In January 2014, we entered into a Note Purchase and Sale Agreement under which we agreed to purchase a loan made to Tronco in order to take over the legal position as Tronco’ s senior secured lender. Tronco is an entity owned by Troy and Annette Meier. Effective August 2017, the Company fully reserved the related party note receivable of $6,979,043, which reduced the related party note receivable balance to $0. The Company continues to hold the 8,267,860 shares of the Company’s common stock as collateral. The Company will record a recovery of the loan upon receiving repayment of the note or interest in other income. On July 7, 2020, the Company entered into an amended and restated loan agreement and note with Tronco changing the payment terms on the note. As amended, the interest rate on the note is fixed at 2% per annum.

 

In December 2019, the Board of Directors approved grants of restricted stock units to Troy and Annette Meier with an approximate value of $587,500. The Board and the Meiers decided in lieu of making such awards, the dollar value of such awards would be used to pay $327,238 on the Tronco Note and the remaining $260,262 was remitted for taxes on the Meiers behalf. Also in December 2019, the Board of Directors approved a bonus to Troy and Annette Meier of $630,000, of which $350,911 was used to pay down the Tronco Note and the remaining $279,089 was remitted for taxes on the Meiers behalf.

 

A bonus was accrued but not paid to the Meiers during 2020. The Meiers did not make a Tronco interest payment in 2020 The Meiers are to pay interest only on December 31, 2021, with a balloon payment of all unpaid interest and principal due upon maturity on December 31, 2022.

 

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NOTE 8. LEASES

 

The Company determines whether a contract is a lease, or contains a lease, at inception of the contract and whether that lease meets the classification criteria of a finance or operating lease. The Company discounts lease payments based on an estimate of its incremental borrowing rate as the Company’s leases do not provide a readily determinable implicit rate.

 

The Company leases certain facilities in Texas, Utah and Dubai under long-term operating leases with lease terms of one year to two years. Effective January 1, 2020, the Company adopted the provision of ASC 842 Leases. See Note 10 – Financing Obligation regarding the sale-leaseback of our Utah facilities.

 

The table below presents the lease related assets and liabilities recorded on the Company’s consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2020:

 

    Classification on Balance Sheet   December 31, 2020  
Assets            
Operating lease assets   Operating lease right of use assets   $ 99,831  
Total lease assets       $ 99,831  
             
Liabilities            
Current liabilities            
Operating lease liability   Current operating lease liability   $ 79,313  
Noncurrrent liabilities            
Operating lease liability   Long-term operating lease liability     20,518  
Total lease liability       $ 99,831  

 

The lease expense and the cash paid under operating leases for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $168,917. At December 31, 2020, the weighted average remaining lease terms were 0.78 years and the weighted average discount rate was 7.25%.

 

The following is the aggregate future lease payments for operating leases as of December 31, 2020:

 

2021   $ 81,990  
2022     15,252  
2023     8,052  
Total undiscounted lease payments     105,294  
Less: effects of discounting     (5,463 )
Present value of lease payments   $ 99,831  

 

NOTE 9. LONG-TERM DEBT

 

Long-term debt is comprised of the following:

 

    December 31,
2020
    December 31,
2019
 
Real estate loans   $ -     $ 2,938,191  
Hard Rock Note     1,500,000       3,000,000  
Credit Agreement     825,366       1,134,626  
Machinery loans     466,448       580,185  
Transportation loans     56,572       298,404  
      2,848,386       7,951,406  
Current portion of long-term debt     (1,397,337 )     (4,102,542 )
    $ 1,451,049     $ 3,848,864  

 

Real Estate Loans

 

In February 2019, the Company entered into a commercial bank loan for $3,129,861 related to our Vernal, Utah Campus. The loan required monthly payments of approximately $43,000, including principal and interest at 7.25%, and was secured by the land and buildings at our Vernal, Utah Campus. The Company repaid the outstanding mortgage on the property in December 2020 as part of the Sale-Leaseback Transaction. See Note 10 – Financing Obligation.

 

Hard Rock Note

 

In 2014, the Company purchased all of the interests of Hard Rock Solutions, LLC (“Hard Rock”). Consideration consisted of $12.5 million paid in cash at closing and a $12.5 million seller’s note (the “Hard Rock Note”). The Hard Rock Note and subsequent amendments are secured by all of the patents, patents pending, other patent rights, and trademarks transferred to Hard Rock.

 

The Hard Rock Note has a remaining balance of $1,500,000 as of December 31, 2020, accrues interest at 8.00% per annum and is fully payable on October 5, 2022. Under the amended terms of the Hard Rock Note, we are required to make the following remaining payments: accrued interest on January 5, April 5, July 5 and October 5 in 2021 and 2022; plus $750,000 in principal on July 5, 2021 with the remaining balance of principal and accrued interest on the Hard Rock Note due on October 5, 2022. In January 2021, the Company made an interest payment of $30,247.

 

49
 

 

Credit Agreement

 

In February 2019, the Company entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (the “Credit Agreement”) with Austin Financial Services, Inc. (“AFS”). The Credit Agreement provides a $4,500,000 credit facility, which includes a $1,000,000 term loan (the “Term Loan”) and a $3,500,000 revolver (the “Revolving Loan”). As of December 31, 2020, we had $666,664 outstanding on the Term Loan and $198,838 outstanding on the Revolving Loan. Amounts outstanding under the Revolving Loan at any time may not exceed the sum of: (a) up to 85% of accounts receivable or such lesser percentage as AFS in its sole discretion may deem appropriate if it determines that there has been a material adverse effect (less a dilution reserve as determined by AFS in its sole good faith discretion), plus (b) the lesser of (i) up to 50% of inventory or such lesser percentage as AFS in its sole discretion may deem appropriate if it determines that there has been a material adverse effect, or (ii) the inventory sublimit, minus (c) the borrowing base reserve as may be determined from time to time by AFS. Amounts outstanding on the Revolving Loan as of December 31, 2020, may not exceed $314,517, which is based on a calculation applying 85% of accounts receivable and 50% of inventory. A collateral management fee is payable monthly on the used portion of the Revolving Loan and Term Loan. Even if our borrowings are less than $1,000,000, we still pay interest as if we had borrowed $1,000,000. At December 31, 2020, we had approximately $8,700 of accrued interest.

 

The Credit Agreement contains various restrictive covenants that, among other things, limit or restrict the ability of the borrowers to incur additional indebtedness; incur additional liens; make dividends and other restricted payments; make investments; engage in mergers, acquisitions and dispositions; make optional prepayments of other indebtedness; engage in transactions with affiliates; and enter into restrictive agreements. The Credit Agreement does not include any financial covenants. If an event of default occurs, the lenders are entitled to accelerate the advances made thereunder and exercise rights against the collateral. Borrowing under the Revolving Loan is classified as current debt as a result of the required lockbox arrangement and the subjective acceleration clause. At December 31, 2020, we were in compliance with the covenants in the Credit Agreement.

 

The interest rate for the Term Loan and the Revolving Loan is prime plus 2%. At December 31, 2020, the interest rate for the Term Loan was 8.85%, which includes a 3.6% management fee rate. The effective interest rate for the Revolving Loan for the year ending December 31, 2020 was 11.35%. The obligations of the Company under the Credit Agreement are secured by a security interest in substantially all of the tangible and intangible assets of the borrowers, other than any assets owned by the Company that constitute real property (and fixtures affixed to such real property), certain excluded equipment, intellectual property, or aircraft. The Credit Agreement matures on February 20, 2023, subject to early termination pursuant to the terms of the agreement or extension as may be agreed by the parties.

 

Equipment Loans

 

The Company purchased equipment in November 2019 and entered into a note payable with a financing company for $478,000. The note has an interest rate of 8.06% and will mature in November 2024. The Company pays monthly payments on this note of approximately $10,000.

 

Transportation Loans

 

Vehicles

 

Our loans for Company vehicles and other transportation are with various financing parties we have engaged with in connection with the acquisition of the vehicles. As of December 31, 2020, the loans bear interest ranging from 0% - 6.99% with maturity dates ranging from June 2021 through June 2024 and are collateralized by the vehicles. Our cumulative monthly payment under these loans as of December 31, 2020 was approximately $2,677, including principal and interest.

 

Future annual maturities of total debt are as follows (1):

 

Year      
2021   $ 1,217,022  
2022     1,213,802  
2023     140,964  
2024     115,207  
2025 - Thereafter    

2,689

 
Total debt   $ 2,689,684  

 

(1) Excludes discounts for debt issuance costs and maturities related to our Revolving Loan.

 

50
 

 

NOTE 10. FINANCING OBLIGATION

 

On December 7, 2020, the Company entered into a sale agreement (the “Sale Agreement”). Pursuant to the terms of the Sale Agreement, the Company sold land and property related to the Company’s headquarters and manufacturing facility in Vernal, Utah (the “Property”) for a purchase price of $4,448,500. Concurrent with the sale of the Property, the Company entered into a fifteen-year lease agreement (the “Lease Agreement”), whereby the Company will lease back the Property at an annual rate of $311,395 with payments made monthly, subject to annual rent increases of 1.5%. Under the Lease Agreement, the Company has an option to extend the term of the lease and to repurchase the Property. Due to this repurchase option, the Company was unable to account for the transfer as a sale under ASC Topic 842, Leases, and as such, the transaction is accounted for as a financing transaction.

 

The Company received cash of $1,622,106, retired real estate debt of $2,638,773 and recorded a financing obligation liability of $4,260,879 related to the transaction. There was no gain recorded since sale accounting was precluded. The financing obligation has an implied interest rate of 6.0%. At the conclusion of the fifteen-year lease period, the financing obligation residual will be $2,160,242, which will correspond to the carrying value of the property. The Company paid $25,950 of principal in 2020 that was prorated for the month of December.

 

The financing obligation is summarized below:

 

    December 31,
2020
 
Finance obligations for sale-leaseback transactions   $ 4,239,952  
Current principal portion of finance obligation     (61,691 )
Non-current portion of finance obligation   $ 4,178,261  

 

The following is the aggregate future lease payments that include principal and interest for the finance obligation as of December 31, 2020:

 

2021   $ 311,784  
2022     316,461  
2023     321,208  
2024     326,026  
2025     330,916  
Thereafter    

3,562,389

 
Total undiscounted lease payments    

5,168,784

 

Residual value of the property

    2,160,242  
Less: effects of discounting     (3,089,074 )
Present value of lease payments   $ 4,239,952  

 

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

We are subject to litigation that arises from time to time in the ordinary course of our business activities. In February 2019, the Company filed a patent infringement lawsuit in the United States District Court for the Western District of Louisiana Lafayette Division asserting Stabil Drill Specialties, LLC (“Stabil Drill”) infringed on our patent that covers the Company’s well bore conditioning tool, the Drill-N-Ream. The lawsuit was subsequently moved from Louisiana to the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division. The court ordered the Company to serve discovery requests upon Stabil Drill and gave Stabil Drill deadlines to respond and produce documents and permit product inspection. Stabil Drill filed a motion for summary judgement and the Company responded and cross-moved for patent infringement. The parties are awaiting the judge’s decision. On October 1, 2020, Superior Energy Services, Stabil Drill’s parent company, filed for bankruptcy, which may result in a delay in the resolution of this litigation. Superior Energy Services announced on February 2, 2021 that it has successfully completed its financial restructuring and has emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Additionally, on May 20, 2019, Extreme Technologies, LLC sued Short Bit & Tool Co. and Lot William Short, Jr. (“Defendants”) in the Northern District of Texas - Dallas Division. Extreme sued for patent infringement based on the same patents discussed in the Stabil Drill litigation. On December 23, 2019, the Court stayed Extreme’s patent infringement claim against Defendants pending resolution of the Southern District of Texas Stabil Drill case. We are not currently involved in any other litigation which management believes could have a material effect on our financial position or results of operations.

 

51
 

 

NOTE 12. INCOME TAXES

 

Components of income tax benefit are as follows:

 

    For the Year
Ended
December 31, 2020
    For the Year
Ended
December 31, 2019
 
Current income taxes:                
Federal   $ -     $ -  
State     10,481       18,550  
International     104,515      

-

 
Current provision for income taxes     114,996       18,550  
Deferred provision (benefit) for income taxes:                
Federal     -       -  
State     -       -  
Deferred provision (benefit) for income taxes     -       -  
Provision for income taxes   $ 114,996     $ 18,550  

 

The non-current deferred tax assets and liabilities consist of the following:

 

Deferred tax assets:                
263A adjustment   $ 12,133     $ 11,103  
Accrued expenses     183,282       -  
Stock compensation     122,191       98,460  
Stock option     70,201       69,463  
Amortization of intangibles     2,839,598       2,952,425  
Net operating loss     2,898,078       2,448,415  
Allowances     1,686,952       1,706,320  
Sale-leaseback – lease liability     1,008,663       -  
Others     20,102       28,077  
Total non-current deferred tax assets     8,841,200       7,314,263  
                 
Deferred tax liabilities:                
Prepaid expenses     (15,458 )     (27,152 )
Depreciation on sale-leaseback fixed assets     (967,055)          
Depreciation on fixed assets     (251,190 )     (582,949 )
Total non-current deferred tax liabilities     (1,233,703 )     (610,101 )
                 
Net non-current deferred tax assets/liabilities     7,607,497       6,704,162  
Less: Valuation Allowance     (7,607,497 )     (6,704,162 )
Total deferred tax liabilities   $ -     $ -  

 

52
 

 

Reconciliation of the tax rate to the U.S. federal statutory tax rate which relate to the year ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 is as follows:

 

    For the Year Ended
December 31, 2020
    For the Year Ended
December 31, 2019
 
             
Tax at federal statutory rate   $ (696,124 )   $ (193,803 )
State income taxes     8,280       14,654  
Permanent differences     (219,880     66,087  
Change in valuation allowance     903,335       (5,477 )
Other adjustment/tax expense true-up    

79,651

      -  
Other - State rate effect     (92,760 )     (28,536 )
Change in status     66,835       128,002  
Other     65,659       37,623  
Provision for income taxes   $ 114,996     $ 18,550  

 

NOTE 13. SHARE-BASED COMPENSATION

 

In 2014, the Company’s Board of Directors approved that the Directors stock compensation would be included in the Employee Stock Incentive Plan (“Stock Plan”) that reserves 1,724,128 shares of common stock for issuance. Equity and equity-based compensation plans are intended to make available incentives that will assist us in attracting, retaining, and motivating employees, officers, consultants, and directors by allowing them to acquire an ownership interest in our business, and, as a result, encouraging them to contribute to our success. We may provide these incentives through the grant of stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, restricted stock units, performance shares and units, and other cash-based or stock-based awards. As a result, we expect to incur non-cash, stock-based compensation expenses in future periods. The Board of Directors has frozen the 2014 Incentive Plan, such that no future grants of awards will be made and the 2014 Incentive Plan shall only remain in effect with respect to awards under that Plan outstanding as of June 15, 2015 until they expire according to their terms.

 

In 2015, our stockholders approved the Superior Drilling Company, Inc. 2015 Long Term Incentive Plan (the “2015 Incentive Plan”). The purpose of the 2015 Incentive Plan is to advance the interests of the Company and its stockholders by providing an incentive to attract, retain and reward persons performing services for the Company and its affiliates and by motivating such persons to contribute to the growth and profitability of the Company and our affiliates. In 2020, the Company’s board of directors approved an additional 2,543,448 shares of the Company’s common stock to be added to the 2015 Incentive Plan. Subject to adjustment as provided in the 2015 Incentive Plan, the maximum aggregate number of shares of the Company’s common stock that may be issued with respect to awards under the 2015 Incentive Plan is 5,576,326. As of December 31, 2020, there were 1,578,709 shares outstanding with respect to awards granted under the Company’s 2015 Incentive Plan.

 

53
 

 

Restricted stock units

 

On August 7, 2020, the Board of Directors granted 1,544,719 restricted stock units from the 2015 Incentive Plan based on the average price of the Company’s common stock on the date of the grant. These restricted units will vest over a three - year period. Executive management received 863,282 restricted stock units and employees received the remaining 681,437.

 

On July 30, 2019, the Board of Directors granted 359,375 restricted stock units from the 2015 Incentive Plan to executive management and directors based on the average price of the Company’s common stock on the date of the grant. These restricted units will vest over a three - year period.

 

Compensation expense recognized for grants of restricted stock vesting under the 2015 Incentive Plan was approximately $545,000 and $577,000 for the years ending December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The Company recognized compensation expense and recorded it as share-based compensation in the consolidated statement of operations.

 

Total unrecognized compensation expense related to unvested restricted stock units expected to be recognized over the remaining weighted vesting period of 2.50 years equaled approximately $1,276,516 at December 31, 2020. These shares vest over three years.

 

The following table summarizes RSU activity for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

    2020     2019  
    Number of Restricted Stock Units     Weighted -
Average Grant
Date Fair Value
    Number of Restricted Stock Units     Weighted -
Average Grant
Date Fair Value
 
Unvested RSU’s at beginning of period     706,394     $ 1.24       747,048     $ 1.37  
Granted     1,544,719     $ 0.59       359,375       0.96  
Forfeited     (110,000 )     0.59       -       -  
Vested     (344,216 )     1.29       (400,029 )     1.25  
Unvested RSU’s at end of period     1,796,897     $ 0.71       706,394     $ 1.24  

 

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Stock Options

 

On December 11, 2019, the Board of Directors granted 75,000 stock options from the 2015 Incentive Plan to officers and employees based on the Company’s common stock on the date of grant, which was $0.84. These options vest 33% on the grant date, 33% on the first anniversary of the grant date, and 34% on the second anniversary of the grant date.

 

Compensation expense recognized for option grants vesting under the 2015 Incentive Plan was approximately $6,000 for the year ending December 31, 2019. The Company recognized compensation expense and recorded it as share-based compensation in the consolidated condensed statement of operations.

 

The following table summarizes stock options outstanding and changes during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

    2020     2019  
    Number of Stock Options     Weighted - Average Exercise Price     Number of Stock Options     Weighted - Average Exercise Price  
Stock options outstanding at beginning of period     588,133     $ 1.50       531,968     $ 1.56  
Granted     -       -       75,000       0.84  
Exercised     -       -       -       -  
Expired     (51,971 )     1.40       (9,329 )     1.62  
Canceled or forfeited     (37,885 )     1.19       (9,506 )     1.50  
Stock options outstanding at end of period     498,277     $ 1.53       588,133     $ 1.50  
Stock options exercisable at end of period     -     $ -       -     $ -  

 

The fair value of stock options granted to employees and directors in 2019 was estimated at the grant date using the Black-Scholes option pricing model using the following assumptions:

 

Expected volatility     59.50 %
Discount rate     1.61 %
Expected life (years)     2  
Dividend yield     NA  

 

Option pricing models require the input of highly subjective assumptions, including the expected price volatility. Expected price volatility is based on the historical volatility of our common stock. Changes in the subjective input assumptions can materially affect the fair value estimate. The expected term of the options granted is derived from the output of the option pricing model and represents the period of time that the options granted are expected to be outstanding. The discount rate for the periods within the contractual term of the option is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the date of grant.

 

NOTE 14. GEOGRAPHICAL OPERATIONS INFORMATION

 

The following summarizes revenue by geographic location:

 

   

For the Year

Ended

December 31, 2020

   

For the Year

Ended

December 31, 2019

 
             
Revenue:                
North America   $ 8,590,933     $ 17,682,560  
International   $ 1,879,865     $ 1,314,454  
    $ 10,470,798     $ 18,997,014  

 

The following summarizes net property, plant and equipment by geographic location:

 

    December 31, 2020     December 31, 2019  
Property, plant and equipment, net:                
North America   $ 6,008,431     $ 7,160,646  
International     1,526,667       885,046  
    $ 7,535,098     $ 8,045,692  

 

55
 

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.

 

None

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(f). The Company’s internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, the Company conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting based on the framework established by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) as set forth in Internal Control - Integrated Framework. Upon evaluation, the Company’s management has concluded that the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was effective in connection with the preparation of the consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2020.

 

Changes in Internal Controls over Financial Reporting

 

There has been no change in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the fourth quarter of 2020 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Inherent Limitations of the Effectiveness of Controls

 

Management does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal control over financial reporting will prevent or detect all error and fraud. A control system, no matter how well designed and operated, is based upon certain assumptions and can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that its objectives will be met. Further, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that misstatements due to error or fraud will not occur or that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected.

 

Attestation Report of Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

This Annual Report does not contain an attestation report of our independent registered public accounting firm related to internal control over financial reporting because the rules for smaller reporting companies provide an exemption from the attestation requirement.

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

56
 

 

PART III

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.

 

The following table sets forth information concerning our directors, executive officers and significant employees as of December 31, 2020:

 

Name   Age   Position
G. Troy Meier   59   Board Chair, Class III Director and Chief Executive Officer
Annette Meier   58   Class II Director, President and Chief Operating Officer
James R.Lines   59   Class II Director
Robert Iversen   66   Class III Director
Michael V. Ronca   67   Class I Director
Christopher D. Cashion   65   Chief Financial Officer

 

G. Troy Meier. Mr. Meier has served as our Board Chair, one of our Class III Directors and Chief Executive Officer since 2014. Mr. Meier has over 40 years of experience in the oil and gas industry. Mr. Meier and co-founder Annette Meier founded our predecessor company in 1999. Since that time through the present, Mr. Meier has spearheaded the development of our new manufacturing business and our research and development activities. As our chief innovator, Mr. Meier has been responsible for not only inventing, but also designing, engineering and manufacturing industry specific machinery and processes and has several patent applications pending. Previously, in 1993, Mr. Meier started our predecessor company, Rocky Mountain Diamond, after thirteen years with Christensen Diamond and its successors. At Christensen Diamond, Mr. Meier established overseas factories in Ireland, Venezuela and China. In addition, Mr. Meier designed tools to improve efficiency both in the plants and in the field. Previously, Mr. Meier had been Christensen Diamond’s first drill bit fabricator specialist and by age 28, was made the Northern Region design engineer responsible for designing drill bits, core systems, centric bits, nozzle systems and related products. As the co-founder, Mr. Meier for the last seven years has focused 100% of his attention on our development and growth.

 

Mr. Meier was selected to serve on our Board of Directors and as the Board Chair because of his extensive industry experience, his role as our co-founder and chief innovator, and his and Ms. Meier’s majority shareholding. Mr. Meier is married to Annette Meier.

 

Annette Meier. Ms. Meier has served as our Class II Director, President and Chief Operating Officer since 2014. Ms. Meier has over 25 years of experience in the oil and gas industry. Since our inception in 1999 to the present, Ms. Meier has managed all of our day-to-day operations and business. In 2008, Ms. Meier envisioned and co-created “CHUCK,” our custom shop management and inventory program software. Ms. Meier was also instrumental to the development of the “nucleus grinding system” that is currently utilized in our new manufacturing processes. In 2005, Ms. Meier served as the creator and chief architect of the Ropers Business Park, the state-of-the-art campus that houses our remanufacturing and new manufacturing facilities in Vernal, Utah. Ms. Meier’s understanding of our business processes resulted in her designing and facilitating the SMART FACILITY layout, process and control systems within the manufacturing plant. Previously, in 1993, Ms. Meier co-founded and managed our predecessor company, Rocky Mountain Diamond. As the co-founder, Ms. Meier for the last seven years has focused 100% of her attention on our development and growth. In 2015, Ms. Meier was elected to serve on the Governors Office of Economic Development Board (GOED) for the state of Utah. Ms. Meier has been the recipient of numerous state, local and industry awards over the years that recognized her for innovation and leadership.

 

Ms. Meier was selected to serve on our Board of Directors because of her extensive industry experience, her role as our co-founder and substantial knowledge of our day-to-day operations, and her and Mr. Meier’s majority shareholding. Ms. Meier is married to G. Troy Meier.

 

James Lines. Mr. Lines has served as a Class II director since December 2016, and is Chairman of the Audit Committee. He also serves on the Compensation Committee and the Nominating and Governance Committee of our Board of Directors. Mr. Lines has served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Graham Corporation since January 2008. Graham designs, manufactures and sells critical equipment for the energy, defense and chemical/petrochemical industries. Previously, Mr. Lines served as Graham’s President and Chief Operating Officer since June 2006. Mr. Lines has served Graham in various capacities since 1984, including Vice President and General Manager, Vice President of Engineering and Vice President of Sales and Marketing. Prior to joining its management team, he served Graham as an application engineer and sales engineer as well as a product supervisor. Mr. Lines holds a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

 

Mr. Lines was selected to serve on the Board of Directors due to his extensive experience in growing a midsize business, as well as his background in manufacturing and engineering in the energy industry.

 

57
 

 

Robert E. Iversen. Mr. Iversen has served as a Class III Director since 2014, Lead Director since December 2016 and has been the Chairman of the Compensation Committee since joining the Board. He has also been a member of the Audit Committee and the Nominating and Governance Committee since 2014. Mr. Iversen has broad executive and operational management experience in the sales, service, and manufacturing sectors of the global upstream oil and gas industry. Currently, Mr. Iversen is a partner and president of CTI Energy Services, LLC of Springtown, Texas, a drilling services company he started in 2011. Mr. Iversen has strong experience in the development and commercialization of new technology products and in company marketing and advertising programs. Previously, Mr. Iversen collaborated with G. Troy Meier as a partner and senior vice president in Tronco Energy Services from 2008 to 2011. From 2002 to 2008, he served as President and other C-level positions with Ulterra Drilling Technologies (Fort Worth, Texas), INRG (Houston, Texas) and NQL Energy Services (Nisku, Alberta). In 1994, Mr. Iversen and partners purchased the U.S. division of DBS Stratabit, a small, underperforming diamond bit company, where, as President until 2002, he built it into a top tier provider of high technology products. Mr. Iversen previously held numerous executive positions in marketing, technology and engineering at various divisions of the Baker Hughes companies, and their predecessors, from 1980 through 1994. Mr. Iversen holds a Bachelor of Science Petroleum Engineering, Montana Tech, as well as numerous technical and executive post-graduate certifications.

 

Mr. Iversen was selected to serve on our Board of Directors because of his strong experience with start-up companies and the development and commercialization of new technology products. Mr. Iversen further brings his broad executive and operational management expertise in the oil and gas industry.

 

Michael Ronca. Mr. Ronca has served as a Class I director since 2014, and is Chairman of the Nominating and Governance Committee. He also serves on the Audit Committee and Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors. Mr. Ronca has over 30 years of experience as an executive building and monetizing businesses. Since 2009, Mr. Ronca has served as President and Chief Executive Officer of EagleRidge Energy, LLC, an oil and gas exploration and development company active in north and central Texas. Previously, he served as Chairman of BAS Oil & Gas, a private company active in developing reserves in the Barnett Shale trend in North Texas. Mr. Ronca has a long history of participating in the energy industry starting with his time at Tenneco Inc., where he served as the Assistant to the Chairman and CEO and later established a new oil and gas division which operated throughout the offshore and onshore Gulf Coast region. He later executed a leveraged buyout with the backing of private equity and soon after took the company public on the NYSE under the name of Domain Energy where he also served as President and CEO. In 1998, Domain Energy merged into Range Resources where Mr. Ronca served as Chief Operating Officer for several years. Mr. Ronca has a BS degree from Villanova University and an MBA in Finance from Drexel University.

 

Mr. Ronca was selected to serve on our Board of Directors because of his strong experience within the oil and gas industry.

 

Christopher D. Cashion. Mr. Cashion has over 40 years of experience in the fields of accounting, finance and private equity. Mr. Cashion joined us in March 2014 to serve as our Chief Financial Officer on a full-time basis. Previously, Mr. Cashion worked as an independent financial and business consultant since 1998. From January 2013 through February 2014, Mr. Cashion was the Chief Financial Officer for Surefire Industries USA LLC, a Houston-based hydraulic fracturing equipment manufacturing company. Previously, from January 2005 to August 2012, Mr. Cashion provided chief financial officer services to five start-up portfolio companies owned by the Shell Technology Venture Fund, a private equity fund. Prior to his tenure with the start-up portfolio companies, Mr. Cashion worked for the First Reserve Corporation, a private equity firm, from 1991 to 1993. Mr. Cashion worked with Baker Hughes, Inc. from 1981 to 1991 and with Ernst & Young from 1977 to 1981. Mr. Cashion holds a B.S. in Accounting from the University of Tennessee and an M.B.A. in Finance and International Business from the University of Houston. Mr. Cashion has been a Certified Public Accountant since 1979.

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

 

Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) requires our directors and executive officers, and persons who own more than 10% of our equity securities, to file initial reports of ownership and reports of changes in ownership of our common stock with the SEC and to furnish us a copy of each filed report.

 

To our knowledge, based solely on review of the copies of such reports furnished to us and written representations that no other reports were required, during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, our officers, directors and greater than 10% beneficial owners timely filed all required Section 16(a) reports.

 

Material Changes in Director Nominations Process

 

There have not been any material changes to the procedures by which shareholders may recommend nominees to our Board.

 

Audit Committee

 

Our Audit Committee is comprised solely of “independent” directors, as defined under and required by Rule 10A-3 of the Exchange Act and the NYSE American rules. Our Audit Committee is directly responsible for, among other things, the appointment, compensation, retention and oversight of our independent registered public accounting firm. The oversight of our independent public accounting firm includes reviewing the plans and results of the audit engagement with the firm, approving any additional professional services provided by the firm and reviewing the independence of the firm. Commencing with our first report on internal controls over financial reporting, the Committee will be responsible for discussing the effectiveness of the internal controls over financial reporting with our independent registered public accounting firm and relevant financial management. The members of this Committee are Messrs. Iversen, Ronca, and Lines with Mr. Lines serving as committee chair. Our Board of Directors has determined that Mr. Lines qualifies as an “audit committee financial expert,” as defined by the rules under the Exchange Act. The Audit Committee held four meetings in 2020, which were all held remotely.

 

Code of Ethics

 

We have adopted a Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that applies to all of our employees, as well as each member of our Board. The Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is available under “Corporate Governance” at the “Investors” section of our website at www.sdpi.com. We intend to post amendments to or waivers from the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics (to the extent applicable to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer or principal accounting officer) at this location on our website.

 

Corporate Governance

 

The charters for our Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee and our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics are available under “Corporate Governance” at the “Investors” section of our website at www.sdpi.com. Copies of these documents are also available in print form at no charge by sending a request to Christopher Cashion, our Chief Financial Officer, Superior Drilling Products, Inc., 1583 South 1700 East, Vernal, Utah 84078, telephone (435) 789-0594.

 

58
 

 

Item 11. Executive Compensation.

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

The following table provides information concerning compensation paid or accrued during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, to our principal executive officer, our chief operating officer and our principal financial officer, to whom we sometimes refer together as our “named executive officers.”

 

Name and

Principal Position

  Year     Salary     Bonus     Stock Awards (3)     Option Awards     Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation     All Other Compensation     Total  
G. Troy Meier     2020     $ 403,750 (1)   $ (2)   $ 152,612 (4)   $     $     $ 8,184 (8)   $ 564,546  
Chief Executive Officer     2019     $ 475,000     $ 665,000 (5)   $     $     $     $ 10,178 (8)   $ 1,150,178  
                                                                 
Annette Meier     2020     $ 361,250 (1)   $ (2)   $ 117,041 (4)   $     $     $ 12,291 (9)   $ 490,582  
President and Chief Operating Officer     2019     $ 425,000     $ 552,500 (6)   $     $