Annual Report (10-k)

Date : 03/31/2016 @ 11:20AM
Source : Edgar (US Regulatory)
Stock : Identiv Inc (INVE)
Quote : 3.22  -0.02 (-0.62%) @ 8:02PM

Annual Report (10-k)

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-K

þ

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015

OR

¨

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                     to

COMMISSION FILE NUMBER 0-29440

 

IDENTIV, INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

DELAWARE

 

77-0444317

(State or other jurisdiction of

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Incorporation or organization)

 

Identification Number)

 

2201 Walnut Avenue, Suite 310, Fremont, California

 

94538

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:

(949) 250-8888

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

None

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Common Stock, $0.001 par value, and associated Preferred Share Purchase Rights

(Title of Class)

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes   ¨     No   þ

Indicated by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes   ¨     No   þ

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes   þ     No   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes   þ     No   ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨

 

Accelerated filer   ¨

 

Non-accelerated filer   ¨

 

Smaller Reporting Company    þ

 

 

 

 

(do not check if smaller reporting company)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes   ¨     No   þ

Based on the closing sale price of the Registrant’s Common Stock on the NASDAQ National Market System on June 30, 2015, the last business day of the Registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, the aggregate market value of Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant was $57,815,133.

At March 6, 2016, the registrant had outstanding 10,746,911 shares of Common Stock, excluding 617,874 shares held in treasury.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Designated portions of the Company’s Proxy Statement to be filed within 120 days after the Registrant’s fiscal year end of December 31, 2015 are incorporated by reference into Part II, Item 5 and Part III of this Report.

 

 

 

 

 


Identiv, Inc.

Form 10-K

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

  

   

Page

PART I

Item 1

  

Business

4

Item 1A

  

Risk Factors

10

Item 1B

  

Unresolved Staff Comments

21

Item 2

  

Properties

21

Item 3

  

Legal Proceedings

21

Item 4

  

Mine Safety Disclosures

22

PART II

Item 5

  

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

23

Item 6

  

Selected Financial Data

25

Item 7

  

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

27

Item 7A

  

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

44

Item 8

  

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

46

Item 9

  

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

79

Item 9A

  

Controls and Procedures

80

Item 9B

  

Other Information

81

PART III

Item 10

  

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

82

Item 11

  

Executive Compensation

82

Item 12

  

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

82

Item 13

  

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

82

Item 14

  

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

82

PART IV

Item 15

  

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedule

83

Signatures

87

 


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Statement Regarding Forward Looking Statements

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (“Annual Report”), including the documents incorporated by reference in this Annual Report, contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. For example, statements, other than statements of historical facts regarding our strategy, future operations and growth, financial position, projected results, estimated revenues or losses, projected costs, prospects, plans, market trends, competition and objectives of management constitute forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “will,” “believe,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “may,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “estimate,” “expect,” “project” or the negative of these terms or other similar expressions. Although we believe that our expectations reflected in or suggested by the forward-looking statements that we make in this Annual Report are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, performance or achievements. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this Annual Report. While we may elect to update forward-looking statements at some point in the future, we specifically disclaim any obligation to do so, even if our expectations change, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. We also caution you that such forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors, not all of which are known to us or within our control, and that actual events or results may differ materially from those indicated by these forward-looking statements. We disclose some of the factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from our expectations in the “Customers,” “Research and Development,” “Competition,” “Proprietary Information and Technology,” “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” sections and elsewhere in this Annual Report. These cautionary statements qualify all of the forward-looking statements included in this Annual Report that are attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf.

Identiv and the Identiv logo are trademarks of Identiv, Inc., registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Certain product and service brands are also trademarks or registered trademarks of the Company, including HIRSCH , idOnDemand , Scramblepad , TouchSecure , and Velocity . Other product and brand names not belonging to Identiv that appear in this document may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Each of the terms the “Company,” “Identiv,” “we” and “us” as used herein refers collectively to Identiv, Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, unless otherwise stated.


 


PART  I

 

ITEM 1.

BUSINESS

Overview

Identiv is a global security technology company that secures data, physical places and things. Global organizations in the government, education, retail, transportation, healthcare and other markets rely upon our solutions. We empower them to create safe, secure, validated and convenient experiences in schools, government offices, factories, transportation, hospitals and virtually every type of facility and for every type of product.

At the beginning of September 2013, we undertook a strategic review of our business and initiated a series of actions to simplify our business structure and streamline our operations. Following the changes in our organizational structure, we changed our operating segments to focus on the following solutions:

 

·

Premises solutions securing buildings via an integrated access control system.

 

·

Information solutions securing enterprise information including PCs, networks, email encryption, login, and printers via delivery of smart card reader products and identity management via our idOnDemand service.

 

·

Everyday items solutions securing connected items, including electronic toys, medical devices, wearables and other internet of things applications

The foundation of our business are our expertise in RFID and access control, our close customer relationships that allow us to develop customer-relevant products, and our core value of quality.

To deliver these solutions, the Company has organized its operations into four reportable business segments, principally by product families: Premises, Identity, Credentials and All Other.

Premises

The foundation of our premises business is the Hirsch line of controllers including the advanced MX line, Hirsch's Velocity management software and our ICPAM software, EDGE controller and reader package. Our modular Hirsch MX controllers are designed to be scalable, allowing customers to start with a small system and expand over time. Hirsch MX controllers can operate autonomously, whether as a single controller or as part of a networked system with Velocity software. The Hirsch Velocity software platform enables centralized management of access and security operations across an organization, including control of doors, gates, turnstiles, elevators and other building equipment, monitoring users as they move around a facility, preventing unwanted access, maintaining compliance and providing a robust audit trail.

uTrust door readers provide unique features to support a number of security environments and standards. For example, uTrust TS readers support the majority of legacy card credentials with a robust next-generation platform that can help companies migrate to more secure credentials and technologies, including smart cards, near field communication (“NFC”) and government-issued credentials. uTrust Scramblepad readers employ numerical scrambling on the keypad to protect access codes from being stolen as they are entered.

Identity

Our Identity products include smart card readers, which includes a broad range of contact, contactless, portable and mobile smart card readers, tokens and terminals that are utilized around the world to enable logical (i.e., PC, network or data) access and security and identification applications, such as national ID, payment, e-Health and e-Government.  

Related to our reader product line, we are a leading provider in the definition and provisioning of access cards and other devices that allow users to conveniently and securely access their facilities and resources, and to empower facilities and security administrators to deploy customized solutions with optimal mix of cost, security and convenience to their user community, whether students, hospital patients, military and government personnel, consumers or users.

Credentials

Our Credentials products include NFC and radio frequency identification (“ RFID”) products — including inlays and inlay-based cards — labels, tags and stickers, as well as other radio frequency (“RF”) and IC components. These products are manufactured in our state-of-the-art facility in Singapore and are used in a diverse range of physical applications, including electronic entertainment

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games, loyalty cards, mobile payment systems, transit a nd event ticketing, and brand authenticity from pharmaceuticals to consumer goods, hospital resource management and many others.  

Leveraging our expertise in RFID, physical access and physical authentication, we're developing new solutions to extend our platforms across a wide variety of physical use cases.  The next major opportunity in our connected world is the Internet of things, which fundamentally is about physical things.  We believe our core strength in physical access and physical instrumentation (RFID) markets, our well-established platforms and our deep knowledge of the relevant technologies, position us well in this growth market. 

All Other 

The All Other segment includes products, such as Chipdrive and Digital Media readers. The products included in the All Other segment do not meet the quantitative thresholds for determining reportable segments and therefore have been combined for reporting purposes.

We primarily conduct sales and marketing activities in each of the markets in which we compete, utilizing our own sales and marketing organization to solicit prospective channel partners and customers, provide technical advice and support with respect to products, systems and services, and manage relationships with customers, distributors and/or original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”). We utilize indirect sales channels that may include OEMs, dealers, systems integrators, value added resellers, resellers or Internet sales, although we also sell directly to end users. In support of our sales efforts, we participate in industry events and conduct sales training courses, targeted marketing programs, and ongoing customer, channel partner and third-party communications programs.

Our corporate headquarters are located in Fremont, California. We maintain research and development facilities in California, and Chennai, India, and local operations and sales facilities in Australia, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Singapore and the U.S. We were founded in 1990 in Munich, Germany and incorporated in 1996 under the laws of the State of Delaware .

For a discussion of our net revenue by segment and geographic location, see Note 10, Segment Reporting and Geographic Information in the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements.

Market Strategy

Our corporate priority is to drive revenue growth by leveraging our core expertise from our existing product portfolio and our enduring customer relationships, as well as our significant experience addressing solutions across multiple markets, including government, transportation, healthcare, education, banking, critical infrastructure and others.

In particular, we believe that our more than 20 years’ experience delivering physical security solutions to U.S. Government customers has provided us with significant expertise and a quality reputation. Our products enable compliance with federal directives and standards implemented over the past decade, including Homeland Security Presidential Directive (“HSPD”) 12 and Federal Information Processing Standard (“FIPS”) 201, which defines a common identification standard known as the Personal Identity Verification (“PIV”) credential, used by all U.S. Government employees and contractors. We have supplied millions of smart card readers to the Department of Defense and other federal agencies and are a leading supplier of physical access control solutions to both federal and state government customers, including agencies within the Department of Justice, Department of the Treasury, the FBI, and the U.S. Military.

In our increasingly connected world, governments, enterprises, commercial businesses, organizations of every size, and individuals are continually challenged to protect their physical environments and digital resources, which are vulnerable to increasingly determined attacks.  As the Internet of Things results in more convenience but also more physical vulnerability, we believe we're positioned to deliver both the convenience promised by the IoT and the physical security required by it.

We develop and sell integrated physical access control solutions to government and enterprise customers worldwid e.   Our systems integrate access control, video surveillance, intrusion detection, building management and other network-based systems using a wide range of access cards, including PIV cards, smart cards, RFID cards and biometrics in order to successfully secure facilities and resources.

Our offerings include Hirsch MX controllers, Velocity management software, ICPAM software and EDGE controller systems.  These combined with door readers and access cards provide scalable systems, allowing customers to start with a small system and expand it over time. Hirsch and ICPAM EM-100 controllers can operate autonomously, whether as a single controller or as part of a networked system with Velocity or ICPAM software. The Hirsch Velocity software platform enables centralized management of access and security operations across an organization, including control of doors, gates, turnstiles, elevators and other building equipment, monitoring users as they move around a facility, preventing unwanted access, maintaining compliance and providing a

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robust audit trail. Our door readers provide unique features to support a number of security environments and standards. For example, our S cramblepad readers employ numerical scrambling on the keypad to protect access codes from being stolen as they are entered. Our TouchSecure readers support the majority of legacy card credentials with a robust next generation platform that can help compani es expand to encompass other credentials and technologies, including smart cards, and mobile government-issued cards.

 

Identiv is a leading global supplier of smart card readers. We offer a broad range of contact, contactless and mobile smart card readers, tokens and terminals that are utilized around the world to enable logical (i.e., PC, network, or data) access and security and identification applications, such as national ID, payment and eHealth and eGovernment. To support the growing demand for solutions that provide secure access via mobile devices, sometimes known as “bring your own device” (“BYOD”), our mobile readers allow users to securely authenticate using iOS™ or Android™ devices, when they present standard credentials issued by the U.S. Government, including the PIV card and its predecessor, the Common Access Card (“CAC”), as well as the PIV-I card issued by commercial contractors under a similar security standard.

 

We design and manufacture a broad range of NFC and RFID products, including inlays and inlay-based cards, labels, tags and stickers, as well as other RF and IC components. Our inlays and converted inlay products are used in a diverse range of identity-based applications, including electronic entertainment, loyalty schemes, mobile payment, transit and event ticketing, and others.

Leveraging our expertise in RFID and NFC technology, and mobility, we are developing new solutions for a wide range of physical connected items, also known as the “Internet of Things.”  Market analysts estimate that by 2020 the number of physical things connected to the Internet will grow into the tens of billions. These will include household appliances, vehicles, medicines, home security systems, books, luggage, jewelry, toys and a host of other objects. We believe the growth of the Internet of Things creates significant opportunities to provide physical access and authentication into nearly every industry, worldwide.  We plan to leverage our physical access and RFID-based physical device-management expertise to provide leading solutions as our customers embrace the Internet of Things.

Customers

We sell to customers worldwide in a diverse range of markets, including government, enterprise, consumer, education, healthcare and transportation. Sales to our ten largest customers accounted for 35% of total net revenue in 2015 and 44% of total net revenue in 2014. One customer accounted for 14% of our total net revenue in 2015. One customer accounted for 23% of our total net revenue in 2014. A significant amount of revenue is sourced from sales of products and systems to our OEM partners and an indirect sales network who sell to various entities within the U.S. federal government sector. U.S. federal government sales are primarily delivered through our OEM partners and an indirect sales network or are priced using published General Service Administration schedules.

Sales and Marketing

We primarily conduct our own sales and marketing activities in each of the markets in which we compete, utilizing our own sales and marketing organization to solicit prospective channel partners and customers, provide technical advice and support with respect to products, systems and services, and manage relationships with customers, distributors and/or OEMs. We sell our smart card readers and RFID/NFC products directly to end users and utilize indirect sales channels that may include OEMs, dealers, systems integrators, value added resellers, resellers or Internet sales. We sell our physical access control solutions and our idOnDemand cloud-based identity and access management services primarily through systems integrators, dealers and value added partners, although we also sell directly to end users. In support of our sales efforts, we participate in trade shows and conduct sales training courses, targeted marketing programs, and ongoing customer, channel partner and third-party communications programs.

Competition

The market for security solutions is competitive and characterized by rapidly changing technology and evolving standards in the industry as a whole and within specific markets. We believe that competition for security solutions is likely to intensify as a result of an ongoing increase in demand for cloud-based credential provisioning and management services as well as solutions that help converge physical and logical access control systems and RFID and NFC products to enable expansion of the connected world.

We face a range of competition for our products, systems and solutions. Competition for our smart card readers and related products primarily comes from several well-established companies, including Gemalto NV and OMNIKEY/HID Global (a division of ASSA ABLOY AB), as well as from a number of smaller suppliers in Asia. Competition for our RFID inlays and inlay-based products comes from a small number of organizations that understand the specialized processes and have the capital equipment required to serve the RFID/NFC technology market. Competitors in this market include SMARTRAC NV, who in the last few years has acquired former competitors UPM RFID and KSW Microtec, as well as a number of inlay conversion companies in Asia. In the market for

6


NF C tags, readers and other solutions, we face competition from traditional smart card reader and RFID technology providers, including Gemalto and ASSA ABLOY for NFC readers, and SMARTRAC and other inlay converters for NFC tags.

Enterprise-class physical access control solutions are available from multiple suppliers. In this market we primarily compete with AMAG Technology (a division of G4S plc), Lenel Systems International (a division of United Technologies Corp.), Software House (a division of Tyco International Ltd.), Gallagher Group Ltd, and Honeywell International Inc.  

We may in the future face competition from other parties that develop physical security and RFID solutions based upon approaches similar to or different from those employed by us. In addition, these markets for security solutions may ultimately be dominated by approaches other than the approach marketed by us. We believe that the principal competitive factors affecting the market for our products, systems and solutions include:

 

·

technical features;

 

·

the ability of channel partners to effectively integrate multiple products and systems in order to address customer requirements including full system capabilities, cost of ownership and ease of use;

 

·

quality and reliability;

 

·

the ability of suppliers to quickly develop new products and integrated solutions to satisfy new customer requirements;

 

·

ease of use;

 

·

strength of sales and distribution channels; and

 

·

price and total cost of system ownership.

While we believe that we compete favorably within our market environment, our ability to continue to successfully compete is subject to a variety of factors, as further discussed below in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Seasonality and Other Factors

In our business overall, we may experience significant variations in demand for our offerings from quarter to quarter, and overall we typically experience a stronger demand cycle in the second half of our fiscal year. Sales of our physical access control solutions to U.S. Government agencies are subject to annual government budget cycles and generally are highest in the third quarter of each year; however the impact of overall budget reductions from actions such as government shutdowns and potential sequester actions on this seasonal trend is uncertain. Sales of our smart card readers and reader chips, many of which are sold to government agencies, are impacted by testing and compliance schedules of government bodies as well as roll-out schedules for application deployments, both of which contribute to variability in demand from quarter to quarter. Further, this business is typically subject to seasonality based on commercial and government budget cycles, with lower sales in the first half, and in particular the first quarter of the year, and the highest sales in the second half of each year.

In addition to the general seasonality of demand, overall U.S. Government expenditure levels have a significant impact on demand for our products due to the significant portion of end demand for our products that we believe is sourced from U.S. Government agencies. Therefore, any significant reduction in U.S. Government spending could adversely impact our financial results and could cause our operating results to fall below any guidance we provide to the market or below the expectations of investors or security analysts.

Backlog

We typically do not maintain a significant level of backlog and revenue in any quarter significantly depends on contracts entered into or orders received and shipped in that quarter. The majority of our sales are made primarily pursuant to purchase orders for current delivery or agreements covering purchases over a period of time. While our customer contracts generally do not require fixed long-term purchase commitments, from time to time we do enter into customer contracts where delivery of products, systems or services is ongoing or is scheduled over multiple quarters or years. In view of our order and shipment patterns, and because of the possibility of customer changes in delivery schedules or cancellation of orders, we do not believe that the ongoing arrangements we enter into provide meaningful backlog figures or are necessarily indicative of actual sales for any succeeding period.

Research and Development

We have made and continue to make significant investments in research and the development of trust solutions for customers in the government, enterprise, consumer and commercial markets. We focus the bulk of our research and development activities on the development of products and solutions for new and emerging market opportunities. In addition to developing core technology that can

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be leveraged across a number of products, our engineering team works with product managers, applications engineers, di stribution partners and customers to develop new products, product enhancements, software and systems to meet customer and market requirements. We also strive to develop and maintain close relationships with key suppliers of components and technologies in order to be able to quickly introduce new offerings that incorporate the latest technological advances. New offerings introduced across our businesses resulting in new inventions provide opportunities for new patent applications.

Our recent research and development activities have included enhancements for our cloud-based credential provisioning and management offerings and the ongoing development of physical access controller platforms, which address new market trends such as secure mobile access and extends our available customer base to include smaller enterprises. On an ongoing basis, we invest in the development of new contactless readers, tokens and modules, new physical access readers to enable converged physical and logical access, and in the extension of our contactless platforms. In addition, we continue to enhance and broaden our RFID and NFC inlay designs and technologies in the areas of security, enablement for NFC applications, card manufacturing and other applications.

We attempt to balance our investment in new technologies, products and services with careful management of our development resources so that our increased development activities do not result in unexpected or significant changes in our overall spending on research and development. Research and development expenses were $9.2 million in 2015 and $6.9 million in 2014 and we capitalized expense related to development of our cloud-based services of $0.1 million in 2015 and $0.5 million in 2014.

We conduct our research and development activities from several locations around the world. Development of our smart card reader products and technologies primarily takes places in India. Development of our cloud-based credential provisioning and management offering primarily takes place in California. Development of our physical access control solutions primarily takes place in California. Development of our RFID and NFC products and technology primarily takes place in Singapore.

Proprietary Technology and Intellectual Property

Our success depends partly upon our proprietary technology. We currently rely on a combination of patent, copyright and trademark laws, trade secrets, confidentiality agreements and contractual provisions to protect our proprietary rights, which afford only limited protection. Although we often seek to protect our proprietary technology through patents, it is possible that no new patents will be issued, that our proprietary products or technologies are not patentable, and that any issued patent will fail to provide us with any competitive advantages. The core of our proprietary technology advantage is the combination of our advanced technical expertise combined with our intimate customer knowledge, enabling us to develop and bring to market products uniquely positioned to deliver benefits to customers.  This is an intellectual property advantage more characterized by trade secrets and unique relationships than formal patents.

 

There has been a great deal of litigation in the technology industry regarding intellectual property rights and from time to time we may be required to use litigation to protect our proprietary technology. This may result in our incurring substantial costs and there is no assurance that we would be successful in any such litigation. Despite our efforts to protect our proprietary rights, unauthorized parties may attempt to copy aspects of our products or to use our proprietary information and software without authorization. In addition, the laws of some foreign countries do not protect proprietary and intellectual property rights to the same extent as do the laws in the U.S. Because many of our products are sold and a substantial portion of our business is conducted outside the U.S., our exposure to intellectual property risks may be higher. Our means of protecting our proprietary and intellectual property rights may not be adequate. There is a risk that our competitors will independently develop similar technology, duplicate our products or design around our patents or other intellectual property rights. If we are unsuccessful in protecting our intellectual property or our products or technologies are duplicated by others, our business could be harmed.

In addition, we have from time to time received claims that we are infringing upon third parties’ intellectual property rights. Future disputes with third parties may arise and these disputes may not be resolved on terms acceptable to us. As the number of products and competitors in our target markets grow, the likelihood of infringement claims also increases. Any claims or litigation may be time-consuming and costly, divert management resources, cause product shipment delays, or require us to redesign our products, accept product returns or to write-off inventory. Any of these events could have a material adverse impact on our business and operating results.

We have a portfolio of approximately 30 patent families (designs, patents, utility models, patents pending and exclusive licenses) in individual or regional filings, covering products, electrical and mechanical designs, software systems and methods and manufacturing process ideas for our various businesses. We also submitted and have pending U.S. and foreign patent filings in RFID tags, converged access readers and systems, smart card manufacturing methods, authentication and cloud-based systems and NFC offerings. Additionally, we leverage our own ASIC designs for smart card interface in some of our reader devices. However, none of our patents are currently material to our business.

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Manufacturing and Sources of Supply

We utilize a combination of our own manufacturing facilities and the services of contract manufacturers in various countries around the world to manufacture our products and components. Our physical access keypads, controllers and software are manufactured primarily in California, using locally sourced components. The majority of our smart card reader products and components are manufactured in Singapore and China. Our RFID and NFC inlays and inlay-based products such as labels and tags are manufactured and assembled by our own internal manufacturing teams in Singapore primarily using locally sourced components and are certified to the ISO 9001:2000 quality manufacturing standard.

We have implemented formal quality control programs to satisfy customer requirements for high quality and reliable products. To ensure that products manufactured by third parties are consistent with internal standards, our quality control programs include management of all key aspects of the production process, including establishing product specifications, selecting the components to be used to produce products, selecting the suppliers of these components and negotiating the prices for certain of these components. In addition, we may work with suppliers to improve process control and product design.

We believe that our success will depend in large part on our ability to provide quality products and services while ensuring the highest level of security for our products during the manufacturing process. In the event any of our contract manufacturers are unable or unwilling to continue to manufacture our products, we may have to rely on other current manufacturing sources or identify and qualify new contract manufacturers. Any significant delay in our ability to obtain adequate supplies of our products from current or alternative sources would harm our business and operating results.

For the majority of our product manufacturing, we utilize a global sourcing strategy that serves all business solution areas within the company, which allows us to achieve economies of scale and uniform quality standards for our products and support higher gross margins.

On an ongoing basis, we analyze the need to add alternative sources for both our products and components. For example, we currently utilize the foundry services of external suppliers to produce our ASICs for smart cards readers and inlays, and we use chips and antenna components from third-party suppliers in our RFID and NFC inlays and contactless smart card readers. Wherever possible, we have qualified additional sources of supply for components. However, a risk remains that we may be adversely impacted by an inadequate supply of components, price increases, late deliveries or poor component quality. In addition, some of the basic components used in our reader products, such as semiconductors, may at any time be in great demand. This could result in components not being available to us in a timely manner or at all, particularly if larger companies have ordered significant volumes of these components, or higher prices being charged for components we require.

Employees

As of December 31, 2015, we had 305 employees, of which 98 were in research and development, 90 were in sales and marketing, 33 were in general and administrative and 84 were in manufacturing and related functions. We are not subject to any collective bargaining agreements and, to our knowledge, none of our employees are currently represented by a labor union. To date, we have experienced no work stoppages and believe that our employee relations are generally good.

Foreign Operations; Properties

We operate globally, with corporate headquarters in Fremont, California. We also maintain leased facilities in Australia, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Singapore and the U.S. We consider these properties adequate for our business needs.

Special Committee Investigation

In April 2015 the Company was served with a complaint (the “Complaint”) from a former employee alleging, among other things, certain expense reimbursement issues with respect to certain executive officers and certain other employees of the Company. The Board of Directors of the Company formed a special committee (the “Committee”) to investigate the allegations contained in the Complaint and related matters with the assistance of independent counsel. As a result of the ongoing investigation, the Company did not timely file its quarterly reports on Form 10-Q for the quarters ended March 31, 2015, June 30, 2015 and September 30, 2015.

On September 9, 2015, after reviewing the findings of the Committee, the Board of Directors appointed Steven Humphreys as the Chief Executive Officer of the Company, replacing Jason Hart, and appointed James Ousley Chairman of the Board.  Mr. Hart continued to serve as President and as a director of the Company until February 2, 2016, when Mr. Hart ceased serving as an officer and director of the Company in connection a restructuring plan announced by the Company on February 2, 2016.

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Unrelated to the Committee’s investigation, effective November 18, 2015, the Board of Directors appointed Steven Finney as interim Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Finney continues to serve as the Company’s principal financial officer and principal accounting officer.

Legal Proceedings

On December 7, 2015, we and certain of our present and former officers and directors were named as defendants in a putative class action lawsuit filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, entitled Ruggiero v. Identiv, Inc. , et al., Case No. 15-cv-05583.  The complaint in that lawsuit alleged violations of Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder and Section 20(a) of the Exchange Act of 1934 based on allegations that we made false and/or misleading statements and/or failed to disclose information in certain public filings and disclosures between 2013 and 2015.  The complaint sought unspecified monetary damages, reasonable costs and attorneys’ fees, and equitable and injunctive relief.  On December 16, 2015, that lawsuit was voluntarily dismissed without prejudice.

Between December 2015 and February 2016, a number of other shareholder lawsuits were filed.  On December 16, 2015, we and certain of our present and former officers and directors were named as defendants in a putative class action lawsuit filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, entitled Rok v. Identiv, Inc., et al. , Case No. 15-cv-05775, alleging violations of Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder and Section 20(a) of the Exchange Act of 1934.  In addition, three shareholder derivative actions were filed between January and February 2016.  On January 1, 2016, certain of our present and former officers and directors were named as defendants, and we were named as nominal defendant, in a shareholder derivative lawsuit filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, entitled Oswald v. Humphreys, et al. , Case No. 16-cv-00241-JCS, alleging breach of fiduciary duty and abuse of control claims.  On January 25, 2016, certain of our present and former officers and directors were named as defendants, and we were named as nominal defendant, in a shareholder derivative lawsuit filed in the Superior Court of the State of California, County of Alameda, entitled Chopra v. Hart, et al. , Case No. RG16801379, alleging breach of fiduciary duty claims.  On February 9, 2016, certain of our present and former officers and directors were named as defendants, and the Company was named as nominal defendant, in a shareholder derivative lawsuit filed in the Superior Court of the State of California, County of Alameda, entitled Wollnik v. Wenzel, et al. , Case No. HG16803342, alleging breach of fiduciary duty, corporate waste, gross mismanagement, and unjust enrichment claims.  These lawsuits generally allege that we made false and/or misleading statements and/or failed to disclose information in certain public filings and disclosures between 2013 and 2015.  Each of the lawsuits seeks one or more of the following remedies: unspecified compensatory damages, unspecified exemplary or punitive damages, restitution, declaratory relief, equitable and injunctive relief, and reasonable costs and attorneys’ fees.  We intend to vigorously defend against these lawsuits.  We cannot currently predict the impact or resolution of each of these lawsuits or reasonably estimate a range of possible loss, which could be material, and the resolution of these lawsuits may harm our business and have a material adverse impact on our financial condition.

From time to time, we could become subject to claims arising in the ordinary course of business or could be named a defendant in additional lawsuits. The outcome of such claims or other proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty and may have a material effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

Availability of SEC Filings

We make available through our website our Annual Reports on Form 10-K,Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Our Internet address is www.identiv.com. The content on our website is not, nor should it be deemed to be, incorporated by reference into this Annual Report. Additionally, documents filed by us with the SEC may be read and copied at the Public Reference Section of the SEC, 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Information on the operation of the Public Reference Room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. Our filings with the SEC are also available to the public through the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov .

 

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

The following discussion of risk factors contains forward-looking statements. These risk factors may be important to understanding any statement in this Form 10-K or elsewhere. The following information should be read in conjunction with Part II, Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the consolidated financial statements and related notes in Part II, Item 8, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Form 10-K.

Because of the following factors, as well as other factors affecting our financial condition and operating results, past financial performance should not be considered to be a reliable indicator of future performance, and investors should not use historical trends to anticipate results or trends in future periods.

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Our revenues and operating results are subject to significant fluctuations and such fluctuations may lead to a reduced market price for our stock.

Our revenues and operating results have varied in the past and will likely continue to fluctuate in the future. We believe that period-to-period comparisons of our operating results are not necessarily meaningful, but security analysts and investors often rely upon these comparisons as indicators of future performance. If our operating results in any future period fall below the expectations of security analysts and investors, or the guidance that we provide, the market price of our stock would likely decline.

Factors that have caused our results to fluctuate in the past and which are likely to affect us in the future include the following:

 

·

business and economic conditions overall and in our markets;

 

·

the timing and size of customer orders that may be tied to annual or other budgetary cycles, seasonal demand, product plans or program roll-out schedules;

 

·

the effects of the U.S. Government spending cuts and other changes in budget allocation or availability that create uncertainty for customers in certain parts of our business;

 

·

the absence of significant backlog in our business;

 

·

cancellations or delays of customer orders or the loss of a significant customer;

 

·

the length of sales cycles associated with our product or service offerings;

 

·

variations in the mix of products and services we sell;

 

·

reductions in the average selling prices that we are able to charge due to competition or other factors;

 

·

our ability to obtain an adequate supply of quality components and to deliver our products on a timely basis;

 

·

our inventory levels and the inventory levels of our customers and indirect sales channels;

 

·

the extent to which we invest in development, sales and marketing, and other expense categories;

 

·

strategic acquisitions, dispositions or organizational restructuring;

 

·

fluctuations in the value of foreign currencies against the U.S. dollar;

 

·

the cost or impact of litigation;  and

 

·

the write-off of investments or goodwill.

Estimating the amount and mix of future revenues is difficult, and our failure to do so accurately could affect our ability to be profitable or reduce the market price for our stock.

Accurately estimating future revenues is difficult because the purchasing patterns of our customers can vary depending upon a number of factors. We sell our smart card readers primarily through a channel of distributors who place orders on an ongoing basis depending on their customers’ requirements. As a result, the size and timing of these orders can vary from quarter to quarter. The increasing market demand for RFID and NFC technology is resulting in larger program deployments of these products and components, as well as increasing competition for these solutions. Across our business, the timing of closing larger orders increases the risk of quarter-to-quarter fluctuation in revenues. If orders forecasted for a specific group of customers for a particular quarter are not realized or revenues are not otherwise recognized in that quarter, our operating results for that quarter could be materially adversely affected. In addition, from time to time, we may experience an unexpected increase or decrease in demand for our products resulting from fluctuations in our customers’ budgets, purchasing patterns or deployment schedules. These occurrences are not always predictable and can have a significant impact on our results in the period in which they occur.

Failure to accurately forecast customer demand may result in excess or obsolete inventory, which if written down might adversely impact our cost of revenues and financial condition.

In addition, our expense levels are based, in significant part, upon our expectations as to future revenues and are largely fixed in the short term. We may be unable to adjust spending in a timely manner to compensate for any unexpected shortfall in revenues. Any significant shortfall in revenues in relation to our expectations could have an immediate and significant effect on our operating results for that quarter and may lead to a reduced market price for our stock.

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Our loan covenants may affect our liquidity or limit our ability to incur debt, make investments, sell assets, merge or complete other significant transactions.

In March 2014, we entered into a Senior Secured Credit Facility Agreement with Opus Bank (the “Credit Agreement”). The loan agreement includes provisions that place limitations on a number of our activities, including our ability to incur additional debt, create liens on our assets or make guarantees, make certain investments or loans, pay dividends or dispose of or sell assets or enter into a merger or similar transaction. Additionally, on November 10, 2014, we entered into an amendment to the Credit Agreement (the “Amended Credit Agreement”). Under the Amended Credit Agreement, the revolving loan facility was increased from $10.0 million to $30.0 million and the revolving loan maturity date was extended to November 10, 2017. On December 4, 2015, we entered into an additional amendment to our Credit Agreement, which revised the Tangible Net Worth covenant.  In addition, the Default or Event of Default arising under the Credit Agreement due to our failure to comply with the Tangible Net Worth covenant for the quarter ended September 30, 2015 was waived.

Together the Credit Agreement and Amended Credit Agreements contain financial covenants that require us to achieve certain levels of financial performance as measured periodically in terms of our tangible net worth, EBITDA, and specific asset levels as they relate to outstanding debt. We have failed to maintain compliance with these financial covenants, and we cannot assure you that we will not be out of compliance with one or more financial covenants again in the future, or that the lender will waive any such failures to be in compliance with covenants.  If an event of default in such covenants occurs and is continuing, the lender may, among other things, accelerate the loan and seize collateral or take other actions of a secured creditor. If repayment of the loan is accelerated, we could face a substantial liquidity problem and may be forced to dispose of material assets or operations, seek to obtain equity capital, or restructure or refinance our indebtedness. Such alternative measures may not be available or successful. Also, our loan covenants may limit our ability to dispose of material assets or operations or to restructure or refinance our indebtedness. Even if we are able to restructure or refinance our indebtedness, the economic terms may not be favorable to us. All of the foregoing could have serious consequences to our financial condition and results of operations. Our ability to generate cash to meet scheduled payments with respect to our debt depends on our financial and operating performance, which in turn, is subject to prevailing economic and competitive conditions and the other factors discussed in this Risk Factors section. If our cash flow and capital resources are insufficient to fund our debt service obligations, we could face substantial liquidity problems and may be forced to dispose of material assets or operations, seek to obtain equity capital, or restructure or refinance our indebtedness as noted above. Such alternative measures may not be successful and may not permit us to meet our scheduled debt service obligations.

If we are not able to secure additional financing when needed, our business could be adversely affected.

We may seek or need to raise additional funds for general corporate and commercial purposes or for acquisitions. Our ability to obtain financing depends on our historical and expected future operating and financial performance, and is also subject to prevailing economic conditions and to financial, business and other factors beyond our control. If we are unable to secure additional financing when desired, our ability to fund our business operations, make capital expenditures, pursue additional expansion or acquisition opportunities, or have resources available to capitalize on other opportunities could be limited, and this could adversely impact our financial results. There can be no assurance that additional capital will be available to us on favorable terms or at all. The sale of additional debt or equity securities may cause dilution to existing stockholders. Any debt or equity securities issued may also provide for rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of our common stock and could impose significant restrictions on our operations.

Acquisitions and strategic investments require substantial resources, expose us to significant risks and may adversely impact our business.

From time to time we may seek to acquire or make investments in companies, products or technologies that we believe complement or augment our existing business, product offerings or technology portfolio. Acquiring and integrating acquired assets into our business exposes us to certain risks.

Executing acquisition or investment transactions and assimilating personnel and operations from an acquired business may require significant attention and resources, which may divert the attention of our management and employees from day-to-day operations and disrupt our business. This may adversely impact our results of operations.

The costs associated with an acquisition may be significant, whether or not the acquisition transaction is successfully concluded. As a result, acquisition activities may reduce the amount of capital available to fund our business. To purchase another company, we may be required to issue additional equity securities, which would result in dilution to our stockholders. A cquisitions may result in the assumption of additional liabilities or debt, including unanticipated liabilities, or charges to earnings for such items as amortization of purchased intangibles or in-process research and development expenses. Such liabilities, indebtedness or charges could have a material and adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations. Acquisitions and strategic investments may also lead to substantial increases in non-current assets, including goodwill. Write-downs of these assets due to unforeseen business developments may materially and adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations.

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Additionally, we have in the past acquired companies that we have subsequently divested, in some cases for less than we paid to acquire the co mpanies. Such divestitures involve risks, such as difficulty separating out portions of or entire businesses, distracting our management team and employees, potential loss of revenue and potentially disrupting customer relationships. We have and may again in the future incur significant costs associated with exit or disposal activities, related impairment charges, or both, if we exit or divest a business or product line. If we are not able to successfully integrate or divest products, technologies, or perso nnel from businesses that we acquire or divest, or if we are not able to realize the expected benefits of our acquisitions, divestitures, or strategic investments, our business and financial results could be adversely affected.   

We may not fully realize the anticipated positive benefits of future financial results from our restructuring efforts.

In late 2013, we realigned our organizational structure to operate as a single, unified company rather than as a group of individual businesses and reorganized our management team and our operational activities by function (e.g., engineering, sales, marketing, customer service and information technology). These restructuring efforts were undertaken to streamline operations and reduce operating expenses. In January 2016, we commenced the implementation of a worldwide restructuring plan designed to refocus resources on our core business segments, including physical access and transponders, and to consolidate operations in several worldwide locations. The restructuring plan includes a reduction of approximately 25% of our non-manufacturing employee base, reallocates overhead roles into direct business activities and eliminates certain management and executive roles. Our ability to achieve the anticipated cost savings and other benefits from our restructuring efforts within expected time frames is subject to many estimates and assumptions, and may vary materially based on factors such as market conditions and the effect of our restructuring efforts on our work force. These estimates and assumptions are subject to significant economic, competitive and other uncertainties, some of which are beyond our control. There can be no assurance that we will fully realize the anticipated positive impacts to future financial results from our current or future restructuring efforts. If our estimates and assumptions are incorrect or if other unforeseen events occur, we may not achieve the cost savings expected from such restructurings, and our business and results of operations could be adversely affected.

Our business and reputation may adversely affected by information technology system failures or network disruptions.

We may be subject to information technology system failures and network disruptions. These may be caused by natural disasters, accidents, power disruptions, telecommunications failures, acts of terrorism or war, computer viruses, physical or electronic break-ins, or other events or disruptions. System redundancy may be ineffective or inadequate, and our disaster recovery planning may not be sufficient for all eventualities. Such failures or disruptions could compromise company or customer data and result in delayed or cancelled orders. System failures and disruptions could also impede the manufacturing and shipping of products, delivery of online services, processing of transactions and reporting of financial results.

Our success depends largely on the continued service and availability of key personnel.

Our future success depends on our ability to continue to attract, retain, and motivate our senior management team as well as qualified technical personnel, particularly software engineers. Competition for these employees is intense and many of our competitors may have greater name recognition and significantly greater financial resources to better compete for these employees. In addition, we have recently experienced a number of changes in our senior management team, including the appointment of a new Chief Executive Officer and an Interim Chief Financial Officer in late 2015. If we are unable to retain our existing personnel, or attract and train additional qualified personnel, our growth may be limited. All of our key employees are employed on an “at will” basis, meaning either we or the employee may terminate their employment with us at any time. The loss of key employees could slow our product development processes and sales efforts or harm our reputation. Also, our low common stock price may result in difficulty attracting and retaining personnel as stock options and other forms of equity incentives generally comprise a significant portion of our employee compensation.  Further, the changes in senior management as well as the restructurings and reductions in force that we have recently experienced may have a negative effect on employee morale and the ability to attract and retain qualified personnel.

Our business could be adversely affected by reductions or delays in the purchase of our products or services for government security programs in the United States and globally.

We derive a substantial portion of our revenues from indirect sales to U.S. federal, state and local governments and government agencies, as well as from subcontracts under federal government prime contracts. Large government programs are an important market for our business, as high-security systems employing physical access, smart card, RFID or other access control technologies are increasingly used to enable applications ranging from authorizing building and network access for federal employees to paying taxes online, to citizen identification, to receiving health care. We believe that the success and growth of our business will continue to be influenced by our successful procurement of government business either directly or through our indirect sales channels. Accordingly, changes in government purchasing policies or government budgetary constraints could directly affect our financial performance. Sales to government agencies and customers primarily serving the U.S. Government, including further sales pursuant to existing contracts, may be adversely affected by factors outside our control, such as the sequester, federal government shutdowns or

13


other Congressional actions to reduce federal spending, and by adverse economic, political or market conditions. A reduction in current or future anticipated sales to the U.S. Government sector could harm our results of operations.

Additionally, we anticipate that an increasingly significant portion of our future revenues will come from government programs outside the U.S., such as electronic national identity, eGovernment and eHealth programs. We currently supply smart card readers, RFID products and cloud-based credential provisioning and management solutions for various government programs in Europe, Asia and Australia and are actively targeting additional programs in these and other geographic areas. However, the allocation and availability of funding for such programs are often impacted by economic or political factors over which we have no control, and which may cause delays in program implementation, which could negatively impact our sales and results of operations.

Our revenues may decline if we cannot compete successfully in an intensely competitive market.

We target our products at the rapidly evolving market for security technologies. Many of our current and potential competitors have significantly greater financial, technical, marketing, purchasing and other resources than we do. As a result, our competitors may be able to respond more quickly to new or emerging technologies or standards and to changes in customer requirements. Our competitors may also be able to devote greater resources to the development, promotion and sale of products or solutions and may be able to deliver competitive products or solutions at a lower end user price.

We also experience indirect competition from certain of our customers who currently offer alternative products or solutions or are expected to introduce competitive offerings in the future. For example, in our physical access control business, many of our dealer channel partners act as system integrators, providing installation and service, and therefore carry competitive lines of products and systems. This is a common practice within the industry as the integrators need access to multiple lines in order to support all potential service and user requirements. Depending on the technical competence of their sales forces, the comfort level of their technical staff with our systems and price pressures from customers, these integrators may choose to offer a competitor’s product. There is also business pressure to provide some level of sales to all vendors to maintain access to a range of products and systems.

We believe that the principal competitive factors affecting the markets for our products and solutions include:

 

·

the extent to which products and systems must support evolving industry standards and provide interoperability;

 

·

the extent to which products are differentiated based on technical features, quality and reliability, ease of use, strength of distribution channels and price;

 

·

the ability to quickly develop new products and solutions to satisfy new market and customer requirements; and

 

·

the total cost of ownership including installation, maintenance and expansion capability of systems.

Increased competition and increased market volatility in our industry could result in lower prices, reduced margins or the failure of our product and service offerings to achieve or maintain market acceptance, any of which could have a serious adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our percentage of revenue and customer concentration is significant in certain of our businesses.

Sales to our ten largest customers accounted for 35% of total net revenue in 2015 and 44% of total net revenue in 2014. One customer accounted for 14% of our total net revenue in 2015. One customer accounted for 23% of our total net revenue in 2014. No customers accounted for more than 10% of our accounts receivable balance as of December 31, 2015. Two customers accounted for more than 10% of our accounts receivable balance as of December 31, 2014 with each customer accounting for approximately 12% of our accounts receivable balance at year end. A significant amount of revenue is sourced from sales of products and systems to our OEM partners and an indirect sales network who sell to various entities within the U.S. federal government sector. We cannot guarantee that future reductions in U.S. Government budgets will not impact our sales to these government entities or that the terms of existing contracts will not be subject to renegotiation. Our loss of one or more of our significant customers could have a significant adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our business will not be successful if we do not keep up with the rapid changes in our industry.

The market for security products and related services is characterized by rapid technological developments, frequent new product introductions and evolving industry standards. To be competitive, we have to continually improve the performance, features and reliability of our products and services, particularly in response to competitive offerings, and quickly demonstrate the value of new products and services or enhancements to existing products and services. Our failure to develop and introduce new products and services successfully on a timely basis and to achieve market acceptance for such products and services could have a significant adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Our focus on cloud-based services presents execution and competitive risks.

A component of our strategy involves the sale of our idOnDemand cloud-based services to deliver identity credential provisioning and management solutions. The market for cloud-based credentialing solutions is at an early stage of development. Customer knowledge of, and trust in the cloud-based delivery of credentialing solutions greatly depends upon suppliers’ ability to demonstrate the value, security and reliability of their offerings compared both to competitive services and to traditional models of management identity credentials. We believe our expertise in cloud-based service delivery, our broad experience with relevant security standards and technologies and our investment in infrastructure provide us with a strong foundation to compete. However, if we are not able to demonstrate sufficient security and reliability, as well as differentiated value of our cloud-based solutions to potential customers, our revenue and gross profit margins could be adversely impacted.

Currently, our idOndemand cloud-based services contribute a small component of our overall revenue.  As this component of our business grows, we may recognize an increasing portion of our revenues over the subscription period, rather than at the time of sale. We have made, and expect to continue to make significant investments to develop, sell and deploy our cloud-based service capabilities. These investments are focused on software development, on expanding and maintaining the secure infrastructure to support our cloud computing services, and on developing sales and distribution channels for our idOnDemand offering. If our investments outpace our revenue growth in cloud services, our operating results will be adversely affected.  

Security breaches, whether or not related to our products, could result in the disclosure of sensitive government information or private personal information that could result in the loss of clients and negative publicity.

Many of the systems we sell manage private personal information or protect sensitive information related to our customers in the government or commercial markets. A well-publicized actual or perceived breach of network or computer security in one of these systems, regardless of whether such a breach is attributable to our products, could adversely affect the market’s perception of us and our products, and could result in the loss of customers, have an adverse effect on our reputation and reduce demand for our products.

As part of our technical support services, we agree, from time to time, to possess all or a portion of the security system database of our customers. This service is subject to a number of risks. For example, despite our security measures our systems may be vulnerable to cyber-attacks by hackers, physical break-ins and service disruptions that could lead to interruptions, delays or loss of data. If any such compromise of our security were to occur, it could be very expensive to correct, could damage our reputation and could discourage potential customers from using our services. Although we have not experienced attempted cyber or physical attacks, we may experience such attempts in the future. Our systems also may be affected by outages, delays and other difficulties. Our insurance coverage may be insufficient to cover losses and liabilities that may result from such events.

Sales of our products could decline and we could be subject to legal claims for damages if our products are found to have defects.

Despite our testing efforts, our products may contain defects that are not detected until after the products have been shipped. The discovery of defects or potential defects may result in damage to our reputation, delays in market acceptance of our products and additional expenditures to resolve issues related to the products’ implementation. If we are unable to provide a solution to actual or potential product defects that is acceptable to our customers, we may be required to incur substantial costs for product recall, repair and replacement, or costs related to legal or warranty claims made against us.

The global nature of our business exposes us to operational and financial risks and our results of operations could be adversely affected if we are unable to manage them effectively.

We market and sell our products and solutions to customers in many countries around the world. To support our global sales, customer base and product development activities, we maintain company offices and/or business operations in several locations around the world, including Australia, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Singapore and the U.S. We also maintain manufacturing facilities in Singapore and California and engage contract manufacturers in multiple countries outside the U.S . Managing our global development, sales, administrative and manufacturing operations places a significant burden on our management resources and our financial processes and exposes us to various risks, including:

 

·

longer accounts receivable collection cycles;

 

·

changes in foreign currency exchange rates;

 

·

changes in foreign laws and regulatory requirements;

 

·

changes in political or economic conditions and stability, particularly in emerging markets;

 

·

difficulties managing widespread sales and manufacturing operations; 

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·

export controls;

 

·

less effective protection of our intellectual property; and

 

·

potentially adverse tax consequences.

Any failure to effectively mitigate these risks and effectively manage our global operations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results.

A significant portion of our revenue is through an indirect sales channel, and the loss of dealers, systems integrators, resellers, or other channel partners could result in decreased revenue.

We currently use an indirect sales channel that includes dealers, systems integrators, value added resellers and resellers to sell a significant portion of our products and solutions, primarily into markets or to customers where the channel partner may have closer relationships or greater access than we do. Some of these channel partners also sell our competitors’ products, and if they favor our competitors’ products for any reason, they may fail to market our products as effectively or to devote necessary resources that result in effective sales, which would cause our sales to suffer. Indirect selling arrangements are intended to benefit both us and the channel partner, and may be long- or short-term relationships, depending on market conditions, competition in the marketplace and other factors. If we are unable to maintain effective indirect sales channels, there could be a reduction in the amount of product we are able to sell, and our revenues could decrease.

We depend upon third-party manufacturers and a limited number of suppliers, and if we experience disruptions in our supply chain or manufacturing, our business may suffer.

We rely upon a limited number of suppliers for some key components of our products which exposes us to various risks, including whether or not our suppliers will provide adequate quantities with sufficient quality on a timely basis and the risk that supplier pricing may be higher than anticipated. In addition, some of the basic components used in some of our products, such as semiconductors, may at any time be in great demand. This could result in components not being available to us in a timely manner or at all, particularly if larger companies have ordered significant volumes of those components, or in higher prices being charged for components we require. Disruption or termination of the supply of components or software used in our products could delay shipments of our products, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results and could also damage relationships with current and prospective customers.

Many of our products are manufactured outside the U.S. by contract manufacturers. Our reliance on these manufactures poses a number of risks, including lack of control over the manufacturing process and ultimately over the quality and timing of delivery of our products. If any of our contract manufacturers cannot meet our production requirements, we may be required to rely on other contract manufacturing sources or identify and qualify new contract manufacturers, and we may not be able to do this in a timely manner or on reasonable terms. Additionally, we may be subject to currency fluctuations, potentially adverse tax consequences, unexpected changes in regulatory requirements, tariffs and other trade barriers, export controls, or political and economic instability. Any significant delay in our ability to obtain adequate supplies of our products from our current or alternative manufacturers could materially and adversely affect our business and operating results. In addition, if we are not successful at managing the contract manufacturing process, the quality of our products could be jeopardized or inventory levels could be inadequate or excessive, which could result in damage to our reputation with our customers and in the marketplace, as well as possible shortages of products or write-offs of excess inventory.

Our U.S. Government business depends upon the continuance of regulations that require federal agencies to implement security systems such as ours, and upon our ability to receive certain government approvals or certifications and demonstrate compliance in government audits or investigations. A failure to receive these government approvals or certifications or a negative audit result could result in a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

While we are not able to quantify the amount of sales made to end customers in the U.S. Government market due to the indirect nature of our selling process, we believe that orders from U.S. Government agencies represent a significant portion of our revenues. The U.S. Government, suppliers to the U.S. Government and certain industries in the public sector currently fall, or may in the future fall, under particular regulations that require federal agencies to implement security systems that utilize physical and logical access control products and solutions such as ours. These regulations include, but are not limited to HSPD 12 and FIPS 201 produced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (“NIST”). Discontinuance of, changes in, or lack of adoption of laws or regulations pertaining to security related to sales to end customers in the U.S. Government market could adversely affect our sales.

Our U.S. Government business is also dependent upon the receipt of certain governmental approvals or certifications and failure to receive such approvals or certifications could have a material adverse effect on our sales in those market segments for which such approvals or certifications are customary or required. Government agencies in the U.S. and other countries may audit our business as

16


part of their routine audits and investigations of government procurement programs. Based on the outcome of any such audit, if any of our costs are found to be improperly allocated to a specific order, those costs may not be re imbursed and any costs already reimbursed for such order may have to be refunded. If a government agency audit uncovers improper or illegal activities, we may be subject to civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions. A negative audit could m aterially affect our competitive position and result in a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations .

Fluctuations in foreign exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and other major currencies in which we do business may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

A significant portion of our business is conducted in foreign currencies, principally the euro. Fluctuations in the value of foreign currencies relative to the U.S. dollar will result in currency exchange gains and losses in our reported results. If a significant portion of operating expenses are incurred in a foreign currency such as the euro, and revenues are generated in U.S. dollars, exchange rate fluctuations might have a positive or negative net financial impact on these transactions, depending on whether the value of the U.S. dollar decreases or increases compared to the euro. In addition, the valuation of current assets and liabilities that are denominated in a currency other than the functional currency can result in currency exchange gains and losses. For example, when one of our subsidiaries uses the euro as the functional currency, and this subsidiary has a receivable in U.S. dollars, a devaluation of the U.S. dollar against the euro of 10% would result in a foreign exchange loss to the reporting entity of 10% of the value of the underlying U.S. dollar receivable. We cannot predict the effect of exchange rate fluctuations upon future operating results. The effect of currency exchange rate changes may increase or decrease our costs and/or revenues in any given period, and we may experience currency losses in the future. To date, we have not adopted a hedging program to protect against the risks associated with foreign currency fluctuations.

We may not be able to protect our intellectual property rights, which could make us less competitive and cause us to lose market share.

Our future success will depend, in part, upon our intellectual property rights and our ability to protect these rights. We rely on a combination of patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret laws, nondisclosure agreements and other contractual provisions to establish, maintain and protect our proprietary rights. From time to time we may be required to use litigation to protect our proprietary technology. This may result in our incurring substantial costs and we may not be successful in any such litigation. Despite our efforts to protect our proprietary rights, unauthorized third parties may copy aspects of our products, obtain and use information that we regard as proprietary, or infringe upon our patents. In addition, the laws of some foreign countries do not protect proprietary and intellectual property rights to the same extent as do the laws in the U.S. Because many of our products are sold and a significant portion of our business is conducted outside the U.S., our exposure to intellectual property risks may be higher. Our efforts to protect our proprietary and intellectual property rights may not be adequate. Additionally, there is a risk that our competitors will independently develop similar technology or duplicate our products or design around patents or other intellectual property rights. If we are unsuccessful in protecting our intellectual property or our products or technologies are duplicated by others, our competitive position could be harmed and we could lose market share.

We face risks from future claims of third parties and litigation, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

From time to time, we may be subject to claims of third parties, possibly resulting in litigation, which could include, among other things, claims regarding infringement of the intellectual property rights of third parties, product defects, employment-related claims, and claims related to acquisitions, dispositions or restructurings. Addressing any such claims or litigation may be time-consuming and costly, divert management resources, cause product shipment delays, require us to redesign our products, require us to accept returns of products and to write-off inventory, or result in other adverse effects to our business. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and could require us to pay significant monetary damages.

We expect the likelihood of intellectual property infringement and misappropriation claims may increase as the number of products and competitors in the security market grows and as we increasingly incorporate third-party technology into our products. As a result of infringement claims, we could be required to license intellectual property from a third party or redesign our products. Licenses may not be offered when required or on acceptable terms. If we do obtain licenses from third parties, we may be required to pay license fees or royalties or we may be required to license some of our intellectual property to others in return for such licenses. If we are unable to obtain a license necessary for us or our third-party manufacturers to manufacture our allegedly infringing products, we could be required to suspend the manufacture of products or stop our suppliers from using processes that may infringe the rights of third parties. We may also be unsuccessful in redesigning our products. Our suppliers and customers may be subject to infringement claims based on intellectual property included in our products. We have historically agreed to indemnify our suppliers and customers for patent infringement claims relating to our products. The scope of this indemnity varies, but may, in some instances, include indemnification for damages and expenses, including attorney’s fees. We may periodically engage in litigation as a result of these indemnification obligations. Our insurance policies exclude coverage for third-party claims for patent infringement.

17


A material impairment in the carrying value of intan gible assets or other long-lived assets could negatively affect our consolidated financial condition and results of operations.

A portion of our assets consist of intangible assets and other long-lived assets. We review goodwill for potential impairment on an annual basis and intangible assets and other long-lived assets for potential impairment whenever events and changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. If the asset is considered impaired, it is reduced to its fair value, resulting in a non-cash charge to earnings during the period in which any impairment is determined.  In 2015, the carrying value of goodwill was determined to be fully impaired and we recorded an impairment charge of $8.8 million to goodwill, as disclosed in our consolidated statements of operations.

Our stock price has been and is likely to remain volatile.

Over the past few years, The NASDAQ Capital Market has experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that have particularly affected the market prices of the stocks of technology companies. Volatility in our stock price may result from a number of factors, including, among others:

 

·

low volumes of trading activity in our stock;

 

·

technical trading patterns of our stock;

 

·

variations in our or our competitors’ financial and/or operational results;

 

·

the fluctuation in market value of comparable companies in any of our markets;

 

·

expected or announced news about partner relationships, customer wins or losses, product announcements or organizational changes;

 

·

comments and forecasts by security analysts;

 

·

the inclusion or removal of our stock from market indices, such as groups of technology stocks or other indices;

 

·

litigation developments; and

 

·

general market downturns.

In the past, companies that have experienced volatility in the market price of their stock have been the object of securities class action litigation.

We have been named as a defendant in putative securities class action lawsuits. These lawsuits and other litigation could cause us to incur substantial expenses and divert our attention and resources.

Securities class action lawsuits have often been brought against a company following periods of volatility in the market price of its securities. Companies such as ours in the technology industry are particularly vulnerable to this kind of litigation due to the volatility of their stock prices. We and a number of our current and former officers and directors are defendants in putative class lawsuits and derivative litigation, which is discussed in the Section entitled “Legal Proceedings.” Any litigation to which we are a party may result in the diversion of management attention and resources from our business and business strategy. In addition, any litigation to which we are a party may result in onerous or unfavorable judgments that may not be reversed upon appeal and that may require us to pay substantial monetary damages or fines, or we may decide to settle lawsuits on similarly unfavorable terms, which could have a material adverse effect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

If we fail to regain compliance with the listing requirements of The NASDAQ Capital Market, the price and liquidity of our common stock, our business and our ability to access the capital markets could be negatively impacted.

Our common stock currently is listed on The NASDAQ Capital Market. On May 21, 2015, we received notification from NASDAQ that we no longer met the requirements for continued listing under NASDAQ’s listing rules because we had failed to file our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended March 31, 2015. We subsequently submitted a plan of compliance to NASDAQ, and were given until November 16, 2015 to regain compliance with the continued listing requirements.  The plan of compliance included an undertaking to file our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the Quarter ended June 30, 2015, which had also become delinquent. We subsequently were unable to file our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2015.  On November 17, 2015, we received a notice from NASDAQ informing us that as a result of our failure  to regain compliance with the continued listing requirements by November 16, 2015, and because our September 30, 2015 Form 10-Q was also delinquent, our common stock was subject to delisting. We requested and were granted a hearing before the NASDAQ Listing Qualifications Panel (the “Panel”) to appeal the delisting determination. On January 26, 2016, we were notified that the Panel had granted our request

18


to remain listed on The NASDAQ Capital Marke t, subject to certain conditions. The Panel determined the our common stock would remain listed subject to our becoming current in our periodic filings with the SEC by March 30, 2016, and our holding our annual meeting of stockholders on or before May 12, 2016. If we do not maintain compliance with the remainder of The NASDAQ Capital Market’s continued listing requirements on an ongoing basis and timely comply with the conditions of the Panel’s decision, our common stock may be immediately delisted from The  NASDAQ Capital Market. Any such delisting could have a material adverse effect on our stock price, the liquidity of our stock, our business and our ability to raise capital.

You may experience dilution of your ownership interests due to the future issuance of additional shares of our stock, and future sales of shares of our common stock could adversely affect our stock price.

We have issued a significant number of shares of our common stock, together with warrants to purchase shares of our common stock, in connection with a number of financing transactions and acquisitions in recent years. Most recently, on September 16, 2014, we sold an aggregate of 2,300,000 shares of our common stock in an underwritten public offering. In the future, from time to time we may issue additional previously authorized and unissued securities, resulting in the dilution of the ownership interests of our current stockholders.

In addition, we have reserved shares of common stock for potential future issuance including stock issued pursuant to various equity incentive plans, as contingent consideration related to previous acquisitions and various warrants issued in connection with previous capitals raises and other transactions. As of December 31, 2015, 1.7 million shares of common stock are reserved for future grants and outstanding equity awards under our various equity incentive plans and an additional 1.1 million shares of common stock are reserved for future issuance in connection with other commitments, including the potential issuance of shares warrant exercises. We may issue additional shares of common stock or other securities that are convertible into or exercisable for shares of common stock in connection with the hiring of personnel, future acquisitions, future private placements, or future public offerings of our securities for capital raising or for other business purposes. If we issue additional securities, the aggregate percentage ownership of our existing stockholders will be reduced. In addition, any new securities that we issue may have rights senior to those of our common stock.

The issuance of additional shares of common stock or preferred stock or other securities, or the perception that such issuances could occur, may create downward pressure on the trading price of our common stock.

One of our directors indirectly holds significant amounts of our common stock and could have significant influence over the outcome of corporate actions requiring board and stockholder approval.

As of March 6, 2016, Mountain Partners AG, together with its affiliates (collectively “Mountain Partners”), had the right to vote approximately 6.7% of the outstanding shares of our common stock. Daniel Wenzel, a director of our company, is a co-founder of Mountain Partners. As of March 6, 2016, our directors and officers collectively held approximately 11.0% of our common stock. Accordingly, our directors and officers could have influence over the outcome of corporate actions requiring Board and stockholder approval, including the election of directors, any merger, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets or any other significant corporate transaction.

If current or future export laws limit or otherwise restrict our business, we could be prohibited from shipping our products to certain countries, which could cause our business, financial condition and results of operations to suffer.

Some of our products are subject to export controls or other laws restricting the sale of our products under the laws of the U.S., the European Union (“EU”) and other governments. The export regimes and the governing policies applicable to our business are subject to change. We cannot be certain that such export authorizations will be available to us or for our products in the future. In some cases, we rely upon the compliance activities of our prime contractors, and we cannot be certain they have taken or will take all measures necessary to comply with applicable export laws. If we or our prime contractor partners cannot obtain required government approvals under applicable regulations, we may not be able to sell our products in certain international jurisdictions.

Changes in tax laws or the interpretation thereof, adverse tax audits and other tax matters may adversely affect our future results.

A number of factors may impact our tax position, including:

 

·

the jurisdictions in which profits are determined to be earned and taxed;

 

·

the resolution of issues arising from tax audits with various tax authorities;

 

·

changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities;

 

·

adjustments to estimated taxes upon finalization of various tax returns;

19


 

·

increases in expenses not deductible for tax purposes; and

 

·

the repatriation of non-U.S. earnings for which we have not previously provided for U.S. taxes.

Any of these factors could make it more difficult for us to project or achieve expected tax results. An increase or decrease in our tax liabilities due to these or other factors could adversely affect our financial results in future periods.

We have a material weakness in our internal controls over financial reporting, and if we fail to maintain adequate internal control over financial reporting, our business could be materially and adversely affected.

Under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, our management must establish, maintain and make certain assessments and certifications regarding our disclosure controls and internal controls over financial reporting . We have dedicated significant resources to comply with these requirements, including significant actions to develop, evaluate, and test our internal controls . A failure to maintain adequate internal controls could result in inaccurate or late reporting of our financial results, an investigation by regulatory authorities, a loss of investor confidence, a decrease in the trading price of our common stock and exposure to costly litigation or regulatory proceedings.

As described in Controls and Procedures in Part II, Item 9A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, in connection with the audit of our financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2015, we identified a material weakness in internal control over financial reporting during 2015, Management determined that the design and operating effectiveness of our controls over the financial statement close process related to the application of our accounting policies and the presentation of disclosures in the financial statements has been inadequate.  Specifically, this material weakness arises from insufficient review and oversight of the recording of complex and non-routine transactions, including revenue transactions, due to an insufficient number of accounting personnel with appropriate knowledge, experience or training in U.S. GAAP.   A similar material weakness was previously identified and disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the years ended December 2012 and 2013, and a remediation plan was implemented.  However in 2015, in the context of managing a significant change in accounting systems and organizational structure, the loss of legacy knowledge in respect of our old consolidation system, the diversion of resources related to an internal investigation which delayed the filing of our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q in 2015, two material weaknesses identified by our prior auditors as described in Item 9, and other external factors, it became apparent that all the information necessary to record complex and non-routine transactions has not been available and addressed timely, resulting in a number of late accounting adjustments.  We may in the future identify additional internal control deficiencies that could rise to the level of a material weakness or uncover errors in our financial reporting, and the existing material weakness or other material weaknesses in our internal controls could have a material adverse effect on the accuracy, timeliness and reliability of our financial reporting, which may have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations as well as the price of our common stock.

Regulations relating to conflict minerals may adversely affect our business.

The SEC has adopted disclosure and reporting rules intended to improve transparency and accountability concerning the supply of certain minerals, known as conflict minerals, originating from the Democratic Republic of Congo (“DRC”) and adjoining countries. These rules require us to determine the origin of certain materials used in our products and to disclose whether we use any materials containing conflict minerals originating from the DRC and adjoining countries. If it is determined that our products contain or use any conflict minerals from the DRC or adjoining countries, additional requirements will be triggered. Compliance with conflict mineral disclosure requirements may result in increased costs of regulatory compliance, potential risks to our reputation, difficulty satisfying any customers that insist on conflict-free products and harm to our business.

Provisions in our charter documents and Delaware law may delay or prevent our acquisition by another company, which could decrease the value of your shares.

Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws and Delaware law contain provisions that could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us or enter into a material transaction with us without the consent of our Board. These provisions include a classified Board and limitations on actions by our stockholders by written consent. Delaware law imposes some restrictions on mergers and other business combinations between us and any holder of 15% or more of our outstanding common stock. In addition, our Board has the right to issue preferred stock without stockholder approval, which could be used to dilute the stock ownership of a potential hostile acquirer. These provisions will apply even if the offer were to be considered adequate by some of our stockholders. Because these provisions may be deemed to discourage a change of control, they may delay or prevent the acquisition of our Company, which could decrease the value of our common stock.

 

ITEM 1B.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

20


 

ITEM 2.

PROPERTIES

Our corporate headquarters are located in Fremont, California and we maintain operational headquarters in Santa Ana, California. We lease additional facilities around the world to house our engineering, sales and marketing, administrative and manufacturing functions. At December 31, 2015, our major facilities consisted of the following:

 

Location

 

Function

 

Square Feet

 

 

Lease Expiration

Fremont, California

 

Corporate headquarters

 

 

10,935

 

 

April 2021

Santa Ana, California

 

Administration; manufacturing; research and development

 

 

34,599

 

 

January 2018

Ismaning, Germany

 

European operations and sales

 

 

15,897

 

 

November 2016

Chennai, India

 

Research and development

 

 

17,500

 

 

October 2017

Singapore

 

RFID/NFC product manufacturing

 

 

16,060

 

 

May 2017

 

ITEM 3.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

On December 7, 2015, we and certain of our present and former officers and directors were named as defendants in a putative class action lawsuit filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, entitled Ruggiero v. Identiv, Inc. , et al., Case No. 15-cv-05583.  The complaint in that lawsuit alleged violations of Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder and Section 20(a) of the Exchange Act of 1934 based on allegations that we made false and/or misleading statements and/or failed to disclose information in certain public filings and disclosures between 2013 and 2015.  The complaint sought unspecified monetary damages, reasonable costs and attorneys’ fees, and equitable and injunctive relief.  On December 16, 2015, that lawsuit was voluntarily dismissed without prejudice.

Between December 2015 and February 2016, a number of other shareholder lawsuits were filed.  On December 16, 2015, we and certain of our present and former officers and directors were named as defendants in a putative class action lawsuit filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, entitled Rok v. Identiv, Inc., et al. , Case No. 15-cv-05775, alleging violations of Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder and Section 20(a) of the Exchange Act of 1934.  In addition, three shareholder derivative actions were filed between January and February 2016.  On January 1, 2016, certain of our present and former officers and directors were named as defendants, and we were named as nominal defendant, in a shareholder derivative lawsuit filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, entitled Oswald v. Humphreys, et al. , Case No. 16-cv-00241-JCS, alleging breach of fiduciary duty and abuse of control claims.  On January 25, 2016, certain of our present and former officers and directors were named as defendants, and we were named as nominal defendant, in a shareholder derivative lawsuit filed in the Superior Court of the State of California, County of Alameda, entitled Chopra v. Hart, et al. , Case No. RG16801379, alleging breach of fiduciary duty claims.  On February 9, 2016, certain of our present and former officers and directors were named as defendants, and the Company was named as nominal defendant, in a shareholder derivative lawsuit filed in the Superior Court of the State of California, County of Alameda, entitled Wollnik v. Wenzel, et al. , Case No. HG16803342, alleging breach of fiduciary duty, corporate waste, gross mismanagement, and unjust enrichment claims.  These lawsuits generally allege that we made false and/or misleading statements and/or failed to disclose information in certain public filings and disclosures between 2013 and 2015.  Each of the lawsuits seeks one or more of the following remedies: unspecified compensatory damages, unspecified exemplary or punitive damages, restitution, declaratory relief, equitable and injunctive relief, and reasonable costs and attorneys’ fees.  We intend to vigorously defend against these lawsuits.  We cannot currently predict the impact or resolution of each of these lawsuits or reasonably estimate a range of possible loss, which could be material, and the resolution of these lawsuits may harm our business and have a material adverse impact on our financial condition.

From time to time, we could become subject to claims arising in the ordinary course of business or could be named a defendant in additional lawsuits. The outcome of such claims or other proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty and may have a material effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not Applicable

 

 

21


Executive Officers of the Registrant

 

Information concerning the Company’s executive officers as of March 1, 2016 is as follows:

 

Steven Humphreys, 54, has served as our Chief Executive Officer since September 9, 2015 and as a director of the Company since July 1996. Mr. Humphreys previously served as Chairman of the Board from September 2013 until September 9, 2015. Mr. Humphreys also previously served on the Strategic Committee of the Board of Directors. Previously, he also served as Lead Director from May 2010 until April 2013 and as Chairman of the Board of Directors from April 2000 to March 2007 and from July 1996 to December 1996. Mr. Humphreys also served as an executive officer of the Company, as President from July 1996 to December 1996 and as President and Chief Executive Officer from December 1996 to April 2000. From November 2011 to December 2014, Mr. Humphreys served as chief executive officer of Flywheel Software, Inc., a privately-held location-based mobile solutions company. From October 2008 until its acquisition by SMSC in February 2010, Mr. Humphreys served as Chief Executive Officer and President of Kleer Corporation, a maker of wireless audio technology. From October 2001 to October 2003, he served as Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of ActivCard Corporation (now ActivIdentity), a publicly-listed company until December 2010 and a provider of digital identity solutions, for which he also served as a director from March 2008 until December 2010. Previously, Mr. Humphreys was President of Caere Corporation, an optical character recognition software and systems company. Prior to Caere, he spent ten years with General Electric Company in a variety of positions. Currently, Mr. Humphreys also serves as a director of Flywheel Software and of Giraff Technologies AB, a communications robotics device company. Additionally he serves on the board of Summit Public Schools, a charter school system with schools across California and Washington state. Mr. Humphreys holds a B.S. degree from Yale University and M.S. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University.

 

Steven Finney, 56, has served as our Interim Chief Financial Officer since November 18, 2015, and as Vice President of Finance since February 2013. Prior to joining Identiv, Mr. Finney had been the Vice President of Finance, Northeast Region, for Thyssenkrupp Elevator, a German materials and technology conglomerate since 2011. From 2004 through 2011, Mr. Finney served in a variety of financial roles at ASSA ABLOY AB, a publicly listed Swedish security industry conglomerate, including division Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Finney is a chartered accountant in the United Kingdom. Mr. Finney holds a B.A. degree, with honors, from the University of Sheffield in Accounting and Financial Management.

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Price Range of Common Stock; Number of Holders; Dividends

Our common stock is traded on The NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “INVE.” According to data available at March 6, 2016, we had 204 registered holders of our common stock. Not represented in this figure are individual stockholders in Germany whose custodian banks do not release stockholder information to us. The following table sets forth the high and low closing prices of our common stock for the periods indicated (adjusted for the 1-for-10 reverse split of our common stock effective May 27, 2014):

 

 

 

High

 

 

Low

 

Fiscal 2015:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

$

14.84

 

 

$

8.51

 

Second Quarter

 

$

12.40

 

 

$

5.82

 

Third Quarter

 

$

5.83

 

 

$

2.64

 

Fourth Quarter

 

$

3.95

 

 

$

1.64

 

Fiscal 2014:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

$

13.00

 

 

$

5.72

 

Second Quarter

 

$

12.50

 

 

$

6.12

 

Third Quarter

 

$

21.31

 

 

$

9.89

 

Fourth Quarter

 

$

15.04

 

 

$

8.39

 

 

We have never declared or paid cash dividends on our common stock. We currently anticipate that we will retain all of our future earnings for use in the expansion and operation of our business and do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future.

The disclosure required by Item 201(d) of Regulation S-K is included in Item 12 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

22


ITEM 6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The information set forth below should be read in conjunction with "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and our audited financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this annual report. The selected balance sheet data at December 31, 2015 and 2014 and the selected statements of operations data for each of the years ended December 31, 2015 and, 2014 have been derived from our audited financial statements that are included elsewhere in this report. The selected balance sheet data at December 31, 2013 and 2012, and the selected statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012 have been derived from our audited financial statements not included in this report. The financial data included in this report are historical and are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected in any future period (in thousands of dollars, except per share data).

IDENTIV, INC.

SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

 

 

 

Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014 (1)

 

 

2013 (1)

 

 

2012 (1)

 

 

 

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net revenue

 

$

60,794

 

 

$

81,249

 

 

$

74,284

 

 

$

71,157

 

Cost of revenue

 

 

37,645

 

 

 

47,793

 

 

 

40,888

 

 

 

39,369

 

Gross profit

 

 

23,149

 

 

 

33,456

 

 

 

33,396

 

 

 

31,788

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

9,151

 

 

 

6,902

 

 

 

6,277

 

 

 

6,965

 

Selling and marketing

 

 

20,236

 

 

 

20,635

 

 

 

18,907

 

 

 

19,055

 

General and administrative

 

 

19,604

 

 

 

12,751

 

 

 

14,149

 

 

 

14,839

 

Re-measurement of contingent consideration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(5,463

)

Earn-out consideration

 

 

 

 

 

3,510

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Impairment of goodwill

 

 

8,771

 

 

 

 

 

 

15,572

 

 

 

17,027

 

Impairment of long-lived assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

178

 

 

 

13,410

 

Restructuring and severance

 

 

1,266

 

 

 

3,098

 

 

 

1,770

 

 

 

325

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

59,028

 

 

 

46,896

 

 

 

56,853

 

 

 

66,158

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(35,879

)

 

 

(13,440

)

 

 

(23,457

)

 

 

(34,370

)

Non-operating income (expense)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other (expense) income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(108

)

Interest expense, net

 

 

(1,908

)

 

 

(3,619

)

 

 

(2,169

)

 

 

(1,077

)

Foreign currency gain (loss), net

 

 

(1,211

)

 

 

(1,270

)

 

 

710

 

 

 

296

 

Loss from continuing operations before income taxes and

   noncontrolling interest

 

 

(38,998

)

 

 

(18,329

)

 

 

(24,916

)

 

 

(35,259

)

Income tax (provision) benefit

 

 

(222

)

 

 

(95

)

 

 

(47

)

 

 

5,755

 

Loss from continuing operations before noncontrolling

   interest

 

 

(39,220

)

 

 

(18,424

)

 

 

(24,963

)

 

 

(29,504

)

Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of

   income taxes

 

 

-

 

 

 

521

 

 

 

(10,835

)

 

 

(24,064

)

Consolidated net loss

 

 

(39,220

)

 

 

(17,903

)

 

 

(35,798

)

 

 

(53,568

)

Less: Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest

 

 

76

 

 

 

109

 

 

 

933

 

 

 

3,232

 

Net loss attributable to Identiv, Inc.

   common shareholders

 

$

(39,144

)

 

$

(17,794

)

 

$

(34,865

)

 

$

(50,336

)

Basic and diluted net income (loss) per share attributable to Identiv, Inc. common shareholders:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations

 

$

(3.62

)

 

$

(2.12

)

 

$

(3.62

)

 

$

(4.41

)

Income (loss) from discontinued operations

 

 

-

 

 

 

0.06

 

 

 

(1.64

)

 

 

(4.03

)

Net loss

 

$

(3.62

)

 

$

(2.06

)

 

$

(5.26

)

 

$

(8.44

)

Weighted average shares used to compute basic and

   diluted loss per share

 

 

10,812

 

 

 

8,648

 

 

 

6,633

 

 

 

5,962

 

 

23


 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014 (1)

 

 

2013 (1)

 

 

2012 (1)

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

16,667

 

 

$

36,547

 

 

$

5,095

 

 

$

6,109

 

Working capital (2)

 

 

25,058

 

 

 

41,980

 

 

 

8,451

 

 

 

(128

)

Total assets

 

 

53,896

 

 

 

85,880

 

 

 

58,759

 

 

 

104,905

 

Long-term payment obligation

 

 

4,878

 

 

 

5,545

 

 

 

5,648

 

 

 

6,177

 

Total other long-term obligations (3)

 

 

508

 

 

 

630

 

 

 

938

 

 

 

721

 

Long-term financial liabilities

 

 

18,104

 

 

 

13,938

 

 

 

3,051

 

 

 

6,167

 

Total equity

 

$

14,190

 

 

$

46,132

 

 

$

24,744

 

 

$

49,590

 

 

 

( 1)

Amounts shown above have been adjusted for divested businesses as disclosed in Note 2 in the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements, Discontinued Operations . Although not a required presentation by a Smaller Reporting Company, we have decided to present the comparative information for the years 2012 to 2015, adjusted for discontinued businesses, as this information presents an overview of our current existing businesses since our acquisition of idOnDemand in 2011. Results for idOnDemand are included in the tables above since acquisition date. The operating results for the years shown are also impacted by the acquisition of Bluehill ID AG (“Bluehill ID”) on January 4, 2010 (excluding Swiss Multicard AG, Dutch Multicard Nederland BV and German Multicard GmbH which were subsidiaries of Bluehill ID at the time of acquisition and sold in December 2013 as disclosed in Note 2 in the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements, Discontinued Operations ) and Smartag on November 19, 2010.

(2)

Working capital is defined as current assets less current liabilities.

(3)

Other long-term obligations exclude long-term deferred tax liability.

 

 

24


ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

This Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and other parts of this Annual Report on Form 10-K (“Annual Report”) contain forward-looking statements, within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, that involve risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements provide current expectations of future events based on certain assumptions and include any statement that does not directly relate to any historical or current fact. Forward-looking statements can also be identified by words such as “will,” “believe,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “may,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “estimate,” “expect,” “project” or the negative of these terms or other similar expressions. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and our actual results may differ significantly from the results discussed in the forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause such differences include, but are not limited to, those discussed in Part I, Item 1A of this Annual Report under the heading “Risk Factors,” which are incorporated herein by reference. The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in Part II, Item 8 of this Annual Report. We assume no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statements for any reason, except as required by law.

Each of the terms the “Company,” “Identiv,” “we” and “us” as used herein refers collectively to Identiv, Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, unless otherwise stated.

Overview

Identiv is a global security technology company that secures data, physical places and things. Global organizations in the government, education, retail, transportation, healthcare and other markets rely upon our solutions. We empower them to create safe, secure, validated and convenient experiences in schools, government offices, factories, transportation, hospitals and virtually every type of facility and for every type of product.

At the beginning of September 2013, we undertook a strategic review of our business and initiated a series of actions to simplify our business structure and streamline our operations. Following the changes in our organizational structure, we changed our operating segments to focus on the following solutions:

 

·

Premises solutions securing buildings via an integrated access control system.

 

·

Information solutions securing enterprise information including PCs, networks, email encryption, login, and printers via delivery of smart card reader products and identity management via our idOnDemand service.

 

·

Everyday items solutions securing connected items, including electronic toys, medical devices, wearables and other internet of things applications

The foundation of our business are our expertise in RFID and access control, our close customer relationships that allow us to develop customer-relevant products, and our core value of quality.

To deliver these solutions, the Company has organized its operations into four reportable business segments, principally by product families: Premises, Identity, Credentials and All Other.

Premises

The foundation of our premises business is the Hirsch line of controllers including the advanced MX line, Hirsch's Velocity management software and our ICPAM software, EDGE controller and reader package. Our modular Hirsch MX controllers are designed to be scalable, allowing customers to start with a small system and expand over time. Hirsch MX controllers can operate autonomously, whether as a single controller or as part of a networked system with Velocity software. The Hirsch Velocity software platform enables centralized management of access and security operations across an organization, including control of doors, gates, turnstiles, elevators and other building equipment, monitoring users as they move around a facility, preventing unwanted access, maintaining compliance and providing a robust audit trail.

uTrust door readers provide unique features to support a number of security environments and standards. For example, uTrust TS readers support the majority of legacy card credentials with a robust next-generation platform that can help companies migrate to more secure credentials and technologies, including smart cards, near field communication (“NFC”) and government-issued credentials. uTrust Scramblepad readers employ numerical scrambling on the keypad to protect access codes from being stolen as they are entered.

25


Identity

Our Identity products include smart card readers, which includes a broad range of contact, contactless, portable and mobile smart card readers, tokens and terminals that are utilized around the world to enable logical (i.e., PC, network or data) access and security and identification applications, such as national ID, payment, e-Health and e-Government.  

Related to our reader product line, we are a leading provider in the definition and provisioning of access cards and other devices to allow users to conveniently and securely access their facilities and resources, and to empower facilities and security administrators to deploy exactly the solutions they want to provide the optimal mix of cost, security and convenience to their user community, whether students, hospital patients, military and government personnel, consumers or a vast array of users.

Credentials

Our Credentials products include NFC and radio frequency identification (“ RFID”) products — including inlays and inlay-based cards — labels, tags and stickers, as well as other radio frequency (“RF”) and IC components. These products are manufactured in our state-of-the-art facility in Singapore and are used in a diverse range of physical applications, including electronic entertainment games, loyalty cards, mobile payment systems, transit and event ticketing, and brand authenticity from pharmaceuticals to consumer goods, hospital resource management and many others.  

Leveraging our expertise in RFID, physical access and physical authentication, we're developing new solutions to extend our platforms across a wide variety of physical use cases.  The next major opportunity in our connected world is the Internet of things, which fundamentally is about physical things.  We believe our core strength in physical access and physical instrumentation (RFID) markets, our well-established platforms and our deep knowledge of the relevant technologies, position us well in this growth market. 

All Other 

The All Other segment includes products, such as Chipdrive and Digital Media readers. The products included in the All Other segment do not meet the quantitative thresholds for determining reportable segments and therefore have been combined for reporting purposes.

We primarily conduct sales and marketing activities in each of the markets in which we compete, utilizing our own sales and marketing organization to solicit prospective channel partners and customers, provide technical advice and support with respect to products, systems and services, and manage relationships with customers, distributors and/or original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”). We utilize indirect sales channels that may include OEMs, dealers, systems integrators, value added resellers, resellers or Internet sales, although we also sell directly to end users. In support of our sales efforts, we participate in industry events and conduct sales training courses, targeted marketing programs, and ongoing customer, channel partner and third-party communications programs.

Our corporate headquarters are located in Fremont, California. We maintain research and development facilities in California, and Chennai, India, and local operations and sales facilities in Australia, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Singapore and the U.S. We were founded in 1990 in Munich, Germany and incorporated in 1996 under the laws of the State of Delaware .

For a discussion of our net revenue by segment and geographic location, see Note 10, Segment Reporting and Geographic Information in the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements.

Recent Developments in our Business

In September 2013, we undertook a strategic review of our business and initiated a series of actions to simplify our business structure and streamline our operations.

The first of these actions was to realign our organizational structure to operate as a single, unified company rather than as a group of individual businesses. This change in our structure enhances our ability to coordinate and focus our strategic and operational activities. To signal this change, we implemented a new corporate identity using the word mark and logo “Identiv” in place of “Identive Group.”  We also reorganized our management team and our operational activities by function (e.g., engineering, sales, marketing, customer service and information technology), allowing centralized management of key activities on a global basis. With the reorganization of and changes to our management team, we moved our executive headquarters to Fremont, California and relocated our operational and certain administrative activities from Ismaning, Germany to our facility in Santa Ana, California.

Another important action was the divestiture of businesses that were determined to be non-core to our ongoing strategy. In December 2013 we completed the sale of our Multicard and payment solution subsidiaries in Europe. In February 2014 we completed

26


the sale of our Multicard subsidiary in the U.S. and in July 2014, we sold certain non-core assets related to o ne of our U. S. based subsidiaries. We have accounted for these divested businesses as discontinued operations, and the statements of operations for all periods presented reflect the discontinuance of these businesses. For more information, see Note 2 Disc ontinued Operations in the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements.

Starting in 2014, our operating segments align to our current market strategy. We reported our financial results under these segments beginning with our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the first quarter of 2014.

Our Strategy

Our corporate priority is to drive revenue growth by leveraging our core expertise from our existing product portfolio, as well as our significant experience addressing customers’ security challenges across multiple markets, including the government, transportation, healthcare, education, banking, critical infrastructure and others.

Trends in our Business

Geographic net revenue, based on each customer’s ship-to location, for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 is as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Americas

 

$

40,848

 

 

$

51,322

 

Europe and the Middle East

 

 

9,472

 

 

 

15,835

 

Asia-Pacific

 

 

10,474

 

 

 

14,092

 

Total

 

$

60,794

 

 

$

81,249

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americas

 

 

67

%

 

 

63

%

Europe and the Middle East

 

 

16

%

 

 

20

%

Asia-Pacific

 

 

17

%

 

 

17

%

Total

 

 

100

%

 

 

100

%

 

Net Revenue Trends

Net revenue in 2015 was $60.8 million, down 25% compared with $81.2 million in 2014. Approximately 45% of our net revenue came from our Credentials segment. Net revenue in our Credentials segment in 2015 was $27.3 million compared to $41.6 million in 2014. Net revenue in our Premises segment in 2015 was $20.0 million compared to $19.0 million in 2014 reflecting a rebound in activity related to U.S. Government entities, which was weak in 2014. The growth in our Premises segment net revenue was more than offset by a 30% decline in net revenue in our Identity segment. The net revenue decline in our Identity segment reflects continued weakness in sales of smart card readers within Europe and the Middle East where sales activity has declined due to continuing economic uncertainty in the region. Premises products accounted for 33% of our business in 2015 and our Identity products accounted for 20% of our net revenue.

Net revenue in the Americas. Net revenue in the Americas was $40.8 million in 2015, accounting for 67% of total net revenue and down 20% compared with $51.3 million in 2014. Net revenue from physical access control solutions for security programs within various U.S. Government agencies, as well as RFID and NFC products, inlays and tags comprise a significant proportion of our net revenue in the Americas region.

Net revenue from our Premises segment in the Americas increased by approximately 8% in 2015 compared to 2014 primarily due to an increase in orders for physical access control solutions from federal and state agency customers. Net revenue from our Identity segment in the Americas remained relatively stable in 2015 compared to 2014. Net revenue from our Credentials segment in the Americas declined 35% in 2015 compared to 2014. The Credential segment net revenue decrease was primarily due to the timing of orders in North America for electronic game toy pieces and other Internet of Things applications.

As a general trend, U.S. Federal agencies continue to be subject to security improvement mandates under programs such as Homeland Security Presidential Directive-12 and reiterated in memoranda from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB M-11-11). We believe that our physical access control solutions is an attractive offering in the market to help agencies move towards compliance with federal directives and mandates. To expand our sales opportunities in the United States in general and with orders

27


sourced from U.S. Government agencies in particular, we have strengthened our U.S. sales organization and reopened a sales presence in Washington D.C.

Net revenue in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia-Pacific. Net revenue in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia-Pacific was $19.9 million in 2015, accounting for 33% of total net revenue and down 33% from $29.9 million in 2014. Net revenue in these regions are very dependent on the completion of large projects and the timing of orders placed by some of our larger customers. Sales of Identity readers and RFID and NFC products and tags comprise a significant proportion of our net revenue in these regions.

Net revenue from our Identity products decreased by approximately 40% in 2015 compared to 2014, as 2014 included the completion of a large order to a significant customer in Germany as well as large orders from two significant customers in Asia. In 2015, we did not see a repeat of these major orders as these customers had recently placed significant fourth quarter 2014 orders.  Identity readers comprise approximately 38% of the net revenue throughout these regions in 2015. Net revenue from our Credentials products, which comprise approximately 41% of the sales in these regions, declined by approximately 32% in 2015 compared to 2014 as sales in Europe have been negatively impacted by the transfer of local production of NFC inlays and tags to Singapore following the end of the second quarter of 2014. Net revenue from our Premises products decreased by 13% in 2015 compared to 2014, primarily driven by the completion of projects in the Middle East involving our physical access control solutions in 2014.

Seasonality and Other Factors. In our business overall, we may experience significant variations in demand for our offerings from quarter to quarter, and typically experience a stronger demand cycle in the second half of our fiscal year. Sales of our premises solutions to U.S. Government agencies are subject to annual government budget cycles and generally are highest in the third quarter of each year. However, the usual seasonal trend can be negatively impacted by actions such as government shutdowns and the passing of continuing resolutions which can act to delay the completion of certain projects. Sales of our identity reader chips, many of which are sold to government agencies worldwide, are impacted by testing and compliance schedules of government bodies as well as roll-out schedules for application deployments, both of which contribute to variability in demand from quarter to quarter. Further, this business is typically subject to seasonality based on differing commercial and global government budget cycles.  Lower sales are expected in the U.S. in the first half, and in particular the first quarter of the year, with higher sales typically in the second half of each year. In Asia and Australia, with fiscal year-ends in March and June, order demand can be high in the first half as customers attempt to complete projects before the end of the fiscal year. Accordingly, our net revenue levels in the first quarter and first half each year often depends on the relative strength of project completions and sales mix between our U.S. customer base and our International customer base.

In addition to the general seasonality of demand, overall U.S. Government expenditure patterns have a significant impact on demand for our products due to the significant portion of revenues that are typically sourced from U.S. Government agencies. Therefore, any significant reduction in U.S. Government spending could adversely impact our financial results and could cause our operating results to fall below any guidance we provide to the market or below the expectations of investors or security analysts.

Operating Expense Trends

Base Operating Expenses  

Our base operating expenses (i.e. research and development, selling and marketing, and general and administrative spending) increased 22% in 2015 compared to 2014. Research and development spending increased by 33% in 2015 compared to 2014, mainly due to the transfer of existing employees into research and development and the addition of new employees, leading to higher payroll costs, and travel expenses, as well as higher costs for external services and contractors. Selling and marketing spending in 2015 were down by 2% compared to 2014, due to the stabilization of sales and marketing organization headcount and marketing program spending. General and administrative spending in 2015 increased 54% from 2014 due to a large increase in legal and professional fees and increases in stock-based compensation in 2015.

Simplification and Streamlining of our Business

In September 2013, we undertook a strategic review of our business and initiated a series of actions to simplify our business structure and streamline our operations. As a consequence of our strategic review in late 2013 and early 2014, we disposed of non-core or under-performing businesses, including our Multicard AG, payment solution AG, Multicard Nederland BV and Multicard U.S. subsidiaries. Additionally, we ceased any additional investment in the Tagtrail mobile services platform. To further simplify our business and streamline our operations, we restructured our organization to operate as a single, unified company rather than as a group of individual businesses. This restructuring included the realignment of our management team and our operational activities by function (for example engineering, sales, marketing, customer service and information technology). With the centralization of various functions, we also eliminated several redundant positions.  Additionally, we completed the process of transferring various functions, such as corporate financial accounting and reporting from Germany to the U.S., in the third quarter of 2014.

28


To streamline production and operations in our Credentials business, we initiated the closure of our German production fac ility for RFID and NFC inlays, tags, and labels to consolidate production in our facility in Singapore. The closure of this production facility was completed in the second quarter of 2014. We have in the past expanded production capacity with the addition of production and assembly lines at our existing facility in California and via partnerships with external manufacturers, and we are planning to further invest in our card production capabilities. Additionally, we continue to invest in enhancements to our data center infrastructure to support the expected growth of our cloud service offerings.

In addition to the initiatives noted above, on January 27, 2016, we commenced the implementation of a worldwide restructuring plan designed to refocus resources on our core business segments, including physical access and transponders, and to further consolidate our operations in several worldwide locations. The restructuring plan includes a reduction of approximately 25% of our non-manufacturing employee base, reallocating overhead roles into direct business activities and the elimination of certain management and executive roles. See Note 11, Restructuring and Severance, and Note 15, Subsequent Events, in the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements for more information.

Restructuring and Severance

As a result of the actions discussed above, certain employees related to non-core functions were terminated. In the year ended December 31, 2014, we recorded $3.1 million in restructuring, severance and other closure related costs. In addition, during the year ended December 31, 2015, we recorded $1.3 million in severance costs primarily related to restructuring within our sales and marketing organization in conjunction with recent corporate restructuring and cost reduction activities.

In connection with the January 2016 restructuring initiatives, we estimate that we will incur aggregate cash charges of approximately $1.6 million to $2.0 million, consisting of approximately $1.5 million to $1.75 million related to severance payments to employees and approximately $100,000 to $250,000 in lease termination fees. The majority of the charges are expected to be paid out during the first quarter of 2016.

29


Results of Operations

The following table includes segment net revenue and segment net profit information by business segment and reconciles gross profit to results of continuing operations before income taxes and noncontrolling interest. The results for 2015 and 2014 have been adjusted for divested businesses as discussed in Note 2 Discontinued Operations , in the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Premises:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net revenue

 

$

19,963

 

 

$

19,033

 

Gross profit

 

 

11,522

 

 

 

11,358

 

Gross profit margin

 

 

58

%

 

 

60

%

Identity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net revenue

 

 

11,950

 

 

 

17,045

 

Gross profit

 

 

5,040

 

 

 

8,232

 

Gross profit margin

 

 

42

%

 

 

48

%

Credentials:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net revenue

 

 

27,336

 

 

 

41,565

 

Gross profit

 

 

5,613

 

 

 

11,898

 

Gross profit margin

 

 

21

%

 

 

29

%

All Other:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net revenue

 

 

1,545

 

 

 

3,606

 

Gross profit

 

 

974

 

 

 

1,968

 

Gross profit margin

 

 

63

%

 

 

55

%

Total:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net revenue

 

 

60,794

 

 

 

81,249

 

Gross profit

 

 

23,149

 

 

 

33,456

 

Gross profit margin

 

 

38

%

 

 

41

%

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

9,151

 

 

 

6,902

 

Selling and marketing

 

 

20,236

 

 

 

20,635

 

General and administrative

 

 

19,604

 

 

 

12,751

 

Earn-out consideration

 

 

 

 

 

3,510

 

Impairment of goodwill

 

 

8,771

 

 

 

 

Restructuring and severance

 

 

1,266

 

 

 

3,098

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

59,028

 

 

 

46,896

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(35,879

)

 

 

(13,440

)

Non-operating income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

(1,908

)

 

 

(3,619

)

Foreign currency losses, net

 

 

(1,211

)

 

 

(1,270

)

Loss from continuing operations before income

   taxes and noncontrolling interest

 

$

(38,998

)

 

$

(18,329

)

 

30


The following table sets forth our statements of operations as a percentage of net revenue for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Net revenue

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

Cost of revenue

 

 

61.9

 

 

 

58.8

 

Gross profit

 

 

38.1

 

 

 

41.2

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

15.1

 

 

 

8.5

 

Selling and marketing

 

 

33.3

 

 

 

25.4

 

General and administrative

 

 

32.2

 

 

 

15.7

 

Earn-out consideration

 

 

 

 

 

4.3

 

Impairment of goodwill

 

 

14.4

 

 

 

 

Restructuring and severance

 

 

2.1

 

 

 

3.8

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

97.1

 

 

 

57.7

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(59.0

)

 

 

(16.5

)

Non-operating income (expense)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

(3.1

)

 

 

(4.5

)

Foreign currency losses, net

 

 

(2.0

)

 

 

(1.6

)

Loss from continuing operations before income taxes and noncontrolling interest

 

 

(64.1

)

 

 

(22.6

)

Income tax provision

 

 

(0.4

)

 

 

(0.1

)

Loss from continuing operations before noncontrolling interest

 

 

(64.5

)

 

 

(22.7

)

Income from discontinued operations, net of income taxes

 

 

 

 

 

0.7

 

Consolidated net loss

 

 

(64.5

)

 

 

(22.0

)

Less: Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest

 

 

0.1

 

 

 

0.1

 

Net loss attributable to Identiv, Inc. stockholders’ equity

 

 

(64.4

)%

 

 

(21.9

)%

 

Fiscal 2015 Compared with Fiscal 2014

Net Revenue

Net revenue in 2015 was $60.8 million, down 25% compared with $81.2 million in 2014. Net revenue was lower in 2015 primarily reflecting lower sales in our Identity, Credentials and All Other segments, partially offset by higher sales in our Premises segment. A more detailed discussion of revenues by segment follows below.  

Our products are sold to end customers in the government, enterprise and commercial markets to address vertical market segments including public services administration, military and defense, law enforcement, healthcare, education, banking, industrial, retail and critical infrastructure.

In our Premises segment, we provide solutions and services that enable the issuance, management and use of secure identity credentials in diverse markets. Our Premises segment includes products to secure buildings via an integrated access control system, and includes MX controllers, Velocity management software and TS door readers. Our modular Hirsch MX controllers are designed to be scalable, allowing customers to start with a small system and expand over time. Hirsch MX controllers can operate autonomously, whether as a single controller or as part of a networked system with Velocity software. The Hirsch Velocity software platform enables centralized management of access and security operations across an organization, including control of doors, gates, turnstiles, elevators and other building equipment, monitoring users as they move around a facility, preventing unwanted access, maintaining compliance and providing a robust audit trail. uTrust door readers provide unique features to support a number of security environments and standards. For example, uTrust Scramblepad readers employ numerical scrambling on the keypad to protect access codes from being stolen as they are entered. uTrust TS readers support the majority of legacy card credentials with a robust next-generation platform that can help companies migrate to more secure credentials and technologies, including smart cards, NFC and government-issued credentials. Because of the complex nature of the problems we address for our Premises solutions customers, pricing pressure is not prevalent in this segment.

Net revenue in our Premises segment was $20.0 million in 2015, an increase of 5% from $19.0 million in 2014. The increase in 2015 primarily was due to higher sales of physical access control solutions in the U.S., resulting from higher overall demand from U.S. Government customers compared to 2014.

31


In our Identity segment, we offer products to secur e enterprise information, including PCs, networks, email encryption, login, and printers via delivery of smart card reader products and identity management via our idOnDemand service. Identiv offers smart card readers - a broad range of contact, contactles s and mobile smart card readers, tokens and terminals - to enable logical (i.e., PC, network or data) access and security and identification applications, such as national ID, payment, e-Health and e-Government. Our idOnDemand service can be used to provis ion (i.e., create and issue) and manage identity credentials.

Net revenue in our Identity segment was $12.0 million in 2015, a decrease of 30% from $17.0 million in 2014. This decrease in Identity segment net revenue in 2015 was primarily the result of significant orders being received in 2014 from our German and Asian customers which were not repeated in 2015, and also reflects continuing economic uncertainty in the international markets we do business in as well as the negative impact of a strong U.S. dollar in 2015 compared to 2014.

In our Credentials segment, we offer access cards and RFID and NFC products, including cards, inlays, labels, tags and stickers, as well as other RF components. These products are manufactured in our state-of-the-art facility in Singapore and are used in a diverse range of identity-based applications, including electronic entertainment, loyalty schemes, mobile payment, transit and event ticketing. In our RFID and NFC product business, there is a trend towards a higher overall average selling price as we sell a higher proportion of finished tickets and tags in addition to our inlays. The margins for access cards have been relatively stable.

Net revenue in our Credentials segment was $27.3 million in 2015, down 34% from $41.6 million in 2014. The Credential net revenue decrease in 2015 was primarily due to the timing of the receipt of orders in North America and Europe for electronic game toy pieces and other Internet of Things applications.

The All Other segment includes sales of our Chipdrive brand and Digital Media reader products.

Net revenue in our All Other segment was $1.5 million in 2015, down 57% from $3.6 million in 2014. Digital Media reader product sales were down significantly in 2015 compared to 2014 and are expected to remain at low levels as certain customers are expected to exit this business.

Gross Profit

Gross profit for 2015 was $23.1 million, or 38% of revenues, compared to $33.5 million or 41% of revenues in 2014. Gross profit represents revenues less direct cost of product sales, manufacturing overhead, other costs directly related to preparing the product for sale including freight, scrap, inventory adjustments and amortization, where applicable. Gross profit margins were down in 2015 primarily related to product mix with significantly higher sales in our lower-margin segments and inventory write downs and reserve adjustments.

In our Premises segment, gross profit on sales of physical access control solutions, including panels, controllers, and access readers was $11.5 million in 2015 and $11.4 million in 2014. Gross profit was higher in 2015 as a direct result of higher sales in the Premises segment in 2014. Gross profit margins in the Premises segment were relatively stable ranging from 58% in 2015 to 60% in 2014.

In our Identity segment, gross profit on sales of information readers and modules as well as cloud-based credential provisioning and management services was $5.0 million in 2015 compared to $8.2 million in 2014. Gross profit was lower in 2015 as a direct result of lower sales in the Identity segment in 2014. Gross profit margins in the Identity segment were lower in 2015 at 42% compared to 48% in 2014 due to product mix and the negative impact of absorbing fixed overhead over a smaller revenue base in the period.

In our Credentials segment, gross profit on sales of RFID & NFC inlays and tags was $5.6 million in 2015 and $11.9 million in 2014. Gross profit was lower in 2015 as a direct result of higher sales of transponders in the Credentials segment in 2014. Gross profit margins in the Credentials segment decreased from 29% in 2014 to 21% in 2015.

We expect there will be some variation in our gross profit from period to period, as our gross profit has been and will continue to be affected by a variety of factors, including, without limitation, competition, product pricing, the volume of sales in any given quarter, manufacturing volumes, product configuration and mix, the availability of new products, product enhancements, software and services, risk of inventory write-downs and the cost and availability of components.

32


Operating Expenses

Information about our operating expenses for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 is set forth below.

Research and Development

 

 

 

Fiscal

2015

 

 

Fiscal

2014

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

 

 

($ in thousands)

 

Research and development expenses

 

$

9,151

 

 

$

6,902

 

 

$

2,249

 

 

 

32.6

%

Percentage of revenue

 

 

15

%

 

 

8

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development expenses consist primarily of employee compensation and fees for the development of hardware, software and firmware products. We focus the bulk of our research and development activities on the continued development of existing products and the development of new offerings for emerging market opportunities.

Research and development expenses were higher in 2015 primarily due to the transfer of existing employees into research and development and the addition of new employees, leading to higher payroll costs and travel expenses, as well as higher costs for external services and contractors in 2015.  

Selling and Marketing

 

 

 

Fiscal

2015

 

 

Fiscal

2014

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

 

 

($ in thousands)

 

Selling and marketing expenses

 

$

20,236

 

 

$

20,635

 

 

$

(399

)

 

 

(1.9

)%

Percentage of revenue

 

 

33

%

 

 

25

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selling and marketing expenses consist primarily of employee compensation as well as amortization expense of certain intangible assets, tradeshow participation, advertising and other marketing and selling costs.

The level of selling and marketing expenses represents the stabilization of sales and marketing organization headcount and marketing program spending resulting from actions begun in 2013 to simplify our business structure and streamline our operations.

General and Administrative

 

 

 

Fiscal

2015

 

 

Fiscal

2014

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

 

 

($ in thousands)

 

General and administrative expenses

 

$

19,604

 

 

$

12,751

 

 

$

6,853

 

 

 

53.7

%

Percentage of revenue

 

 

32

%

 

 

16

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of compensation expenses for employees performing administrative functions, and professional fees incurred for legal, auditing and other consulting services.

General and administrative spending in 2015 increased from 2014 due to a large increase in legal and professional fees and increases in stock-based compensation.

Earn-out and Impairment Charges

 

 

 

Fiscal

2015

 

 

Fiscal

2014

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

 

 

($ in thousands)

 

Earn-out consideration

 

$

 

 

$

3,510

 

 

$

(3,510

)

 

 

 

Impairment of goodwill

 

$

8,771

 

 

$

 

 

$

8,771

 

 

100%

 

 

33


Pursuant to the terms of the Stock Purchase Agreement entered into on April 29, 2011 between the selling stockholders of idOnDemand, Inc. (the “idOnDemand Agreement”) and us, we accrued an earn-out obligation for the year ended December 31, 2014. The estimated earn-out consideration was calculated based on the achievement of specific financial and sales performance targets as defined in the idOnDemand Agreement. The earn-out consideration liability was settled during the quarter ended June 30, 201 5 by the issuance of common stock to the selling shareholders.

As detailed in Note 6, Goodwill and Intangible Assets in the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements, under our accounting policy, we are required to perform an annual impairment review of our goodwill and an interim analysis of our long-lived assets, when there are changes in our business that may indicate impairment of those assets.

During the second quarter of 2015, we noted certain indicators of impairment, including a sustained decline in the price of our common stock and continued reduced performance in our Identity reporting unit. Based on the results of step one of the goodwill impairment analysis, we determined that the net adjusted carrying value exceeded the estimated fair value of the Identity reporting unit. As a result, we concluded that the carrying value of goodwill for our Identity reporting unit was fully impaired and recorded an impairment charge of approximately $ 1.0 million in our consolidated statements of operations during the second quarter of 2015.   

 

During the quarter ended December 31, 2015, our stock price declined significantly which resulted in a significant reduction in our fair value and market capitalization. The stock price declined from $3.64 as of October 1, 2015 to $1.99 as of December 31, 2015, and subsequently dropped further, reaching a low of $1.56 in February 2016. Additionally, our net losses continued in the quarter ended December 31, 2015, and we announced a worldwide restructuring plan designed to refocus resources on our core business segments and to consolidate operations in several worldwide locations. As a result, we performed an impairment test and determined that our goodwill was fully impaired based on qualitative factors as the net fair value of the company exceeded its carrying value. As a result, we recorded an impairment charge of $7.8 million in our consolidated statement of operations in the fourth quarter of 2015.

In December 2014, we performed our annual goodwill impairment test and found no potential indicators of impairment. In addition, our assessments of long-lived assets during 2015 and 2014 found no indicators of impairment during the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014.

Restructuring and Severance Charges