UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934  

 

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2019

 

or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

Commission file number: 333-216054

 

AVRA MEDICAL ROBOTICS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Florida   47-3478854
(State or Other Jurisdiction of   (I.R.S. Employer
Incorporation or Organization)   Identification No.)

 

3259 Progress Drive, Suite 112A, Orlando, FL 32826

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(407) 956-2250

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

 

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒   No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (ss.232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☐    No ☒

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading Symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered
None        
         
         

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

 

Large Accelerated Filer Accelerated Filer
Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No ☒

The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock, $0.0001 par value, as of August 6, 2019 was 21,507,218 shares.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
     
PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION 1
     
Item 1. Financial Statements 1
     
  Condensed Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018(unaudited) 1
     
  Condensed Statements of Operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 and June 30, 2018 (unaudited) 2
     
  Condensed Statements of Cash Flows for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and June 30, 2017 (unaudited) 3
     
  Condensed Statement of Shareholders’ (Deficit) for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and June 30, 2018 (unaudited) 4
     
  Notes to Condensed Financial Statements (unaudited) 5
     
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 19
     
Item 3. Quantitative Disclosures About Market Risks 22
     
Item 4. Controls and Procedures 22
     
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION 24
     
Item 1. Legal Proceedings 24
     
Item 1A. Risk Factors 24
     
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 24
     
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities 24
     
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 24
     
Item 5. Other Information 24
     
Item 6. Exhibits 24
     
SIGNATURES 25

 

i

 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements.

 

AVRA MEDICAL ROBOTICS, INC.

CONDENSED BALANCE SHEETS

(Unaudited)

 

    June 30,
2019
    December 31,
2018
 
             
ASSETS            
CURRENT ASSETS:            
Cash and cash equivalents   $ 39,095     $ 35,716  
Other prepaid expenses and deposit     6,291       5,830  
Total Current Assets     45,386       41,546  
                 
EQUIPMENT     119,592       44,592  
Accumulated depreciation     (20,298 )     (9,252 )
      99,294       35,340  
OTHER ASSETS                
Intellectual Property     43,548       43,548  
Website     36,000       36,000  
Accumulated amortization     (17,000 )     (11,000 )
Total Other Assets     62,548       68,548  
                 
TOTAL ASSETS   $ 207,228     $ 145,434  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT                
CURRENT LIABILITIES:                
Accounts Payable   $ 105,414     $ 10,020  
Accrued expenses     459,323       328,450  
Stock Liability     96,591       81,313  
Notes payable - related party     122,500       15,000  
Promissory notes, net of discount of $9,914 and $0 at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018 respectively     100,086       15,000  
Total Current Liabilities     883,914       449,783  
                 
STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT                
Preferred stock, 5,000,000 shares authorized, $.0001 par value, none issued or outstanding     -       -  
Common stock, 100,000,000 shares authorized, $.0001 par value, 21,427,546 and 21,007,446 issued and outstanding at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018 respectively     2,143       2,101  
Additional paid-in capital     2,504,979       2,176,643  
Accumulated Deficit     (3,183,808 )     (2,483,093 )
Total Stockholders’ Deficit     (676,686 )     (304,349 )
                 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT   $ 207,228     $ 145,434  

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited Condensed Financial Statements.

 

1

 

 

AVRA MEDICAL ROBOTICS, INC.

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

   

For the

Three Months Ended

June 30,

   

For the

Six Months Ended

June 30,

 
    2019     2018     2019     2018  
                         
                         
Revenue   $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -  
                                 
OPERATING EXPENSES                                
Research and Development     27,812       4,229       51,874       16,281  
General and Administrative     355,693       201,298       641,197       427,676  
Total operating expenses     383,505       205,527       693,071       443,957  
                                 
OTHER INCOME AND (EXPENSES)                                
Interest Earned     1       18       5       44  
Interest Expense     (6,493 )     -       (7,649 )     -  
Total other income and (expenses)     (6,492 )     18       (7,644 )     44  
                                 
Loss before income tax taxes     (389,997 )     (205,509 )     (700,715 )     (443,913 )
                                 
Income tax provision     -       -       -       -  
                                 
NET LOSS   $ (389,997 )   $ (205,509 )   $ (700,715 )   $ (443,913 )
                                 
Loss per common share - basic and diluted     (0.02 )     (0.01 )     (0.03 )     (0.02 )
                                 
Weighted average common shares outstanding -  basic and diluted     21,424,194       20,862,746       21,274,498       20,791,685  

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited Condensed Financial Statements.

 

2

 

 

AVRA MEDICAL ROBOTICS, INC.

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF SHAREHOLDERS’ (DEFICIT)

FOR THE THREE AND SIX MONTHS ENDED June 30, 2019 AND 2018

(Unaudited)

 

    Common Stock     Additional Paid-In     Accumulated     Total Shareholders’
Equity
 
    Number     Amount     Capital     Deficit     (Deficit)  
                               
BALANCE AT DECEMBER 31, 2018     21,007,446     $ 2,101     $ 2,176,643     $ (2,483,093 )   $ (304,349 )
                                         
Stock based compensation expense     -       -       (3,369 )     -       (3,369 )
Net (loss) - 3 months ended March 31, 2019     -       -       -       (310,718 )     (310,718 )
Stock issued for services     115,050       11       143,802       -       143,813  
Stock warrants     -       -       16,221       -       16,221  
BALANCE AT MARCH 31, 2019     21,122,496     $ 2,112     $ 2,333,297     $ (2,793,811 )   $ (458,402 )
                                         
Net (loss) - 3 months ended June 30, 2019                           $ (389,997 )     (389,997 )
Exercise of stock options     210,000       21       39,464       -       39,485  
Stock issued for services     35,050       4       43,809       -       43,813  
Stock issued for services     60,000       6       74,994       -       75,000  
Stock based compensation expense     -       -       13,415       -       13,415  
                                         
BALANCE AS AT JUNE 30, 2019     21,427,546       2143     $ 2,504,979     $ (3,183,808 )   $ (676,686 )
                                         
BALANCE AT DECEMBER 31, 2017     20,644,746     $ 2,064     $ 1,621,800     $ (1,522,771 )   $ 101,093  
                                         
Stock based compensation expense     -       -       37,731       -       37,731  
Related party accrued expenses converted  into stock     19,500       2       38,998       -       39,000  
Stock issued for services     198,500       20       225,480       -       225,500  
Net (loss) - 3 months ended March 31, 2018     -       -       -       (238,404 )     (238,404 )
BALANCE AT MARCH 31, 2018     20,862,746     $ 2,086     $ 1,924,009     $ (1,761,175 )   $ 164,920  
                                         
Stock based compensation expense     -       -       7,050       -       7,050  
Net (loss) - 3 months ended June 30, 2018     -       -       -       (205,509 )     (205,509 )
                                         
BALANCE AS AT JUNE 30, 2018     20,862,746       2,086     $ 1,931,059     $ (1,966,684 )   $ (33,539 )

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

3

 

 

AVRA MEDICAL ROBOTICS, INC.

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

 

   

For the

Six Months Ended

June 30,

 
    2019     2018  
             
CASH FLOWS OPERATING ACTIVITIES:            
Net loss   $ (700,715 )   $ (443,913 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash (used in) provided by operating activities:              
Depreciation and amortization expense     17,046       5,845  
Stock compensation expense     198,935       44,781  
Non-cash interest     6,307       -  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:                
Prepaid expenses     (461 )     (1,372 )
Accounts payable and accrued expenses     333,767       152,347  
NET CASH USED IN OPERATING ACTIVITIES     (145,121 )     (242,312 )
                 
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:                
Website costs     -       (14,400 )
Equipment acquisition     (75,000 )     (4,167 )
NET CASH USED IN INVESTING ACTIVITIES     (75,000 )     (18,567 )
                 
FINANCING ACTIVITIES:                
Exercise of stock options     21,000       -  
Proceeds from shareholder loans     107,500       -  
Proceeds from promissory notes     95,000       -  
NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES     223,500       -  
                 
INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS     3,379       (260,879 )
                 
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - BEGINNING OF PERIOD     35,716       452,572  
                 
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - END OF PERIOD   $ 39,095     $ 191,693  
                 
Supplemental information of non-cash investing and financing activities:                
Cash paid for interest   $ -     $ -  
Cash paid for income taxes   $ -     $ -  
                 
Noncash financing activities:                
Stock issued for website and services   $ 262,626     $ 24,000  
Related party note payable converted to common stock   $ -     $ 18,000  

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited Condensed Financial Statements.

 

4

 

 

AVRA MEDICAL ROBOTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

  

NOTE 1 – FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

AVRA Medical Robotics, Inc. (the “Company” or “Avra”) was incorporated as AVRA Surgical Microsystems, Inc. in the State of Florida on February 4, 2015. Effective November 5, 2015, the Company’s corporate name was changed to AVRA Medical Robotics, Inc. The Company was established to develop advanced medical surgical devices. The Company is structured to invest in four principal areas – surgical robotic systems, surgical tools, implantable devices and surgical robotic training.

 

The significant accounting policies of Avra were described in Note 1 to the audited financial statements included in the Company’s 2018 Annual Report on Form 10-K (the “2018 Form 10-K”). There have been no significant changes in the Company’s significant accounting policies for the three months ended June 30, 2019.

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed financial statements of the Company have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) for interim financial information and in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Therefore, they do not include all information and footnotes normally included in annual consolidated financial statements and should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in the 2018 Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018. In the opinion of the Company’s management, the accompanying unaudited condensed financial statements contain all the adjustments necessary (consisting only of normal recurring accruals) to present the financial position of the Company as of June 30, 2019 and the results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented. The results of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of the operating results for the full fiscal year or any future period.

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming the continuation of the Company as a going concern. The Company has not yet established an ongoing source of revenues sufficient to cover its operating costs and is dependent on debt and equity financing to fund its operations. Management of the Company is making efforts to raise additional funding until a registration statement relating to an equity funding facility is in effect. While management of the Company believes that it will be successful in its capital formation and planned operating activities, there can be no assurance that the Company will be able to raise additional equity capital, or be successful in the development and commercialization of the products it develops or initiates collaboration agreements thereon. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that may result from the possible inability of the Company to continue as a going concern.

 

5

 

 

NOTE 2 - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all cash on hand, cash accounts not subject to withdrawal restrictions or penalties, and all highly liquid debt instruments purchased with a maturity of three months or less to be cash and cash equivalents.

 

Stock Compensation Expense

 

The Company accounts for equity instruments issued in exchange for the receipt of goods or services from other than employees in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 505, “Equity.” Costs are measured at the estimated fair market value of the consideration received or the estimated fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The value of equity instruments issued for consideration other than employee services is determined on the earlier of a performance commitment or completion of performance by the provider of goods or services as defined by ASC Topic 505.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes pursuant to ASC Topic 740 “ Income Taxes. ” Under ASC Topic 740, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on temporary differences between the bases of certain assets and liabilities for income tax and financial reporting purposes. The deferred tax assets and liabilities are classified according to the financial statement classification of the assets and liabilities generating the differences. A valuation allowance is recorded when it is more likely than not that some or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

 

The Company applies the provisions of ASC Topic 740-10-05 “ Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes .” The ASC clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise’s financial statements. The ASC prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. The ASC provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition.

 

Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities and expenses. The Company regularly evaluates estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates made by management.

 

6

 

 

Concentration of Credit Risk

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk consist principally of cash. The Company maintains its principal cash balance in a financial institution. These balances are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to $250,000. At June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, $0 were in excess of the FDIC insured limit, respectively.

 

Basic and Diluted Loss per Share

 

In accordance with ASC Topic 260 “ Earnings Per Share,  basic loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted loss per common share gives effect to dilutive convertible securities, options, warrants and other potential common stock outstanding during the period, only in periods in which such effect is dilutive. The Company only has stock options and convertible promissory notes that may be converted to outstanding potential common shares.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Effective January 1, 2018, the Company adopted guidance issued by the FASB regarding recognizing revenue from contracts with customers. The revenue recognition policies as enumerated below reflect the Company’s accounting policies effective January 1, 2018, which did not have a materially different financial statement result than what the results would have been under the previous accounting policies for revenue recognition.

 

Research and Development Costs

 

In accordance with ASC Topic 730 “Research and Development”, with the exception of intellectual property that is purchased from another enterprise and have alternative future use, research and development expenses are charged to operations as incurred. The Company purchased existing Intellectual Property from the University of Central Florida. Management regularly assesses the carrying value of the intellectual property to determine if there has been any diminution of value.

 

Equipment

 

Equipment is recorded at cost and depreciated using the straight-line method at rates determined to estimate the useful lives of the assets. The annual rates used in calculating depreciation is as follows:

 

Equipment -5 years straight-line

 

Website

 

Website is recorded at cost and amortized using the straight-line method over its estimated life of 3 years.

 

7

 

 

Long-lived Assets

 

In accordance with ASC 360, “ Property Plant and Equipment ”, the Company tests long-lived assets or asset groups for recoverability when events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying amount may not be recoverable. Circumstances which could trigger a review include, but are not limited to : significant decreases in the market price of the asset; significant adverse changes in the business climate or legal factors; accumulation of costs significantly in excess of the amount originally expected for the acquisition or construction of the asset; current cash flow or operating losses combined with a history of losses or a forecast of continuing losses associated with the use of the asset and current expectation that the asset will more than likely not be sold or disposed significantly before the end of its estimated useful life. Recoverability is assessed based on the carrying amount of the asset and its fair value which is generally determined based on the sum of the discounted cash flows expected to result from the use and the eventual disposal of the asset, as well as specific appraisal in certain circumstances. An impairment loss is recognized when the carrying amount is not recoverable and exceeds fair value.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Our financial instruments consist principally of accounts receivable, amounts due to related parties and promissory notes payable.

 

ASC 820  Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures  and ASC 825,  Financial Instruments   establish a framework for measuring fair value, establishes a fair value hierarchy based on the quality of the inputs used to measure fair value, and enhances disclosure requirements for fair value measurements.

 

Fair Value Hierarchy

 

The Company has categorized its financial statements, based on the priority of inputs to the valuation technique, into a three-tier fair value hierarchy. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1) and the lowest level priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3).

 

Financial assets and liabilities recorded on the balance sheet are categorized based on inputs to the valuation techniques as follows:

 

Level 1

Financial assets and liabilities for which values are based on unadjusted quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in an active market that management has the ability to access.

   
Level 2

Financial assets and liabilities for which values are based on quoted prices in markets that are not active or model inputs that are observable either directly or indirectly for substantially the full term of the asset or liability (commodity derivatives and interest rate swaps).

   
Level 3

Financial assets and liabilities for which values are based on prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both unobservable and significant to the overall fair value measurement. These inputs reflect management’s own assumptions about the assumptions a market participant would use in pricing the asset or liability.

 

8

 

 

When the inputs used to measure fair value fall within different levels of the hierarchy, the level within which the fair value measurement is categorized is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement in its entirety.

 

The carrying amounts of cash and cash equivalents and promissory notes approximate fair value because of the short-term nature of these items.

 

NOTE 3 - RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

Simplifying the Goodwill Impairment Test

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued an accounting standard update that simplifies the subsequent measurement of goodwill by eliminating the second step of the goodwill impairment test. Under the new standard, goodwill impairment should be recognized based on the amount by which the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, but should not exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to the reporting unit. The amendments in this accounting standard update are to be applied prospectively and are effective for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, with early adoption permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. The provisions of this accounting standard update did not have an impact on our financial statements.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standard Update (“ASU”) 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” (“ASU 2014-09”). ASU 2014-09 amends the accounting guidance on revenue recognition. The amendments in this accounting standard update are intended to provide a more robust framework for addressing revenue issues, improve comparability of revenue recognition practices, and improve disclosure requirements. Under the new standard, revenue is recognized when a customer obtains control of promised goods or services and is recognized in an amount that reflects the consideration which the entity expects to receive in exchange for those goods or services. The principles in the standard should be applied using a five-step model that includes 1) identifying the contract(s) with a customer, 2) identifying the performance obligations in the contract, 3) determining the transaction price, 4) allocating the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract, and 5) recognizing revenue when (or as) the performance obligations are satisfied. The standard also requires disclosure of the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. In addition, the standard amends the existing requirements for the recognition of a gain or loss on the transfer of nonfinancial assets that are and are not in a contract with a customer (for example, sales of real estate) to be consistent with the standard’s guidance on recognition and measurement (including the constraint on revenue). The FASB also subsequently issued several amendments to the standard, including clarification on principal versus agent guidance, identifying performance obligations, and immaterial goods and services in a contract.

 

The Company adopted ASU 2014-09 and its related amendments (collectively known as ASC 606) effective on January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective approach applied only to contracts not completed as of the date of adoption, with no restatement of comparative periods. Therefore, the comparative information has not been adjusted and continues to be reported under ASC Topic 605. Please see refer earlier in Note 2 for a discussion of the Company’s updated policies related to revenue recognition, accounting for costs to obtain and fulfill a customer contract and for the disclosures related to adopting this standard.

 

9

 

 

Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments

 

In August 2016, the FASB issued an accounting standard update that provides classification guidance on eight specific cash flow issues, for which guidance previously did not exist or was unclear. The amendments in this accounting standard update are effective for periods beginning after December 15, 2017. Early adoption is permitted for any entity in any interim or annual period. The provisions of this accounting standard update did not have a material impact on our statements of cash flows.

 

Compensation—Stock Compensation

 

In May 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-09, “Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Scope of Modification Accounting,” that provides guidance about which changes to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award require an entity to apply modification accounting. The new guidance became effective for the Company on January 1, 2018 and was applied on a prospective basis, as required. The adoption of this standard did not have an impact on the financial statements or the related disclosures.

 

Income Statement – Reporting Comprehensive Income

 

In February 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, “Income Statement – Reporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income” to address stakeholder concerns about the guidance in current GAAP that requires deferred tax liabilities and assets to be adjusted for the effect of a change in tax laws or rates with the effect included in income from continuing operations in the reporting period that includes the enactment date. The amendments in this update allow a reclassification from accumulated other comprehensive income to retained earnings for stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the “2017 Act”). The ASU must be applied either in the period of adoption or retrospectively to each period in which the effect of the change in the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate in the 2017 Act is recognized. The Company made the election to early adopt ASU 2018-02 as of January 1, 2018, the standard did not have an impact our financial statements.

 

Intangibles – Goodwill and Other – Internal-Use Software

 

In September 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, “Intangibles – Goodwill and Other – Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That Is a Service Contract” which requires cloud computing arrangements in a service contact to follow the internal-use software guidance provided by ASC 350-40 in determining the accounting treatment of implementation costs. ASC 350-40 states that only qualifying costs incurred during the application development stage may be capitalized. The Company made the election to early adopt ASU 2018-15 on a retrospective basis, and the standard did not have an impact our financial statements.

 

10

 

 

Derivatives and Hedging

 

In August 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-12, “Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities.” The ASU is targeted at simplifying the application of hedge accounting and aims at aligning the recognition and presentation of the effects of hedge instruments and hedge items. ASU 2016-02 is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2019 and it did not have an impact on the financial statements and related disclosures.

 

Leases

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, “Leases (Topic 842)” (“ASU 2016-02”). The FASB issued ASU 2016-02 to increase transparency and comparability among organizations recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements. Under ASU 2016-02, lessors will account for leases using an approach that is substantially equivalent to existing GAAP for sales-type leases, direct financing leases and operating leases. Unlike current guidance, however, a lease with collectability uncertainties may be classified as a sales-type lease. If collectability of lease payments, plus any amount necessary to satisfy a lessee residual value guarantee, is not probable, lease payments received will be recognized as a deposit liability and the underlying assets will not be derecognized until collectability of the remaining amounts becomes probable. ASU 2016-02 is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted, and must be adopted using a modified retrospective transition. The Company adopted the standard effective January 1, 2019, utilizing the lessor practical expedient. Since the Company has only one lease and it is short term, the standard did not have an impact on our balance sheets or statements of operations.

 

NOTE 4 – Research collaboration agreement

 

Effective May 1, 2016, the Company entered into a Research Agreement (the “Research Agreement”) with the University of Central Florida (“UCF” or the “University”) for the development of a prototype surgical robotic device supporting minimal invasive surgical facial corrections.

 

The Agreement provides that the University will provide personnel to accomplish the objectives as stated in the Statement of Work over a period extending to September 30, 2017. Effective May 1, 2017, the research agreement with the University of Central Florida has been extended to April 30, 2021. No additional payments to the University were required.

 

The Company agreed to extend funding of $163,307 from Avra’s existing funds.

 

In addition, Avra has paid $43,548 for outright ownership of the University’s Intellectual Property resulting from the collaboration, which amount is shown as Intellectual Property. Management has assessed the carrying value of the asset and believes there has been no diminution of its value and accordingly, no adjustment is necessary.

 

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The total cost to the Company is:

 

Research Expense -funded from existing funds   $ 163,307  
Acquisition of Intellectual Property Rights     43,548  
Total   $ 206,855  

 

For the six and three months ended June 30, 2019, $51,874 and $27,812 had been paid under the Agreement, respectively. For the six and three months ended June 30, 2018, $4,229 and $16,281 had been paid under the Agreement, respectively. The balance of the amount owing to the University was fully paid on February 24, 2017 and April 7, 2017. Additionally, a $68,952 matching funds grant from the Florida High Tech Corridor Council (FHTCC) was approved on July 16, 2016 which will provide the University research funds in addition to the Company’s funding obligation to the University. The FHTCC research grant is subject to certain research obligations and action requirements which if not met may result in the loss of the FHTCC research funding. The agreement further provides for the payment of a 1% royalty to the University in any year when the sales of products using the intellectual property exceeds $20,000,000.

 

NOTE 5 – ACCRUED EXPENSES

 

Accrued Expenses include $240,000 and $150,000 of accrued officer compensation at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018 respectively.

 

NOTE 6 – PROMISSORY NOTES

 

During the year ended December 31, 2016, the Company borrowed $480,000 under 7.5% Convertible Promissory Note Agreements. The Notes were due September 30, 2017 and bore interest at 7.5%. The noteholders had agreed to extend the maturity to October 31, 2017. The notes were convertible into common stock of the Company at $0.50 per share in the event of a voluntary conversion on or before an optional prepayment or the maturity date, or (1) the lower of $0.50 or (2) a 20% discount to the effective price per share offering price in the event of a mandatory conversion upon consummation of a “Qualified Financing”, as defined. The Company had pledged all assets as security for the notes. In the event of default, the notes would bear interest at 12% per annum.

 

Based upon the Company’s funding of $542,260, a Qualified Financing, a mandatory conversion of the $480,000 in principal of Convertible Notes was triggered. The $480,000 in principal plus accrued interest were converted into 960,000 common shares and three-year Warrants to purchase 144,000 common shares at $1.25 per share.

 

Further, the Company borrowed $100,000 from an individual on May 16, 2016 under a note bearing interest at 5%. The note, along with accrued interest, was repaid on September 30, 2016.

 

On December 31, 2018, the Company borrowed $15,000 under a non-interest bearing promissory note from a related party. The note matures on December 31, 2019. Also on December 31, 2018, the Company borrowed an additional $15,000, with interest payable annually at 4%, maturing on December 31, 2019.

 

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During January 2019, the Company borrowed $20,000 under a non interest bearing promissory note which matures on December 31, 2019.

 

On February 6, 2019, the Company borrowed from its CEO, $17,500 under a non interest bearing promissory note which matures on February 6, 2020.

 

On March 11, 2019, the Company borrowed $25,000 under a promissory note bearing an annual interest rate of 5% and which matures on September 11, 2019. The loan includes a warrant to purchase 12,500 common shares at a strike price of $1.25 per share. The warrant expires in 3 years.

 

On March 14, 2019, the Company borrowed $25,000 under a promissory note bearing an annual interest rate of 5% and which matures on September 14, 2019. The loan includes a warrant to purchase 12,500 common shares at a strike price of $1.25 per share. The warrant expires in 3 years.

 

On March 29, 2019, the Company borrowed $25,000 under a promissory note bearing an annual interest rate of 5% and which matures on September 29, 2019. The loan includes a warrant to purchase 12,500 common shares at a strike price of $1.25 per share. The warrant expires in 3 years.

 

On May 8, 2019, the Company borrowed from its CEO, $25,000 under a non interest bearing promissory note which matures on May 8, 2020.

 

On May 29, 2019, the Company borrowed from its CEO, $25,000 under a non interest bearing promissory note which matures on May 29, 2020.

 


On June 26, 2019, the Company borrowed from its CEO, $40,000 under a non interest bearing promissory note which matures on June 26, 2020.

 

The warrants are valued at $16,221 using Black Scholes and such amount has been recorded as Unamortized Discount on Notes Payable and is being amortized over six months, the maturity term of the notes payable. During the six and three months ended June 30, 2019, $6,307 and $5,406 respectively of the discount was amortized and charged to interest expense.

 

NOTE 7– INCOME TAXES

 

The Company’s deferred tax assets at June 30, 2019 consist of net operating loss carry forwards of $2,579,192. Using a new federal statutory tax rate of 21%, the valuation allowance balance as of June 30, 2019 total of $541,630. The increase in the valuation allowance balance for the six months ended June 30, 2019 of $62,505 is entirely attributable to the net operating loss.

 

The Company’s deferred tax assets at December 31, 2018 consist of net operating loss carry forwards of $2,083,255. Using a federal statutory tax rate of 21%, the valuation allowance balance as of December 31, 2018 total of $437,484.

 

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Due to the uncertainty of their realization, no income tax benefits have been recorded by the Company for these loss carry forwards as valuation allowances have been established for any such benefits. The increase in the valuation allowance was the result of increases in the net operating losses discussed above. Therefore, the Company’s provision for income taxes is $-0- for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018.

 

At June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, the Company had no material unrecognized tax benefits and no adjustments to liabilities or operations were required. The Company does not expect that its unrecognized tax benefits will materially increase within the next twelve months. The Company recognizes interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions in general and administrative expense. At June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, the Company has not recorded any provisions for accrued interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions.

 

The Company files U.S. federal and state income tax returns in jurisdictions with varying statutes of limitations.

 

NOTE 8 – STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

The Company is authorized to issue up to 100,000,000 shares of common stock, $0.0001 par value per share plus 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.0001. On February 1, 2016 subscriptions were issued for 5,899,600 shares of common stock at $0.0001 per share (total $590). In February 2017, the Company raised an additional $135,000 from a private offering of 135,000 shares of common stock at a price of $1.00 per share made to three investors.

 

On September 30, 2017, the Company raised an additional $542,260, from a private offering of 433,808 shares of common stock at a price of $1.25 per share.

 

Effective April 1, 2017, the Company entered into Conversion Agreements with its Chairman/CEO and its former Chief Financial Officer whereby each agreed to convert the amounts owing to them as of March 31, 2017 as compensation into common stock of the Company at a price of $2.00 per share. Furthermore, the former Chief Financial Officer had agreed to convert any future amounts due as compensation per his Employment Agreement effective through August 1, 2017, into shares of common stock at $2.00 per share as such amounts are earned, and the Chairman/CEO had agreed to convert any future amounts in excess of $2,500 per month due as compensation through July 1, 2017, per his Employment Agreement, into shares of common stock at $2.00 per share as such amounts are earned. On April 1, 2017, 57,438 shares were issued under the agreement to convert compensation due to the Chairman/CEO and its former Chief Financial Officer. Both agreements were renewed upon their respective expirations. As of July 1, 2017, the Chairman/CEO agreed to convert any future amounts in excess of $2,500 per month due as compensation through December 31, 2017, per his Employment Agreement, into shares of common stock at $2.00 per share, as such amounts are earned. As of August 1, 2017, its former Chief Financial Officer agreed to convert all cash payments due to the employee per his Employment Agreement, into shares of common stock using a price of $2.00 per share, as such amounts are earned.

 

On September 30, 2017, the Chairman/CEO and its former Chief Financial Officer converted $117,000 of compensation owed into 58,500 common shares.

 

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In addition, on September 30, 2017, the promissory notes of $480,000 were converted into 960,000 shares of common stock (see Note 5). The interest due on the promissory note was exchanged for Warrants to purchase 144,000 common shares at $1.25. The Warrants expire on the third-year anniversary.

 

On February 23, 2018, the board of directors of Avra authorized the issuance of an aggregate of 218,000 shares of Avra’s common stock (the “Shares”) as follows:

 

150,000 Shares at a value of $1.25 per Share, to six consultants and service providers for services rendered through December 31, 2017;
     
35,000 Shares, at a value of $1.25 per Share, to Farhan Taghizadeh, M.D., Avra’s Chief Medical Officer, for services rendered during the period September 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017; and
     
19,500 and 13,500 Shares, at a value of $2.00 per Share, to Barry F. Cohen and A. Christian Schauer, our Chief Executive Officer and its former Chief Financial Officer, respectively, pursuant to Conversion Agreements with each of such officers, under which they converted all December 31, 2017 accrued but unpaid compensation due them under their respective employment agreements with the Company into the Shares..

 

On August 13, 2018 the Company sold 16,000 shares of its common stock for $20,000.

 

On October 4, 2018, the Board of Directors adopted the following resolutions and took the following actions by unanimous written consent in lieu of a meeting in accordance with the applicable provisions of the Florida business Corporation Act:

 

128,300 shares of restricted common stock required to be issued, to six consultants and service providers for services rendered through September 30, 2018;
     
400 shares of restricted common stock required to be issued, for services rendered through February 28, 2018;

 

On January 4, 2019, 115,050 Shares at a value of $1.25 per Share was issued for service rendered.

 

On April 1, 2019, 95,050 Shares at a value of $1.25 per Share was issued for services rendered.

 

Holders are entitled to one vote for each share of common stock. No preferred stock has been issued.

 

NOTE 9 – 2016 INCENTIVE STOCK PLAN

 

On August 1, 2016, the Company adopted the 2016 Incentive Stock Plan (the “Plan”). The Plan provides for the granting of options to employees, directors, consultants and advisors to purchase up to 3,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. The Board is responsible for administration of the Plan. The Board determines the term of each option, the option exercise price, the number of shares for which each option is granted and the rate at which each option is exercisable. Incentive stock options may be granted to any officer or employee at an exercise price per share of not less than the fair market value per common share on the date of the grant.

 

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For options granted October 1, 2017, the following factors were used: volatility 45.07%; expected term of 3 years, risk-free interest rate of 2.00%, dividend yield of 0% and exercise price of $1.25 per share.

 

For options granted May 1, 2018, the following factors were used: volatility 62.16%; expected term of 3 years, risk-free interest rate of 2.00%, dividend yield of 0% and exercise price of $1.25 per share.

 

For options granted July 1, 2018, the following factors were used: volatility 31.34%; expected term of 3 years, risk-free interest rate of 2.00%, dividend yield of 0% and exercise price of $1.25 per share.

 

On July 1, 2018 options for 75,000 shares were issued to our Counsel for services rendered totaling $21,000. These shares are vested immediately and expire on July 1, 2023. The exercise price is $1.25.

 

For the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, 210,000 and zero options were exercised. Non-vested Options for 97,639 shares were forfeited during March 2018.

 

At June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018 options representing 2,280,417 shares and 2,243,250 shares were vested or exercisable, respectively.

 

All options issued to-date expire after five years from the issue date. Except for the option for one million shares issued to the CEO and to the Company’s counsel for 115,000 shares that vested immediately, all the options issued to date vest over three years.

 

Stock options are accounted for in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718, Compensation –Stock Compensation , with option expense amortized over the vesting period based on the Black-Scholes option-pricing model fair value on the grant date, which includes a number of estimates that affect the amount of expense. During the three months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, $15,117 and $7,981 respectively, of expensed stock options has been recorded as stock-based compensation and classified in general and administrative expense on the Statement of Operations. The total amount of unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested options was $98,787 as of June 30, 2019. This amount will be recognized over a period of 25 months expiring April 2021.

 

The grant date fair value of options granted during the year of 2016 were estimated on the grant date using the Black-Scholes model with the following assumptions: expected volatility of 181%, expected term of 2.9 years, risk-free interest rate of 2.00% and expected dividend yield of 0% for the options granted on August 15, 2016 with an exercise price of $0.10 per share and; expected volatility of 73.64%, expected term of 2.9 years, risk-free interest rate of 2.00% and expected dividend yield of 0% for the options granted on October 1, 2016 with an exercise price of $0.15 per share. For options granted January 1, 2017, the following factors were used; volatility 63.05%; expected term of 2.9 years, risk-free interest rate of 2.00%, dividend yield of 0% and exercise price of $0.15 per share. For options granted August 1, 2017, the following factors were used: volatility 36.18%; expected term of 2.9 years, risk-free interest rate of 2.00%, dividend yield of 0% and exercise price of $1.00 per share. For options granted May 1, 2018, the following factors were used; volatility 62.16%; expected term of 3 years, risk-free interest rate of 2.00%, dividend yield of 0% and exercise price of $1.25 per share. For options granted July 1, 2018, the following factors were used; volatility 31.34%; expected term of 3 years, risk-free interest rate of 2.00%, dividend yield of 0% and exercise price of $1.25 per share. For options issued on February 1, 2019, volatility 50.58%; expected term of 3 years, risk-free interest rate of 2.00%, dividend yield of 0% and exercise price of $2.00 per share.

 

Expected volatility is based on the average of the historical volatility of the stock prices of a blend of five publicly traded companies operating in a similar industry as that of the Company. The risk-free rate is based on the rate of U.S Treasury zero-coupon issues with a remaining term equal to the expected life of the options. The Company uses historical data to estimate pre-vesting for feature rates.

 

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NOTE 10 – EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENTS

 

On July 1, 2016, the Company entered into an Employment Agreement with its Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. The agreement provides for an annual salary of $120,000 per year, increasing to $180,000 per year beginning July 2017. Through December 2016, the employee agreed to not receive the compensation in cash until the Board of Directors deemed it prudent to pay some or all of his salary. Further the Agreement provides that the employee will receive a three-year option to purchase 1,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share, and becoming fully vested on August 15, 2016.

 

On August 1, 2016, the Company entered into a one-year Employment Agreement with its Chief Financial Officer. The agreement provides for an annual salary of $108,000 per year. Through December 2016, the employee agreed to not receive the compensation in cash until the Board of Directors deemed it prudent to pay some or all of his salary. Further the Agreement provides that the employee will receive a three-year option to purchase 210,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share, with 70,000 shares becoming fully vested upon each yearly anniversary. The options are to be surrendered and cancelled if the Agreement is terminated. The Agreement has expired but its compensation terms continue in effect as long as the employee remains employed by the Company.

 

On August 1, 2016, the Company entered into a three-year Employment Agreement with its Vice President of Global Business Development. The agreement provides for an annual salary of $96,000 per year, increasing to $144,000 per year beginning July 2017. Through December 2016, the employee agreed to not receive the compensation in cash until the Board of Directors deemed it prudent to pay some or all of his salary. Further the Agreement provides that the employee will receive a three-year option to purchase 300,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share, with 100,000 shares vested on each yearly anniversary.

 

Further, on July 1, 2016, the Company entered into Indemnification Agreements with the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, and on August 1, 2016 the Chief Financial Officer and the Vice-President of Global Business Development providing for the Company to indemnify the individuals for all expenses, judgments, etc. incurred while serving in various capacities with the Company.

 

Commencing March 1, 2018, the Company entered into an employment agreement with its new Chief Strategy Officer whereby compensation will be determined upon sufficient funding of the Company. The Company granted a 300,000 share stock award under its 2016 Incentive Stock Plan, which vests in five equal annual installments of 60,000 shares each.

 

In addition, on May 1, 2018 options for 250,000 shares that vest monthly over 3 years were also issued to our Chief Strategy Officer. These options expire on May 1, 2023 and are exercisable at $1.25.

 

Commencing January 1, 2019, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with an IR/PR Company whereby compensation will be $1,500 per month for six months. Also, the Company will issue 36,000 restricted common shares as part of the compensation (see Note 13).

 

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NOTE 11 – EARNINGS PER SHARE

 

Basic earnings per share (“basic EPS”) is computed by dividing the net income or loss by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the reporting period. Diluted earnings per share (“diluted EPS”) gives effect to all dilutive potential shares outstanding. For the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, the potential exercise of stock options has been excluded from the computation of loss per share as the effect was anti-dilutive.

 

NOTE 12 – LEASE COMMITMENT

 

The Company occupies office and laboratory space in Orlando, Florida under a lease agreement that expired on July 31, 2017. Effective August 1, 2018 and modified on September 1, 2018, the agreement extended the lease term to July 31, 2019. The amended agreement provides that the Company pay insurance, maintenance and taxes with a monthly lease expense of $2,363.05. Either party may cancel the agreement at any time with 30 days’ notice.

 

NOTE 13 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

The Company has evaluated subsequent events through the date that the financial statements were issued and determined that there were subsequent events requiring adjustments to or disclosure in the financial statements.

 

On July 1, 2019, the Board of Directors adopted the following resolutions and took the following actions by unanimous written consent in lieu of a meeting in accordance with the applicable provisions of the Florida Business Corporation Act:

 

43,672 shares of restricted common stock required to be issued, to seven consultants and service providers for services rendered through June 30, 2019;

 

On July 1, 2019, 36,000 shares of restricted common stock was issued, to its IR/PR Company per the consulting agreement (see Note 10).

 

On July 19, 2019, the Company borrowed from its CEO, $50,000 under a non interest bearing promissory note which matures on July 19, 2020.

 

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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

When used in this report, unless otherwise indicated, the terms “ Avra ,” “ the Company ,” “ we ,” “ us ” and “ our ” refer to Avra Medical Robotics, Inc.

 

Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements

 

This report contains forward-looking statements that reflect our current views about future events. We use the words “ anticipate ,” “ assume ,” “ believe ,” “ estimate ,” “ expect ,” “ will ,” “ intend ,” “ may ,” “ plan ,” “ project ,” “ should ,” “ could ,” “ seek ,” “ designed ,” “ potential ,” “ forecast ,” “ target ,” “ objective ,” “ goal ” or the negatives of such terms or other similar expressions. These statements relate to future events or our future financial performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements.

 

Introduction

 

Avra is developing a fully autonomous medical robotic system using proprietary software which integrates Artificial Intelligence (“ AI ”) and Deep Learning or machine learning (“ DL ”). By using an AI and DL enhanced software program, Avra is creating an intelligent robotic arm that we believe can “ robotize ” a wide range of medical procedures currently being performed by human hands. Avra is concentrating its research and development efforts to meet rising expectations of patients and practitioners alike for the precision, safety and speed offered by robotics and AI when combined with proven medical devices, end-effectors and surgical instruments.

 

The Company’s medical robotic system utilizes a robotic arm that has 7-degrees of freedom integrated with its control software and algorithms. The robotic arm was designed and built under the required medical device standards of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“ FDA ”) requirements. The Company’s strategy is to integrate the robotic arm with FDA approved devices in the system, which is expected to allow for a more expedited approval of the integrated system. The Company believes that the FDA approval process will primarily focus upon validation of the medical robotic system’s software control.

 

In order to expedite securing approvals to market, Avra has retained the services of The Horizon Phoenix Group (“ HPG ”), a consulting firm experienced in securing U.S. and foreign approvals to market medical devices. HPG has prepared and filed an application with the FDA for the Company’s initial medical robotic system and anticipates that Avra will have its pre-collaboration meeting with the FDA in August 2019.

 

The Company plans to leverage the growing demand for practical medical robotic devices by developing a platform-independent precision guidance system, applicable to a variety of minimally and non-invasive procedures, with an initial focus on skin resurfacing. Our medical robotic system is expected to be capable of delivering skin resurfacing treatments, such as micro-needling and laser therapies with improved efficiency, accuracy and precision over the human hand. As a result, use of Avra’s medical robotic system is expected to provide improved quality and safety as well as improve patient throughput and flow.

 

Avra was deliberately organized into a senior leadership team with broad and deep experience in medical research, innovation and development in the medical robotics field. The Company believes that its team, which has been active in the medical robotics field for a number of years, brings the necessary skills and experience to develop and commercialize intelligent medical robotic systems, as well as in marketing, supply chain management, and the implementation of all other aspects of business operations. The Company believes that progress in mechanical and software engineering has made possible lightweight and relatively inexpensive robotic devices for difficult procedures in various medical fields.

 

Medical robots are already being successfully employed in several areas of surgery, including Urology (Prostate), Colo-Rectal, Gynecology, Thoracic, General Surgery, Orthopedics, Neuro and Spine Surgery. Robots are also being used for Tele-medicine and assistive robotic methods are addressing the delivery of healthcare in inaccessible locations, ranging from rural areas lacking specialist expertise to post-disaster scenarios, and battlefield areas. With the aging population dominating demographics in the U.S. across all spectrums of health care, robotic technologies are being developed toward promoting improved function, less morbidity and improved overall outcomes.

 

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Since 2016, Avra has had a research partnership with the University of Central Florida (“ UCF ”) to develop a prototype intelligent medical robotic system. UCF is recognized particularly for its work in the area of medical robotic research and design, focusing on the guidance systems. The system is being developed to be compatible with available surgical tools and enable Avra to initially penetrate a sizable and fast-growing aesthetics market which includes micro-needling and CO2 laser solutions. Avra’s device will allow surgeons and anyone permitted to treat a patient, defined at the State level, such as a licensed aesthetician to treat damaged skin semi-autonomously by delivering micro-needling to the skin. The micro-needling catalyzes the natural process of collagen remodeling, consisting of formation of new collagen, elastin, and vascularization in the papillary dermis, similar to the effect of CO2 laser treatments.

 

An analogy may be that Avra is developing the technologies for an autonomous robot just as other companies are developing the technologies for the driverless car. Since the robot industry has progressed greatly in miniaturization, adaptability and lower costs, the Avra “ brains ” component can lead to dramatic opportunities in all of medicine. A truly disruptive model - designed and developed through a seamless collaboration of the surgeon, the engineer and the scientist.

 

Avra believes that its initial medical robotic system will find rapid acceptance based on all the advantages of using robotics versus manual application and as no medical reimbursement issues are involved with most procedures in the skin resurfacing market.

 

However, since Avra is in development of its robotic system and is in the prototype stage, to date Avra has no products or training programs approved or ready for retail marketing and there can be no assurance as to when products will be ready to reach market. Unanticipated delays in market readiness will substantially harm the Company’s prospects.

 

The financial statements appearing elsewhere in this report have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern. The Company was recently formed and has not established sufficient operations or revenues to sustain the Company. These conditions raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

 

To date, the Company has relied on debt and equity raised in private offerings and shareholder loans to finance operations and no other sources of capital has been identified. If we experience a shortfall in operating capital, we could be faced with having to limit our research and development activities.

 

Results of Operations

 

Three months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to three months ended June 30, 2018

 

Revenues. We had no revenues during either the three months ended June 30, 2019 or the three months ended June 30 31, 2018.

 

Research and Development Expenses. Research and development expenses during the three months ended June 30, 2019 were $27,812, as compared to $4,229 for the three months ended June 30, 2018. Research and development expenses in both the 2019 and 2018 quarters, reflect continuing development work on the Company’s prototype robotic system at its facilities at UCF’s incubator in Orlando, Florida.

 

General and Administrative Expenses. We incurred $355,693 and $201,298 in general and administrative expenses during the three months ended June 30, 2019 and June 30, 2018, respectively. General and administrative expenses include compensation for the management staff, legal and other professional expenses related to the Company’s filings as a public company with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “ SEC ”) and stock-based compensation expense related to the Company’s 2016 Stock Incentive Plan.

 

Other Income/Expenses . We had $6,492 of other expenses during the three months ended June 30, 2019 consisting of $6,493 in interest expense related to loans, offset by interest earned of $1. This is compared to other income of $18 for the three months ended June 30, 2018, consisting entirely of interest earned.

 

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Net Loss. We incurred a net loss of $389,997 for the three months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to a net loss of $205,509 for the three months ended June 30, 2018.

 

Six months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to six months ended June 30, 2018

 

Revenues. We had no revenues during either the six months ended June 30, 2019 or the six months ended June 30, 2018.

 

Research and Development Expenses. Research and development expenses during the six months ended June 30, 2019 were $51,874, as compared to $16,281 for the six months ended June 30, 2018. Research and development expenses in both the 2019 and 2018 periods, reflect continuing development work on the Company’s prototype robotic system at its facilities at UCF’s incubator in Orlando, Florida.

 

General and Administrative Expenses. We incurred $641,197 and $427,626 in general and administrative expenses during the six months ended June 30, 2019 and June 30, 2018, respectively. General and administrative expenses include compensation for the management staff, legal and other professional expenses related to the Company’s filings as a public company with the SEC and stock-based compensation expense related to the Company’s 2016 Stock Incentive Plan.

  

Other Income/Expenses . We had $7,644 of other expenses during the six months ended June 30, 2019 consisting of $7,649 in interest expense related to loans, offset by interest earned of $5. This is compared to other income of $44 for the six months ended June 30, 2018, consisting entirely of interest earned.

 

Net Loss. We incurred a net loss of $700,715 for the six months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to a net loss of $443,913 for the six months ended June 30, 2018.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

The Company expects to require substantial funds for research and development, to continue to develop, secure marketing approval for and ultimately manufacture and market its initial medical robotic system. Until the Company is able to generate revenues from the sale of its initial medical robotic system, it expects to meet its operating cash flow requirements from the net proceeds of this Offering and if necessary, from future public or private sales of its securities and, if possible, on favorable terms, by entering into development partnerships to assist the Company with its technology development activities.

 

During the period from inception (February 4, 2015) through March 31, 2019, the Company raised (a) $1,900 from an initial private offering of its common stock in February 2017; (b) $480,000 from the private offering of the convertible notes completed in June 2017; (c) $135,000 from a private offering of 135,000 shares of common stock at a price of $1.00 per share completed in February 2017; (d) $542,260 from a private offering of 433,808 shares of stock in a private offering at a price of $1.25 per share completed in September 2017; and (e) $20,000 from the private sale of 16,000 shares of our common stock at a price of $1.25 per share in August 2018.

 

In March 2019, the Company sold 7.5 Units in a private offering of ten (10) units (“ Units ”), each Unit consisting of a $10,000 principal amount six-month promissory note bearing interest at the rate of 5% per annum and a three-year warrant to purchase 5,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $1.25 per share.

 

In addition to the foregoing, in December 2019, the Company obtained loans from Barry F. Cohen, our Chief Executive Officer and the late A. Christian Schauer, a former director and executive officer, and a third non-affiliated shareholder, in the principal amounts of $15,000, $20,000 and $15,000, respectively. The loans are due December 31, 2019 and do not bear interest, other than the loan obtained from the non-executive shareholder, which bears interest at the rate of 4% per annum, payable upon maturity. In February, May and July 2019, Mr. Cohen made additional one-year interest free loans to the Company in the principal amounts of $17,500, $25,000 and $50,000, respectively.

 

While we have been successful in raising funds to fund our operations since inception and we believe that we will be successful in obtaining the necessary financing to fund our operations going forward, we do not have any committed sources of funding and there are no assurances that we will be able to secure additional funding. The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern; however, if the efforts noted above are not successful, it would raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we cannot obtain financing, then we may be forced to further curtail our operations or consider other strategic alternatives. Even if we are successful in raising the additional financing, there is no assurance regarding the terms of any additional investment and any such investment or other strategic alternative would likely substantially dilute our current shareholders.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.  Actual results could differ from those estimates.  Significant estimates included deferred revenue, costs incurred related to deferred revenue, the useful lives of property and equipment and the useful lives of intangible assets.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes in accordance with ASC 740, Accounting for Income Taxes, as clarified by ASC 740-10, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes.  Under this method, deferred income taxes are determined based on the estimated future tax effects of differences between the financial statement and tax basis of assets and liabilities given the provisions of enacted tax laws.  Deferred income tax provisions and benefits are based on changes to the assets or liabilities from year to year.  In providing for deferred taxes, the Company considers tax regulations of the jurisdictions in which the Company operates, estimates of future taxable income, and available tax planning strategies.  If tax regulations, operating results or the ability to implement tax-planning strategies vary, adjustments to the carrying value of deferred tax assets and liabilities may be required.  Valuation allowances are recorded related to deferred tax assets based on the “more likely than not” criteria of ASC 740.

 

ASC 740-10 requires that the Company recognize the financial statement benefit of a tax position only after determining that the relevant tax authority would more likely than not sustain the position following an audit.  For tax positions meeting the “more-likely-than-not” threshold, the amount recognized in the financial statements is the largest benefit that has a greater than 50 percent likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement with the relevant tax authority.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

There are no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to investors.

 

Item 3. Quantitative Disclosures About Market Risks.

 

As a “ smaller reporting company, ” we are not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

Our Chief Executive Officer and Acting Chief Financial Officer, as our principal Executive, Financial and Accounting Officer, conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “ Exchange Act ”), as of June 30, 2019, to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports filed or submitted by us under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the SEC, including to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports filed or submitted by us under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Acting Chief Financial Officer, as our Principal Executive, Financial and Accounting Officer, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Acting Chief Financial Officer, as our principal Executive, Financial and Accounting Officer, has concluded that as of June 30, 2019, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective at the reasonable assurance level due to the material weaknesses identified and described in Item 9A(b) of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

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Our Chief Executive Officer and Acting Chief Financial Officer, as our principal Executive, Financial and Accounting Officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls or internal controls will prevent all error and all fraud. Although our disclosure controls and procedures were designed to provide reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and our principal executive officer has determined that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective at doing so, a control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute assurance that the objectives of the system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented if there exists in an individual a desire to do so. There can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions.

 

Changes in Internal Controls Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during the period covered by this report that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

  

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PART II -OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings.

 

Not Applicable.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

See the section entitled “ Risk Factors ” in Post-Effective Amendment No. 1 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-216054), declared effective by the SEC on December 20, 2018.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

 

During the second quarter of 2019, the Company issued the following shares of our common stock without registration under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “ Securities Act ”):

 

  (a) 19,000 shares to Farhan Taghizadeh, our Chief Medical Officer as compensation for his services as an employee of the Company; and

 

  (b) 124,672 shares to four non-affiliated consultants for services rendered.

 

 All the above shares of our common stock were issued pursuant to the exemptions from registration under the Securities Act afforded by Section 4(a)(2) thereof and the rules and regulations thereunder.

 

  Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.

 

None.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information.

 

None.

 

Item 6. Exhibits.

 

Exhibit No.   Description of Exhibit
     
31.1   Section 302 Certification
     
32.1   Section 906 Certification

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

  AVRA MEDICAL ROBOTICS, INC.
     
Dated: August 7, 2019 By: /s/ Barry F. Cohen
    Barry F. Cohen, Chief Executive Officer and
Acting Chief Financial Officer
    (Principal Executive, Financial and
Accounting Officer)

 

 

25

 

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