UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

☒   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

 

☐    TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _______ to ______

 

Commission File Number: 000-53443

 

COOL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada

75-3076597

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

8875 Hidden River Parkway, Suite 300

Tampa, Florida 33637

(Address of principal executive office)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (813) 975-7467

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

None

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Common Stock, $0.001 par value

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐   No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐   No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒   No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☒   No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large, accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicated by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ☐   No ☒

 

The aggregate market value of the shares of voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant as of June 30, 2020, the last business day of the Registrant’s last completed second quarter, based upon the closing price of $0.009 per share as reported by the OTCQB Stock Market on such date was $3,618,247. This computation is based on the number of issued and outstanding shares held by persons other than officers, directors and shareholders of 5% or more of the registrant’s common stock.

 

As of April 6, 2021, 563,182,690 shares of common stock are issued, and outstanding excluding 1,000,000 shares held in escrow.

 

Documents incorporated by reference: None

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Item No.

 

 

Page No.

 

PART I

1

Business

 

 

4

 

1A

Risk Factors

 

 

13

 

1B

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

 

21

 

2

Properties

 

 

21

 

3

Legal Proceedings

 

 

22

 

4

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

 

22

 

 

 

PART II

 

5

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

 

23

 

6

Selected Financial Data

 

 

27

 

7

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

 

27

 

7A

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

 

44

 

8

Financial Statements and Supplemental Data

 

 

45

 

9

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

 

46

 

9A

Controls and Procedures

 

 

46

 

9B

Other Information

 

 

47

 

 

 

PART III

 

10

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

 

48

 

11

Executive Compensation

 

 

53

 

12

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

 

56

 

13

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

 

58

 

14

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

 

 

59

 

 

PART IV

 

15

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

 

 

60

 

SIGNATURES

 

 

63

 

 
2

Table of Contents

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Report contains predictions, estimates and other forward-looking statements that relate to future events or our future financial performance. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expects,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential,” “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology.

 

Forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performances or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements represent our management’s beliefs and assumptions only as of the date of this Annual Report. You should read this Report and the documents that we have filed as exhibits to this Report completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect.

 

All forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made. We undertake no obligation to update such statements to reflect events that occur or circumstances that exist after the date on which they are made, except as required by federal securities and any other applicable law.

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

PART I

 

Item 1. Business

 

As used in this Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Report”), references to the “Company,” the “registrant,” “we,” “our” or “us” refer to Cool Technologies, Inc. and our 95% owned subsidiary, Ultimate Power Truck, LLC (“UPT”), unless the context otherwise indicates.

 

Corporate History

 

We were incorporated on July 22, 2002 in the State of Nevada under the name Bibb Corporation.

 

On September 3, 2010, we changed our name to Z3 Enterprises, Inc. (“Z3”), and on April 5, 2012, to HPEV, Inc. (“HPEV”) and on August 19, 2015 our stockholders voted to approve a name change to Cool Technologies, Inc. Our 95% owned subsidiary, Ultimate Power Truck, LLC (“UPT”), was formed on April 17, 2014 in the State of Florida.

 

On March 29, 2011, we entered into a share exchange agreement (which was amended on June 14, 2011) with HPEV, Inc., a Delaware corporation (“the Share Exchange Agreement”) to acquire 100 shares, constituting all of the issued and outstanding shares of HPEV, Inc. in consideration for the issuance of 22,000,000 shares of common stock. Upon closing of the share exchange on April 15, 2011, HPEV, Inc. became our wholly owned subsidiary. There was a change of control of our company on April 15, 2011 as a result of the issuance of 21,880,000 shares of our common stock to the original shareholders of HPEV, Inc. pursuant to the terms of the Share Exchange Agreement. An additional 120,000 shares were issued during the fourth quarter of 2011 which completed the issuance of 22,000,000 shares of common stock under the terms of the amended Share Exchange Agreement.

 

We filed an amendment to our Articles of Incorporation with the Secretary of State of the State of Nevada increasing our authorized shares of common stock, from 140,000,000 shares to 350,000,000 shares, effective March 22, 2017. We filed a second amendment to our Articles of Incorporation with the Secretary of State of the State of Nevada increasing our authorized shares of common stock, from 350,000,000 shares to 500,000,000 shares, effective October 28, 2019. We filed a third amendment to our Articles of Incorporation with the Secretary of State of the State of Nevada increasing our authorized shares of common stock, from 500,000,000 shares to 1,000,000,000 shares, effective February 13, 2020.

 

As of April 6, 2021, we have seven US patents, one Canadian patent, two granted patents (1 Mexican, 1 Canadian) and two pending applications (1 in the US, 1 in Brazil) covering composite heat structures, motors, and related structures, heat pipe architecture, and applications (commonly referred to as “thermal” or “heat dispersion technology”). We also have one Patent Cooperation Treaty (“PCT”) application pending that covers integrated electrical power generation methods and systems.

 

The Company intends to sell a mobile electric power system to government, military and commercial vehicle and fleet owners. It intends to commercialize its patents by licensing its thermal technologies and applications to electric motor, pump and vehicle component manufacturers. It may license its mobile electric power system as well.

 

Business Description

 

Cool Technologies has spent years designing and developing its technologies. The core technologies are:

 

Thermal Dispersion – patented technologies (totally enclosed heat pipe cooled and radial vent) that deliver liquid-cooled results for rotating equipment, multi-plate clutches, brakes and rotors without the use of liquid. Liquid cooling is the best, most effective cooling system for electric motors, however, it is also the most expensive. Our technologies reduce the cost of rotating equipment by eliminating the active material and, otherwise, extra components that liquid cooling requires. Our technologies also reduce production costs by increasing the power densities of the rotating equipment which enables them to output the same power from a smaller package.

 

Mobile Power Generation -- a patented and patents pending in-chassis system that outputs electrical power in amounts equal to or greater than skid-mounted generators or tow-behind generators from a smaller, lighter, more efficient package.

 

The markets for products utilizing our technology include consumer, industrial and military markets, both in the U.S. and worldwide. Our initial target markets include those involved in moving materials and moving people, such as:

 

 

·

Motors/Generators,

 

·

Mobile auxiliary power,

 

·

Water purification and desalination

 

·

Electric vehicle charging

 

·

Compressors,

 

·

Turbines (Wind, Micro),

 

·

Bearings,

 

·

Electric Vehicles: rail, off-highway, mining, delivery, refuse,

 

·

Brakes/rotors/calipers,

 

·

Pumps/fans,

 

·

Passenger vehicles: autos, RVs, buses, trains, aircraft,

 

·

Commercial vehicles: SUV, light trucks, trams, bucket trucks

 

·

Military: boats, Humvees, trucks, aircraft, and

 

·

Marine: boats ranging in size from 30 feet to 120 feet and beyond.

  

 
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Table of Contents

 

Our Technologies

 

Our technologies are divided into two distinct but complementary categories: heat dispersion technology and mobile power generation (MG).

 

Totally Enclosed Heat Pipe and Radial Vent Heat Pipe

 

The Company has developed, designed, prototyped and third party tested Totally Enclosed Heat Pipe Cooled (TEHPC) designs. It also owns the patents on the designs. The designs apply to dry pit submersible motors and

650 kVA marine duty generators.

 

Our patent portfolio covers the application and integration of our heat pipes into various other cooling schemes for enhanced heat removal in motors (i.e. electric motorcycles, cars and trucks), generators (i.e. e-axles and the MG system) and numerous other industrial applications including multi-clutches for vehicles and brakes and rotors for vehicles marine, aviation and military. We believe that our technologies have the potential to deliver power output increases and cost reductions, depending on the machine type or motor/generator size, as follows:

 

1.

Increase power density of current motor platforms by 20% to 40%,

2.

Reduce total product cost by 12.5% to 25%,

3.

Increase motor and generator efficiency by 1% to 2%, and

4.

Increase motor and generator life.

 

We also believe that products produced with our technologies have the potential to deliver operational savings as well, including savings from:

 

-

reduced maintenance costs,

-

the standardization of multiple platforms down to a single platform,

-

the standardization of drawings and data around existing platforms,

-

the ability to use standard designs and standard insulation systems versus customization, and

-

the ability to integrate and produce on existing production lines with no retooling and no additional, or minimal, capital investment.

 

Testing conducted by independent laboratories showed a 200% increase in horsepower capability for a dry pit submersible pump and a 25 to 35% increase in power density for a 650 kVA generator.

 

In 2019, a new Canadian patent covering a Heat Pipe Cooled Wet Rotating Disc Engagement System and a Radial Vent Composite Heat Pipe was added to the Company’s existing patents. It’s a utility patent which is more difficult to circumvent and, therefore, easier to defend. The designation ‘utility patent’ means that the patent covers the Company’s cooling technologies when used in a wide variety of specific applications as opposed to simply covering the cooling method or technology itself. This is an extremely important distinction with regard to defending patents. These applications include electric vehicle motors, standard electric motors, generators, engine hot spots, pistons, ERG (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) coolers and more. Similar patents are pending in other countries as part of the Global PCT patent process.

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

Our revenue model for the heat dispersion technology is to license the technology in exchange for royalties. Our design and manufacturing experience will be put to use by taking current product in the market, retrofitting with our TEHPC and radial vent heat pipes and handing back to the OEM a third party tested and validated, manufacturable product that increases performance and lowers cost.

 

The electric motorcycle industry which includes brands such as Harley Davidson, Zero and others, relies on both air- cooled and liquid-cooled motors. We believe our technology can result in the production of smaller, lighter weight motors as well as cooler motors, batteries and controls. We believe it will also address common performance issues such as overheating which shuts down the motor and forces the rider to stop and let the motor cool. Finally, we believe our wet rotating disc engagement system can cool motorcycle clutches and brakes.

 

Thermal Technology Target Markets: Generators

 

 

 

Large kilowatt:

 

prime power

Stationary:

 

emergency back-up, UPS systems

Commercial Mobile:

 

Electric vehicles and motor- cycles, e-axles, battery management systems

Consumer:

 

home standby, recreation

Rental:

 

mobile + light towers, pumps, compressors

  

Mobile Power Generation (MG)

 

The Company’s mobile power generation system enables work trucks to power an in-chassis generator, eliminating the need for some commercial vehicles to tow a mobile generator to a work site. Management believes that there is an unmet demand for on-board, continuous generation of up to 350 to 400 kilowatts (kW) of power to remote jobsites, charge electric vehicles and generate emergency power in the event of an outage or disaster. Recent meetings with Mexican farmers, military personnel and electric vehicle companies along with feedback from international representatives and agents of the Company have confirmed the need for such applications. We offer an in-chassis generator installation kit as a stand-alone (Mobile Generator or MG) for third parties and have contracted with Craftsmen Industries to perform domestic installations. It’s likely the Company will also contract with a facility overseas to handle the foreign orders it has received.

 

Management, along with key directors and members of the Board of Advisors, utilized 2020 to increase MG output up to 400 kVA and add or enhance optional capabilities. Despite the fact that COVID 19 eliminated face to face meetings, they also managed to build vendor relationships, expand existing business relationships and establish new ones in Mexico, the Middle East, Africa and the USA, specifically the US Army and the mining industry.

 

The Company has signed international joint ventures in Turkey (Belirti Teknoloji) and Australia (KeyOptions) as well as a strategic alliance with VerdeWatts and FirmGreen. Belirti Teknoloji will market and sell CoolTech’s entire product platform in Southern Europe, the Middle East and some North African nations. KeyOptions will market and sell CoolTech’s entire product platform in Australia and neighboring countries in Southeast Asia.

 

The Company has also signed an independent agent agreement with H&K Ventures to generate investment funding and revenues from its business relationships in Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the US.

 

Our joint venture with Belirti Teknoloji (a multi-national, multibillion-dollar engineering firm) has produced a non-contingent purchase order for six hundred MG80, MG125 and MG200 Mobile Generation systems.

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

As the Company is still pre-revenue, some production funding may be made in conjunction with projects that involve our director Steve Wilburn’s companies’ FirmGreen or VerdeWatts. In the meantime, CoolTech has continued to pursue non-dilutive financing based upon the third party valuation of the Company’s intellectual property, however, there can be no assurance that financing will be obtained.

 

As a result of a cross marketing and license agreement the Company signed with FirmGreen (a producer of commercial water systems) and the interest we received from Mexican government officials, we are commercializing our water desalination and purification capability. The Company now offers MG125 water purification and desalination systems capable of producing up to 14,000 gallons of potable water per day as well as delivery if a rolling tank is hitched to the truck. The truck-mounted systems should cleanse contaminated, polluted and wastewater or remove saline from saltwater. The desalination unit should output either clean potable water for drinking and cooking or non-potable water for agricultural or mining use.

 

In July 2019, our CEO attended a meeting with senators, federal, local, and Oaxaca state deputies, as well as representatives of state and federal agencies in Villa Alta, Mexico to discuss ways to clean the water in the Atoyac River, which is considered to be one of the most polluted rivers in Mexico.

 

Since then elected officials in the states of Jalisco, Hidalgo and Sonora have also expressed interest in using the MG to treat water from their rivers. The need in Hidalgo is especially urgent. Over 100,000 people were infected with the coronavirus in 2020 due to the contamination of their drinking water. For most states, the primary contaminant is sewage. In Sonora, it’s salt. Both impact drinking water and irrigation.

 

We expect the license agreement signed with VerdeWatts (a solar panel and energy storage manufacturer) will also act as a catalyst in the development of a no-idle option that will enable the MG system to operate solely through battery and solar power without the need to idle the truck’s engine. An MG outfitted with a solar or battery-powered no idle system could output clean drinkable water for virtually no cost.

 

Mexican interest extends beyond immediate applications. Federal Deputy Efrain Rocha Vega announced in 2020, the Mexican government will also support a Cool Technologies Center of Excellence to help integrate CoolTech’s green energy platform into other areas of the Mexican economy. A Center of Excellence is a shared facility or entity that provides leadership, best practices, research, support and/or training for our MG power systems, our mobile water purification and desalination systems and possibly our solar-powered and no-idle technology

 

The joint venture the Company signed with VerdeWatts and FirmGreen added a new application for the MG System: making it an integral part of mobile microgrids. VerdeWatts solar panels and battery storage systems would provide the sustainable energy. MG Systems would recharge or back-up the microgrids and simultaneously power FirmGreen water purification and desalination systems.

 

The mobile microgrids would interface with existing infrastructure for power, water, wireless communications and healthcare. They would provide or increase resilience during grid outages such as what occurred this past winter in Texas, using clean energy alternatives to mobile fossil fuel generators. The microgrids could also power, light and provide potable water and irrigation for farming villages throughout rural America and the developing world. VerdeWatts has publicly stated it has microgrid projects in Puerto Rico, Chile and Nigeria and that it intends to build mobile medical clinics and emergency command posts powered by MG systems.

 

An application that the Company has demonstrated publicly is truck mounted electric vehicle charging. Mobile charging vehicles don’t require permits or build out of infrastructure which, depending on the type of charging required can cost $300,000 to $400,000. (https://electrek.co/2018/10/16/porsche-taycan-dealers-charging-stations/). Our technology can provide Level 2, DC Fast Charging and even mega charging (up to and including 400 kVA on a medium duty Class 6 truck) and should deliver even more power in the future. Because the system is retrofittable, it can be uninstalled and reinstalled on a larger or newer model truck that generates more torque.

 

 
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Our revenue model for an in-chassis mobile electric power generation system is driven by the efforts of partner up-fitters and truck body builders along with regional sales teams and independent representatives as well as strategic alliances and joint ventures.

 

We believe that in head-to-head competition with tow behind generators, our mobile generation technology should prove very disruptive. Operators in such markets as the military, utilities and agriculture, to name a few, will be able to work in remote locations without having to tow or drop in a generator. We believe that the reduction in overall weight and size should also deliver significant operating efficiencies and savings to government and work truck fleets. Furthermore, we believe that our new applications will enhance adoption of the MG across an even wider range of industries, NGOs and government entities in both first and third world countries.

 

Competition

 

Heat Dispersion Technologies (Totally Enclosed Heat Pipe Cooled and Radial Vent Heat Pipe)

 

Cooling solutions to remove or control heat produced by industrial electric motors, generators and alternators are provided by the manufacturers. Their current best practices are based on technology that’s over 50 years old. They either add a liquid cooling system to the motor or build an extra-large frame around the motor to provide additional surface area to help dissipate the heat. Both practices increase the cost and complexity of their products.

 

The Company is not aware of any new alternatives on the market.

 

Mobile Electric Power (MG30-MG200)

 

The worldwide market for power generation off site spans a broad range. We believe the competitive factors in our markets include but are not limited to:

 

 

·

technological innovation and adaptability;

 

·

ease of transport and use;

 

·

product quality and safety;

 

·

kilowatts output and efficiency; and

 

·

product price.

   

We believe our primary competition in the mobile generator market will be from well-established companies such as Cummins, Caterpillar Inc., Doosan Group, Wacker Neuson SE, Multi Quip Inc. and Generac Power Systems All of them offer towable, trailer-mounted generators. Only Cummins Onan offers an onboard generator, and it is specifically engineered for mobile emergency vehicle use.

 

Portable generators address a need for mobile electric power in the commercial, leisure and residential markets. As outputs tend to range from 1 to 20 kilowatts (kW), the competition they provide is only at the lowest end of our power output spectrum. Onan, Honda and Kohler are among the well-established brand names.

 

A standard option that can be ordered when purchasing a truck is a power take-off or PTO. PTOs are mounted to a truck’s drivetrain and redirect engine power to operate onboard equipment. Integrated power systems use the PTO to run an alternating current generator. Cool Tech has the capability to power the generator directly from the drivetrain or from a PTO.

 

Real Power from Contour Hardening, Inc. offers alternating current (AC) power systems driven by a PTO. System voltages range from 10 to 180 kVA. Those under 30 kW retrofit under the beds of class 3 to 5 diesel trucks. Systems larger than 100 kW require Class 6 diesel trucks and a side mount. An important difference between the Real Power and the MG systems is that the MG can generate up to 125 kW on class 3 to 5 trucks and it can operate independently from the transmission.

 

 
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Modular integrated systems offer varying combinations of air compressors, welders, hydraulics and generators. Vanair Manufacturing, Inc’s Underdeck uses a PTO to power various combinations and output from 6.6 to 25 kilowatts.

 

HIPPO Multipower packages hydraulic, air, electric and welding into a single unit. Outputs range from 5.2 to 9 kW. The Enpak from Miller Electric Manufacturing Company offers the same package powered by a separate diesel engine that exports 6 kW of power.

 

Many electric vehicles (“EV”) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (“PHEV”) can use excess battery capacity to provide exportable power with no idling. Via Motors retails a plug-in hybrid electric van. The optional power export module provides 14.4 kW. Ford’s 2021 hybrid F-150 pickup truck exports 2.4 to 7.2 kilowatts of power. Odyne Systems, LLC, manufactures hybrid systems for medium and heavy-duty work trucks over 14,000 pounds. The systems export 6 to 18 kW of AC power.

 

Another way EV and PHEV can power onboard equipment is through an ePTO or electric power take-off which is essentially a battery-powered version of a PTO. Terex’s Corporation’s hybrid-electric system uses an ePTO to export up to 3.8 kW of power. Cummins, Inc. PHEV and EV drivetrain systems offer an exportable power option that provides 50 to 200 kW of grid-synchronized power. The drive system made by First Priority Greenfleet exports up to 120 kW of synchronized power.

 

Allison Transmission and a partner company combine a generator and transmission into a single casing to produce 30 to 125 kW of electric power.

 

While both the MG and the Allison Transmission are retrofittable, there are important differences. The Allison is limited to new vehicles that incorporate its 3,000 and 4,000 Series transmissions. The MG can produce up to 125 kW on an 8,000 pound as opposed to a 40,000-pound vehicle. Also, the MG’s power is produced independently from the transmission, consequently, the truck can still operate if the generator stops working.

 

Other companies use a vehicle’s engine to charge on-board batteries, which then run the generator when the vehicle is stopped. Output tends to be less than 50 kW and lithium-ion batteries typically power the system. The batteries have limited runtimes and a shorter lifespan than acid batteries. In addition, they must be cooled to operate properly. Altec Inc. Jobsite Energy Management System provides up to 4 kW of exportable power.

 

Aura Systems, Inc. and Mobile Electric Power Solutions, Inc. (“MEPS”) use a vehicle engine’s drive belt to turn a generator. MEPS provides up to 15 kW of AC power whereas Aura Systems generates up to 20 kW of direct current (DC) or AC power. Other MEPS engine or transmission-based electrical power take-off systems output small amounts in the range of 7 kW or 15 kW when two generators are aligned.

 

CoolTech’s Mobile Generation system can also provide Level 2 and Level 3 DC Fast Charging (up to and including 350 kVA on a Class 7 (13 liter) truck. ‘Levels’ indicate the charging power. The higher the level, the higher the power. More power equals shorter charging times. Level 2 is typically 240 volt AC (alternating current) power. Level 3 relies on 480 volt DC (direct current) power. Most Level 3 chargers provide an 80% charge in 30 minutes.

 

The Company expects to deliver even more power in the future. That’s because the system is retrofittable. It can be uninstalled and reinstalled on a larger truck that generates more torque.

 

Real Power uses a PTO driven generator to output 50 kW of power for Level 3 DC fast charging. Lightning Mobile puts a rechargeable package into a vehicle or trailer.to deliver DC fast charging at up to 80 kW and, optionally, Level 2 AC charging at up to 19.2 kW. In China, vans operated by Nio store about 200 kilowatt hours (kWh) for vehicle charging. The Blink Mobile Emergency Charger outputs up to 9.6 kW which equates to about 1 mile of charge per minute.

 

The Mobi EV Charger is essentially batteries on wheels with a joystick drive system. The Level 2 fast charger is equipped with an 80-kWh battery. SparkCharge’s transportable fast-charging system incorporates a battery module that provides up to 20 kW of power.

 

 
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Another variation on mobile charging relies on a self-contained unit that is dropped into place. EVgo’s Fast Start incorporates a pair of 50-kilowatt fast chargers on a metal sled. EV Safe Charge offers a temporary Level 2 and DC fast charging systems delivered to locations on demand. Depending upon on-site capabilities, chargers are powered either through existing power at the location, solar panels, or self-contained generating systems. Electrify America and Volkswagen have installed 30 solar powered charging stations in rural California that two provide two Level 2 charging plugs.

 

Both the battery-on-wheels and the delivery and drop-off systems aim to address the problems with permitting, construction and electrical infrastructure upgrades common to permanent charging installations.

 

We believe our proprietary technology is so powerful, innovative, versatile, easy to use and offers very attractive price points that we can compete in and even disrupt the remote power generation market in spite of the challenges posed by our competition.

 

Equipment

 

As a company that intends to commercialize or license its proprietary technology for others to install, manufacture and/or distribute, our equipment needs are project specific and temporary. We do not intend to purchase any production equipment to implement our business operations, but instead we will rent, lease or outsource as needed.

 

Manufacturing

 

We do not plan to manufacture in-house. The Company works with Craftsmen Industries utilizing its assets and system integrators to upfit our Mobile Generation technology. For our thermal technologies, the Company plans to rely on product development agreements with manufacturers who will then pay a license or royalty per unit. We anticipate that such agreements will delineate the respective intellectual property owned by both companies, describe the goal of the testing to verify the savings and value to a particular company, the equipment to be modified, the criteria that constitute successful testing, how and where the tests will be conducted and the next steps to be taken in the event of successful testing.

 

Suppliers

 

For mobile power generation, the required software and its vehicle integration will be supplied by third party provider of engineering services along with partner truck up-fitter and others to be named later.

 

Production level quantities of system components will be handled by at least three suppliers.

 

For the thermal technology applications in electric motors, a single supplier will provide the heat pipes and mechanical structure, which combine to make the heat exchangers. We will coordinate with them to combine our thermal technology with their technology in the creation of heat exchangers.

 

For dry pit submersibles (a type of submersible pump which can also operate in a dry environment), we intend to purchase the wound stator and the rotor-shaft from one of the largest electric motor manufacturers in the world. We intend to purchase the fully-machined castings from an American company and rely on assembly and testing by another corporation based in the USA.

 

As of April 6, 2021, we have not signed formal agreements with any suppliers.

 

Intellectual Property

 

Our success depends in part on our ability to protect our technology and intellectual property. To accomplish this, we rely on a combination of patents, patent applications, trade secrets, copyright laws, trademarks, intellectual property licenses and other contractual rights to establish and protect our proprietary rights. Currently, we have no licenses or contractual rights in place to protect our technology and intellectual property, only patents or patents pending.

 

 
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As of April 6, 2021, we have seven US patents, one Canadian patent, two granted patents (1 Mexican, 1 Canadian) and two pending applications (1 in the US, 1 in Brazil) covering composite heat structures, motors, and related structures, heat pipe architecture, and applications (commonly referred to as “thermal” or “heat dispersion technology”). We also have a Patent Cooperation Treaty (“PCT”) application pending that covers integrated electrical power generation methods and systems. In addition, we have applied for and received a trademark for an acronym for one of our technologies: “TEHPC”

 

Our success will likely depend upon our ability to preserve our proprietary technologies and operate without infringing the proprietary rights of other parties. However, we may also rely on certain proprietary technologies and know-how that are not patentable.

 

We strive to protect such proprietary information, in part, by the use of confidentiality agreements with our employees, consultants and contractors. The Company has a policy of not disclosing its patent applications in order to protect the underlying technology.

 

The following table sets forth the patents we own or license which we believe support our technology.

 

Patent

Number

Country

Filing

Date

Issue

Date

Expiration

Date

Title

8,283,818 B2

US

February 4, 2010

October 9, 2012

October 9, 2032

Electric Motor with Heat Pipes

8,134,260 B2

US

July 31, 2009

March 13, 2012

March 13, 2032

Electric Motor with Heat Pipes

8,148,858 B2

US

August 6, 2009

April 3, 2012

April 3, 2032

Totally Enclosed Heat Pipe Cooled Motor

8,198,770 B2

US

April 3, 2009

June 12, 2012

June 12, 2032

Heat Pipe Bearing Cooler Systems and Methods

7,569,955 B2

US

June 19, 2007

August 4, 2009

August 4, 2029

Electric Motor with Heat Pipes

9,618,068

 

US

 

December 18, 2014

 

April 11, 2017

 

April 11, 2037

 

Heat Pipe Cooled Wet Brake

9,543,809

 

US

 

February 25, 2014

January 10, 2017

 

January 10, 2037

 

Radial Vent Composite Heat Pipe

2,971,404

 

Canada

 

June 16, 2017

 

November 15, 2019

 

June 16, 2037

 

Heat Pipe Cooled Wet Brake

 

Government and Industry Regulation

 

We intend to conduct business worldwide and, therefore, we must comply with local, state, federal, and international regulations, both in operations and for our products.

 

As a company, we do not plan to manufacture any of our products. Therefore, the government regulations we will be subject to will be limited to storage and involve rotating the shafts of stored electric motors on a regular basis.

 

Applicable laws and regulations include those governing, among other things, the handling, storage and transportation of materials and products as well as noise and employee safety.

 

In addition, some of our products are subject to various laws and regulations relating to, among other things, emissions and fuel requirements.

 

Accordingly, we may be required or may voluntarily determine to obtain approval of our products from one or more of the organizations engaged in regulating product or environmental safety. These approvals could require significant time and resources from our technical staff and, if redesign were necessary, could result in a delay in the introduction of our products in various markets and applications.

 

Although we believe that our operations and products are in material compliance with current applicable regulations noted within this section, there can be no assurance that changes in such laws and regulations will not impose costly compliance requirements on us or otherwise subject us to future liabilities. New regulations could also require our licensees to redesign their products which could cause us to redesign our technologies which, consequently, could affect market growth for our products.

 

 
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As our thermal technologies are incorporated in existing motors, generators and other manufactured products that are already subject to regulation. The regulatory burden will fall on the original equipment manufacturers that license our technology.

 

The Company adds a mobile power generation system to Class 3-8 work trucks. In addition to an existing generator incorporating our thermal technology, the gearing system will incorporate our thermal technology as well. The vehicle and drive train operate normally in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications. No regulations are violated or exceeded. Nonetheless, in some markets, the Company will have to certify that it meets federal, state or local noise and emission regulations.

 

Our designs comply with current EPA emission standards and we believe they will comply with future requirements.

 

No original vehicle parts will be significantly modified in the retrofitting process. There will be some additional parts (generator, touchscreens, software, sensors and controls) added, but these parts will not change how the vehicle operates in any way. The drive train will operate according to the manufacturer’s specifications. Therefore, we believe that the original warranty will remain in effect and we do not believe that the conversion will violate the Magnuson-Moss Act.

 

The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act is a federal law that protects consumers by barring a vehicle manufacturer from voiding the warranty on a vehicle due to an aftermarket part unless the manufacturer can prove that the aftermarket part caused or contributed to the failure in the vehicle. The Company will warranty the MG System with an industry standard warranty. All of our other components (generator, human machine interface, software, controller/sensors) will be warranted by their respective manufacturers.

 

The Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (“NHTSA”) is charged with writing and enforcing safety and fuel economy standards for motor vehicles through their Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. These standards require manufacturers to design their electrically powered vehicles so that, in the event of a crash, the electrical energy storage, conversion, and traction systems are either electrically isolated from the vehicle’s chassis or their voltage is below specified levels considered safe from electric shock hazards. Our planned no-idle version of our Mobile Generation system will be designed to meet or exceed these requirements.

 

Optional components such as solar panels, batteries, water purification or desalination systems will be supplied and warrantied by their manufacturers

 

In addition, the total weight of the additional components should remain within the vehicle’s gross vehicle weight rating. As a result, we believe that our retrofits will comply with federal and state transportation regulations.

 

While we do not create and market our products around government subsidies and tax incentives, a class 3 to 5 MG truck equipped with a charger can provide a Level II charge to one or more electric vehicles. Our 200 kVA truck will provide Level III DC fast charging and a medium duty class 6 truck (Ford F-650) can power what is informally known as a mega-charger for vehicles like the Porsche Taycan or Tesla-- all from the truck bed. Assuming the MG truck qualifies as a charging station almost every state and a number of municipalities and utilities offer grants, rebates, tax credits, or other incentives for electric vehicle charging stations.

 

If we fulfill all elements of our business plan, we will have to prepare for, understand and ultimately meet emerging product environmental regulations around the world. Our products will have to comply with the current emission standards that went into effect in the European Union in 2015, as well as the standards in other international markets, including Japan, Mexico, Australia, Brazil, Russia, India, and China that are becoming more stringent.

 

 
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Employees

 

As of April 6, 2021, we had two full time employees, one full time consultant and two part time employees. We hope to hire additional employees, on an as-needed basis, subject to sufficient funding, as products and services are developed.

 

Research and Development

 

During the years 2020 and 2019, we incurred research and development costs of $19,069 and $296,800, respectively. All costs were borne by the Company.

 

Item 1A: Risk Factors

 

RISKS RELATED TO OUR BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY

 

Our independent auditors have expressed their concern as to our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

As a result of our financial condition, we have received a report from our independent registered public accounting firm for our consolidated financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 that includes an explanatory paragraph describing the uncertainty as to our ability to continue as a going concern. As of December 31, 2020, we have incurred net losses of $55,830,210 since inception and have not yet commenced full operations, raising substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. As of December 31, 2020 we had $33 in cash on hand. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent on our ability to generate revenue, achieve profitable operations and repay our obligations when they come due. These consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or amounts and classification of liabilities that might result from this uncertainty. We are pursuing various financing alternatives to support the sales, component acquisition and assembly of our mobile power generation systems as well as the completion of the secondary elements of our business plan: to license its thermal technologies and applications, including submersible dry-pit applications. There can be no assurance, however, that we will obtain adequate funding or that we will be successful in accomplishing any of our objectives. The Company believes that if it does not obtain adequate working capital by the end of the second quarter 2021, it may need to cease or curtail operations.

 

We have approximately $2,639,500 in principal amount of promissory notes and if we are not able to make timely payments on these notes we may be in default.

 

We have approximately $2,639,500 in principal amount of promissory notes and if we are not able to make timely payments on these notes we may be in default. We do not have enough cash on hand to pay our obligations when due and may default on these notes. As a result if we default on the notes the lender will be able to seek to enforce the obligations on the notes which will hurt our business operations and may cause us to curtail or cease operations.

 

Our limited operating history makes evaluating our business and future prospects difficult and may increase the risk of your investment.

 

We have a limited operating history on which investors can base an evaluation of our business, operating results and prospects. We have no operating history with respect to commercializing our heat pipe technology and licensing it to motor and generator manufacturers or selling mobile generators or translating our thermal technology from testing and one-off applications into mass market production. Consequently, it is difficult to predict our future revenues, if any, and appropriately budget for our expenses, and we have limited insight into trends that may emerge and affect our business.

 

We have only recently commercialized our mobile power generation system. Funds from recent bridge financing financed a pilot run by Craftsmen Industries which is our manufacturing partner. We also have reason to believe from current negotiations that funds will be available for the transition from pilot run to full production of the mobile generation system. If we are unable to obtain additional funding in a timely manner it will have a negative impact. Any additional equity financing may involve substantial dilution to our then existing stockholders. The inability to raise the additional capital will restrict our ability to develop and conduct business operations.

 

 
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We have a history of operating losses and can provide no assurance of our future operating results.

 

From incorporation in 2002 to December 31, 2020, we have incurred net losses of $55,830,210. The losses may continue into the foreseeable future. There can be no assurance we will ever operate profitably or that we will have adequate working capital to meet our obligations as they become due. Investors must consider the risks and difficulties frequently encountered by early stage companies, particularly in rapidly evolving markets. We cannot be certain that our business strategy will be successful or that we will successfully address these risks. In the event that we do not successfully address these risks, our business, prospects, financial condition, and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

 

The market for mobile power generation is changing.

 

Although tow-behind generators have been the standard for more than 60 years, the market is changing. A greater number of hybrid and electric vehicles are being sold and low power generation systems are being incorporated in internal combustion trucks. As the MG System produces power equal to tow behinds from a smaller, lighter package, it is reflective of that change. In addition, usage of electric vehicles continues to increase, however, in many countries, charging infrastructure is not likely to keep pace. As the MG Systems offer both slow and fast charging capabilities, this creates new opportunities for the Company. Nonetheless, significant increases in the electrical output of existing mobile power systems, rapid build-out of electric vehicle charging infrastructure, new government regulations or changes in consumer demand and behavior may slow the growth of our business and negatively impact our financial results.

 

Many of our potential competitors are better established and have significantly greater resources.

 

The market for the products we develop is highly competitive. Many of our potential competitors are well established with larger and better resources, longer relationships with customers and suppliers, greater name recognition and greater financial, technical and marketing resources than we have. Increased competition may result in price reductions, reduced gross margins, loss of market share and loss of licensees, any of which could materially and adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition. We cannot ensure that prospective competitors will not adopt technologies or business plans similar to ours or develop products which may be superior to ours or which may prove to be more popular. It is possible that new competitors will emerge and rapidly acquire market share. We cannot ensure that we will be able to compete successfully against future competitors or that the competitive pressures will not materially and adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

We may experience significant delays in the design and implementation of our thermal technology into the motors and/or generators of the companies with which we have research and development agreements which could harm our business and prospects.

 

Motor manufacturers often experience delays in the design, manufacture and commercial release of new product lines. Any delay in the financing, design, and implementation of our thermal technology into the motor and/or generator lines of companies with which we may have research and development agreements could materially damage our brand, business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

 

If we are unable to adequately control the costs associated with operating our business, including our costs of sales and materials, our business, financial condition, operating results and prospects will suffer.

 

If we are unable to maintain a sufficiently low level of costs for designing, marketing, selling and distributing our conversion system and thermal technologies relative to their selling prices, our operating results, gross margins, business and prospects could be adversely impacted. We have made, and will be required to continue to make, significant investments for the design and sales of our system and technologies. There can be no assurances that our costs of producing and delivering our system and technologies will be less than the revenue, if any, we may generate from sales and/or licensing. We may be required to incur substantial marketing costs and expenses to promote our systems and technologies, even though our marketing expenses to date have been relatively limited. Many of the factors that impact our operating costs are beyond our control. For example, the costs of our components could increase due to shortages if global demand for such components increases.

 

 
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We will be dependent on our suppliers. The inability or refusal of these suppliers to deliver components at prices and volumes acceptable to us would have an adverse effect on our business.

 

We have selected suppliers, issued purchase orders and received products for our mobile power generation system. We source globally from a number of suppliers, none of which are single source suppliers for these components.

 

Failure to obtain reliable sources of component supply that will enable us to meet quality, price, engineering, design and production standards, as well as the production volumes required to successfully market our conversion system could negatively affect our Company’s revenues and business operations. Even if we are successful in developing a high-volume mobile power manufacturing platform and reliable sources of component supply, we do not know whether we will be able to do so in a manner that avoids significant delays and cost overruns.

 

If we experience significant increased demand, or need to replace our existing suppliers, there can be no assurance that additional supplies of component parts will be available when required on terms that are favorable to us, or that a supplier would allocate sufficient supplies to us in order to meet our requirements or fill our orders in a timely manner. The loss of any single or limited source supplier or the disruption in the supply of components from these suppliers could lead to delays to our customers, which could hurt our relationships with our customers, result in negative publicity, damage our brand and adversely affect our business, prospects and operating results.

 

Any significant disruption in our supplier relationships, particularly relationships with sole source suppliers, could harm our business. Furthermore, some of our suppliers may not be able to handle any commodity cost volatility and/or sharply changing volumes while still performing as we expect. To the extent our suppliers experience supply disruptions, there is a risk for delivery delays, production delays, production issues or delivery of non-conforming products by our suppliers. Even where these risks do not materialize, we may incur costs as we try to make contingency plans for such risks.

 

Our research and commercialization efforts may not be sufficient to adapt to technological changes.

 

As technologies change, we plan to upgrade or adapt our mobile power generation system in order to continue to provide vehicles with the latest technology. However, our installations or retrofits may not compete effectively with alternative vehicles if we are not able to source and integrate the latest technology into our mobile power generation system. We plan to offer a no-idle system, however, since we do not plan to manufacture battery cells and/or solar panels, we are dependent on suppliers of battery cell and/or solar panel technology for our no idle systems. To help mitigate the risk, we have signed a strategic alliance with a solar power and energy storage company (VerdeWatts). However, there can be no guarantee that such risk mitigation will be successful. Furthermore, any failure to keep up with advances in electric or hybrid vehicle technology would result in a decline in our competitive position which would adversely affect our business, prospects, operating results and financial condition.

 

An occurrence of an uncontrollable event such as the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to negatively affect our operations.

 

The occurrence of an uncontrollable event such as the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to negatively affect our operations. A pandemic typically results in social distancing, travel bans and quarantine, and this has limited access to our facilities, customers, management, support staff and professional advisors. These, in turn, will not only impact our operations, financial condition and demand for our products but our overall ability to react timely to mitigate the impact of this event. Also, it may substantially hamper our efforts to provide our investors with timely information and comply with our filing obligations with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

A prolonged economic downturn or economic uncertainty could adversely affect our business and cause us to require additional sources of financing, which may not be available.

 

Economic cycles and any related fluctuation in the businesses of our potential fleet customers, electric motor manufacturers or income of the general public may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. If global economic conditions deteriorate or economic uncertainty increases, our potential customers may experience lowered incomes or deterioration of their businesses, which may result in the delay or cancellation of plans to convert their vehicles, reduced license sales or reduced royalties from sales by licensees. As a consequence, our cash flow could be adversely impacted.

 

 
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Any changes in business credit availability or cost of borrowing could adversely affect our business.

 

Declines in the availability of business credit and increases in corporate borrowing costs could negatively impact the number of mobile generators installed and the number of electric motors and generators manufactured. Substantial declines in the number of installations or retrofits by our customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

If we lose any of our key management personnel, we may not be able to successfully manage our business or achieve our objectives.

 

Our future success depends in large part upon the leadership and performance of our management and consultants. The Company’s operations and business strategy are dependent upon the knowledge and business contacts of our executive officers and our consultants. We have employment agreements with our Chief Executive Officer and Vice President and a consulting agreement for the services of our Chief Financial Officer. Although, we hope to retain the services of all of our officers, if an officer should choose to leave us for any reason before we have hired additional personnel, our operations may suffer. If we should lose their services before we are able to engage and retain qualified employees and consultants to execute our business plan, we may not be able to continue to develop our business as quickly or efficiently.

 

In addition, we and our production partners/affiliates must be able to attract, train, motivate and retain highly skilled and experienced technical employees in order to successfully develop our business. Qualified technical employees often are in great demand and may be unavailable in the time frame required to satisfy our business requirements. We may not be able to attract and retain sufficient numbers of highly skilled technical employees in the future. The loss of technical personnel or our inability to hire or retain sufficient technical personnel at competitive rates of compensation could impair our ability to successfully grow our business. If we lose the services of any of our consultants, we may not be able to replace them with similarly qualified personnel, which could harm our business.

 

We may incur material losses and costs as a result of product defects, warranty claims or product liability actions that may be brought against us.

 

We face an inherent business risk of exposure to product liability if our mobile power generation system or other products fail to perform as expected or failure of our products results in bodily injury or property damage.

 

If flaws in the design of our products were to occur, we could experience a rate of failure in our mobile power generation system or other products that could result in significant charges for product re-work or replacement costs. Although we plan to engage in extensive quality programs and processes, these may not be sufficient to avoid conversion or product failures, which could cause us to:

 

·

lose net revenue;

·

incur increased costs such as costs associated with customer support;

·

experience delays, cancellations or rescheduling of retrofits or orders for our products;

·

experience increased product returns or discounts; or

·

damage our reputation;

 

All of the above could negatively affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

If any of our mobile power generation systems or other products are or are alleged to be defective, we may be required to participate in a recall involving such installations or retrofits or products. A recall claim brought against us, or a product liability claim brought against us in excess of our insurance, may have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

 
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Depending on the terms under which we supply products to a vehicle component or engine manufacturer, a manufacturer may attempt to hold us responsible for some or all of the repair or replacement costs of defective products under their warranties when the manufacturer asserts that the product supplied did not perform as warranted.

 

Developments or assertions by us or against us relating to intellectual property rights could materially impact our business.

 

We own significant intellectual property, including a number of patents, and intend to be involved in numerous licensing arrangements. Our intellectual property should play an important role in maintaining our competitive position in a number of the markets we intend to serve.

 

We will attempt to protect proprietary and intellectual property rights to our products and conversion system through available patent laws and licensing and distribution arrangements with reputable domestic and international companies. Despite these precautions, patent laws afford only limited practical protection in certain countries.

 

Litigation may also be necessary in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights or to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others or to defend against claims of invalidity. Such litigation could result in substantial costs and the diversion of resources.

 

As we create or adopt new technology, we will also face an inherent risk of exposure to the claims of others that we have allegedly violated their intellectual property rights.

 

Our products could infringe on the intellectual property rights of others which may result in costly litigation and, if we do not prevail, could also cause us to pay substantial damages and prohibit us from selling or licensing our products.

 

Third parties may assert infringement or other intellectual property claims against us. We may have to pay substantial damages, including damages for past infringement if it is ultimately determined that our products or technology infringe a third party’s proprietary rights. Further, we may be prohibited from selling or providing products before we obtain additional licenses, which, if available at all, may require us to pay substantial royalties or licensing fees. Even if claims are determined to be without merit, defending a lawsuit takes significant time, may be expensive and may divert management’s attention from our other business concerns. Any public announcements related to litigation or interference proceedings initiated or threatened against us could cause our business to be negatively impacted and our stock price to decline.

 

We may incur losses, additional costs or even interruption of business operations as a result of fines or sanctions brought by government regulators.

 

Our business will be subject to various U.S. federal, state and local, and non-U.S. environmental, transportation and safety laws and regulations.

 

We cannot assure you that we will be at all times in complete compliance with such laws, regulations and permits. If we violate or fail to comply with these laws, regulations or certifications, we could be fined or otherwise sanctioned by regulators.

 

We may face risks from doing business internationally.

 

We have orders for our mobile power generation systems for Mexican and Turkish customers and we have signed joint venture and/or sales representation agreements with companies in Turkey, Poland and Australia. It’s likely that there will be further sales, licensing and distribution of products and technologies outside the United States, and that we will derive revenues from these sources. Consequently, our revenues and results of operations will be vulnerable to currency fluctuations. We will report our revenues and results of operations in United States dollars, but a significant portion of our revenues may be earned outside of the United States. We cannot accurately predict the impact of future exchange rate fluctuations on revenues and operating margins. Such fluctuations could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

 
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Our business will also be subject to other risks inherent in the international marketplace, many of which are beyond our control. These risks include:

 

·

laws and policies affecting trade, investment and taxes, including laws and policies relating to the repatriation of funds and withholding taxes, and changes in these laws;

·

changes in local regulatory requirements, including restrictions on installations or retrofits;

·

differing cultural tastes and attitudes;

·

differing degrees of protection for intellectual property;

·

the instability of foreign economies and governments;

·

war and acts of terrorism.

 

Any of the foregoing could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

If we are unable to effectively implement or maintain a system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately or timely report our financial results and our stock price could be adversely affected.

 

Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and related regulations require us to evaluate the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of the end of each fiscal year, and to include a management report assessing the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for that fiscal year. Management determined that as of December 31, 2020, our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting were not effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in reports filed or submitted under the Securities Exchange Act were recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Act Commission’s rules and forms and that our disclosure controls are not effectively designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our internal controls are not effective for the following reasons, (1) we have limited entity-level controls because of the limited time and abilities of the three officers, (2) we have not implemented adequate system and manual controls, and (3) there is no separate audit committee.

 

Any failure to implement new or improved controls necessary to remedy the material weaknesses described above, or difficulties encountered in the implementation or operation of these controls, could harm our operations, decrease the reliability of our financial reporting, and cause us to fail to meet our financial reporting obligations, which could adversely affect our business and reduce our stock price.

 

We may be at risk to accurately report financial results or detect fraud if we fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls.

 

As directed by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the SEC adopted rules requiring public companies to include a report that contains an assessment by management on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting in their annual and quarterly reports on Form 10-K and 10-Q. We cannot assure you that significant deficiencies or material weaknesses in our disclosure controls and internal control over financial reporting will not be identified in the future. Also, future changes in our accounting, financial reporting, and regulatory environment may create new areas of risk exposure. Failure to modify our existing control environment accordingly may impair our controls over financial reporting and cause our investors to lose confidence in the reliability of our financial reporting, which may adversely affect our stock price.

 

RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH OUR COMMON STOCK

 

The issuance of shares upon conversion of our preferred stock and exercise of outstanding warrants and options will cause immediate and substantial dilution to our existing stockholders.

 

As of December 31, 2020, there are 3 shares of Series A preferred stock (“Series A Stock”) issued and outstanding (each such share of Series A Stock has the voting right of 50,000 shares of common stock) convertible into an aggregate of 150,000 shares of common stock and 2,727,270 shares of Series B preferred stock (“Series B Stock”) issued and outstanding. For so long as the Series B Stock is issued and outstanding, the holders of Series B Stock shall vote together as a single class with the holders of the common stock and the holders of any other class or series of shares entitled to vote with the common stock, with the holders of Series B Stock being entitled to 66 2/3% of the total votes on all such matters. There are also warrants to purchase an aggregate of 68,765,759 shares of common stock and options to purchase an aggregate of 4,000,000 shares of common stock outstanding. The issuance of shares upon conversion of preferred stock and exercise of warrants and options will result in substantial dilution to the interests of other stockholders.

 

 
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The holders of the Series B Stock have 66 2/3% of the voting rights of the Company.

 

Because the holders of the Series B Stock have 66 2/3% of the voting rights of the Company if they act together, they will be able to influence the outcome of all corporate actions requiring approval of our stockholders, including the election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions, which may result in corporate action with which other stockholders do not agree. If the Series B stockholders vote in favor of the foregoing action and have sufficient voting power to approve such actions through their ownership of Series B Stock, no other stockholder approvals will be required.

 

Our common stock is subject to the “penny stock” rules of the SEC and the trading market in our securities is limited, which makes transactions in our stock cumbersome and may reduce the value of an investment in our stock.

 

The SEC has adopted Rule 15g-9 which establishes the definition of a “penny stock,” for the purposes relevant to us, as any equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share or with an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. For any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, the rules require: (i) that a broker or dealer approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks; and (ii) the broker or dealer receive from the investor a written agreement to the transaction, setting forth the identity and quantity of the penny stock to be purchased. In order to approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, the broker or dealer must: (i) obtain financial information and investment experience objectives of the person; and (ii) make a reasonable determination that the transactions in penny stocks are suitable for that person and the person has sufficient knowledge and experience in financial matters to be capable of evaluating the risks of transactions in penny stocks.

 

The broker or dealer must also deliver, prior to any transaction in a penny stock, a disclosure schedule prescribed by the SEC relating to the penny stock market, which, in highlight form: (i) sets forth the basis on which the broker or dealer made the suitability determination; and (ii) that the broker or dealer received a signed, written agreement from the investor prior to the transaction.

 

Generally, brokers may be less willing to execute transactions in securities subject to the “penny stock” rules. This may make it more difficult for investors to dispose of our common stock and cause a decline in the market value of our stock.

 

Disclosure also has to be made about the risks of investing in penny stocks in both public offerings and in secondary trading and about the commissions payable to both the broker-dealer and the registered representative, current quotations for the securities and the rights and remedies available to an investor in cases of fraud in penny stock transactions. Finally, monthly statements have to be sent disclosing recent price information for the penny stock held in the account and information on the limited market in penny stocks.

 

Because we do not intend to pay any cash dividends on our shares of common stock, our stockholders will not be able to receive a return on their shares unless they sell them.

 

We intend to retain any future earnings to finance the development and expansion of our business. We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. Unless we pay dividends, our stockholders will not be able to receive a return on their shares unless they sell them at a price higher than that which they initially paid for such shares.

 

 
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The market price of our shares of common stock is subject to fluctuation.

 

The market prices of our shares may fluctuate significantly in response to factors, some of which are beyond our control, including:

 

·

The announcement of new products by our competitors

·

The release of new products by our competitors

·

Developments in our industry or target markets

·

General market conditions including factors unrelated to our operating performance

 

Recently, the stock market in general has experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations. Continued market fluctuations could result in extreme market volatility in the price of our shares of common stock which could cause a decline in the value of our shares.

 

There is a limited trading market for our securities.

 

There is currently only a limited trading market for our common stock. We cannot predict the extent investor interest will lead to development of an active trading market or how liquid that trading market might become. If an active trading market does not develop or is not sustained, it may be difficult for investors to sell shares of our common stock at a price that is attractive or at all. In such a case, you may find that you are unable to achieve any benefit from your investment or liquidate your shares.

 

Because we are not subject to compliance with rules requiring the adoption of certain corporate governance measures, our stockholders have limited protections against interested director transactions, conflicts of interest and similar matters.

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as well as rule changes proposed and enacted by the SEC, the New York Stock Exchange, the Amex Equities Exchanges and NASDAQ, as a result of Sarbanes-Oxley, require the implementation of various measures relating to corporate governance. These measures are designed to enhance the integrity of corporate management and the securities markets and apply to securities which are listed on those exchanges or the NASDAQ.

 

Although our shareholders appointed independent directors to the board, we do not currently have independent audit or compensation committees. Until then, the directors who are part of management have the ability, among other things, to determine their own level of compensation. Until we comply with such corporate governance measures, regardless of whether such compliance is required, the absence of such standards of corporate governance may leave our stockholders without protections against interested director transactions, conflicts of interest and similar matters and investors may be reluctant to provide us with funds necessary to expand our operations.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation allow for our board of directors to create new series of preferred stock without further approval by our stockholders which could adversely affect the rights of the holders of our common stock.

 

Our Board has the authority to fix and determine the relative rights and preferences of preferred stock. As a result, our Board could authorize the issuance of a series of preferred stock that would grant to such holders (i) the preferred right to our assets upon liquidation, (ii) the right to receive dividend payments before dividends are distributed to the holders of common stock and (iii) the right to the redemption of the shares, together with a premium, prior to the redemption of our common stock. In addition, our Board could authorize the issuance of a series of preferred stock that has greater voting power than our common stock or that is convertible into our common stock, which could decrease the relative voting power of our common stock or result in dilution to our existing common stockholders.

 

Any of the actions described in the preceding paragraph could significantly adversely affect the investment made by holders of our common stock. Holders of common stock could potentially not receive dividends that they might otherwise have received. In addition, holders of our common stock could receive less proceeds in connection with any future sale of the Company, whether in liquidation or on any other basis.

 

 
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Our officers, directors and Series B preferred shareholders own a substantial amount of our common stock and exercise significant control over our corporate governance and affairs which may result in their taking actions with which other shareholders do not agree.

 

Our executive officers and directors control approximately 5% of our outstanding common stock. In addition, a former director owns Series B preferred shares with two other stockholders. Together, they control 66 and 2/3 of the voting rights of the Company. The officers, directors and Series B stockholders, if they act together, may be able to exercise substantial influence over the outcome of all corporate actions requiring approval of our stockholders, including the election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions, which may result in corporate action with which other stockholders do not agree. This concentration of ownership may also have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control which might be in other stockholders’ best interest, but which might negatively affect the market price of our common stock.

 

We are in breach of our agreements with certain investors for failure to timely file a registration statement with the SEC registering shares offered and sold to such investors.

 

In connection with the offer and sale shares and warrants to purchase shares of common stock, the Company agreed to file a registration statement with the SEC including these shares once the Company sold an aggregate of 1 million shares. The Company sold 1 million shares in July 2013. In addition, our placement agents also have “piggyback” registration rights for shares underlying warrants issued to them. If an investor or placement agent decides to bring an action against the Company before this registration statement is deemed effective, we may be faced with litigation and other costs and damages if unsuccessful in any such action.

 

We may, in the future, issue additional common shares, which would reduce investors’ percent of ownership and may dilute our share value.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation authorizes the issuance of 1,000,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.001 per share, of which as of April 6, 2021, 563,182,690 shares are issued, and outstanding excluding 1,000,000 shares held in escrow. On February 13, 2020, stockholders holding shares that entitled them to exercise at least a majority of the voting power, voted in favor of increasing the number of authorized shares of common stock, from 500,000,000 shares to 1,000,000,000 shares. The future issuance of common stock may result in substantial dilution in the percentage of our common stock held by our then existing stockholders. We may value any common stock issued in the future on an arbitrary basis. The issuance of common stock for future services or acquisitions or other corporate actions may have the effect of diluting the value of the shares held by our investors and may have an adverse effect on any trading market of our common stock.

 

Offers or availability for sale of a substantial number of shares of our common stock may cause the price of our common stock to decline.

 

If our stockholders sell substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market under Rule 144 or upon the exercise of outstanding options or warrants, it could create a circumstance commonly referred to as an “overhang” and in anticipation of which the market price of our common stock could fall. The existence of an overhang, whether or not sales have occurred or are occurring, also could make more difficult our ability to raise additional financing through the sale of equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and price that we deem reasonable or appropriate.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 2. Properties

 

The Company rents a virtual office, which it uses as its corporate headquarters for a monthly rent of $300. The office is located at 8875 Hidden River Parkway, Suite 300, Tampa, Florida 33637. We believe this space is adequate for our current operations.

 

 
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Item 3. Legal Proceedings

 

Securities and Exchange Commission Settlement

 

On September 20, 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) approved an offer to settle the enforcement proceedings against the Company pursuant to Section 21C of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

 

These proceedings arose out of the violation of the Regulation S-X requirement that interim financial statements filed as part of a Form 10-Q be reviewed by an independent public accounting firm prior to filing.

 

On three occasions, specifically, May 20, 2013, August 19, 2013 and August 22, 2016, Cool Technologies filed Form 10-Qs that contained financial statements that were not reviewed by an independent public accounting firm. In two cases, the Company properly disclosed that the 10Q’s were “unaudited and unreviewed” as set forth by the guidance in the Division of Corporation Finance Financial Reporting Manual Section 4410.3. And in each case, the Company subsequently filed a restated and amended Form 10-Q/A that complied with the Interim Review Requirement. In no instance were the filings ever subjected to audit challenge.

 

Pursuant to the enforcement proceeding instituted by the SEC, the Company settled for a fine of $75,000 and agreed to cease and desist from any future violations of Sections 13(a) of the Exchange Act and Rule 13a-13 thereunder, and Rule 8-03 of Regulation S-X.

 

From time to time, the Company may be a party to other legal proceedings. Management currently believes that the ultimate resolution of these other matters, if any, and after consideration of amounts accrued, will not have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial position, or cash flow.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

 
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PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock was quoted on the OTC Bulletin Board from July 30, 2009 to March 26, 2010 under the symbol BIBB. Prior to September 2010, there was no active market for our common stock. Our common stock is currently quoted on the OTCQB under the trading symbol WARM.

 

The following table sets forth the high and low sales prices as reported on the OTCQB. The quotations reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission, and may not represent actual transactions.

 

Quarter Ended

 

High

 

 

Low

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 31, 2020

 

$ 0.010

 

 

$ 0.009

 

June 30, 2020

 

$ 0.010

 

 

$ 0.008

 

September 30, 2020

 

$ 0.021

 

 

$ 0.017

 

December 31, 2020

 

$ 0.016

 

 

$ 0.014

 

March 31, 2019

 

$ 0.070

 

 

$ 0.030

 

June 30, 2019

 

$ 0.070

 

 

$ 0.030

 

September 30, 2019

 

$ 0.070

 

 

$ 0.020

 

December 31, 2019

 

$ 0.030

 

 

$ 0.010

 

 

The last reported sales price of our common stock on the OTCQB on April 6, 2021, was $0.087.

 

As of April 6, 2021, there were 219 stockholders of record of our common stock.

 

Dividend Policy

 

The Company has never paid dividends on its common stock and does not anticipate that it will pay dividends in the foreseeable future. It intends to use any future earnings for the expansion of its business. Any future determination of applicable dividends will be made at the discretion of the board of directors and will depend on the results of operations, financial condition, capital requirements and other factors deemed relevant.

 

 
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Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

The following table provides information regarding our equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2020:

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

Plan category

 

Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights

 

 

Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights

 

 

Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans

 

Equity compensation plans approved by security holders

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

 

 

11,860,714

(1)

 

$ 0.74

 

 

 

--

 

______________

(1)

Represents (i) options to purchase 1,000,000 shares of common stock at $2.00 per share to each of Timothy Hassett and Mark Hodowanec; (ii) options to purchase 2,000,000 shares of common stock at $2.00 per share to Judson Bibb; and (iii) warrants to purchase 7,860,714 shares of common stock as set forth in Part III, Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters. of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

On January 3, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 2,238,806 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $15,000 on convertible debt with a principal of $168,300.

 

On January 6, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 5,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $17,920 on convertible debt with a principal of $179,950.

 

On January 8, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 3,174,603 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt with a principal of $168,300.

 

On January 13, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 4,220,881 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $20,978 on convertible debt with a principal of $143,000.

 

On January 14, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 3,921,569 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt with a principal of $168,300.

 

 
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On January 16, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 4,444,444 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt with a principal of $168,300.

 

On January 21, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 5,111,111 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $23,000 on convertible debt with a principal of $168,300.

 

On January 21, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 10,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $22,400 on convertible debt with a principal of $179,950.

 

On January 27, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 6,173,709 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $21,040 on convertible debt with a principal of $143,000.

 

On January 30, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 7,142,857 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt with a principal of $168,300.

 

On February 3, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 9,573,426 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon final conversion of $21,071 on convertible debt with a principal of $143,000.

 

On February 13, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 11,992,022 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $26,394 on convertible debt with a principal of $143,000.

 

On February 24, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 15,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $17,400 on convertible debt with a principal of $179,950.

 

On March 2, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 9,820,030 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $26,494 on convertible debt with a principal of $143,000.

 

On March 4, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 6,500,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $8,840 on convertible debt with a principal of $179,950.

 

On March 9, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 10,282,003 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $40,151 on convertible debt with a principal of $126,500.

 

On March 24, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 8,500,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $23,120 on convertible debt with a principal of $179,950.

 

On May 5, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 4,460,094 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $31,667 on convertible debt with a principal of $126,500.

 

On May 8, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 2,352,941 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt of $141,000.

 

On June 1, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 15,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $69,000 on convertible debt with a principal of $179,950.

 

On June 5, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 3,325,335 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $26,561 on convertible debt with a principal of $126,500.

 

On June 12, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 3,924,883 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $23,408 on convertible debt with a principal of $126,500.

 

 
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On June 29, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 2,067,880 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon final conversion of $11,746 on convertible debt with a principal of $126,500.

 

On September 21, 2020, the Company issued 1,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC pursuant to the terms of a promissory note agreement entered into on September 15, 2020. The shares were an inducement for the purchase of the promissory note. 

 

On October 6, 2020, the Company issued 3,667,241 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of $21,270 on convertible debt with a principal of $179,950. 

 

On October 9, 2020, the Company issued 1,000,000 shares of common stock to JSJ Investments, Inc. pursuant to the terms of a promissory note agreement entered into on October 8, 2020. The shares were issued as additional consideration for the purchase of the promissory note. 

 

On October 12, 2020, the Company issued 995,920 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $11,879 on convertible debt with a principal of $139,150.

  

On October 16, 2020, the Company issued 1,082,114 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $11,909 on convertible debt with a principal of $139,150.

  

On October 21, 2020, the Company issued 1,136,784 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $11,945 on convertible debt with a principal of $139,150.

  

On October 29, 2020, the Company issued 1,271,206 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $12,004 on convertible debt with a principal of $139,150. 

 

On October 30, 2020, the Company issued 5,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $24,200 on convertible debt with a principal of $45,000.

  

On November 3, 2020, the Company issued 1,500,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC pursuant to the terms of a promissory note agreement entered into on October 30, 2020. The shares were an inducement for the purchase of the promissory note. 

 

On November 6, 2020, the Company issued 1,558,686 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $12,063 on convertible debt with a principal of $139,150.

  

On November 10, 2020, the Company issued 1,606,697 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon final conversion of $12,092 on convertible debt with a principal of $139,150. 

 

On November 12, 2020, the Company issued 5,500,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of $22,000.

  

On November 12, 2020, the Company issued 517,087 shares of our common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon final conversion of $3,892 on convertible debt with a principal of $143,000.

 

On November 23, 2020, the Company issued 20,356,630 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of $150,639 on convertible debt of $150,639.

 

On November 20, 2020, the Company issued 1,858,907 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $13,990 on convertible debt with a principal of $139,150.

  

 
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On December 7, 2020, the Company issued 2,360,436 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon conversion of $18,435 on a bridge promissory note with a principal of $139,150.

  

On December 14, 2020, the Company issued 2,370,294 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $18,512 on convertible debt with a principal of $139,150.

  

On December 21, 2020, the Company issued 4,155,824 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon final conversion of $30,982 on convertible debt with a principal of $139,150.  

 

On December 22, 2020, the Company issued 13,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $97,500 on convertible debt with a principal of $162,700.

  

On December 28, 2020, the Company issued 12,577,332 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $94,330 on convertible debt with a principal of $162,700.

 

None of the above issuances involved any underwriters, underwriting discounts or commissions, or any public offering and we believe were exempt from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933 by virtue of Section 4(2) thereof and/or Regulation D promulgated thereunder.

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

 

As a smaller reporting company, we are not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Our Management’s Discussion and Analysis contains not only statements that are historical facts, but also statements that are forward-looking. Forward-looking statements are, by their very nature, uncertain and risky. These risks and uncertainties include international, national and local general economic and market conditions; demographic changes and pandemics; our ability to sustain, manage, or forecast growth; our ability to successfully make and integrate acquisitions; raw material costs and availability; new product development and introduction; existing government regulations and changes in, or the failure to comply with, government regulations; adverse publicity; competition; the loss of significant customers or suppliers; fluctuations and difficulty in forecasting operating results; changes in business strategy or development plans; business disruptions; the ability to attract and retain qualified personnel; the ability to protect technology; and other risks that might be detailed from time to time in our filings with the SEC.

 

Because forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties, the actual results and outcomes may differ materially from the results and outcomes discussed in the forward-looking statements. The following discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations of the Company is based upon, and should be read in conjunction with, the audited consolidated financial statements and related notes elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Plan of Operation

 

Cool Technologies, Inc. and subsidiary, (“the Company” or “Cool Technologies” or “CoolTech”) was incorporated in the State of Nevada in July 2002. In April 2014, CoolTech formed Ultimate Power Truck, LLC (“Ultimate Power Truck” or “UPT”), of which the Company owns 95% and a shareholder of Cool Technologies owns 5%. Cool Technologies was formerly known as Bibb Corporation, as Z3 Enterprises, and as HPEV, Inc. On August 20, 2015, the Company changed its name to Cool Technologies, Inc.

 

The Company’s technologies are divided into two distinct but complementary categories: mobile power generation and heat dispersion technology.

 

The Company has developed a mobile power generation system (MG) that enables work trucks to generate electric power by running an in-chassis generator. The MG system can be retrofit onto new and existing American trucks. CoolTech intends to sell the mobile electric power system to government, commercial and fleet vehicle owners. Sales are expected to occur through the direct efforts of the Company, its sales agents and its joint venture partners. CoolTech may also license the MG system as well.

 

 
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The markets targeted include consumer, agricultural, industrial, military and emergency responders, both in the U.S. and worldwide.

 

CoolTech has also developed heat dispersion technologies based on proprietary composite heat structures and heat pipe architecture in various product platforms such as electric motors, pumps, turbines, bearings and vehicle components. In preparation, Cool Technologies filed for and received a trademark for Totally Enclosed Heat Pipe Cooled: TEHPC.

 

When a generator is enhanced by CoolTech’s patented thermal technologies, it should be able to output more power than any other generator of its size on the market. That’s because third party testing has demonstrated that the cooling provided by the thermal technologies can help increase the efficiency of electric motors.

  

Furthermore, management believes that the technologies will increase the lifespan as well as help meet regulatory emissions standards for electric motors and other heat producing equipment and components. The simplicity of the heat pipe architecture as well as the fact that it provides effective new applications for existing manufacturing processes should enhance the cost structure in several large industries including motor/generator and engine manufacturing.

 

As of December 31, 2020, we have seven US patents, one Canadian patent, two granted patents (1 Mexican, 1 Canadian) and two pending applications (1 in the US, 1 in Brazil) covering composite heat structures, motors, and related structures, heat pipe architecture, and applications (commonly referred to as “thermal” or “heat dispersion technology”). We also have one Patent Cooperation Treaty (“PCT”) application pending that covers integrated electrical power generation methods and systems.

 

The Company intends to commercialize its patents by integrating the thermal technologies and applications with Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) partners and by licensing them to electric motor, generator, pump and vehicle component (brake, resistor, caliper) manufacturers.

 

We believe the benefits of our mobile power generation systems are quickly realized once potential customers see it in operation. Public demonstrations of the MG systems began in April 2017. An inspection and performance demonstration for Mexican government officials and business leaders occurred in May 2018. Feedback from initial viewers resulted in more government officials and fruit growers coming to see the MG power equipment and to learn about the water purification options in March 2019. Even more officials and growers followed -- flying to St. Louis for a review in May 2019.

 

We generated our first Mobile Generation order during the quarter ended June 30, 2014 and received a partial deposit in advance of completing the sale. On June 9, 2017, the Company received a purchase order for 10 MG systems from Craftsmen Industries. As Craftsmen builds custom vehicles designed to the individual specifications of their customers whose businesses and technical requirements vary widely, it is impossible to estimate when the order will be fulfilled.

 

In November 2017, the Company received a purchase commitment for 234 MG systems from a Mexican Producers’ Union. That was followed by a purchase commitment for 24 to 50 MG units from a second Mexican Producers’ Union in December 2017. On April 9, 2018, the first Mexican Producers’ Union executed a purchase order with the Company for 10 Ford F350s with MG80 kVA systems installed. On May 7, 2019, Turkish technology company Belirti Teknoloji, A.S. delivered a purchase order for six hundred MG80, MG125 and MG200 Mobile Generation systems. As of the December 31, 2020, the Company does not have the funds available to fulfill the orders.

 

Craftsmen Industries was selected to produce the first systems due to its engineering capabilities and extensive facilities. In January 2019, it began production on the initial vehicles and completed an initial production run vehicle two months later.

 

 
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We have not generated any revenues to date. Consequently, there can be no assurances that the Company will be able to generate new orders nor fulfill the existing ones nor address all the requirements of all the interested parties.

 

Management is pursuing various financing alternatives, based upon a third-party assessment of the historically demonstrated or contractually committed profit-earning capacities of our IP. We see this as the best path forward for non-dilutive funding.

 

If funding is received, it will be used to support completion of the initial phases of our business plan, which is to license our thermal technologies and applications; to license or sell a mobile electric power system; and to license our submersible motor dry pit technologies and/or to bring to market our technologies and applications through key distribution and joint venture partners. As of the filing date, it is uncertain whether COVID-19 will continue to have a significant impact on production and distribution of Company products.

 

The occurrence of an uncontrollable event such as the COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected our operations over the past year. A pandemic typically results in social distancing, travel bans, lockdowns and quarantines. This has limited access to our facilities, customers, management, support staff and professional advisors. These, in turn, have impacted our operations and financial condition. It may also impact demand for our products and may continue to hamper our efforts to provide our investors with timely information and comply with our filing obligations with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

Significant Developments

 

Amendment of Series B Preferred Stock

 

On October 31, 2016, the Company filed an amended and restated Series B Preferred Stock Certificate of Designation (which was originally filed with the Secretary of State of Nevada on April 19, 2016 and amended on August 12, 2016) to designate 3,636,360 shares as Series B Preferred Stock and to provide for supermajority 66 2/3% voting rights for the Series B Preferred Stock. The Series B Preferred Stock will not bear dividends, will not be entitled to receive any distributions in the event of any liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the Company, and will have no other preferences, rights, restrictions, or qualifications, except as otherwise provided by law or the articles of incorporation of the Company. The holders of Class B Stock shall have the right, at such holder’s option, at any time to convert such shares into common stock, in a conversion ratio of one share of common stock for each share of Class B Stock. If the common stock trades or is quoted at a price per share in excess of $2.25 for any twenty consecutive day trading period, (subject to appropriate adjustment for forward or reverse stock splits, recapitalizations, stock dividends and the like), the Series B Stock will automatically be convertible into the common stock in a conversion ratio of one share of common stock for each share of Series B Stock. The Series B Stock may not be sold, hypothecated, transferred, assigned or disposed without the prior written consent of the Company and the holders of the outstanding Series B Preferred Stock.

 

Amendment of Articles of Incorporation

 

We filed an amendment to our Articles of Incorporation with the Secretary of State of the State of Nevada increasing our authorized shares of common stock, from 140,000,000 shares to 350,000,000 shares, effective March 22, 2017. We filed a second amendment to our Articles of Incorporation with the Secretary of State of the State of Nevada increasing our authorized shares of common stock, from 350,000,000 shares to 500,000,000 shares, effective October 28,

2019.

 

On February 13, 2020, stockholders holding shares that entitled them to exercise at least a majority of the voting power, voted in favor of increasing the number of authorized shares of common stock, from 500,000,000 shares to 1,000,000,000 shares. The vote marked the first step in the process to amend the articles again.

 

 
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Craftsmen Industries, Inc.

 

As a consequence of the first public demonstration of the MG 30 kilovolt amp (“kVA”) system at the North America International Auto Show in Detroit in January 2017, the Company entered into an agreement in principle, dated February 21, 2017, with Craftsmen Industries, Inc.(“Craftsmen’), a company engaged in the design, engineering and production of mobile marketing vehicles, experiential marketing platforms and industrial mobile solutions.

 

On April 25, 2017, we delivered to Craftsmen Industries, a Class III Vehicle (Ford F-350 dually) up-fitted with a production-ready MG 30 kVA (single phase/three phase) system.

 

Subsequently, Craftsmen invited the Company to demonstrate its mobile generation technology and the potential benefits for Craftsmen products at Craftsmen’s 35th Anniversary Party on April 27, 2017. Over 100 current and prospective Craftsmen customers were in the audience for the demonstrations.

 

On June 9, 2017, the Company received a purchase order for 10 MG systems from Craftsmen, each in the amount of $29,500 with 50% paid as a down payment at the time of customer acceptance.

 

Furthermore, Craftsmen has agreed to produce the MG systems for the Company’s initial orders from Jatropha and Veracruz (See below). Since October 2018 we have been ordering components for the initial pilot production run which was completed in the first quarter of 2019 and showcased on March 27, 2019. In parallel, purchase orders will be placed for components to support increased production in the months that follow.

 

Veteran Technology Group

 

On May 26, 2017, the Company entered into a five-year strategic alliance agreement with Veteran Technology Group LLC (“Vet Tech”), a developer of artificial intelligence (“AI”) software for advanced troubleshooting of complex systems. The agreement automatically renews for successive one-year terms unless terminated by either party 30 days prior to its expiration. The agreement may be terminated earlier by either party upon 60 days prior notice. The parties agreed not to solicit the other parties’ employees or contractors for six months after the expiration or termination of the agreement.

 

The agreement provides that the Company market and provide its MG product and services to customers referred by Vet Tech and Vet Tech will market and provide GAIT software and other AI services for clients referred by the Company.

 

National Union of Jatropha Producers

 

In November 2017, the Company received a purchase commitment for 234 MG systems from the National Union of Producers of Jatropha in Mexico (Jatropha).

 

Jatropha has established a center for processing oil from Jatropha seeds for biofuel production. Through their union of producers, Jatropha plans to introduce the MG and promote the product to their supplier network.

 

The purchase commitment stipulates that CoolTech will furnish Jatropha with an MG80 retro-fitted onto a Ford F-350 truck within 60 business days. To ensure the system is optimized to meet Jatropha’s needs, CoolTech set the terms of the agreement to allow both teams to gather data and provide performance feedback another 30 to 60 days. Upon completion of this period, Jatropha will release the balance of the order for 233 units. Payment terms require 50% down and 50% at time of shipment, FOB (Freight on Board) from Cool Technologies’ dock.

 

 
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On February 6, 2019, Jatropha signed an agreement to amend their previous purchase agreement. It eliminates the 60 business day deadline for the truck to be shipped to Mexico. Under the new agreement, representatives from Jatropha will come to Colorado for an inspection and live performance demonstration. If approved, the generator-equipped trucks will go into production as specified in the original purchase agreement.

 

A representative of the National Union of Jatropha Producers approved the generator-equipped truck. It will go into production as the Company secures final funding.

 

The value of the purchase commitment is expected to be between $17,000,000 and $22,000,000. On April 9, 2018, Jatropha executed a purchase order with the Company for 10 Ford F-350s with MG80 kVA systems installed. The value of the initial order is in excess of one million dollars.

 

National Union of Producers in Mexico for the state of Veracruz

 

In December 2017, the Company received a purchase commitment for 24 to 50 MG units from the National Union of Producers in Mexico for the state of Veracruz. Depending on the respective numbers of MG55 and MG80 kVA systems ordered, the Company expects the value of the commitment to range between $1,200,000 and $3,750,000.

 

The union represents farmers who grow labor and energy intensive crops such as sugar cane, tobacco, bananas, coffee, rice and vanilla. It expects that the MG systems will increase yields, exports and income for its members and their communities.

 

According to the contract, the Company will deliver an MG 80 retro-fitted onto a Ford F-350 truck within 60 business days. Then, to ensure the system fully addresses the application requirements, CoolTech, as a best practice of Six Sigma quality, will gather data and performance feedback. When CoolTech is satisfied that optimal performance has been achieved, the union will release the balance of the order and production begins.

 

On February 23, 2018, Veracruz signed an agreement to amend their previous purchase agreement. It eliminates the 60 business day deadline for the truck to be shipped to Mexico. Under the new agreement, representatives from Veracruz will come to Colorado for an inspection and live performance demonstration. If approved, the generator-equipped trucks will go into production as specified in the original purchase agreement.

 

A representative of the National Union of Jatropha Producers approved the generator-equipped truck. It will go into production as the Company secures final funding.

 

Payment terms require 50% down and 50% at time of shipment, each payable with a bank letter of credit. Product delivery will be considered FOB (Freight on Board) from Cool Technologies’ shipping dock.

 

The value of the purchase commitment is expected to commitment to range between $1.2M and $3.9M.

 

Panasonic System Communications Company of North America.

 

In January 2018, the Company announced that its Mobile Generation systems will incorporate Panasonic Toughpad tablets to run CoolTech’s software.

 

The association between the two companies dates back to April 2017 when Cool Technologies demonstrated its Mobile Generation (MG) system at Craftsman Industries in St. Louis. In attendance was the Executive Director of Product Planning Strategy and Innovation at the Silicon Valley Center of Panasonic Corporation of North America. He received a demonstration of the MG technology as well as an overview of CoolTech’s thermal dispersion technologies. That led to several conversations and meetings regarding the ways in which the two companies could pursue joint initiatives and opportunities.

 

 
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The first initiative resulted in CoolTech’s use of the Panasonic Toughpad tablet to provide a rugged touchscreen interface for field technicians to control and calibrate the Mobile Generation systems. The Toughpad will be deployed in the trucks’ cabs.

 

Aon Risk Services Central, Inc and Lee and Hayes, PLLC

 

On January 18, 2018, the Company entered into an agreement with Aon Risk Services Central, Inc. and Lee and Hayes, PLLC, through its operating unit, 601West, which provides intellectual property (“IP”) analytics, to assess the value of the Company’s IP. As set forth in the agreement, the assessment will be founded on historically demonstrated or contractually committed profit-earning capacities of our IP and may be used to obtain financing, including but not limited to, non-dilutive financing. Since then significant progress has been achieved, although at a pace much slower than anticipated.

 

Live MG80 Demonstration in Fort Collins, Colorado

 

On May 4, 2018, nine representatives from Mexico’s farming, banking, and government sectors flew to Fort Collins, Colorado for a live demonstration of CoolTech’s generator-equipped truck. The demonstration showcased the capabilities and ease of operation of the system. The Company demonstrated how an operator is able to control the generator from the comfort and safety of the truck’s cab using a Panasonic Toughpad. The Company also used the electricity from the truck to power a screw compressor, an industrial fan, and an industrial load bank. Additional capabilities, such as purifying water and using batteries and solar power to make operations more sustainable and environmentally friendly were discussed with the attendees.

 

A representative of the National Union of Jatropha Producers approved the generator-equipped truck. CoolTech plans to put this into production as soon as final funding is secured.

 

Purchase and Delivery of Truck to Craftsman Industries

 

On July 15, 2018, the Company purchased a Ford F-450 Chassis Cab Truck. Subsequently, a metal flatbed was manufactured and installed. The truck was delivered to Craftsmen on September 15th. It will be used for the installation and refinement of the MG 80 kVA system. A second F-450 will be used for the MG 125 kVA system.

 

Order of Parts and Components

 

During the week of October 7, 2018, the Company placed orders for System Controllers, 80 and 125 kVA Generators, Voltage Regulators, Panasonic Toughpads, Power Take-Offs (PTO) and Split Shaft PTOs.

 

CALSTART, Inc.

 

CoolTech joined CALSTART, Inc. (“CALSTART”) a non-profit, clean transportation technology coalition in November 2018. The coalition works with member companies and agencies to foster a high-tech clean-transportation industry by accelerating the adoption of emerging technologies and helping build markets.

 

Since then, the Company has been in contact with 4 utilities, 3 telecoms, 2 truck upfitters and 3 hybrid truck manufacturers. Proposals have been made for 3 MG systems of differing power to be installed on California Air Resources Board (CARB) certified vehicles, an MG No-idle system and an MG truck with a hydrogen-infused fuel system.

 

On Thursday, January 17, 2019, a representative of the Company attended a meeting of the CALSTART Leadership Circle at Porsche Cars North American Headquarters, in Atlanta. Among the topics covered were the infrastructure pathway for electric vehicles and electric vehicle market growth. At the event, the Company met with representatives from Southern Company, Duke Energy and Altec, Inc.

 

 
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Creation and Delivery of Business Proposals

 

The Company has been active in putting forth new business proposals in line with our strategy to target specific industry markets. We regularly review relevant press releases, major media articles and trade publications from various industries to keep up with trends and uncover opportunities. We also attend seminars and conferences to meet and network with prospective clients, however, COVID-19 has put a damper on such activities.

 

TARDEC

 

On February 26, 2019, a representative of the Company attended a Collaboration Day with the U.S. Army’s Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) at Marine Corps Air Station, Miramar. TARDEC is the U.S. Army’s Research, Development and Engineering Center for all Ground Vehicles and Ground Vehicle Systems technology and integration, as well as Fuels and Lubricants, Water Supply and Wastewater Treatment, Tactical Military Bridging, Construction Equipment, Material Handling Equipment, and Army Watercraft. The Company participated in one-on-one sessions with members from the Ground Vehicle Power and Mobility team which pursues advanced technologies to increase fleet energy flexibility and efficiency with the goal of providing more power output without adding weight that degrades system performance.

 

On February 27, 2019, the Company participated in TARDEC’s Vehicle Electrification Forum which serves to advance electrification of Army combat and tactical systems by enabling industry to innovate products that meet Army needs and requirements. The Forum is a mechanism for industry to contribute to the formation of TARDEC’s Vehicle Electrification Strategy. A representative from the Company participated in a session covering electric recharging and issues related to future powertrain configurations including improved system efficiency; requirements for hybrid, electric, and fuel cell configurations; energy storage; vehicle-to-grid and vehicle-to-vehicle capabilities; and engine/transmission improvements.  

 

Unveiling of Initial Production Run Vehicle

 

On March 27, 2019, the Company unveiled the initial production run of its Mobile Generation (MG) work trucks for inspection by an audience of agricultural and community leaders from Latin America at Craftsmen Industries.

 

The itinerary for the showcase event included a tour of the St. Louis manufacturing facility and inspection of the first production run MG vehicle in operation as it powered a variety of equipment.

 

The purpose of the viewing was not only to show the truck’s capabilities, but to get feedback from the attendees.

 

Mexican Government

 

On May 13, 2019, government officials and fruit growers were at Craftsmen Industries in St. Louis for a review of a first run MG80 production vehicle and water purification/desalination options.

 

Among the politicians in attendance was Congressman Efraín Rocha Vega who is Secretary of the Commission of Development and Rural, Agricultural and Food Self-sufficiency Conservation, a member of the commission of Livestock and the commission of Environment, Sustainability, Climate Change and Natural Resources. Subsequent to the event, in an official Congressional Letter of Support, dated May 20, 2019, Congressman Rocha wrote: “The successful demonstration of these technologies further strengthens the Mexican Government’s support of Mexican entities that desire to purchase CoolTech products, as well as affirms our position to provide financial assistance to such entities.” The letter can be viewed in its entirety at: http://www.cooltechnologiesinc.com/content/pdf/MexicanLegislationandFinancialAssistanceLetter.pdf.

 

Introduction of new options

 

During the fourth quarter of 2019, the Company has introduced new options, which include an MG System that generates up to 200 kVA of electric power, water purification and desalination systems.

 

 
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The truck mounted water purification and desalination units can produce from 2,800 to 14,000 gallons of fresh water every day. Assuming the average person needs 2 liters per day, 10,000 gallons is enough for 26,498 people.

 

A 30 kVA MG system could power any size unit as well as the pumps to deliver the water or five units at once which would conceivably be enough to keep the population of Santa Barbara hydrated. It could even tow a 1,250 gallon water tanker, if needed.

 

The purification and desalinization units feature fully automated controls and monitoring. When combined with the optional telematics offered in the vehicles, each unit could be remotely controlled and monitored from distant locations.

 

Belirti Teknoloji

 

On May 7, 2019, the Company entered into a joint venture agreement (“JV”) with Turkish technology company Belirti Teknoloji, A.S. (“BelirtiTech”). To launch the business, BelirtiTech awarded Cool Technologies a purchase order for up to $42 million USD for the purchase of several different models of its Mobile Generation kits. The purchase order will supply the JV with its initial inventory for resale into the Middle East and some African nations. The Company is actively working with the customer’s bank in addition to insurance companies and other financial entities to facilitate the financing of the orders. As of the date of this filing, the funds to fulfill the orders are not in place.

 

The initial purchase order is for six hundred MG80, MG125 and MG200 Mobile Generation systems. The MG systems will be integrated into the end customer’s choice of vehicles.

 

The order also includes an additional MG80 installed in a Ford F-450 with the 2,500 gallon per day mobile water desalinization option included.

 

KeyOptions

 

On May 30, 2019, the Company entered into a joint venture agreement (“JV”) with KeyOptions Pty Ltd., a privately held technology and security provider based in Victoria, Australia.

 

KeyOptions develops and markets products for governments, defense contractors and other commercial applications to counter security and cyber threats. The Company will provide a license for the JV to market and sell CoolTech’s entire product platform in Australia and neighboring countries in Southeast Asia.

 

New Strategic Alliance

 

On December 16, 2019, the Company signed a cross marketing and licensing agreement with VerdeWatts, LLC., an energy generation and storage company encompassing everything from mobile solar power generation systems to large scale biogas turbine installations. Pursuant to the agreement VerdeWatts and the Company each granted the other a royalty free non-exclusive license to certain patents which license is subject to certain future negotiation.

 

Like CoolTech’s Mobile Generation systems (“MG”), VerdeWatts’ products are scalable and offer the ability to bring power nearly anywhere it is needed. Their proprietary Smart Solar Power Generation Units and energy storage systems combine to deliver sustainable power long after the sun has set.

 

The agreement with VerdeWatts also included a cross marketing and royalty free non-exclusive licensing agreement with FirmGreen, Inc., a water treatment facilities developer that works closely with VerdeWatts to create a suite of synergistic products that address significant needs in the global marketplace. FirmGreen specializes in water purification and desalination technologies. Their mobile, solar and container applications feature 6 levels of water purification for unrivaled drinkability. Pursuant to the agreement FirmGreen and the Company each granted the other a royalty free non-exclusive license to certain patents which license is subject to certain future negotiation.

 

 
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CoolTech’s MG platform makes the companies’ product offering complete with mobile power generation. It provides the capability to power everything from irrigation for farms and water purification for rural areas to electric vehicle charging and fast charging in the urban ones.

 

Consider the solar-powered generator system with a built-in water purification unit that makes seawater desalination sustainable. The system pumps and purifies up to 3,000 gallons per day and interfaces with CoolTech’s MG system for 24-hour operation. The solar panels collapse and fold together, so the entire system fits easily in the bed of a work truck. It can be set up and operate anywhere a four-wheel drive vehicle can reach. All of these systems are patent protected and cross licensed to each of the three companies.

 

FirmGreen and VerdeWatts have a global presence with projects on 3 continents. The largest encompasses the installation of 14 natural gas generators to produce over 60 megawatts (MW) of power. The generators will be integrated with 50 megawatt hours of battery storage and another 6 MW of solar to ensure a consistent flow of power. VerdeWatts intend to replace most of the legacy on-site generators with CoolTech’s MG systems, however the Company has not received any orders and there cannot be any assurance that any orders will be placed.

 

Together the companies can create an energy or utility ecosystem that can enable less developed countries to leapfrog non-existent, inadequate or failing infrastructure to deliver reliable power and water quickly, sustainably and cost effectively to their citizens, agriculture and other businesses. The scale and impact can reach from the individual farms and villages to cities and regions.

 

In fact, by combining their respective technologies: energy generation, energy storage and load management controls into a single suite of products, the companies create what is called a “microgrid”. Varying combinations of energy sources such as solar, wind, biogas and MG systems both backup and supplement one another to provide consistent, uninterrupted primary power even during severe weather or other emergency situations.

 

The synergies between the companies extend beyond water purification and power generation. VerdeWatts’ wind and gas turbines and generators which produce electric power can all be improved by CoolTech’s thermal reduction technologies.

 

Request for Collaboration Sent to US Government Officials

 

On December 11, 2019, letters signed by 13 government officials and Congressmen in Mexico were mailed to their counterparts in the US, specifically Governor Gavin Newsom, Secretary Rick Perry, Secretary Wilbur Ross, Senator Mitch McConnell and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi.

 

The letters were a request for collaborative support between the two countries to accelerate CoolTech’s product deployment into Mexico to help solve urgent rural power and water purification problems that are hurting rural communities. Those problems include irregular and faulty power in rural areas which hinders crop irrigation and water pollution which affects crops farmed for sale to the US.

 

The letters also detail the Mexican officials’ satisfaction with CoolTech’s solutions and management team and that they have met with the Company on several occasions for product demonstrations as well as strategic and technical advice. They highlight the benefits of CoolTech products, how they could quickly and efficiently address the problems noted, and how they expect them to become a viable part of the country’s infrastructure.

 

Export Import Bank of the United States

 

With the help of VerdeWatts and FirmGreen, CoolTech has initiated a relationship with the Export-Import Bank of the United States (EXIM), a U.S. government agency whose sole mission is to support U.S. exports. The bank fulfills its mission by offering very cost-effective financing for international customers and project developers to purchase U.S.-made services and purchase or lease U.S.-made goods.

 

To that end, the two companies applied to finance the Mexican projects referenced above. CoolTech also sent product information for due diligence review by the technical team at EXIM bank. Subsequently, CoolTech has received a Letter of Interest from EXIM, however, there cannot be any assurance that EXIM will provide any funding to the Company.

 

 
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Increase in Number of Authorized Shares

 

On August 10, 2020, the Nevada Secretary of State accepted and filed the Company’s Certificate of Amendment to the Company’s Articles of Incorporation. The filing amends Article II of the Articles of Incorporation by increasing the number of authorized shares of common stock from 500,000,000 to 1,000,000,000.

 

New Sales Agent

 

In January 2021, the Company terminated its independent agent agreement with Gaia Energy of Gdansk, Poland.

 

On January 26, 2021, the Company signed an independent agent agreement with H&K Ventures, LLC of Morganhill, California. H&K will act as the Company’s independent agent.

 

The principals of H&K were also part of Gaia Energy. Consequently, the agreement and the expertise provide by H&K are essentially the same. H&K will concentrate on developing markets in Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The agreement describes the agent’s duties as “generating revenue, and investment funding, for the Company from various organizations including investment funds, end-users, channel partners, integrators, and OEMs.”

 

Team members of H&K Ventures include executives with more than twenty-five years’ experience with Panasonic, Ford Motor Company, Electronic Data Systems and the US Air Force in the fields of advanced technologies and an African diplomat with a thirty-year background working with and for diplomatic missions, non-governmental organizations and international disasters and aid management services.

 

The diplomat introduced CoolTech products at a recent African technical summit attended by representatives from 54 countries.

 

Going Concern

 

As a result of our financial condition, we have received a report from our independent registered public accounting firm for our consolidated financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 that includes an explanatory paragraph describing the uncertainty as to our ability to continue as a going concern. As of December 31, 2020, we have not commenced full operations, raising substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent on our ability to generate revenue, achieve profitable operations and repay our obligations when they come due. As of December 31, 2020, we have $33 in cash and we owe $319,000 and $2,639,500 for convertible and promissory notes, respectively. We are pursuing various financing alternatives to address the payment of outstanding debt and to support the sales, component acquisition and assembly of our mobile power generation systems as well as the completion of the secondary elements of our business plan: to license its thermal technologies and applications, including submersible dry-pit applications. There can be no assurance, however, that we will obtain adequate funding or that we will be successful in accomplishing any of our objectives. Consequently, we may not be able to continue as an operating company.

 

Results of Operations

 

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, consolidated statements of operations data. The table and the discussion below should be read in conjunction with the accompanying consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto, appearing elsewhere in this report.

 

 
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Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

Change

 

 

%

 

Revenues

 

$ --

 

 

$ --

 

 

 

N/A

 

 

 

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payroll and related expenses

 

 

357,884

 

 

 

657,178

 

 

 

(299,294 )

 

 

(45.5 )%

Consulting

 

 

316,068

 

 

 

331,107

 

 

 

(15,039 )

 

 

(4.5 )%

Professional fees

 

 

224,453

 

 

 

226,859

 

 

 

(2,406 )

 

 

(1.1 )%

Research and development

 

 

19,069

 

 

 

296,800

 

 

 

(277,731 )

 

 

(93.6 )%

General and administrative

 

 

68,309

 

 

 

242,994

 

 

 

(174,685 )

 

 

(71.9 )%

Total operating expenses

 

 

985,783

 

 

 

1,754,938

 

 

 

(769,155 )

 

 

(43.8 )%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

(1,472,104 )

 

 

(2,027,030 )

 

 

554,926

 

 

 

27.3 %

Change in fair value of derivative liability

 

 

(341,553 )

 

 

330,728

 

 

 

(672,281 )

 

 

(203.3 )%

Gain (Loss) on extinguishment

 

 

75,757

 

 

 

208,328

 

 

 

(132,571 )

 

 

(63.6 )%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

 

(2,723,683 )

 

 

(3,242,912 )

 

 

519,229

 

 

 

(16.0 )%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Less: Non-controlling interest

 

 

(913 )

 

 

(1,600 )

 

 

687

 

 

 

(42.9 )%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss to shareholders

 

$ (2,722,770 )

 

$ (3,241,312 )

 

$ 518,542

 

 

 

(16.0 )%

 

Revenues

 

During the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, and since inception, we have not generated any revenues. We generated our first Mobile Generation order during the quarter ended June 30, 2014 and received a partial deposit in advance of completing the sale with companies controlled by the individual who is a 5% owner of UPT and a shareholder of our Company. The order is in the production queue along with other existing orders.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses decreased during the year ended December 31, 2020 compared to the year ended December 31, 2019, due to reductions in payroll and related expenses, consulting costs, professional fees, research and development as well as general and administrative.

 

The decrease in professional fees was due primarily to the reduced requirements for accounting and legal. The decrease in research and development was due to the focus on commercialization of the Company’s MG system. The decrease in general and administrative costs was due to limited funds.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020, payroll and related expenses decreased by $299,294 due to the elimination of Mark Hodowanec’s salary after he resigned in July 2019 and due to the fact that the remaining officers received no salary during the first quarter and only one month’s salary in the second quarter.

 

Consulting expenses decreased from $331,107 in 2019 to $316,068 in 2020. This was due primarily to the reduced workload and payments for related-party consultants and general consultants as well as a reflection of the Company’s need to conserve cash

 

Professional fees decreased from $226,859 in 2019 to $224,453 in 2020. The decrease was negligible, as before professional fees consisted primarily of fees to retain legal representation to defend the Company against the eviction complaint.

 

Research and development expenses decreased from $296,800 in 2019 to $19,069 in 2020 due to the completion of the design of the MG system and the Company’s focus on its commercialization.

 

General and administrative expenses decreased from $242,994 in 2019 to $68,309 in 2020 due to limited funds.

 

 
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Other Income and Expense

 

Interest expenses during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 related primarily to our debt. The change in fair value of derivative liability reflects the change in fair value of the conversion features embedded in the convertible debt agreements entered into in September 2020, October 2020, and November 2020, and also includes the change in fair value of common share equivalents that were previously reclassified to derivative liability as a result of insufficient authorized but unissued shares.

 

Interest expense decreased during the year ended December 31 from $2,027,030 in 2019 to $1,472,104 in 2020 due to a number of vendors adding previously unrecognized interest to their bills. Interest expense decreased in 2020 primarily due to our debt.

 

Net Loss and Noncontrolling Interest

 

Since we have incurred losses since inception, we have not recorded any income tax expense or benefit. Accordingly, our net loss is driven by our operating and other expenses. Noncontrolling interest represents the 5% third-party ownership in UPT, which is subtracted to calculate net loss to shareholders.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

We have historically met our liquidity requirements primarily through the public sale and private placement of equity securities, debt financing, and exchanging common stock warrants and options for professional and consulting services. On December 31, 2020, we had cash and cash equivalents of $33.

 

Working capital is the amount by which current assets exceed current liabilities. We had negative working capital of $7,042,484 and $6,821,643 on December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The decrease in negative working capital was due to decreases in accounts payable, current debt and derivative liability. To that end, we owe approximately $319,000 for convertible notes that mature in the next eleven months and we owe another $2,639,500 in notes payable. Based on its current forecast and budget, management believes that its cash resources will not be sufficient to fund its operations through the end of the second quarter. Unless the Company can generate sufficient revenue from the execution of the Company’s business plan, it will need to obtain additional capital to continue to fund the Company’s operations. There is no assurance that capital in any form would be available to us, and if available, on terms and conditions that are acceptable. If we are unable to obtain sufficient funds, we may be forced to curtail and/or cease operations.

 

February Convertible Note --On February 1, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $75,000 after an original issue discount of $7,500 in lieu of interest. The total amount of $82,500 plus 3% interest of $2,475 will be due on December 13, 2019. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a fixed price of $0.0125 per share In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied.

 

May Convertible Note -- On May 13, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $150,000 after an original issue discount of $15,000 in lieu of interest, for a total amount of $165,000 due on December 13, 2019. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied.

 

The note also included a clause which stated that if the effective conversion price is less than $0.01 at any time, the principal amount of the note shall increase by $10,000 and that the conversion price will be permanently redefined to equal 40% of the lowest traded price that occurred during the 15 consecutive trading days immediately preceding the date on which the note holder elects to convert all or part of the note. On December 20, 2019, the effective conversion price reached sub-penny threshold. The principal amount and the subsequent conversion price were adjusted as noted above. Therefore, as of December 31, 2019, the convertible balance remaining totaled $179,950.

 

On January 6, 2020, the Company issued 5,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $17,920 on convertible debt of $179,950. On January 21, 2020, the Company issued 10,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $22,400 on convertible debt of $179,950. On February 24, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 15,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $17,400 on convertible debt of $179,950. On March 4, 2020, the Company issued 6,500,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $8,840 on convertible debt of $179,950. On March 24, 2020, the Company issued 8,500,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $23,120 on convertible debt of $179,950. On October 6, 2020, the Company issued 3,667,241 shares upon final conversion of $21,270 and the note was retired.

 

 
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June Convertible Note -- On June 6, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $130,000 with an original issue discount of $13,000 and an annual interest rate of 8%. The principal ($143,000) and interest will be due on June 6, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 24% per annum, require the Company to pay the product of the then outstanding principal amount, plus accrued interest and default interest, divided by the conversion price multiplied by the highest price at which the common stock traded at any time between the issuance date and the date of the event of default.

 

On December 19, 2019, Cool Technologies issued 1,128,687 shares of common stock to the holder upon partial conversion of $10,418 in debt. On December 24, 2019, the Company issued 2,674,064 shares of common stock to the holder upon partial conversion of $20,884 in debt.

  

On January 13, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 4,220,881 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $20,978 on convertible debt of $143,000. On January 27, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 6,173,709 shares of common stock to Eagles Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $21,040 on convertible debt of $143,000. On February 3, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 9,573,426 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $21,071 on convertible debt of $143,000. On February 13, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 11,992,022 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $26,394 on convertible debt of $143,000. On March 2, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 9,820,030 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $26,494 on convertible debt of $143,000. On June 7, 2020, the Company defaulted on the Note. As a result, the principal increases by 10% and a default interest rate of 24% per annum was applied. On November 12, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 517,087 shares upon final conversion of $3,892 and the note was retired.

 

July Convertible Note - On July 3, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $150,000 with an original issue discount of $15,300 in lieu of interest, for a total amount of $168,300 plus 8% annual interest due on July 3, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of CoolTech’s common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 22% per annum, require the Company to redeem all or any portion of the note at a premium of 150%.

 

On January 3, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 2,238,806 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group Ltd. upon partial conversion of $15,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On January 8, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 3,174,603 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On January 14, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 3,921,569 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On January 16, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 4,444,444 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On January 21, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 5,111,111 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $23,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On January 30, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 7,142,857 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On February 3, 2020, Cool Technologies wired $72,000 to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. and the note was retired.

 

August Convertible Note -- On August 28, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $115,000 with an original issue discount of $11,500 and an annual interest rate of 8%. The principal ($126,500) and interest will be due on August 28, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 24% per annum or the highest rate of interest permitted by law.

 

 
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On March 9, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 10,282,003 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $40,151 on convertible debt of $126,500. On May 5, 2020, the Company issued 4,460,094 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $31,667. On June 5, 2020, the Company issued 3,325,335 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $26,561. On June 12, 2020, the Company issued 3,924,883 shares of common stock upon partial conversion $23,408. On June 29, 2020, the Company issued 2,067,880 shares of common stock upon final conversion of $11,746 and the note was retired.

 

October Convertible Note -- On October 3, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It issued 350,000 inducement shares of restricted common stock and received $115,000 with an original issue discount of $11,500 and an annual interest rate of 8%. The principal ($126,500) and interest will be due on October 2, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest closing price during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 24% per annum or the highest rate of interest permitted by law.

 

On October 12, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 995,920 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $11,879. On October 16, 2020, the Company issued 1,082,114 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $11,909. On October 21, 2020, the Company issued 1,136,784 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $11,945. On October 29, 2020, the Company issued 1,271,206 shares of common stock upon partial conversion $12,004. On November 6, 2020, the Company issued 1,558,686 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $12,063.

 

On November 10, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 1,606,697 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $12,092 on convertible debt of $139,150. On November 20, 2020, the Company issued 1,858,907 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $13,990. On December 7, 2020, the Company issued 2,360,436 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $18,435. On December 14, 2020, the Company issued 2,370,294 shares of common stock upon partial conversion $18,512. On December 21, 2020, the Company issued 4,155,824 shares of common stock upon final conversion of $30,982 and the note was retired.

 

November Convertible Note -- On November 9, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $126,000 with an original issue discount of $13,000 and an annual interest rate of 8%. The principal ($141,000) and interest will be due on November 6, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest closing price during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 24% per annum or the highest rate of interest permitted by law. On May 8, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 2,352,941 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $20,000. On May 14, 2020, the noteholder sold the convertible note to LGH Investments, LLC for $162,700. All terms and conditions remained the same.

 

On December 22, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 13,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $97,500 on convertible debt of $162,700. On December 28, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 12,577,332 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of $94,330 and the note was retired.

  

December Convertible Note -- On December 5, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $103,000 with an original issue discount of $6,000 and an annual interest rate of 8%. The principal ($109,000) and interest will be due on December 5, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest Volume Weighted Average Price (VWAP) during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 18% per annum or the highest rate of interest permitted by law. On May 6, 2020, the noteholder sold the convertible note to LGH Investments, LLC for $144,313. All terms and conditions remained the same. On November23, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 20,356,630 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of $150,639 and the note was retired.

 

 
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January Convertible Note -- On January 30, 2020, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement with an accredited investor. It received $36,000 after an original issue discount of $4,000 in lieu of interest, for a total amount of $40,000 due on July 30, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied.

 

On October 30, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 5,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $24,200. On November 12, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 5,500,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of $22,000 and the note was retired.

 

January Promissory Note -- On January 31, 2020, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement with an accredited investor. It received $36,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 3% per annum. Furthermore, the Company issued cashless warrants to purchase 4,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.005. The warrants expire after five years.

 

May Government Loan -- On May 4, 2020, the Company received loan proceeds of $52,612 (the “PPP Loan”) under the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP” under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act).

 

The PPP Loan is evidenced by a promissory note (the “Note”), between the Company and Small Business Administration (the “Lender”). The Note has a two-year term, bears interest at the rate of 1.00% per annum, and may be prepaid at any time without payment of any premium. No collateral or guarantees were provided in connection with the PPP Note. No payments of principal or interest are due during the six-month period beginning on the date of the Note (the “Deferral Period”).

 

The principal and accrued interest under the Note is forgivable after eight weeks if the Company uses the PPP Loan proceeds for eligible purposes, including payroll, benefits, rent and utilities, and otherwise complies with PPP requirements. In order to obtain forgiveness of the PPP Loan, the Company must submit a request and provide satisfactory documentation regarding its compliance with applicable requirements. The Company must repay any unforgiven principal amount of the Note, with interest, on a monthly basis following the Deferral Period. The Company intends to use the proceeds of the PPP Loan for eligible purposes and to pursue forgiveness, although the Company may take action that could cause some or all of the PPP Loan to become ineligible for forgiveness. No assurance can be provided that forgiveness for all or any portion of the PPP Loan will be obtained.

 

The Note contains customary events of default relating to, among other things, payment defaults and breaches of representations, warranties or covenants. The occurrence of an event of default may result in the repayment of all amounts outstanding, collection of all amounts owing from the Company, or filing suit and obtaining judgment against the Company. As of December 31, 2020, the outstanding balance totaled $52,963.

 

June Promissory Note -- On June 29, 2020, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement with an accredited investor. It received $85,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with interest of $10,000 by July 29, 2020. As additional compensation, the investor received cashless warrants to purchase 1,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years. In the event of a default, the investor may, upon written notice to the Company, declare all unpaid principal and interest immediately due and payable. As of the filing date, the Company has not received a notice of default.

 

September Convertible Note -- On September 15, 2020, the Company signed a promissory note agreement with an accredited investor. It issued 1,000,000 inducement shares of restricted common stock and received $60,000 after an original issue discount of $6,000. The total amount of $66,000 plus 3% interest or $1.980 will be due on April 15, 2021. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied. As of December 31, 2020, the remaining balance totaled $67,980.

 

 
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October Convertible Note -- On October 8, 2020, the Company signed a promissory note agreement with an accredited investor. It issued 1,000,000 inducement shares of restricted common stock and received $58,000 after an original issue discount of $6,000 and payment of $2,000 in legal fees. The total amount of $66,000 will be due on October 8, 2021. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and the interest rate will increase to 18% until the default is remedied. As of December 31, 2020, the remaining balance totaled $76,625.

 

October Convertible Note -- On October 30, 2020, the Company signed a promissory note agreement with an accredited investor. It issued 1,500,000 inducement shares of restricted common stock as additional consideration and received $45,000 after an original issue discount of $5,000. The total amount of $50,000 plus 3% interest or $1,500 will be due on May 30, 2021. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied. As of December 31, 2020, the remaining balance totaled $51,500.

 

November Convertible Note -- On November 18, 2020, the Company signed a promissory note agreement with an accredited investor. It received $130,000 after an original issue discount of $7,000. The total amount of $137,000 will be due on November 18, 2021. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 50% and the interest rate will increase to 22% until the default is remedied. As of December 31, 2020, the remaining balance totaled $138,292.

 

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We currently have no off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

Cash Flows

 

Our cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities were as follows:

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

$ (514,573 )

 

$ (1,352,953 )

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(20,750 )

 

 

(51,622 )

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

520,050

 

 

 

1,395,446

 

 

Net cash from operating activities decreased due to reductions in net loss. Our investing activity decreased due to an elimination in the purchases of equipment which overwhelmed an increase in expenditure for intangible assets, which relates to the development of patents. Net cash provided by financing activities decreased primarily due to a reduction in proceeds of debt or debt borrowings.

 

The Company’s capital requirements for the next 12 months will consist of $3.4 million with anticipated expenses of $1.4 million for salaries, public company filings, and consultants and professional fees. An additional $2.0 million in working capital is expected to be needed for inventory and related costs for production of our mobile power generation systems as well as development and commercialization of our thermal dispersion technology applications.

 

Management believes the Company’s funds are insufficient to provide for its projected needs for operations for the next 12 months. The Company is currently negotiating additional non-dilutive funding to support product development or for other purposes. In the event that the negotiations fail, the Company may have to rely on equity or debt financing that may involve substantial dilution to our then existing stockholders. If it is unable to close additional equity financing, the Company may have to cease operations.

 

 
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Critical Accounting Policies

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities, and the amounts of revenues and expenses. Critical accounting policies are those that require the application of management’s most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often because of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain and that may change in subsequent periods. In applying these critical accounting policies, our management uses its judgment to determine the appropriate assumptions to be used in making certain estimates. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

 

We define critical accounting policies as those that are reflective of significant judgments and uncertainties and which may potentially result in materially different results under different assumptions and conditions. In applying these critical accounting policies, our management uses its judgment to determine the appropriate assumptions to be used in making certain estimates. These estimates are subject to an inherent degree of uncertainty.

 

Impairment of long-lived assets

 

When facts and circumstances indicate that the carrying value of long-lived assets may not be recoverable, management assesses the recoverability of the carrying value by preparing estimates of revenues and the resulting gross profit and cash flows. These estimated future cash flows are consistent with those we use in our internal planning. If the sum of the expected future cash flows (undiscounted and without interest charges) is less than the carrying amount, we recognize an impairment loss. The impairment loss recognized, if any, is the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset (or asset group) exceeds the fair value. We may use a variety of methods to determine the fair value of these assets, including discounted cash flow models, which are consistent with the assumptions we believe hypothetical marketplace participants would use.

 

If actual results are not consistent with our assumptions and estimates, or our assumptions and estimates change due to new information, we may be exposed to an impairment charge in the future.

 

Derivative financial instruments

 

When we issue debt that contains a conversion feature, we first evaluate whether the conversion feature meets the requirements to be treated as a derivative: a) one or more underlying, typically the price of the Company’s stock; b) one or more notional amounts or payment provisions or both, generally the number of shares upon conversion; c) no initial net investment, which typically excludes the amount borrowed; and d) net settlement provisions, which in the case of convertible debt generally means the stock received upon conversion can be readily sold for cash. There are certain scope exceptions from derivative treatment, but these typically exclude conversion features that provide for a variable number of shares.

 

When we issue warrants to purchase our common stock, we must evaluate whether they meet the requirements to be treated as a derivative. Generally, warrants would be treated as a derivative if the provisions of the warrant agreement create uncertainty as to a) the number of shares to be issued upon exercise; or b) whether shares may be issued upon exercise.

 

If the conversion feature within convertible debt or warrants meets the requirements to be treated as a derivative, we estimate the fair value of the derivative liability using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model upon the date of issuance. If the fair value of the derivative liability is higher than the face value of the convertible debt, the excess is immediately recognized as interest expense. Otherwise, the fair value of the derivative liability is recorded as a liability with an offsetting amount recorded as a debt discount, which offsets the carrying amount of the debt. The derivative liability is revalued at the end of each reporting period and any change in fair value is recorded as a change in fair value in the consolidated statement of operations. The debt discount is amortized through interest expense over the life of the debt. Derivative instrument liabilities and the host debt agreement are classified on the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether settlement of the derivative instrument could be required within twelve months of the balance sheet date.

 

 
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The accounting treatment of derivative financial instruments requires that the Company record the embedded conversion option and warrants at their fair values as of the inception date of the agreement and at fair value as of each subsequent balance sheet date. Any change in fair value is recorded as non-operating, non-cash income or expense for each reporting period at each balance sheet date. The Company reassesses the classification of its derivative instruments at each balance sheet date. If the classification changes as a result of events during the period, the contract is reclassified as of the date of the event that caused the reclassification. As a result of entering into warrant agreements, for which such instruments contained a variable conversion feature with no floor, the Company has adopted a sequencing policy in accordance with ASC 815-40-35-12 whereby all future instruments may be classified as a derivative liability with the exception of instruments related to share-based compensation issued to employees or directors.

 

Contingent liabilities

 

We accrue a loss for contingencies if it is probable that an asset has been impaired or a liability has been incurred, and when the amount of loss can be reasonably estimable. When no accrual is made because one or both conditions do not exist, we disclose the contingency if there is at least a reasonable possibility that a loss may be incurred. We estimate contingent liabilities based on the best information we have available at the time. If we have a range of possible outcomes, we accrue the low end of the range.

 

Share-based Payments

 

All our share-based awards are classified as equity, as they may only be settled in shares of our common stock.

 

We recognize expense for fully-vested warrants at the time they are granted. For awards with service or performance conditions, we generally recognize expense when the service is complete; however, there may be circumstances in which we determine that the performance condition is probable before the actual performance condition is achieved. In such circumstances, the amount recognized as expense is the pro rata amount, depending on the estimated progress towards completion of the performance condition. Nonemployee share-based payments are measured at fair value, based on either the fair value of the equity instrument issued or on the fair value of the services received. Typically, it is not practical to value the services received, so we determine the fair value of common stock grants based on the price of the common stock on the measurement date, and the fair value of common stock warrants using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model (“Black-Scholes”). We use historical data to estimate the expected price volatility, the expected stock option life and expected forfeiture rate. The risk-free interest rate is based on the United States Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for the estimated life of the stock option. For awards that are recognized when a performance condition is probable, the fair value is estimated at each reporting date. The cost ultimately recognized is the fair value of the equity award on the date the performance condition is achieved. Accordingly, the expense recognized may change between interim reporting dates and the date the performance condition is achieved.

 

We issue two types of common stock options to employees: 1) fully-vested at the time of grant and 2) market price-based vesting. We recognize expense for fully-vested stock options on the date of grant at the estimated fair value of the options using Black-Scholes. We recognize expense for market price-based options at the estimated fair value of the options using the lattice-based option valuation model (“Lattice Model”) over the estimated life of the options used in the Lattice Model. We use historical data to estimate the expected price volatility, the expected stock option life and expected forfeiture rate. The risk-free interest rate is based on the United States Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for the estimated life of the stock option. In the event, we modify the terms of a non-vested share-based payment award, we would incur additional expense for the excess of the fair value of the modified share-based payment award over the fair value of the original share-based payment award. The incremental expense would be recognized ratably over the remaining vesting period.

 

Income taxes

 

We recognize deferred income tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the income tax and financial reporting carrying amount of our assets and liabilities. We monitor our deferred tax assets and evaluate the need for a valuation allowance based on the estimate of the amount of such deferred tax assets that we believe do not meet the more-likely-than-not recognition criteria. We also evaluate whether we have any uncertain tax positions and would record a reserve if we believe it is more-likely-than-not our position would not prevail with the applicable tax authorities. We have significant net operating loss carryforwards, for which we have established a valuation allowance. If our estimate of the amount of such deferred tax assets change, we may recognize a benefit in the future. UPT is a limited liability company (“LLC”), which is treated as a partnership for income tax purposes, where all tax obligations flow through to the owners of the LLC during the period in which income taxes were incurred.

  

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

As a smaller reporting company, we are not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

 
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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTAL DATA

 

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Consolidated Financial Statements

 

Page

 

 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

F-1

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2020 and 2019

 

F-3

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

 

F-4

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Deficit for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

 

F-5

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

 

F-6

 

 

 

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

F-7

 

 

 
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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of

Cool Technologies, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Cool Technologies, Inc. (the Company) as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ deficit, and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes and schedules (collectively referred to as the financial statements). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

  

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our  audits  included  performing  procedures  to  assess  the  risks  of  material  misstatement  of  the  financial statements,  whether  due  to  error  or  fraud,  and  performing  procedures  that  respond  to  those  risks.  Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

Critical Audit Matters

 

The critical audit matters communicated below are matters arising from the current period audit of the financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. The communication of critical audit matters does not alter in any way our opinion on the financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matters below, providing separate opinions on the critical audit matters or on the accounts or disclosures to which they relate.

 

Derivatives

 

As described in Note 1 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements, when the Company issues debt that contains  a  conversion  feature  and/or  warrants  to  purchase  common  stock,  it  first  evaluates  whether  the conversion feature meets the requirements to be treated as a derivative.  If the conversion feature within convertible debt meets the requirements to be treated as a derivative, the Company estimates and records the fair value of the derivative liability using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model upon the date of issuance.  The derivative liability is revalued at the end of each reporting period.

 

We identified the Company’s application of the accounting for convertible notes and warrants as a critical audit matter.  The principal considerations for our determination of this critical audit matter related to the high degree of subjectivity in the Company’s judgments in determining the qualitative factors.  Auditing these judgments and assumptions by the Company involves auditor judgment due to the nature and extent of audit evidence and effort required to address these matters.

 

 

 
F-1

 

 

The primary procedures we performed to address these critical audit matters included the following:

 

 

·

We obtained debt and warrant related agreements and performed the following procedures:

 

 

-

Reviewed agreements for all relevant terms.

 

 

 

 

-

Tested management’s identification and treatment of agreement terms. 

 

 

 

 

-

Recalculated management’s fair value of each conversion feature based on the terms in the agreements. 

 

 

 

 

-

Assessed the terms and evaluated the appropriateness of management’s application of their accounting policies, along with their use of estimates, in the determination of the amortization of the debt discount. 

 

 

 

 

-

Used an auditor specialist to calculate the fair value of the derivative liability using the Monte Carlo method to determine whether the derivative liability recorded by the Company was reasonable. 

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

As described in Note 1 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements, when facts and circumstances indicate that the carrying value of long-lived assets may not be recoverable, management assesses the recoverability of the carrying value by preparing estimates of revenues and the resulting gross profit and cash flows.  If the sum of the expected future cash flows is less than the carrying amount, an impairment loss is recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds fair value.

 

We identified the Company’s application of impairment of long-lived assets as a critical audit matter. The principal considerations for our determination of this critical audit matter related to the high degree of subjectivity in the Company’s judgments in determining the qualitative factors.  Auditing these judgments and assumptions by the Company involves auditor judgment due to the nature and extent of audit evidence and effort required to address these matters.

 

The primary procedures we performed to address these critical audit matters included the following:

 

 

·

We obtained management’s impairment analysis on the intangibles and performed the following procedures:

 

 

-

Reviewed the analysis.

 

 

 

 

-

Tested supporting documentation related to management’s conclusion that the expected future cash flows is greater than the carrying value.

 

 

 

 

-

Assessed the assumptions used by management and evaluated the appropriateness of management’s application of their accounting policies, along with their use of estimates, in the determination that no impairment exists.

 

Substantial Doubt about the Company’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1, the Company has incurred net losses and negative cash flow from operations since inception. These factors, and the need for additional financing in order for the Company to meet its business plans raises substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Our opinion is not modified with respect to that matter.

 

 

We have served as theCompany’s auditor since 2019.

 

Tampa, Florida

April 15, 2021

 

 
F-2

 

 

Cool Technologies, Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash

 

$ 33

 

 

$ 15,306

 

Inventory

 

 

179,593

 

 

 

149,744

 

Prepaid expenses

 

 

--

 

 

 

5,000

 

Total current assets

 

 

179,626

 

 

 

170,050

 

Intangibles

 

 

233,942

 

 

 

213,192

 

Equipment, net

 

 

57,211

 

 

 

76,280

 

Total assets

 

$ 470,779

 

 

$ 459,522

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$ 1,473,513

 

 

$ 1,524,506

 

Accrued Interest Payable

 

 

763,641

 

 

 

407,037

 

Accrued liabilities – related party

 

 

1,143,235

 

 

 

913,948

 

Customer deposits – related party

 

 

400,000

 

 

 

400,000

 

Accrued payroll

 

 

106,742

 

 

 

62,049

 

Debt, current portion, net

 

 

2,938,836

 

 

 

2,971,232

 

Derivative liability

 

 

396,143

 

 

 

712,921

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

7,222,110

 

 

 

6,991,693

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Debt, long-term portion

 

 

37,581

 

 

 

29,329

 

Total liabilities

 

 

7,259,691

 

 

 

7,021,022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ deficit:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock Series A, $.001 par value; 410 shares authorized; 3 shares issued and outstanding on December 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Preferred stock Series B, $.001 par value; 3,636,360 shares authorized: 2,727,270 issued and outstanding on December 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

 

2,727

 

 

 

2,727

 

Common stock, $.001 par value; 1,000,000,000 shares authorized; 508,674,682 and 267,450,916 shares issued and outstanding on December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

 

508,675

 

 

 

267,450

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

48,520,062

 

 

 

46,265,016

 

Common stock issuable

 

 

58,670

 

 

 

58,670

 

Common stock held in escrow

 

 

8,441

 

 

 

8,441

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(55,830,210 )

 

 

(53,107,440 )

Non-controlling interest

 

 

(57,277 )

 

 

(56,364 )

Total stockholders’ deficit

 

 

(6,788,912 )

 

 

(6,561,500 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ deficit

 

$ 470,779

 

 

$ 459,522

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-3

Table of Contents

  

Cool Technologies, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues

 

$ --

 

 

$ --

 

Cost of revenues

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Gross profit

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payroll and related expenses

 

 

357,884

 

 

 

657,178

 

Consulting

 

 

316,068

 

 

 

331,107

 

Professional fees

 

 

224,453

 

 

 

226,859

 

Research and development

 

 

19,069

 

 

 

296,800

 

General and administrative

 

 

68,309

 

 

 

242,994

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

985,783

 

 

 

1,754,938

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating loss

 

 

(985,783 )

 

 

(1,754,938 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income and (expense)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

(1,472,104 )

 

 

(2,027,030 )

Change in fair value of derivative liability

 

 

(341,553 )

 

 

330,728

 

Gain (Loss) on extinguishment

 

 

75,757

 

 

 

208,328

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

 

(2,723,683 )

 

 

(3,242,912 )

Net loss attributable to non-controlling interest

 

 

(913 )

 

 

(1,600 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to Cool Technologies, Inc.

 

$ (2,722,770 )

 

$ (3,241,312 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss per common share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted

 

$ (0.01 )

 

$ (0.01 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average common shares outstanding:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted

 

 

401,652,835

 

 

 

238,714,877

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

 
F-4

Table of Contents

  

Cool Technologies, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Deficit

Years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

 

 

 

Preferred Stock

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

Additional

Paid-in

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

Preferred

Stock

 

 

Common Stock

Held in

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

Non-

Controlling

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

Issuable

 

 

Issuable

 

 

Escrow

 

 

Deficit

 

 

Interest

 

 

Total

 

December 31, 2018

 

 

2,727,290

 

 

$

2,727

 

 

 

214,705,916

 

 

214,705

 

 

$

45,160,994

 

 

123,670

 

 

 

--

 

 

$

8,441

 

 

$

(49,866,128 )

 

$

(54,764 )

 

(4,410,355 )

Debt converted

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

49,894,101

 

 

 

49,895

 

 

 

715,028

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

764,923

 

Stock issued for Services

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

350,000

 

 

 

350

 

 

 

7,350

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

7,700

 

Issuance of common stock issuable

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

1,650,000

 

 

 

1,650

 

 

 

93,350

 

 

 

(95,000 )

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Series A preferred stock to common stock

 

 

(17 )

 

 

--

 

 

 

850,000

 

 

 

850

 

 

 

(850 )

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Stock issued with debt

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

30,000

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

30,000

 

Warrants issued for services

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

32,624

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

32,624

 

Warrants issued with debt

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

112,260

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

112,260

 

Debt issued with beneficial conversion feature

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

144,260

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

144,260

 

Net loss

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

(3,242,912 )

 

 

--

 

 

 

(3,242,912 )

Noncontrolling interest

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

1,600

 

 

 

(1,600 )

 

 

--

 

December 31, 2019

 

 

2,727,273

 

 

2,727

 

 

 

267,450,017

 

 

267,450

 

 

46,265,016

 

 

58,670

 

 

 

--

 

 

8,441

 

 

(53,107,440 )

 

(56,364 )

 

(6,561,500 )

Debt converted

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

232,724,665

 

 

 

232,725

 

 

 

2,050,027

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

2,282,752

 

Sale of Common Shares

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

7,500,000

 

 

 

7,500

 

 

 

83,900

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

91,400

 

Stock issued with debt

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

1,000,000

 

 

 

1,000

 

 

 

17,000

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

18,000

 

Warrants issued for services

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

91,465

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

91,465

 

Warrants issued with debt

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

12,654

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

12,654

 

Net Loss

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

----

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

(2,723,683 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

(2,723,683 )

Noncontrolling Interest

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

913

 

 

 

(913 )

 

 

--

 

December 31, 2020

 

 

2,727,273

 

 

$ 2,727

 

 

 

508,674,682

 

 

$ 508,675

 

 

$ 48,520,062

 

 

$ 58,670

 

 

 

--

 

 

$ 8,441

 

 

$ (55,830,210 )

 

$ (57,277 )

 

$ (6,788,912 )

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

 
F-5

Table of Contents

  

Cool Technologies, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Operating Activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$ (2,723,683 )

 

$ (3,242,912 )

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock issued for services

 

 

--

 

 

 

7,700

 

Warrants issued for services

 

 

91,465

 

 

 

32,624

 

(Gain) Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

(75,757

)

 

 

(208,328 )

Change in fair value of derivative liability

 

 

341,553

 

 

 

(330,728 )

Amortization of debt discount

 

 

1,205,709

 

 

 

1,623,463

 

Depreciation expense

 

 

19,069

 

 

 

32,570

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inventory

 

 

(29,849 )

 

 

(95,270 )

 Prepaid expenses

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

7,000

 

 Accounts payable

 

 

(20,993 )

 

 

643,848

 

 Accrued Interest Payable

 

 

398,933

 

 

 

--

 

 Accrued liabilities – related party

 

 

229,827

 

 

 

170,080

 

 Accrued payroll taxes

 

 

44,693

 

 

 

--

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(514,573 )

 

 

(1,352,953 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investing Activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenditure for Intangible assets

 

 

(20,750 )

 

 

(7,218 )

Purchase of Equipment

 

 

--

 

 

 

(44,404 )

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(20,750 )

 

 

(51,622 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Financing Activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from sale of common stock

 

 

109,400

 

 

 

--

 

Proceeds from debt

 

 

475,100

 

 

 

1,524,333

 

Payments on debt

 

 

(64,450 )

 

 

(128,887 )

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

520,050

 

 

 

1,395,446

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net change in cash

 

 

(15,273 )

 

 

(9,129 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash, beginning of period

 

 

15,306

 

 

 

24,435

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash, end of period

 

$ 33

 

 

$ 15,306

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash paid for:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest

 

$ 16,376

 

 

$ 65,933

 

Income taxes

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-cash transactions:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Derivative liability due to issuance of debt

 

 

626,994

 

 

 

1,138,804

 

Reduction of common stock issuable by issuing stock

 

 

--

 

 

 

95,000

 

Liability converted to NP

 

 

30,000

 

 

 

--

 

Debt and interest settled for common stock

 

 

2,282,752

 

 

 

679,392

 

Stock and warrants issued with debt

 

 

12,654

 

 

 

142,260

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-6

Table of Contents

  

Cool Technologies, Inc. and subsidiary

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

Note 1 – Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Description of Business

 

Cool Technologies, Inc. and subsidiary, (“the Company” or “Cool Technologies” or “CoolTech”) was incorporated in the State of Nevada in July 2002. In April 2014, CoolTech formed Ultimate Power Truck, LLC (“Ultimate Power Truck” or “UPT”), of which the Company owns 95% and a shareholder of Cool Technologies owns 5%. Cool Technologies was formerly known as Bibb Corporation, as Z3 Enterprises, and as HPEV, Inc. On August 20, 2015, the Company changed its name to Cool Technologies, Inc.

 

The Company’s technologies can be divided into two distinct but complementary categories: a) mobile power generation and b) heat dispersion technology.

 

The Company has developed and is commercializing a mobile power generation system that enables work trucks retrofitted with the system to generate electric power. The Company intends to sell the mobile power generator system to government, commercial and fleet vehicle owners. It may license its system as well.

 

CoolTech has also developed and intends to commercialize patented heat dispersion technologies by licensing them to electric motor, pump and vehicle component manufacturers.

 

In preparation, CoolTech has applied for trademarks for one of its technologies and its acronym. Cool Technologies currently owns one trademark: TEHPC (Totally Enclosed Heat Pipe Cooled).

 

The Company believes that its proprietary technologies, including the patent portfolio and trade secrets, can help increase the efficiency and positively effect manufacturing cost structure in several large industries beginning with motors/generators and fleet vehicles. The markets for products utilizing the technologies include consumer, industrial, agricultural and military markets, both in the U.S. and worldwide.

 

The Company’s technologies are divided into two distinct but complementary categories: a) mobile power generation, and b) heat dispersion technology.

 

As of December 31, 2020, CoolTech has seven US patents, one Canadian patent, one granted Mexican and one granted Canadian patent, two pending applications (1 in the US, 1 in Brazil) in the area of composite heat structures, motors, and related structures, heat pipe architecture, and applications (commonly referred to as “thermal” or “heat dispersion technology”). Cool Technologies also has a Patent Cooperation Treaty (“PCT”) application pending that covers integrated electrical power generation methods and systems.

 

The Company intends to commercialize its patents by licensing its thermal technologies and applications to electric motor, pump and vehicle component manufacturers and by licensing or selling a mobile electric power system to commercial vehicle and fleet owners.

 

Basis of Presentation, Use of Estimates and Principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Cool Technologies, Inc. and Ultimate Power Truck, LLC. Intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated upon consolidation. The consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”). The preparation of the consolidated financial statements requires the Company to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses. Although these estimates are based on management’s knowledge of current events and actions the Company may undertake in the future, actual results may ultimately differ from these estimates and assumptions. Furthermore, when testing assets for impairment in future periods, if management uses different assumptions or if different conditions occur, impairment charges may result.

 

Noncontrolling interest represents the 5% third-party interest in UPT. There are no restrictions on the transfer of funds or net assets from UPT to Cool Technologies.

 

 
F-7

Table of Contents

 

Going Concern and Management’s Plan

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern. CoolTech has incurred net losses of $55,830,210 since inception. As of December 31, 2020, its debts include $319,000 in convertible notes and $2,639,500 in notes payable. The cash available totals $33. CoolTech has not fully commenced operations, raising substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management believes that the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern is dependent on its ability to generate revenue, achieve profitable operations and repay obligations when they come due. These consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or amounts and classification of liabilities that might result from this uncertainty.

 

As of the filing date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, management is negotiating additional non-dilutive funding arrangements to support completion of the initial phases of the Company’s business plan: to license its thermal technologies and applications, including submersible dry-pit applications and to license and sell mobile generation retrofit kits. There can be no assurance, however, that the Company will be successful in accomplishing these objectives. Consequently, it may have to curtail or cease operations if funding is not received by the end of the second quarter.

 

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits with banks, and investments that are highly liquid and have maturities of three months or less at the date of purchase.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory, consisting of mobile generation kit materials and parts, is stated at the lower of cost (first in, first out method) or net realizable value.

 

Intangible assets

 

The Company’s intangible assets consist of patents on its technology, recorded at cost. Cost is based on third party expenditures for patent applications. CoolTech will begin amortizing the intangibles over their estimated remaining useful life when it begins revenue-producing activities. Cool Technologies will determine the useful lives of its intangible assets after considering the specific facts and circumstances related to each intangible asset. Factors that will be considered when determining useful lives include the contractual term of any agreement related to the asset, the historical performance of the asset, the long-term strategy for using the asset, any laws or other local regulations that could impact the useful life of the asset, and other economic factors, including competition and specific market conditions.

 

Equipment

 

Equipment consists of vehicles the Company uses for testing and demonstrating its technology to potential customers. Depreciation is recorded using the straight-line method over five years, the estimated useful life.

 

Impairment of long-lived assets

 

When facts and circumstances indicate that the carrying value of long-lived assets may not be recoverable, management assesses the recoverability of the carrying value by preparing estimates of revenues and the resulting gross profit and cash flows. These estimated future cash flows are consistent with those CoolTech uses in its internal planning. If the sum of the expected future cash flows (undiscounted and without interest charges) is less than the carrying amount, it recognizes an impairment loss. The impairment loss recognized, if any, is the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset (or asset group) exceeds the fair value. Cool Technologies may use a variety of methods to determine the fair value of these assets, including discounted cash flow models, which are consistent with the assumption’s management believes hypothetical marketplace participants would use. The Company has not recorded any impairment expense on its long-lived assets as of December 31, 2020.

 

 
F-8

Table of Contents

 

Debt – original issue discount

 

When the Company issues notes payable with a face value higher than the proceeds it receives, CoolTech records the difference as a debt discount and amortizes it through interest expense over the life of the underlying note payable.

 

Derivative financial instruments

 

When the Company issues debt that contains a conversion feature, it first evaluates whether the conversion feature meets the requirements to be treated as a derivative: a) one or more underlying, typically the price of the Company’s stock; b) one or more notional amounts or payment provisions or both, generally the number of shares upon conversion; c) no initial net investment, which typically excludes the amount borrowed; and d) net settlement provisions, which in the case of convertible debt generally means the stock received upon conversion can be readily sold for cash. There are certain scope exceptions from derivative treatment, but these typically exclude conversion features that provide for a variable number of shares.

 

When Cool Technologies issues warrants to purchase its common stock, the Company must evaluate whether they meet the requirements to be treated as a derivative. Generally, warrants would be treated as a derivative if the provisions of the warrant agreement create uncertainty as to a) the number of shares to be issued upon exercise; or b) whether shares may be issued upon exercise.

 

If the conversion feature within convertible debt or warrants meets the requirements to be treated as a derivative, CoolTech estimates the fair value of the derivative liability using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model upon the date of issuance. If the fair value of the derivative liability is higher than the face value of the convertible debt, the excess is immediately recognized as interest expense. Otherwise, the fair value of the derivative liability is recorded as a liability with an offsetting amount recorded as a debt discount, which offsets the carrying amount of the debt. The derivative liability is revalued at the end of each reporting period and any change in fair value is recorded as a change in fair value in the consolidated statements of operations. The debt discount is amortized through interest expense over the life of the debt. Derivative instrument liabilities and the host debt agreement are classified on the consolidated balance sheets as current or non-current based on whether settlement of the derivative instrument could be required within twelve months of the balance sheet date.

 

The accounting treatment of derivative financial instruments requires that the Company record the embedded conversion option and warrants at their fair values as of the inception date of the agreement and at fair value as of each subsequent balance sheet date. Any change in fair value is recorded as non-operating, non-cash income or expense for each reporting period at each balance sheet date. The Company reassesses the classification of its derivative instruments at each balance sheet date. If the classification changes as a result of events during the period, the contract is reclassified as of the date of the event that caused the reclassification. As a result of entering into warrant agreements, for which such instruments contained a variable conversion feature with no floor, the Company has adopted a sequencing policy in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 815-40-35-12 “Derivatives and Hedging” (which provides comprehensive guidance on derivative and hedging transactions) whereby all future instruments may be classified as a derivative liability with the exception of instruments related to share-based compensation issued to employees or directors.

 

Revenue

 

The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) ASC Topic 606, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” and all related amendments. The core principle of Topic 606 requires revenue recognition to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. Topic 606 requires identifying the contract, identifying the performance obligations, determining the transaction price, allocating the transaction price to performance obligations and recognizing the revenue upon satisfaction of the performance obligations.

 

 
F-9

Table of Contents

 

Research and development costs

 

Internal costs related to research and development efforts on existing or potential products are expensed as incurred. External costs incurred for intangible assets, such as attorney fees for patents, are capitalized.

 

Share-based payments

 

All the Company’s share-based awards are classified as equity. CoolTech does not have any liability classified share-based awards. Each warrant or stock option is exercisable for one share of common stock.

 

Nonemployees Cool Technologies may enter into agreements with nonemployees to make share-based payments in return for services. These payments may be made in the form of common stock or common stock warrants. The Company recognizes expense for fully vested warrants at the time they are granted. For awards with service or performance conditions, CoolTech generally recognizes expense over the service period or when the performance condition is met; however, there may be circumstances in which it determines that the performance condition is probable before the actual performance condition is achieved. In such circumstances, the amount recognized as expense is the pro rata amount, depending on the estimated progress towards completion of the performance condition. Nonemployee share-based payments are measured at fair value, based on either the fair value of the equity instrument issued or on the fair value of the services received. Typically, it is not practical to value the services received, so the Company determines the fair value of common stock grants based on the price of the common stock on the measurement date (which is the earlier of the date at which a commitment for performance by the counterparty to earn the equity instruments is reached, if there are sufficient disincentives to ensure performance, or the date at which the counterparty’s performance is complete), and the fair value of common stock warrants using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model (“Black-Scholes”). Cool Technologies uses historical data to estimate the expected price volatility, the expected stock option life and expected forfeiture rate. The risk-free interest rate is based on the United States Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for the estimated life of the stock option. For awards that are recognized when a performance condition is probable, the fair value is estimated at each reporting date. The cost ultimately recognized is the fair value of the equity award on the date the performance condition is achieved. Accordingly, the expense recognized may change between interim reporting dates and the date the performance condition is achieved.

 

Employees – Cool Technologies issues two types of common stock options to employees: 1) fully-vested at the time of grant and 2) market price-based vesting. The Company recognizes expense for fully vested stock options on the date of grant at the estimated fair value of the options using Black-Scholes. CoolTech recognizes expense for market price-based options at the estimated fair value of the options using the lattice-based option valuation model (“Lattice Model”) over the estimated life of the options used in the Lattice Model. The Company uses historical data to estimate the expected price volatility, the expected stock option life and expected forfeiture rate. The risk-free interest rate is based on the United States Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for the estimated life of the stock option.

 

Modification of share-based payment awards – In the event Cool Technologies modifies the terms of a non-vested share-based payment award, it would incur additional expense for the excess of the fair value of the modified share-based payment award, measured at the date of modification, over the fair value of the original share-based payment award. The incremental expense would be recognized ratably over the remaining vesting period.

 

Sale of common stock with warrants – When the Company sells common stock it may also issue common stock warrants. CoolTech treats the value of these warrants as equity issuance costs. Accordingly, the value of the common stock warrants is included as a component of additional paid-in capital upon recording the sale of common stock.

 

Cashless exercise – Most of the common stock warrants and stock options may be exercised on a cashless basis. The number of shares of common stock received upon exercising on a cashless basis is based on a) the volume weighted-average price of the common stock for three trading days immediately preceding the exercise date; b) the exercise price of the warrant or option; and c) the number of common shares issuable under the instrument.

 

 
F-10

Table of Contents

 

Income taxes

 

Cool Technologies recognizes deferred income tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the income tax and financial reporting carrying amount of the Company’s assets and liabilities. The Company monitors its deferred tax assets and evaluates the need for a valuation allowance based on the estimate of the amount of such deferred tax assets that it believes does not meet the more-likely-than-not recognition criteria. CoolTech also evaluates whether it has any uncertain tax positions and would record a reserve if management believes it is more-likely-than-not their position would not prevail with the applicable tax authorities. The Company’s assessment of tax positions as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, determined that there were no material uncertain tax positions.

 

UPT is a limited liability company (“LLC”), which is treated as a partnership for income tax purposes, where all tax obligations flow through to the owners of the LLC during the period in which income taxes were incurred.

 

Fair value of financial instruments

 

Cool Technologies financial instruments include cash and cash equivalents, accounts payable, accrued liabilities, and debt. The carrying value of these financial instruments is considered to be representative of their fair value due to the short maturity of these instruments. The carrying amount of the debt approximates fair value, because the interest rates on these instruments approximate the interest rate on debt with similar terms available to the Company. CoolTech’s derivative liabilities were adjusted to fair market value at the end of each reporting period, using Level 3 inputs.

 

Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability, in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. Valuation techniques used to measure fair value must maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. The fair value hierarchy is based on three levels of inputs, of which the first two are considered observable and the last unobservable, as follows:

 

Level 1 – Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

Level 2 – Inputs other than Level 1 that are observable, either directly or indirectly, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.

 

Level 3 – Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the measurement of the fair value of the assets or liabilities.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

FASB ASU 2016-02 “Leases (Topic 842)”- In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, which requires lessees to recognize almost all leases on their balance sheet as a right-of-use asset and a lease liability. For income statement purposes, the FASB retained a dual model, requiring leases to be classified as either operating or finance. Classification is to be based on criteria that are largely similar to those applied in current lease accounting, but without explicit bright lines. Lessor accounting is similar to the old model but updated to align with certain changes to the lessee model and the new revenue recognition standard. The Company adopted this ASU on January 1, 2019. As the Company does not have outstanding leases, adopting this standard did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statement or financial statement disclosure.

 

 
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Note 2 – Equipment

 

Equipment consists of the following:

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Test vehicles

 

$ 147,893

 

 

$ 147,893

 

Other

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

152,893

 

 

 

152,893

 

Less: accumulated depreciation

 

 

(95,682 )

 

 

(76,613 )

 

 

$ 57,211

 

 

$ 76,280

 

 

Depreciation expense for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, was $19,069 and $32,570, respectively.

 

Note 3 – Customer deposits – Related party

 

Customer deposits represent advance payments of $400,000 received on orders that have not yet been fulfilled, with companies controlled by the individual who is the 5% owner of UPT and is a shareholder of Cool Technologies.

 

Note 4 – Debt

 

Debt consists of the following:

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Notes payable

 

$ 2,639,500

 

 

$ 3,071,300

 

Convertible notes payable

 

 

319,000

 

 

 

381,667

 

PPP Loan

 

 

52,612

 

 

 

--

 

Vehicle financing

 

 

55,918

 

 

 

70,418

 

Related party advances

 

 

49,887

 

 

 

21,641

 

Note payable – UPT minority owner

 

 

110,000

 

 

 

80,000

 

 

 

 

3,226,917

 

 

 

3,525,026

 

Debt discount

 

 

(250,500 )

 

 

(524,465 )

 

 

 

2,976,417

 

 

 

3,000,561

 

Less: current portion

 

 

2,938,836

 

 

 

2,971,232

 

Long-term portion

 

$ 37,581

 

 

$ 29,329

 

  

 
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Notes Payable

 

From September 5 – 7, 2018, the Company entered into Promissory Note Agreements with two accredited investors. CoolTech received $250,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 15% per annum. Furthermore, the Company committed to pay the principal amount and accrued interest within 30 days of the receipt of funds from debt or surety bond financing. In exchange, the Company granted a security interest in all of the Company’s intellectual property as collateral and it issued cashless warrants to purchase 2,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years.

 

On September 11, 2018, the Company entered into Promissory Note Agreements with an accredited investor. CoolTech received $250,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 15% per annum on or before the one-year anniversary. Furthermore, the Company committed to pay the principal amount and accrued interest within 30 days of the receipt of funds from debt or surety bond financing. In exchange, the Company granted a security interest in all of the Company’s intellectual property as collateral and it issued cashless warrants to purchase 2,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years. On March 16, 2020, the investor signed an amendment to the agreement extending the maturity date until April 30, 2020.

 

On September 11, 2018, the Company entered into Promissory Note Agreements with an accredited investor. CoolTech received $250,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 15% per annum on or before the one-year anniversary. Furthermore, the Company committed to pay the principal amount and accrued interest within 30 days of the receipt of funds from debt or surety bond financing. In exchange, the Company granted a security interest in all of the Company’s intellectual property as collateral and it issued cashless warrants to purchase 2,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years. On March 16, 2020, the investor signed an amendment to the agreement extending the maturity date until April 30, 2020. As of the filing date, the Company has not received a notice of default.

  

From September 7 - 17, 2018, the Company entered into Promissory Note Agreements with three accredited investors. CoolTech received $125,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 15% per annum. Furthermore, the Company committed to pay the principal amount and accrued interest within 30 days of the receipt of funds from debt or surety bond financing. In exchange, the Company granted a security interest in all of the Company’s intellectual property as collateral and CoolTech issued cashless warrants to purchase 1,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years.

 

On September 25, 2018, the Company entered into Promissory Note Agreements with an accredited investor. CoolTech received $125,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 15% per annum on or before the one-year anniversary. Furthermore, the Company committed to pay the principal amount and accrued interest within 30 days of the receipt of funds from debt or surety bond financing. In exchange, the Company granted a security interest in all of the Company’s intellectual property as collateral and CoolTech issued cashless warrants to purchase 1,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years. On March 16, 2020, the investor signed an amendment to the agreement extending the maturity date until April 30, 2020. As of the filing date, the Company has not received a notice of default.

 

On October 2, 2018, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement with an accredited investor. It received $250,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 15% per annum. Furthermore, the Company committed to pay the principal amount and accrued interest within 30 days of the receipt of funds from debt or surety bond financing. In exchange, the Company granted a security interest in all of the Company’s intellectual property as collateral and Cool Technologies issued cashless warrants to purchase 2,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years.

  

On October 26, 2018, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement with an accredited investor. It received $250,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 15% per annum on or before the one-year anniversary. Furthermore, the Company committed to pay the principal amount and accrued interest within 30 days of the receipt of funds from debt or surety bond financing. In exchange, the Company granted a security interest in all of the Company’s intellectual property as collateral and Cool Technologies issued cashless warrants to purchase 2,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years. On October 26, 2019, the Company and the investor signed an amendment to the agreement extending the maturity date for seven months. On November 20, 2020, they signed another amendment to the agreement in which they agreed that in the event there are any amounts outstanding under the Note on January 1, 2021, the investor shall be able to convert, any amounts outstanding under the Note into shares of common stock, at a conversion price of seventy one percent of the lowest Volume Weighted Average Price (VWAP) over the previous ten trading days prior to the delivery of a conversion notice.

 

 
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On December 19, 2018, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement with an accredited investor. It received $50,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 15% per annum. Furthermore, the Company committed to pay the principal amount and accrued interest within 30 days of the receipt of funds from debt or surety bond financing. In exchange, the Company granted a security interest in all of the Company’s intellectual property as collateral and Cool Technologies issued cashless warrants to purchase 400,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years.

 

On March 13, 2019, the Company and a vendor agreed to convert an overdue $25,000 account payable into a Promissory Note Agreement. CoolTech promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 15% per annum. Furthermore, the Company committed to pay the principal amount and accrued interest within 30 days of the receipt of funds from debt or surety bond financing. In exchange, the Company granted a security interest in all of the Company’s intellectual property as collateral and CoolTech issued cashless warrants to purchase 200,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years.

 

On March 18, 2019, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement with an accredited investor. It received $250,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 15% per annum on or before the one-year anniversary. Furthermore, the Company committed to pay the principal amount and accrued interest within 30 days of the receipt of funds from debt or surety bond financing. In exchange, the Company granted a security interest in all of the Company’s intellectual property and CoolTech issued cashless warrants to purchase 2,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years. On March 19, 2020, the Company defaulted on the note payable. The principal and interest as of May 19, 2020 total $317,038. As of the filing date, the Company has not received a notice of default for the note. As per the terms of the note, interest will continue to accrue at 15% per annum until paid in full.

 

On March 19, 2019, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement with an accredited investor. It received $250,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 15% per annum on or before the one-year anniversary. Furthermore, the Company committed to pay the principal amount and accrued interest within 30 days of the receipt of funds from debt or surety bond financing. In exchange, the Company granted a security interest in all of the Company’s intellectual property and CoolTech issued cashless warrants to purchase 2,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years. On March 19, 2020, the investor signed an amendment to the agreement extending the maturity date for four months.

 

On January 31, 2020, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement with an accredited investor. It received $36,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with simple interest of 3% per annum. Furthermore, the Company issued cashless warrants to purchase 4,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.005. The warrants expire after five years.

 

On May 4, 2020, the Company received loan proceeds of $52,612 (the “PPP Loan”) under the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP” under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act).

 

The PPP Loan is evidenced by a promissory note (the “Note”), between the Company and Small Business Administration (the “Lender”). The Note has a two-year term, bears interest at the rate of 1.00% per annum, and may be prepaid at any time without payment of any premium. No collateral or guarantees were provided in connection with the PPP Notes. No payments of principal or interest are due during the six-month period beginning on the date of the Note (the “Deferral Period”).

 

The principal and accrued interest under the Note is forgivable after eight weeks if the Company uses the PPP Loan proceeds for eligible purposes, including payroll, benefits, rent and utilities, and otherwise complies with PPP requirements. In order to obtain forgiveness of the PPP Loan, the Company must submit a request and provide satisfactory documentation regarding its compliance with applicable requirements. The Company must repay any unforgiven principal amount of the Note, with interest, on a monthly basis following the Deferral Period. The Company intends to use the proceeds of the PPP Loan for eligible purposes and to pursue forgiveness, although the Company may take action that could cause some or all of the PPP Loan to become ineligible for forgiveness. No assurance can be provided that forgiveness for all or any portion of the PPP Loan will be obtained.

 

The Note contains customary events of default relating to, among other things, payment defaults and breaches of representations, warranties or covenants. The occurrence of an event of default may result in the repayment of all amounts outstanding, collection of all amounts owing from the Company, or filing suit and obtaining judgment against the Company.

 

 
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On June 29, 2020, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement with an accredited investor. It received $85,000 in financing and promised to pay the principal amount together with interest of $10,000 by July 29, 2020. As additional compensation, the investor received cashless warrants to purchase 1,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.05. The warrants expire after five years. In the event of a default, the investor may, upon written notice to the Company, declare all unpaid principal and interest immediately due and payable. As of the filing date, the Company has not received a notice of default.

 

Convertible notes payable

 

February Convertible Note --On February 1, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $75,000 after an original issue discount of $7,500 in lieu of interest. The total amount of $82,500 plus 3% interest or $2,475 will be due on December 13, 2019. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a fixed price of $0.0125 per share In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied.

 

May Convertible Note -- On May 13, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $150,000 after an original issue discount of $15,000 in lieu of interest, for a total amount of $165,000 due on December 13, 2019. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied.

 

The note also included a clause which stated that if the effective conversion price is less than $0.01 at any time, the principal amount of the note shall increase by $10,000 and that the conversion price will be permanently redefined to equal 40% of the lowest traded price that occurred during the 15 consecutive trading days immediately preceding the date on which the note holder elects to convert all or part of the note. On December 20, 2019, the effective conversion price reached sub-penny threshold. The principal amount and the subsequent conversion price were adjusted as noted above. Therefore, as of December 31, 2019, the convertible balance remaining totaled $179,950.

 

On January 6, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 5,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $17,920 on convertible debt of $179,950. On January 21, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 10,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $22,400 on convertible debt of $179,950. On February 24, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 15,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $17,400 on convertible debt of $179,950. On March 4, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 6,500,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $8,840 on convertible debt of $179,950. On March 24, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 8,500,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $23,120 on convertible debt of $179,950. On October 6, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 3,667,241 shares upon final conversion of $21,270 and the note was retired.

 

June Convertible Note -- On June 6, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $130,000 with an original issue discount of $13,000 and an annual interest rate of 8%. The principal ($143,000) and interest will be due on June 6, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 24% per annum, require the Company to pay the product of the then outstanding principal amount, plus accrued interest and default interest, divided by the conversion price multiplied by the highest price at which the common stock traded at any time between the issuance date and the date of the event of default.

  

On December 19, 2019, Cool Technologies issued 1,128,687 shares of common stock to the holder upon partial conversion of $10,418 in debt. On December 24, 2019, the Company issued 2,674,064 shares of common stock to the holder upon partial conversion of $20,884 in debt.

 

 
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On January 13, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 4,220,881 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $20,978 on convertible debt of $143,000. On January 27, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 6,173,709 shares of common stock to Eagles Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $21,040 on convertible debt of $143,000. On February 3, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 9,573,426 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $21,071 on convertible debt of $143,000. On February 13, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 11,992,022 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $26,394 on convertible debt of $143,000. On March 2, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 9,820,030 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $26,494 on convertible debt of $143,000. On June 7, 2020, the Company defaulted on note. As a result, the principal increased by 10% and of 24% per annum was applied. On November 12, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 517,087 shares upon final conversion of $3,892 and the note was retired.

 

July Convertible Note - On July 3, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $150,000 with an original issue discount of $15,300 in lieu of interest, for a total amount of $168,300 plus 8% annual interest due on July 3, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of CoolTech’s common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 22% per annum, require the Company to redeem all or any portion of the note at a premium of 150%.

 

On January 3, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 2,238,806 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group Ltd. upon partial conversion of $15,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On January 8, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 3,174,603 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On January 14, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 3,921,569 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On January 16, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 4,444,444 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On January 21, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 5,111,111 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $23,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On January 30, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 7,142,857 shares of common stock to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. upon partial conversion of $20,000 on convertible debt of $168,300. On February 3, 2020, Cool Technologies wired $72,000 to PowerUp Lending Group, Ltd. and the note with convertible debt of $168,300 was retired.

 

August Convertible Note -- On August 28, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $115,000 with an original issue discount of $11,500 and an annual interest rate of 8%. The principal ($126,500) and interest will be due on August 28, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 24% per annum or the highest rate of interest permitted by law.

 

On March 9, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 10,282,003 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $40,151 on convertible debt of $126,500. On May 5, 2020, the Company issued 4,460,094 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $31,667. On June 5, 2020, the Company issued 3,325,335 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $26,561. On June 12, 2020, the Company issued 3,924,883 shares of common stock upon partial conversion $23,408. On June 29, 2020, the Company issued 2,067,880 shares of common stock upon final conversion of $11,746 and the note was retired.

 

October Convertible Note -- On October 3, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It issued 350,000 inducement shares of restricted common stock and received $115,000 with an original issue discount of $11,500 and an annual interest rate of 8%. The principal ($126,500) and interest will be due on October 2, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest closing price during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 24% per annum or the highest rate of interest permitted by law.

 

On October 12, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 995,920 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $11,879. On October 16, 2020, the Company issued 1,082,114 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $11,909. On October 21, 2020, the Company issued 1,136,784 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $11,945. On October 29, 2020, the Company issued 1,271,206 shares of common stock upon partial conversion $12,004. On November 6, 2020, the Company issued 1,558,686 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $12,063.

 

 
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On November 10, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 1,606,697 shares of common stock to Eagle Equities, LLC upon partial conversion of $12,092 on convertible debt of $139,150. On November 20, 2020, the Company issued 1,858,907 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $13,990. On December 7, 2020, the Company issued 2,360,436 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $18,435. On December 14, 2020, the Company issued 2,370,294 shares of common stock upon partial conversion $18,512. On December 21, 2020, the Company issued 4,155,824 shares of common stock upon final conversion of $30,982 and the note was retired.

 

November Convertible Note -- On November 9, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $126,000 with an original issue discount of $13,000 and an annual interest rate of 8%. The principal ($141,000) and interest will be due on November 6, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest closing price during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 24% per annum or the highest rate of interest permitted by law.

 

On May 8, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 2,352,941 shares of common stock upon partial conversion of $20,000. On May 14, 2020, the noteholder sold the convertible note to LGH Investments, LLC for $162,700. One clause was added which states that the note shall have a cash redemption premium of 140% of the outstanding principal plus accrued and default interest until the maturity date. Otherwise, all terms and conditions remained the same.

 

On December 22, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 13,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $97,500 on convertible debt of $162,700. On December 28, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 12,577,332 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of $94,330 and the note was retired.

 

December Convertible Note -- On December 5, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement. It received $103,000 with an original issue discount of $6,000 and an annual interest rate of 8%. The principal ($109,000) and interest will be due on December 5, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest Volume Weighted Average Price (VWAP) during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the interest rate will be 18% per annum or the highest rate of interest permitted by law.

 

On May 8, 2020, the noteholder sold the convertible note to LGH Investments, LLC for $144,313. All terms and conditions remained the same. On November 23, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 20,356,630 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of $150,639 and the note was retired.

 

January Convertible Note -- On January 30, 2020, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement with an accredited investor. It received $36,000 after an original issue discount of $4,000 in lieu of interest, for a total amount of $40,000 due on July 30, 2020. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied.

 

On October 30, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 5,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $24,200. On November 12, 2020, Cool Technologies issued 5,500,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of $22,000 and the note was retired.

 

 
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September Convertible Note -- On September 15, 2020, the Company signed a promissory note agreement with an accredited investor. It issued 1,000,000 inducement shares of restricted common stock and received $60,000 after an original issue discount of $6,000, plus 3% interest or $1,980. The total amount of $67,980 will be due on April 15, 2021. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied. As of December 31, 2020, the remaining balance totaled $67,980.

 

October Convertible Note -- On October 8, 2020, the Company signed a promissory note agreement with an accredited investor. It issued 1,000,000 inducement shares of restricted common stock and received $58,000 after an original issue discount of $6,000 and payment of $2,000 in legal fees. The total amount of $66,000 will be due on October 8, 2021. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and the interest rate will increase to 18% until the default is remedied. As of December 31, 2020, the remaining balance totaled $76,625.

 

October Convertible Note -- On October 30, 2020, the Company signed a promissory note agreement with an accredited investor. It issued 1,500,000 inducement shares of restricted common stock as additional consideration and received $45,000 after an original issue discount of $5,000. The total amount of $50,000 plus 3% interest or $1,500 will be due on May 30, 2021. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied. As of December 31, 2020, the remaining balance totaled $51,500.

 

November Convertible Note -- On November 18, 2020, the Company signed a promissory note agreement with an accredited investor. It received $130,000 after an original issue discount of $7,000. The total amount of $137,000 will be due on November 18, 2021. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 50% and the interest rate will increase to 22% until the default is remedied. As of December 31, 2020, the remaining balance totaled $138,292.

 

Test Vehicle Financing

 

In October 2014, the Company entered into financing agreements for the purchase of test vehicles, bearing interest at 5.99% payable monthly over five years, collateralized by the vehicles. In July 2018, CoolTech traded-in one test vehicle and purchased another bearing an interest rate of 9.92% payable monthly over 6 years.

 

In June 2019, the Company traded in one test vehicle and purchased another with financing of approximately $44,500, bearing an interest rate of 9.92% payable monthly over a 5-year period.

 

Warrants Issued with Debt

 

When the Company issues notes payable, it may also be required to issue warrants. 

 

 

 

Number of Warrants

 

 

Weighted-average Exercise Price

 

 

Weighted-average Remaining Life (Years)

 

 

Aggregate

Intrinsic

Value

 

Outstanding

December 31, 2018

 

 

14,467,717

 

 

$ 0.05

 

 

 

4.6

 

 

$ 1,564

 

Granted

 

 

4,200,000

 

 

 

0.03

 

 

 

5.0

 

 

 

220,000

 

Forfeited or expired

 

 

(200,000 )

 

 

0.08

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

10,000

 

Exercised

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2019

 

 

18,467,717

 

 

 

0.05

 

 

 

3.7

 

 

 

941,144

 

Exercisable, December 31, 2019

 

 

18,467,717

 

 

 

0.05

 

 

 

3.7

 

 

 

941,144

 

Granted

 

 

5,000,000

 

 

 

0.01

 

 

 

4.4

 

 

 

36,800

 

Forfeited or expired

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Exercised

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2020

 

 

23,467,717

 

 

 

0.04

 

 

 

3.1

 

 

 

36,800

 

Exercisable, December 31, 2020

 

 

23,467,717

 

 

$ 0.04

 

 

 

3.1

 

 

$ 36,800

 

  

 
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Table of Contents

 

Transactions with Related Parties

 

The related party advances, in the amount of $49,887, is held by two of the Company’s officers and relates to unreimbursed expenses.

 

The note payable - UPT minority owner, in the amount of $110,000, is held by the 5% minority owner of UPT. The terms of the note have not been finalized.

 

Future contractual maturities of debt are as follows:

 

Year ending December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2021

 

$ 3,189,336

 

2022

 

 

15,036

 

2023

 

 

15,036

 

2024

 

 

7,509

 

 

 

$ 3,226,917

 

 

Note 5 – Derivative Liability

 

Under the terms of the September 2020, October 2020, and November 2020 Convertible Notes, the Company identified derivative instruments arising from embedded conversion features.

 

The following summarizes the Black-Scholes assumptions used to estimate the fair value of the derivative liability at the dates of issuance and the revaluation dates:

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Volatility

 

177%-257%

 

 

114%-148%

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

.09%-.10%

 

 

1.50%-2.50%

 

Expected life (years)

 

0.29 – 0.88

 

 

0.9 - 1.2

 

Dividend yield

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

Changes in the derivative liability were as follows:

 

 

 

Level 1

 

 

Level 2

 

 

Level 3

 

Convertible debt and other derivative liabilities on December 31, 2018

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

$ 149,759

 

Conversions of convertible debt

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

(79,027 )

Issuance of convertible debt and other derivatives

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

1,138,804

 

Extinguishment of convertible debt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(165,887 )

Change in fair value

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

(330,728 )

Convertible debt and other derivative liabilities on December 31, 2019

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

712,921

 

Conversions of convertible debt

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

(904,070 )

Issuance of convertible debt and other derivatives

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

552,232

 

Extinguishment of convertible debt

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

(306,493 )

Change in fair value

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

341,553

 

Convertible debt and other derivative liabilities on December 31, 2020

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

$ 396,143

 

 

Note 6 – Commitments and Contingencies

 

Securities and Exchange Commission Settlement

 

On September 20, 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) approved an offer to settle the enforcement proceedings against the Company pursuant to Section 21C of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

 

These proceedings arose out of the violation of the Regulation S-X requirement that interim financial statements filed as part of a Form 10-Q be reviewed by an independent public accounting firm prior to filing.

 

On three occasions, specifically, May 20, 2013, August 19, 2013 and August 22, 2016, Cool Technologies filed Form 10-Qs that contained financial statements that were not reviewed by an independent public accounting firm. In two cases, the Company properly disclosed that the 10Q’s were “unaudited and unreviewed” as set forth by the guidance in the Division of Corporation Finance Financial Reporting Manual Section 4410.3 and in each case, the Company subsequently filed a restated and amended Form 10-Q/A that complied with the Interim Review Requirement. In no instance were the filings ever subjected to audit challenge.

 

Pursuant to the enforcement proceeding instituted by the SEC, the Company settled for a fine of $75,000 and agreed to cease and desist from any future violations of Sections 13(a) of the Exchange Act and Rule 13a-13 thereunder, and Rule 8-03 of Regulation S-X. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, $50,000 is still due, which is included within accounts payable on the consolidated balance sheets.

 

From time to time, Cool Technologies may be a party to other legal proceedings. Management currently believes that the ultimate resolution of these matters, and after consideration of amounts accrued, will not have a material adverse effect on consolidated results of operations, financial position, or cash flow.

 

Note 7 – Equity

 

Preferred Stock

 

Cool Technologies has 15,000,000 preferred shares authorized and 3 Series A and 2,727,270 Series B preferred shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2020.

 

On August 12, 2016, the Company entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement with four accredited investors pursuant to which it sold 3,636,360 shares of the Company’s Series B Convertible Preferred Stock. Each share of the preferred stock is convertible into one share of the Company’s common stock. The conversion price of the preferred stock is equal to the $0.055.

 

In addition to the preferred stock, the Securities Purchase Agreement included warrants to purchase 3,636,360 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.07 per share. The warrants cannot be exercised on a cashless basis. The aggregate purchase price of the preferred stock and warrants was $200,000, of which $150,000 was paid in cash and $50,000 was paid in services.

 

In connection with the sale of the Preferred Stock, on October 20, 2016, the Company filed with the Secretary of the State of Nevada, an amended Certificate of Designations of the Rights, Preferences, Privileges and Restrictions, which have not been set forth in the Certificate of Designation of the Series B Convertible Preferred Stock nor the first Amendment to Certificate of Designation filed on August 12, 2016.

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

The preferred stock has the same rights as if each share of Series B Convertible Preferred Stock were converted into one share of common stock. For so long as the Series B Convertible Preferred Stock is issued and outstanding, the holders of such Series B Convertible Preferred Stock vote together as a single class with the holders of the common stock and the holders of any other class or series of shares entitled to vote with the common stock, with the holders of Series B Stock being entitled to 66 2/3% of the total votes on all such matters.

 

In the event of the death of a holder of the Class B Preferred Stock, or a liquidation, winding up or bankruptcy of a holder which is an entity, all voting rights of the Class B Preferred Stock shall cease.

 

The holder of any shares of Class B Preferred Stock have the right to convert their shares into common stock at any time, in a conversion ratio of one share of common stock for each share of Class B Preferred. If the Company’s common stock trades or is quoted at a price per share in excess of $2.25 for any twenty consecutive day trading period, the Class B Preferred Stock will automatically be convertible into the common stock of the Company in a conversion ratio of one share of common stock for each share of Class B Preferred.

 

The holders of Class B Preferred Stock are not entitled to receive any distributions in the event of any liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the Company.

 

The warrants cannot be exercised on a cashless basis.

 

On May 8, 2017, Inverom Corporation converted its 909,090 Series B preferred shares into 909,090 shares of common stock. This represented all of the shares of Series B stock held by Inverom Corporation.

 

Preferred stock issuable on the consolidated balance sheets represents preferred stock to be issued for either cash received, or services performed. As of December 31, 2020, and 2019, the number of shares of preferred stock to be issued was 0 and the number of shares of Series B preferred stock was 2,727,270.

 

KHIC, Inc., a related party holds the remaining 3 shares of Series A Preferred Stock. Each share of Series A Preferred Stock (“Preferred Stock”) is convertible into 50,000 shares of common stock. Each share of preferred stock has voting rights as if they were converted into 50,000 shares of common stock. The holders of each share of preferred stock then outstanding shall be entitled to be paid out of the Available Funds and Assets (as defined in the “Certificate of Designation”), and prior and in preference to any payment or distribution (or any setting a part of any payment or distribution) of any Available Funds and Assets on any shares of common stock, an amount per preferred share equal to the Preferred Stock Liquidation Price ($2,500 per share).

 

Common stock

 

On September 13, 2019, stockholders holding shares that entitled them to exercise at least a majority of the voting power, voted in favor of increasing the number of authorized shares of common stock, from 350,000,000 shares to 500,000,000 shares.

 

On February 13, 2020, stockholders holding shares that entitled them to exercise at least a majority of the voting power, voted in favor of increasing the number of authorized shares of common stock, from 500,000,000 shares to 1,000,000,000 shares.

 

Common stock issuable on the consolidated balance sheets represents common stock to be issued for either cash received, or services performed. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the number of shares of common stock to be issued was the same: 494,697 shares.

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

Common stock warrants issued with the sale of CoolTech’s common stock

 

When the Company sells shares of its common stock the buyer also typically receives fully vested common stock warrants with a maximum contractual term of 3-5 years. A summary of common stock warrants issued with the sale of common stock as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, and changes during the years then ended is presented below:

 

 

 

Number of Warrants

 

 

Weighted-average Exercise Price

 

 

Weighted-average Remaining Life (Years)

 

 

Aggregate

Intrinsic

Value

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2018

 

 

52,367,887

 

 

$ 0.18

 

 

 

1.3

 

 

$ 114,900

 

Granted

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeited or expired

 

 

(6,853,719 )

 

 

0.56

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2019

 

 

45,514,168

 

 

 

0.12

 

 

 

1.1

 

 

 

 

 

Exercisable, December 31, 2019

 

 

45,514,168

 

 

 

0.12

 

 

 

1.1

 

 

 

 

 

Granted

 

 

3,750,000

 

 

 

0.02

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeited or expired

 

 

(16,132,629 )

 

 

0.17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2020

 

 

33,131,539

 

 

 

0.08

 

 

 

1.0

 

 

 

-

 

Exercisable, December 31, 2020

 

 

33,131,539

 

 

$ 0.08

 

 

 

1.0

 

 

$ -

 

 

Note 8 – Share-based payments

 

Amounts recognized as expense in the consolidated statements of operations related to share-based payments are as follows:

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Nonemployee common stock

 

$ --

 

 

$ 7,700

 

Nonemployee warrants – fully vested upon issuance

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Total share-based expense charged against income

 

$ --

 

 

$ 7,700

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Impact on net loss per common share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted

 

$ (0.00 )

 

$ (0.00 )

 

UPT management agreement

 

In July 2014, Cool Technologies entered into a three year agreement with the Company managing the operations of UPT, whereby it would issue common stock under the following conditions:

 

Condition

 

Number of Shares

 

UPT recognizes $100 million of revenue or a change in control

 

 

500,000

 

UPT recognizes $100 million of revenue

 

 

150,000

 

 

 

 

650,000

 

 

On June 30, 2017, the agreement expired. None of the conditions were met prior to expiration, so no expense will be recognized, and no common stock will be issued under this agreement.

 

In July 2014, Cool Technologies entered into a three-year agreement with the Company managing the operations of UPT, whereby CoolTech would issue common stock warrants under the following conditions:

 

 

 

 

Number of

 

Vesting Condition

 

Category

 

Warrants

 

Fully vest upon UPT generating $1 million of revenue

 

Performance

 

 

350,000

 

45,945 warrants for every $3 million of revenue generated by UPT up to $100 million

 

Performance

 

 

1,530,000

 

60,000 warrants for every three months of completed service managing UPT

 

Service

 

 

720,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,600,000

 

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

The common stock warrants have a three-year life and an exercise price of $1.00 per share. The grant date fair value was $2,586,000. On June 30, 2017, the agreement expired. None of the performance conditions were met prior to expiration, so no expense will be recognized, and no common stock warrants will vest under the performance conditions. During the year ended December 21, 2017, 120,000 of the common stock warrants under the service condition vested with the passage of time and the Company recognized expense of $6,118. There is no remaining service award expense to recognize. During 2019, 240,000 of the common stock warrants expired. During the first half of 2020, the remaining 120,000 warrants expired.

 

Nonemployee common stock

 

Other

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, Cool Technologies issued an additional 350,000 shares of common stock, respectively, in exchange for services, with a fair value of $7,700. None were issued during the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

Nonemployee common stock warrants -- Fully-vested upon issuance

 

Cool Technologies may issue fully vested common stock warrants with a maximum contractual term of 5 years to non-employees in return for services or to satisfy liabilities, such as accrued interest. The following summarizes the activity for common stock warrants that were fully vested upon issuance:

 

 

 

Number of Warrants

 

 

Weighted-average Exercise Price

 

 

Weighted-average Remaining Life (Years)

 

 

Aggregate

Intrinsic

Value

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2018

 

 

13,445,836

 

 

$ 0.27

 

 

 

1.4

 

 

$ 78,000

 

Granted

 

 

2,100,000

 

 

 

0.004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeited or expired

 

 

(5,810,000 )

 

 

0.49

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2019

 

 

9,735,836

 

 

 

0.36

 

 

 

1.3

 

 

$ 2,000

 

Exercisable, December 31, 2019

 

 

9,735,836

 

 

 

0.36

 

 

 

1.3

 

 

$ 2,000

 

Granted

 

 

5,500,000

 

 

 

0.02

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeited or expired

 

 

(3,319,333 )

 

 

0.12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2020

 

 

11,916,503

 

 

 

0.05

 

 

 

1.9

 

 

$ 10,500

 

Exercisable, December 31, 2020

 

 

11,916,503

 

 

$ 0.05

 

 

 

1.9

 

 

$ 10,500

 

 

The following summarizes the Black-Scholes assumptions used to estimate the fair value of fully vested common stock warrants:

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Volatility

 

174%- 183%

 

 

125%-148%

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

0.17%- 0.36%

 

 

1.60%-1.70%

 

Expected life (years)

 

0.9 -1.0

 

 

.05 – 4.20

 

Dividend yield

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 
F-23

Table of Contents

 

No fully vested common stock warrants were exercised in 2020 and 2019.

 

Nonemployee common stock warrants -- Service and performance conditions

 

Summary

 

The following summarizes the activity for warrants that have performance and service conditions. There were no grants in 2020.

 

 

 

Number of Warrants

 

 

Weighted-average Exercise Price

 

 

Weighted-average Remaining Life (Years)

 

 

Aggregate

Intrinsic

Value

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2018

 

 

360,000

 

 

$ 1.00

 

 

 

0.40

 

 

 

 

Granted

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

 

Forfeited or expired

 

 

(240,000 )

 

 

1.00

 

 

 

0.00

 

 

 

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2019

 

 

120,000

 

 

 

1.00

 

 

 

0.39

 

 

 

 

Exercisable, December 31, 2019

 

 

120,000

 

 

 

1.00

 

 

 

0.39

 

 

 

 

Granted

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

 

Forfeited or expired

 

 

(120,000 )

 

 

1.00

 

 

 

0.00

 

 

 

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2020

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

 

Exercisable, December 31, 2020

 

 

--

 

 

$ --

 

 

 

--

 

 

$ --

 

 

Legal settlement – Replacement warrants

 

Under the terms of the February 2016 Waiver of Performance and Second Amendment to Settlement Agreement with Spirit Bear, the Company agreed in April to issue replacement warrants for previously amended and replaced warrants. Six million of the previously amended and replaced warrants owned by Spirit Bear and by Leonora Lorenzo had their expiration dates extended from January 29, 2017, until January 29, 2020, and had their exercise price reduced from $0.25 to $0.10 per share.

 

In addition, Spirit Bear consented to the withdrawal of a Registration Statement on Form S-1 that was pending before the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC). The proposed registration statement covered the common shares underlying the preferred shares owned by Spirit Bear and the common shares underlying the warrants owned by Spirit Bear and Leonora Lorenzo.

 

When a replacement equity instrument is issued, expense is recorded if the fair value of the new instruments is greater than the fair value of the original instruments. The Company recorded expense of $423,973 associated with the replacement warrants. The following summarizes the Black-Scholes assumptions used to estimate the fair value of the previously issued warrants and the replacement warrants:

 

 

 

Previously issued

 

 

Replacement

 

Volatility

 

 

206 %

 

 

151 %

Risk-free interest rate

 

 

0.5 %

 

 

1.3 %

Expected life (years)

 

 

0.2

 

 

 

3.2

 

Dividend yield

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 
F-24

Table of Contents

 

Employee stock options – Fully-vested upon grant

 

Cool Technologies granted stock options to certain members of management in 2014 that were fully vested at the date of grant. There were no grants in 2020 or 2019. The following is a summary of fully vested stock option activity:

 

 

 

Number of

Shares

 

 

Weighted-average Exercise Price per Share

 

 

Weighted-average Remaining Contractual

Term

 

 

Aggregate

Intrinsic Value

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2018

 

 

4,000,000

 

 

$ 2.00

 

 

 --

 

 

$

 --

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2019

 

 

4,000,000

 

 

 

2.00

 

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

Exercisable, December 31, 2019

 

 

4,000,000

 

 

 

2.00

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Outstanding, December 31, 2020

 

 

4,000,000

 

 

 

2.00

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Exercisable, December 31, 2020

 

 

4,000,000

 

 

$ 2.00

 

 

 

--

 

 

$ --

 

 

Note 9 – Income Taxes

 

The components of the Company’s deferred tax asset are as follows:

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Net operating loss carryforwards

 

$ 7,881,536

 

 

$ 7,153,247

 

Equity-based instruments

 

 

6,490,670

 

 

 

6,467,488

 

Accrued liabilities

 

 

177,609

 

 

 

332,655

 

Deferred Revenue

 

 

96,311

 

 

 

96,311

 

Pass-through losses

 

 

104,685

 

 

 

100,315

 

Valuation allowance

 

 

(14,750,811 )

 

 

(14,150,016 )

Deferred tax asset

 

$ --

 

 

$ --

 

 

Effective January 1, 2018, the Federal corporate income tax rate has been decreased from 34% to 21%. The effect of this change on deferred taxes and the valuation allowance on December 31, 2017 was approximately $6.5 million. The NOLs that have been generated December 31, 2017 and prior are going to be 100% allowable against future income and will expire in 20 years. NOLs generated January 1, 2018 and forward will be subject to the 80% limitation and they will never expire. For the year ended December 31, 2019, the increase in the valuation allowance was $546,422 and for the year ended December 31, 2020, the increase in the valuation allowance was $546,422

 

A reconciliation of income taxes computed at the statutory rate to the income tax amount recorded is as follows:

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Income tax benefit at statutory rate

 

$ (571,973 )

 

$ (681,012 )

State income tax, net of Federal benefit

 

 

(118,344 )

 

 

(140,905 )

Convertible debt

 

 

89,296

 

 

 

274,844

 

Other adjustments

 

 

230

 

 

 

405

 

Meals and entertainment

 

 

--

 

 

 

246

 

Increase in valuation allowance

 

 

600,791

 

 

 

546,422

 

Income tax benefit

 

$ --

 

 

$ --

 

 

Cool Technologies had no gross unrecognized tax benefits that, if recognized, would favorably affect the effective income tax rate in future periods. It has not accrued any interest or penalties associated with income taxes. The Company files income tax returns in the United States federal jurisdiction. With few exceptions, it is no longer subject to U.S. federal, state or non-U.S. income tax examination by tax authorities on tax returns filed before January 31, 2012. No tax returns are currently under examination by any tax authorities.

 

 
F-25

Table of Contents

 

Note 10 – Net Loss per Share

 

Basic net loss per share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the reporting period. Diluted net loss per share is computed similarly to basic loss per share, except that it includes the potential dilution that could occur if dilutive securities are exercised.

 

The following table presents a reconciliation of the denominators used in the computation of net loss per share – basic and diluted:

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Net loss available for stockholders

 

$ (2,722,770 )

 

$ (3,241,312 )

Weighted average outstanding shares of common stock

 

 

401,652,835

 

 

 

238,714,877

 

Dilutive effect of stock options and warrants

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Common stock and equivalents

 

 

401,652,835

 

 

 

238,714,877

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss per share – Basic and diluted

 

$ (0.01 )

 

$ (0.01 )

 

Outstanding stock options and common stock warrants are considered anti-dilutive because the Company is in a net loss position. The following summarizes equity instruments that may, in the future, have a dilutive effect on earnings per share:

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Stock options

 

 

4,000,000

 

 

 

4,000,000

 

Common stock warrants

 

 

68,765,759

 

 

 

74,830,224

 

Common stock issuable

 

 

--

 

 

 

494,697

 

Convertible notes

 

 

42,760,597

 

 

 

170,228,752

 

Convertible preferred stock

 

 

2,877,270

 

 

 

2,877,270

 

Convertible preferred stock issuable

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

Total

 

 

118,403,626

 

 

 

252,430,943

 

Total exercisable on December 31

 

 

75,643,029

 

 

 

175,538,408

 

 

Note 11 – Subsequent Events

 

The Company has evaluated all the events or transactions that have occurred since December 31, 2020 and determined that the following should be disclosed:

 

On January 18, 2021, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement with an accredited investor. It issued 2,000,000 inducement shares of restricted common stock and received $120,000 after an original issue discount of $12,000 in lieu of interest. The total amount of $132,000 plus 3% interest or $3,960 will be due on October 19, 2021. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a fixed price of $0.025 per share. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied.

 

On January 20, 2021, the Company issued 15,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $137,385 on convertible debt and interest of $333,938.

 

On January 22, 2021, the Company issued 15,000,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon partial conversion of $137,385 on convertible debt and interest of $333,938.

 

 
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On January 26, 2021, the Company signed an independent agent agreement with H&K Ventures, LLC of Morgan Hill, California. H&K will concentrate on developing markets in Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The agreement describes the agent’s duties as “generating revenue, and investment funding for the Company from various organizations including investment funds, end-users, channel partners, integrators, and OEMs.

  

On February 3, 2021, the Company issued 2,653,125 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of $38,205 (minus an adjustment of $20,963 for a previous conversion overage) on convertible debt and interest of $333,938.

 

On February 4, 2021, the Company signed a promissory note agreement with an accredited investor. It received $73,000 after an original issue discount of $4,000. The total amount of $77,000 will be due on February 4, 2022. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a 29% discount to the lowest VWAP during the 10 trading days preceding the conversion date. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 50% and the interest rate will increase to 22% until the default is remedied.

 

On February 10, 2021, the Company issued 6,798,000 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of convertible debt and interest of $84,975.

 

On February 25, 2021, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement with an accredited investor. It issued 2,000,000 inducement shares of restricted common stock and received $150,000 after an original issue discount of $15,000 in lieu of interest. The total amount of $165,000 plus 3% interest or $4,950 will be due on November 25, 2021. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a fixed price of $0.025 per share. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $100 will accrue until the default is remedied.

 

On March 17, 2021, the Company issued 3,468,367 shares of common stock to LGH Investments, LLC upon final conversion of convertible debt and interest of $67,980.

 

On March 24, 2021, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement with an accredited investor. It issued two sets of commitment shares: a block of 500,000 and a block of 2,500,000 shares of restricted common stock as well as warrants to purchase 1,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share. In return, the Company received $250,000 after an original issue discount of $25,000 in lieu of interest. The total amount of $275,000 plus 8% interest or $22,000 will be due on December 24, 2021. After 60 days, if the note has not been paid in full, the investor will have the right to purchase up to 6 million additional warrant shares After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a fixed price of $0.055 per share. If the note is repaid by the maturity date, the investor will forfeit the block of 2,500,000 shares of restricted common stock and the shares will be returned to the Company’s treasury. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $1,000 will accrue until the default is remedied.

 

On March 24, 2021, the Company entered into a convertible note agreement with an accredited investor. It issued two sets of commitment shares: a block of 500,000 and a block of 2,500,000 shares of restricted common stock as well as warrants to purchase 1,000,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share. In return, the Company received $750,000 after an original issue discount of $75,000 in lieu of interest. The total amount of $825,000 plus 8% interest or $66,000 will be due on December 24, 2021. After 60 days, if the note has not been paid in full, the investor will have the right to purchase up to 2 million additional warrant shares. After 180 days, at the holder’s option, a portion or all of the unpaid principal and interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a fixed price of $0.055 per share. If the note is repaid by the maturity date, the investor will forfeit the block of 2,500,000 shares of restricted common stock and the shares will be returned to the Company’s treasury. In the event of default, the outstanding balance will increase by 25% and a daily penalty of $1,000 will accrue until the default is remedied.

 

 
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Item 9. Changes In and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosures

 

None

 

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

  

The Company’s management does not expect that its internal controls over financial reporting will prevent all error and all fraud. Control systems, no matter how well conceived and managed, can provide only reasonable assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. The design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake.

 

Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any system of controls also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, control may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

 

(a) Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Under the supervision and with the participation of management, including the principal executive officer and principal financial officer, Cool Technologies conducted an evaluation of its disclosure controls and procedures, as such term is defined under Rule 13a-15(e) and Rule 15d-15(e) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as of December 31, 2020. Based on this evaluation, the principal executive officer and principal financial officer have concluded that, based on the material weaknesses discussed below, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were not effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed in reports filed or submitted under the Securities Exchange Act were recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Act Commission’s rules and forms and that the Company’s disclosure controls are not effectively designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports that Cool Technologies files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management, including the principal executive officer and principal financial officer, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

(b) Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(f) of the Exchange Act.

 

Internal control over financial reporting is defined under the Exchange Act as a process designed by, or under the supervision of, the CEO and CFO, and effected by the board of directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and includes those policies and procedures that:

 

 

--

Pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the Company’s assets;

 

 

--

Provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors; and

 

 

--

Provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Company assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

 
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Because Cool Technologies has only three officers and limited personnel, the Company’s internal controls are not effective for the following reasons, (1) there are limited entity-level controls because of the limited time and abilities of the three officers, (2) it has not implemented adequate system and manual controls, and (3) there is no separate audit committee. As a result, the Company’s internal controls have inherent material weaknesses which may increase the risks of errors in financial reporting under current operations and, accordingly, are not effective as evaluated against the criteria set forth in “Internal Control – Integrated Framework” issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) in 2013. Based on this evaluation, management concluded that Cool Technologies’ internal controls over financial reporting were not effective as of December 31, 2020.

 

Even though there are inherent weaknesses, management has taken steps to minimize the risk. The Company uses a third-party consultant to review transactions for appropriate technical accounting, reconcile accounts, review significant transactions and prepare financial statements Any deviation or errors are reported to management.

 

(c) Remediation of Material Weaknesses

 

Cool Technologies can provide no assurance that its internal controls over financial reporting will be compliant in the near future. As revenues permit, the Company will enhance its internal controls through additional software and other means. If and when it becomes a listed company under SEC rules, the Company will create an audit committee comprised of independent directors.

 

(d) Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting during the fourth quarter that have materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect CoolTech’s our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Item 9B. Other Information.

 

None.

 

 
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PART III

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.

 

The following table sets forth the names, ages and positions of our current board members and executive officers:

 

Name

 

Age

 

Position(s)

 

Timothy Hassett

 

60

 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and Director

Quentin Ponder

 

91

 

Vice Chairman Chief Financial Officer and Director

Judson Bibb

 

64

 

Vice President, Secretary and Director

Christopher McKee

 

52

 

Director

Richard “Dick” Schul

 

74

 

Director

Donald Bowman

 

52

 

Director

Steven Wilburn

 

72

 

Director

 

Our directors are elected for a term of one year and serve until such director’s successor is duly elected and qualified. Each executive officer serves at the pleasure of the Board.

 

The Company has no nominating, audit or compensation committees at this time.

 

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

 

The following summarizes the occupational and business experience of our officers and directors.

 

Timothy Hassett is a co-founder of the Company and has been its Chairman since its inception and Chief Executive Officer since April 5, 2012. Mr. Hassett began his career as a marketing and business manager, for Rockwell Automation Incorporated’s Motor Special Products division from 1990 to 1995, where he launched new product platforms and developed and implemented global distribution initiatives and channels. Mr. Hassett worked at General Electric from January 1996 to February 1998, as a general manager of Distribution Services in the Industrial Systems Division and from February 1998 to March 2000, in the Electric Motors Unit of the Industrial Systems Division where he restructured the unit, consolidated product lines and grew the business. From March 2000 to August 2003, he served as President of Hawk Motors and Rotors, a division of Hawk Corporation, a brake manufacturer, where he restructured the Company. From August 2003 to October 2005, Mr. Hassett served as Vice President and General Manager of WaveCrest Laboratories, a propulsion systems and controls start-up, where he led the development and launch of four new product platforms. From June 2006 to October 2010, Mr. Hassett served as President and Managing Director of LEMO USA, a Swiss-based connector company, where he restructured the Company, helped contain costs and improved operating margins and business. From December 2010 to October 2011, Mr. Hassett served as President of Cavometrix, a connector company serving the medical, energy and alternative energy industries. Mr. Hassett has a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Cleveland State University and a BS in Physics from Youngstown State University. Mr. Hassett’s patents and patents pending and his extensive experience and professional contacts in the electric motor industry led to the decision to appoint him to the Board.

 

 
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Quentin Ponder has served as President from October 20, 2011 until April 5, 2012, Secretary from October 20, 2011 until November 11, 2011 and Treasurer of the Company since October 20, 2011. On April 5, 2012, Mr. Ponder was appointed Chief Financial Officer and Vice Chairman. Mr. Ponder is a seasoned executive with over 40 years of management experience. From November 1962 to July 1967, Mr. Ponder served as Senior Manufacturing Engineer at General Electric where he worked in the development of a flow manufacturing system. From July 1980 to June 1985, he was President of Franklin Electric, Inc., an electric motor company, where he restructured the Company which became a global leader in submersible motors for water wells. From July 1985 to March 1990, Mr. Ponder was President of Baldor Electric, Inc., an electric motor company, where he restructured the Company. From April 1990 to May 1997, Mr. Ponder worked for Lincoln Electric, Inc., as a consultant. From May 1990 to the present, Mr. Ponder has worked as an independent management consultant. Mr. Ponder serves as a director and is a 33.3% owner of Reliable Electric Motor Company, Inc., an electric motor importer. Mr. Ponder is the sole owner and a director of Summit Management Consulting, Inc. and Capital Alternatives, Inc., a semi-trailer leasing company. Mr. Ponder earned a Ph.D. from Columbia University in general management, accounting, and economics. Mr. Ponder’s extensive experience in the electric motor industry led to the decision to appoint him to the Board.

 

On October 16, 2020, we issued for services to the Company three-year warrants to purchase a total of 400,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.02 per share, to our Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer, Quentin Ponder. The warrants may be exercised on a cashless basis.

 

Judson W. Bibb has been a director of the Company since April 15, 2011. Mr. Bibb was appointed Secretary on November 11, 2011 and Vice President on April 5, 2012. He has worked exclusively for the Company since 2013. Prior to that, Mr. Bibb was a self-employed freelance multi-media producer since 1983. His services included: producer, writer, director, cinematographer, videographer, still photographer, audio and video editor, voiceover talent, marketer, ad designer and Internet search engine optimizer. His client list included KPMG, T. Rowe Price, Briggs & Stratton, Caterpillar, Toyota, Georgia-Pacific, Alcoa Aluminum, Lowes, Office Depot, PepsiCo, Hewlett-Packard, Bayer, Caremark, and T-Mobile. Mr. Bibb graduated cum laude from the University of South Florida with a B.A. in mass communications-film. Mr. Bibb’s broad background and wide variety of resources, including experience in marketing and public relations and business experience in automotive, trucking, electronics, retail, direct response and the Internet led to the decision to appoint him to the Board.

 

On October 16, 2020, we issued for services to the Company three-year warrants to purchase a total of 400,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.02 per share, to our Secretary and Vice President, Judson Bibb, The warrants may be exercised on a cashless basis.  

 

Christopher McKee has been a director of the Company since August 19, 2015. Mr. McKee joined GTT Communications, Inc. (“GTT”) (NYSE GTT) in 2008 and is GTT’s President, Infrastructure. Mr. McKee is responsible for running the Infrastructure Division of GTT which is being sold to I Squared Capital for $2.15 Billion. That transaction is expected to Close in 2Q 2021. Mr. McKee has over 20 years of broad legal experience in the telecommunications industry. Prior to joining GTT, he served as General Counsel for StarVox Communications where he was responsible for the Company’s legal department, mergers and acquisitions, employment law, litigation, and legal support for the sales teams. Mr. McKee also formerly served as Vice President and Assistant General Counsel for Covad Communications where he headed its Washington, DC office and directed its federal and state regulatory compliance and advocacy efforts. Mr. McKee previously worked for XO Communications, Net2000 Communications and was in private practice in Washington, DC as an associate at Dickstein Shapiro and Cooley LLP. Mr. McKee earned a law degree from Syracuse University and received his Bachelor of Arts from Colby College. Mr. McKee’s background of supply chain, micro-cap and small cap as well as his M&A background and his knowledge and experience of regulatory compliance and company legal structure led to the decision to appoint Mr. McKee to the board.

 

 
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On October 16, 2020, we issued for services to the Company three-year warrants to purchase a total of 600,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.02 per share, to a director, Chris McKee. The warrants may be exercised on a cashless basis.

 

Richard J. “Dick” Schul has been a director of the Company since August 19, 2015. Since November 2013, Mr. Schul has been an independent management consultant providing management and strategic planning services to company executives. Mr. Schul started his career with Emerson Electric in St. Louis in 1981, where he held positions of increasing responsibility throughout, including marketing manager, director of marketing and vice president of marketing for Emerson Motors (a global leader in generator technology) through 1989. In 1990, Mr. Schul was named president of Alco Controls Division of Emerson in Maryland Heights. In 1997, Mr. Schul was named president of Emerson’s Air Moving Motors Division. In 1998 Mr. Schul was named president of Specialty and Air Moving Motors and in 2000 was named group vice president of Emerson’s Commercial Industrial Motors group. In 2004, Mr. Schul was named group vice president of Emerson Climate Technologies. Mr. Shul received the Richard Schultz award and the Distinguished Service Award (highest award given by the Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute in November 2011. Mr. Schul retired from Emerson in November 2011 after 43 years in the HVACR industry. Mr. Schul continued to work part-time as a consultant for Emerson through 2013. Mr. Schul graduated from Indiana Institute of Technology with a BS in Mechanical Engineering in 1969 and an MBA from the University of Dayton in 1976. Mr. Schul’s background in the motor and generator industries as well as his business relationships led to the decision to appoint Mr. Schul to the board.

 

On October 16, 2020, we issued for services to the Company three-year warrants to purchase a total of 600,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.02 per share, to a director, Richard Schul. The warrants may be exercised on a cashless basis.

 

Donald L. Bowman has been a director of the Company since August 19, 2015. Mr. Bowman has been Chief Executive Officer of BVU Authority (formerly known as Bristol Virginia Utilities) since November 2013. BVU Authority is a utility system that provides electric, water, wastewater and fiber optic telecommunication and information services to the City of Bristol and the surrounding area. From 2011 to November 2013, Mr. Bowman provided consulting services to the legal industry and various California businesses. Mr. Bowman served as Operations and Business Development Manager and consultant to the General Manager of Lemo USA Inc., from 2006-2011. Prior thereto from 2004 to 2006, Mr. Bowman served as Vice President and General Counsel of WaveCrest Laboratories LLC, a technology company in Northern Virginia (“WaveCrest”). Prior to WaveCrest, Mr. Bowman served as Associate General Corporate Counsel of MeadWestvaco from 2001 to 2004. Mr. Bowman was an associate at the law firm of Dickstein Shapiro in Washington D.C. from 1999 to 2001. Mr. Bowman’s has a Juris Doctorate from the University of Virginia School of Law (1998), a Master’s in Engineering Management from the Florida Institute of Technology (1993), a Master’s in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Old Dominion University (1992), and a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering with Highest Honors from Virginia Military Institute (1990). He is a licensed professional engineer in the state of Virginia. He has been a registered patent attorney with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for over fourteen years. Mr. Bowman served five years on active duty as an officer with the United States Navy and retired as Commander from the U.S. Naval Reserves in 2011. Mr. Bowman’s business and legal background led to the decision to appoint Mr. Bowman to the board.

 

On October 16, 2020, we issued for services to the Company three-year warrants to purchase a total of 450,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.02 per share, to a director, Don Bowman. The warrants may be exercised on a cashless basis.

 

Steven Wilburn was elected to the Board on January 15, 2020. In 2004, Mr. Wilburn founded FirmGreen, Inc., an integrated energy company participating in virtually all aspects of the global green energy business. Since then, he has served as the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of FirmGreen, Inc. In 2014, Mr. Wilburn founded VerdeWatts, LLC, an energy storage and management solutions company, and has served as the Managing Member of VerdeWatts since its founding. During 2013 and 2014, Steve served on the Advisory Board of the Export Import Bank of the United States. From 2016 until 2018, he served on the inaugural Trade and Finance Advisory Committee under the Obama and Trump administrations.

 

 
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In 1977, Wilburn was selected to lead a joint venture team (Monsanto, Wheelabrator, McDonnell-Douglas) to find a new cost-effective and environmentally-sound method of producing pure hydrogen for NASA’s Space Shuttle Program. The team built a pilot plant that gasified petroleum coke and coal to produce pure hydrogen fuel.

 

In 1976 Steve joined GWF Power Systems. His team invented a new process to generate clean power from petroleum coke, while producing a salable and environmentally stable soil amendment as a byproduct.

 

He was subsequently promoted to VP of Business Development at the newly merged Allied Signal Corporation, where he was responsible for the design, permitting, and construction of 5 power plants with a combined capital costs of $300 million dollars in 1984 dollars. ($750 million in 2019 dollars).

 

In 2001, Governor Gray Davis recruited him to fast track natural gas fired power plants during California’s energy crisis. Steve brought the plants on-line within 5 months of the signing the State’s Letter of Commitment.

 

Subsequently, he helped a friend commercialize a patented biogas cleanup process which produced pipeline quality gas and food grade CO2 from landfill gas and Anaerobic Digester Biogas. Steve and the team designed, built and operated a pilot plant at the Burlington County Landfill in New Jersey under a DOE grant.

 

In 1994, Steve started an alternative energy consulting business, Steve Wilburn and Associates.

 

A combat wounded and disabled Marine who was awarded the Purple Heart, a chemical engineer with in-depth applications engineering experience and an executive with over 40 years of experience in alternative energy and water treatment, Steve Wilburn’s depth of knowledge and vast industry experience in alternative energy, successful track record and political clout led to the decision to appoint Mr. Wilburn to the board.

 

On November 16, 2019, we issued for services to the Company thirty month warrants to purchase a total of 200,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.032 per share, to a member of the board of advisors who subsequently became director two months later, Stephen Wilburn. The warrants may be exercised on a cashless basis.

 

Family relationships

 

There are no family relationships among any of our officers or directors.

 

Involvement in legal proceedings

 

Other than described above in “Legal Proceedings”, there are no legal proceedings that have occurred within the past ten years concerning our directors, or control persons which involved a criminal conviction, a criminal proceeding, an administrative or civil proceeding limiting one’s participation in the securities or banking industries, or a finding of securities or commodities law violations,

 

Committees of the Board of Directors

 

The Company does not have an audit committee. We are not a “listed company” under SEC rules and are therefore not required to have an audit committee comprised of independent directors.

 

We do not currently have a “financial expert” within the meaning of the rules and regulations of the SEC.

 

The Company has no nominating or compensation committees at this time. The entire Board participates in the nomination and audit oversight processes and considers executive and director compensation. Given the size of the Company and its stage of development, the entire Board is involved in such decision-making processes. Thus, there is a potential conflict of interest in that our directors and officers have the authority to determine issues concerning management compensation, nominations, and audit issues that may affect management decisions. We are not aware of any other conflicts of interest with any of our executive officers or directors.

 

 
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Resignations

  

Daniel C. Ustian resigned from the Board effective May 26, 2020.

 

Board of Advisors

 

The Company has a Board of Advisors which currently consists of eleven members. Scott Van Dorn (appointed March 18, 2014), currently engineering director at Navistar Corporation, has more than 20 years of experience in global engineering and management in vehicles, engines electronics and design. Richard Schul (appointed December 31, 2013) is a veteran of the motor/generator industry. The other members include: Bill Finley (appointed July 7, 2014), Chief Technology Officer of Siemens Industry Drive Technology; Dan Ustian (appointed September 10, 2014), a former chief executive officer of Navistar; Chris McKee (appointed June 1, 2014), executive vice president and general counsel of GTT; Gurminder Bedi (appointed January 1, 2016), managing partner at Compass Acquisitions, LLC; Mark Steele (appointed May 9, 2017), CEO, president and co-owner of Craftsmen Industries, Inc.; Steve Wilburn (appointed December 9, 2019) founder, Chairman and CEO for FirmGreen, Inc. and founder and managing member of VerdeWatts, LLC; Hakan Kostepen (appointed December 10, 2019) formerly Panasonic’s Executive Director of Product Strategy & Innovation who headed up their Silicon Valley Center; Raoul Wood (appointed December 17, 2019), an expert in sustainable energy and power generation who has developed more than twenty public sector solar power projects and over 2,000 solar electric vehicle charging installations; and Harvey Beverly (appointed December 17, 2019), who recently finished a 30-year career with the United States Army Corps of Engineers, the federal agency that oversees dams, canals and flood protection as well as public works projects worldwide.

 

Upon the execution of an Advisory Board Agreement, the Company issues a non-qualified 30-month warrant to purchase 200,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price that has varied from $0.03 to $0.80 per share depending on the Company’s current share price. The warrant is immediately exercisable.

 

Code of Ethics

 

The Company has adopted a Code of Ethics that establishes the standards of ethical conduct applicable to all directors, officers and employees of the Company, including our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, and persons performing similar functions. A copy of our Code of Ethics is available on our web site at www.cooltechnologiesinc.com. We will provide a copy of our Code of Ethics free of charge to any person who requests a copy. Requests should be directed to the Secretary at Cool Technologies, Inc., 8875 Hidden River Parkway, Suite 300, Tampa, Florida 33637, or by telephone at (813) 975-7467.

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

 

Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 requires our executive officers and directors, and persons who beneficially own more than 10% percent of our equity securities (“Reporting Persons”) to file reports of ownership and changes in ownership with the SEC. Based solely on our review of copies of such reports and representations from the Reporting Persons, we believe that occurred during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020:

 

 

·

All reports were filed on a timely basis

  

Changes in Nominating Process

 

There are no material changes to the procedures by which security holders may recommend nominees to our Board.

 

 
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Item 11. Executive Compensation

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

The following table provides certain information regarding compensation awarded to, earned by or paid to persons serving as our Chief Executive Officer during fiscal 2020 and 2019 and our two other most highly compensated officers who had total compensation exceeding $100,000 for fiscal 2020 (each a “named executive officer”).

 

Note: our CFO, Quentin Ponder, works under a consulting contract and, consequently, is not considered an employee. More information regarding his compensation can be found under “Consulting Agreements” below.

 

Name and Principal Position

 

Fiscal Year
Ended 12/31

 

Salary
($)

 

 

Bonus
($)

 

 

Stock Awards
($)

 

 

Warrant

Awards

($)

 

 

Option Awards
($)

 

 

All Other
($)

 

 

Total
($)

 

Timothy Hassett 

 

2020

 

 

210,000

(3)

 

 

--

 

 

 

--