By Rhiannon Hoyle 
 

SYDNEY--Rio Tinto said it will set up an indigenous advisory group to improve the miner's understanding of cultural heritage issues following the destruction of two ancient rock shelters in Australia last year.

The miner said the decision to establish the group follows broad consultation with traditional land owners and indigenous leaders.

Rio Tinto also said it has started a review on best practice for cultural heritage management in the mining industry, which will be done in consultation with the indigenous advisory group and other independent parties. This "will enable Rio Tinto to identify gaps in current protocols and provide a clear pathway to re-establish trust over time and regain Rio Tinto's previous standing in this area," the miner said.

Rio Tinto, the world's second largest mining company by market value, has also committed to additional disclosures on heritage issues, which will begin from the third quarter of this year.

The destruction of the caves at Juukan Gorge in the north west of the country last May cost Rio Tinto's chief executive, chairman and two other executives their jobs and damaged the mining industry's reputation more broadly.

 

Write to Rhiannon Hoyle at rhiannon.hoyle@wsj.com

 

(END) Dow Jones Newswires

March 22, 2021 17:55 ET (21:55 GMT)

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