UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10–K

 

☒   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

 

or

 

☐   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from                     to                     

 

Commission file number: 000-55768

 

HealthLynked Corp.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
     
Nevada   47-1634127
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 

1726 Medical Blvd Suite 101, Naples, Florida

  34110
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)
 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: 239-513-1992

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None.

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐ No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐ No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes ☐  No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes ☒  No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer ☐  Accelerated filer ☐ 
Non-accelerated filer ☒   Smaller reporting company ☒ 
    Emerging growth company ☒ 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐  No ☒

 

On June 29, 2019, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, the aggregate market value of the Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was $10,048,055, based upon the closing price on that date of the Common Stock of the registrant on the OTCQB of $0.205. For purposes of this response, the registrant has assumed that its directors, executive officers and beneficial owners of 10% or more of its Common Stock are deemed affiliates of the registrant.

 

As of March 30, 2020, there were 118,887,168 shares of the issuer’s common stock, par value $0.0001, issued and outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    PAGE
PART I    
Item 1. BUSINESS 1
Item 1A. RISK FACTORS 11
Item 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS 22
Item 2. PROPERTIES 23
Item 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 23
Item 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE 23
PART II    
Item 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES 24
Item 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA 26
Item 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 27
Item 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 37
Item 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA F-1
Item 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE 38
Item 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES 38
Item 9B. OTHER INFORMATION 38
PART III    
Item 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE 39
Item 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION 41
Item 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS 43
Item 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE 44
Item 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES 45
PART IV    
Item 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES 46
SIGNATURES   48

 

i

 

 

PART I.

 

Item 1. Business

 

Overview

 

HealthLynked Corp. is a growth stage company incorporated in the state of Nevada on August 6, 2014. We currently operate in two distinct divisions: Health Services and Digital Healthcare. Our Health Services division is comprised of the operations of (i) Naples Women’s Center (“NWC”), a multi-specialty medical group including OB/GYN (both Obstetrics and Gynecology), and General Practice, and (ii) Naples Center for Functional Medicine (“NCFM”), a Functional Medical Practice acquired in April 2019 that is engaged in improving the health of its patients through individualized and integrative health care. Our Digital Healthcare division develops and plans to operate an online personal medical information and record archive system, the “HealthLynked Network,” which will enable patients and doctors to keep track of medical information via the Internet in a cloud-based system.

 

Recent Developments

 

On February 27, 2020, we released our COVID-19 tracker application for IOS mobile devices. We released our Android version on March 5, 2020. The application allows users to report how they are feeling and if they are having any symptoms consistent with the COVID-19 infection. In addition, the application includes a detailed global map tracking the virus, the latest twitter feeds, and a real-time chat for users to engage with people from around the world to share information. As of March 24, 2020, the application was the number one downloaded medical app in the Apple Store.

 

On February 5, 2020, we entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger to acquire Cura Health Management LLC (“CHM”) and its subsidiary ACO Health Partners, LLC (“AHP”). CHM is a healthcare enablement company that empowers local providers to own and operate in a franchise-like model that extends their reach and capabilities to maximize revenue, deliver quality care and improve patient outcomes. CHM’s resources and solutions are administered as an extension of providers’ current in-practice resources, expanding care coordination, care management services and value-based analytics. These solutions support financial success within both traditional payment models and expansion to new services, allowing partners to succeed within current and ever emerging value-based payment models.

 

AHP is an Accountable Care Organization (“ACO”) with providers around the U.S. participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program. AHP was formed to benefit the patients (Medicare Fee-for-Service Beneficiaries), providers and the communities it serves. AHP is built on a model of coordinated care to ensure that patients, especially the chronically ill and the elderly, receive the right care at the right time, avoiding unnecessary duplication of services and prevention of medical errors. Following completion of the acquisition, the business of CHM and AHP will constitute a new ACO division.

 

Health Services Division

 

In August 2014, we acquired NWC, an OB/GYN practice in Naples, Florida that was established in 1996. NWC provides Obstetrical and Gynecological medical services to patients in the Southwest Florida region. NWC currently employs three OB/GYN physicians and two ARNP nurse practitioners. The services offered include obstetrical services for high and low risk patients, in office ultrasonography, and prenatal testing. Gynecological services include general physical exams, surgical procedures such as hysterectomy, bladder incontinence procedures, pelvic reconstruction, sterilization, endometrial ablation, advanced robotic surgery, contraceptive management and infertility testing and treatment.

 

1

 

 

On April 12, 2019 we acquired a 100% interest in Hughes Center for Functional Medicine (“HCFM”), a medical practice engaged in improving the health of its patients through individualized and integrative health care. HCFM, which was rebranded as NCFM upon acquisition, is a leader in functional medicine focusing on neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Multiple Sclerosis. HCFM provides cutting-edge treatments to improve health and slow aging, including hormones, thyroid, weight loss, wellness and prevention. HCFM’s income streams are derived from patient office visits, a dedicated IV room, hyperbaric oxygen chambers, ozone, UVlrx, DNA sequence testing and the sale of supplements.

 

In January 2020, we launched a new physical therapy practice in Bonita Springs, Florida called Bridging the Gap Physical Therapy (“BTG”). BTG employs two doctors who provide hands-on functional manual therapy techniques to speed patients’ recovery and manage pain without pain medication or surgery.

 

Digital HealthCare Division

 

We operate a cloud-based Patient Information Network (PIN) and record archiving system, referred to as the “HealthLynked Network”, which enables patients and doctors to keep track of medical information via the Internet in a cloud-based system. Through our website, www.HealthLynked.com and our mobile apps, patients can complete a detailed online personal medical history including past surgical history, medications, allergies, and family medical history. Once this information is entered, patients and their treating physicians are able to update the information as needed, to provide a comprehensive and up to date medical history.

 

We believe that the HealthLynked Network offers several advantages to patients and physicians not available in the market today. We provide a comprehensive marketing solution allowing physicians to market to both active and inactive patients, and an easy to use connection at the point of care through our patient access HUB. Patient members can access medical newsfeeds and groups. Our real-time appointment scheduling application allows for patients to book appointments online with participating healthcare providers. Our database and record archives allow for seamless sharing of medical records between healthcare providers and keeps patients in control of shared access. In the HealthLynked Network, parents can create accounts for their children that are linked to their family account, allowing them to provide access to healthcare providers, track vaccination records, allow hospitals and schools access to important medical information in case of emergencies. The HealthLynked Network is accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, via the internet and on mobile applications for both Android and iOS devices. We believe this type of accessibility is important for schools and during office visits, but more important, in times of a medical emergency.

 

We anticipate that our system will also provide for 24-hour access to medical specialist healthcare providers who can answer medical questions and direct appropriate care to paying members. In addition to 24-hour access, patients may also schedule telemedicine consultations at set times with participating healthcare providers who have expertise in various specialized areas of medicine. Participating physicians can elect to allow patients to request online appointments either via our real-time app or by setting, in their administrator dashboard panel, times and days of the week that patients may request appointments. Appointment requests are then sent by our system to an email address specified by the physician’s office, who are then requested to follow up to confirm these appointment requests or automatically accept the appointment request.

 

HealthLynked has created 880,000 physician base profiles for most physicians in the United States, which are searchable on the Internet. Physicians can claim their profiles confirming the accuracy of the information free of charge.

 

There are three type of providers in the HealthLynked Network: in-network, out of network and participating providers. All physicians can claim their profile and update basic information online and add videos and images of their profile. Once a provider has claimed their profile they are considered in-network. Providers that opt pay a monthly fee for access to the full range of HealthLynked Network services, which include online scheduling, marketing services and analytics about their practice performance.

 

HealthLynked provider profiles enable participating providers to market directly to patients through our patient access HUB and online marketing services to recruit new patients and reengage with former patients. Physician practices generate more income the more patients they treat, so maximizing efficiency and patient turnover is critical to increasing total revenues and profitability. As such, we believe that our system will enable physicians to reduce the amount of time required to process patient intake forms, as patients will no longer be required to spend ten to thirty minutes filling out forms at each visit, and the practices’ staffs will not need to input this information multiple times into their electronic medical records systems. Patients complete their online profiles once, and thereafter, they and their physicians are able to update their profiles as needed. Physicians’ participating in the HealthLynked Network are required to update the patient records within 24 hours of seeing the patient. The information is organized in an easy to read format in order that a physician be able to review the necessary information quickly during, and prior to, patient visits, which in turn facilitates a more comprehensive and effective patient encounter.

 

Patient data is stored in conformity with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, and the regulations promulgated under each by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Civil Rights (collectively, “HIPAA”). The network utilizes Amazon AWS infrastructure which uses Amazon HIPPA complaint servers along with Amazon RDS with LAMP, HTML5 and several JavaScript frameworks, including Angular and React. Recommendations for end users are 512 kbps+ internet connection speed and a web browser such as Google Chrome, Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Safari or handheld devices such as iOS devices, android phones or tablets. Our developers utilize third party controls for functionality and user interface where the use of those controls adds value to the system beyond custom creation of new tools. We intend to adjust forward compatibility for major browser version updates, new browsers, operating system updates or new operating system as needed. The HealthLynked Network is EMR agnostic, and is compatible with all electronic medical records systems, allowing for minimal barriers to participation and broader penetration of the market.

 

In addition, on February 27, 2020, we released our COVID-19 tracker application for IOS mobile devices. We released our Android version on March 5, 2020. The application allows users to report how they are feeling and if they are having any symptoms consistent with the COVID-19 infection. In addition, the application includes a detailed global map tracking the virus, the latest twitter feeds, and a real-time chat for users to engage with people from around the world to share information. As of March 24, 2020, the application was the number one downloaded medical app in the Apple Store.

2

 

 

The HealthLynked Network- How It Works

 

Our system walks patients through a series of easy to use pages with point and click selections and drop-down menus that allow them to enter their past medical history, past surgical history, allergies, medications, and family medical history. In addition, members can create accounts for children under the age of 18 and keep track of required visits and vaccines. Members select physicians, schools, hospitals and other parties to whom they wish to grant access to their records. This access can be either ongoing, or restricted by time and date, in accordance with the patient’s control settings.

 

Physicians are required to have a claimed active account in order to access patients’ online records and receive referrals for new patients. Once a patient has granted their physician access to their medical charts, office intake paperwork can be downloaded by the physician without the need for the patient to fill out lengthy and repetitive paperwork. Upon completion of the office visit, providers are required to upload the medical record into the online patients’ file within 24 hours via eFax, APIs with select EMRs or through the HealthLynked Portal. Each patient’s account has a unique bar code that when faxed into our system is recognized for that patient, and archived in the patient’s chart, by date and provider. The HealthLynked Network is independent of any EMR system and physicians only require a fax machine or computer to participate, allowing for minimal barriers to participation and broader penetration of the market.

 

In addition to serving as a complete medical record archive, we believe that the HealthLynked Network allows for shorter wait times at doctors’ offices by giving doctors immediate access to patients’ complete medical information, insurance information and required treatment consent forms. Patients only need to verify their treating physician’s access to their files upon or prior to their next doctor’s visit. Patients are also able to coordinate multiple physician visits and keep an updated and complete personal medical record archive. These files may also be shared among a patient’s different specialty physicians, a function that we believe is especially helpful for patients who travel and may need to access their records or obtain physician referrals in multiple localities. We also believe that the HealthLynked Network is especially useful in medical emergencies when patients are unable to provide a medical history on their own because our system allows patients the option to grant healthcare providers, in advance, special access in emergency situations. 

 

The HealthLynked Network also provides an online scheduling function for patients to book appointments with participating providers. Healthcare provider profiles feature physicians’ biographies, office locations, hours and available appointment times. In addition, the platform will provide patients with a list of recommended health screenings tailored to each patient’s unique medical history and demographics. Recommended screenings could include, but is not limited to, annual mammograms for women over the age of 40, colonoscopy every 10 years after the age of 50, recommended pap smear screenings, routine blood tests, and prostate exams. This base service will be free for patients. However, we plan to charge additional fees for real-time schedule booking, access to telemedicine service and access to a 24-hour nurse’s hotline and to charge physicians for upgraded physician profiles and SEO marketing.

 

Benefits for Multiple Constituencies

 

We believe that the HealthLynked Network provides numerous benefits for patients and their relatives, medical providers, hospitals, emergency rooms and schools.

 

Benefits for patients:

 

  Base service, which includes all of the below benefits other than telemedicine and the nurse hotline, will be free
     
  Easy online scheduling of appointments
     
  Real-time booking for appointments available within 4 hours
     
  Keep track of co-pays and deductibles on insurance plans
     
  More accurate and detailed personal medical history
     
  Complete medication lists with dosing and warnings of potential drug interactions
     
  Ability to create accounts for children, and track recommended health screenings and vaccines
     
  When traveling, patients will have the ability to access their medical records online 24 hours a day, 7 days a week even in the case of an emergency
     
  Shortened wait times at physicians’ offices by reducing the need to fill out redundant paperwork
     
  Access to a referral network of physicians across the United States who participate in the HealthLynked Network
     
  Patients can access family members’ records in the event of illness or accident
     
  Access to telemedicine for medical consultations and appointments for fee paying members
     
  24-hour nurse hotline available for fee paying members

 

3

 

 

Benefits for physicians and providers:

 

  More accurate patient medical history including past medical records
     
  “EMR Agnostic” and compatible with all electronic medical records systems
     
  A detailed and accurate medications list from patients
     
  Shortened time for patients to complete necessary paperwork translating into improved efficiency, shorter wait times, greater patient satisfaction and higher revenues
     
  Online marketing profiles
     
  Comprehensive Marketing to active and inactive patients
     
  SEO and marketing options
     
  Co-pay and deductible information on patients’ insurance plans will be readily available
     
  Additional revenue stream from signing up new patients
     
  Online and real-time patient scheduling to control gaps in scheduling due to last minute cancelations by existing patients
     
  Low membership fees of $300 - $400 per month per provider during the first year
     
  Patient Access Hub “PAH” (provisional patent pending) is provided to physician offices free of charge to provide free Wi-Fi for their patients. Patient analytics are provided to physician members.

 

Benefits for hospitals and emergency rooms:

 

  Information on patients who present that are not conscious to provide a complete medical history
     
  Information on traveling patients who present to a hospital in an emergency situation
     
  Online access to patient information 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
     
  “EMR Agnostic” and compatible with all electronic medical records systems
     
  No new equipment required

 

Benefits for schools:

 

  Access by authorized school officials to students’ medical histories
     
  Linked access to students’ primary care physicians
     
  Access to vaccination records
     
  Allergy and medication tracking
     
  Emergency contact information of family members

 

Benefits for parents:

 

  Complete children profiles
     
  Access given to schools in case of medical emergences
     
  List of allergies available to those granted access
     
  Vaccine records available to those granted access
     
  Recommended health screenings
     
  Journal for health log and milestones through news feeds and groups

 

4

 

 

Business Model

 

Our business model is focused on market penetration and recruiting physicians and patients to use our system for archiving patient medical records, comprehensive marketing to active and inactive patients, a way to connect on a regular basis utilizing news feeds and groups, accessing new patients, and for on-line “real-time” scheduling physician appointments.

 

We currently charge physicians $300 - $400 per month to participate in the network. Physicians upload their patients into a secure patient portal to market to their active and inactive patients. They initially send to all their patients an email inviting them to claim their HLYK profile free of charge, update their profiles and bring it with them to their next visit to the physician’s office.

 

We also anticipate charging certain healthcare facilities either an annual or monthly fee that will vary per facility based upon number of professionals per facility. Currently, it is anticipated that hospitals and emergency rooms would be charged a higher fee for our services once our patient network has been expanded.

 

The base services of our network are free for patients, and they may also upgrade their service should they wish to receive telemedicine services and access to a 24-hour nurse hotline.

 

Pursuant to our business strategy, we began deployment of the HealthLynked Network by registering NWC’s approximately 6,000 active patients and 6,500 inactive patients. We intend to further populate the HealthLynked Network with patients from the healthcare providers serviced by CHM and AHP. While we expect to generate minimal revenues from physician fees related to such deployment in 2020, we anticipate that establishing the patient database will be a valuable marketing tool for telesales to physician practices.

 

Sales Strategy

 

During the fourth quarter of 2018, the Company developed a more efficient strategy regarding the marketing of the HealthLynked Network utilizing its patient access hub technology:

 

  Eliminated the direct sales force, reducing our burn rate by approximately $50,000 per month

 

  Adopted a more efficient telesales model for bringing on physicians “in network” to the HealthLynked Network, including the following:

 

  o Starting with physicians claiming their existing base profiles, confirming accuracy, and opting to be an “in network” provider free of charge
     
  o Providing Patient Access Hub (“PAH”) offering Wi-Fi to the practice patients free of charge
     
  o Providing patient analytics off the PAH to provider members
     
  o SEO/SEM campaigns direct to physician practices
     
  o Participation in healthcare events that offer CME credits to physicians is another excellent vehicle that we are using to introduce HLYK and our network to physicians. We anticipate one event per quarter as part of our marketing plan.
     
  o Focusing on comprehensive marketing to physicians active and inactive patients to improve retention and significantly increase practice revenue
     
  o Physicians upload patients in secured HLYK portal and send email for patients to claim their HLYK profile and update it to bring into the office for their next visit.
     
  o Use of HealthLynked Network for on-line appointment scheduling for patients

 

  Direct to patient marketing, including SEO/SEM campaigns direct to patients

 

  Affiliated marketing campaigns

 

  Co-marketing with MedOfficeDirect (a virtual distributor of medical supplies to the general public and to physicians’ offices that is affiliated with our management team)

 

5

 

 

After 1.5 years of direct sales efforts, in 2018, we decided to eliminate the entire direct sales force after developing a more efficient and effective strategy for onboarding new in-network providers which eliminated an estimated $650,000 of annual cost. During 2019, we deployed our Patient Access Hub ‘PAH” (provisional patent pending) providing free Wi-Fi to the practice patients at no cost to our in-network physicians. Physician members will receive patient analytics from the PAH and we anticipate by the end of 2020 we will be attracting 1,000 physicians and 300,000 patients per quarter utilizing the patient access hub.

 

PAH analytics will include information such as most popular days, most popular times of day, patient wait times per physician, patient mix, and social media footprint, to name a few.

 

Healthcare events that offer continuing medical education (“CME”) credits to Physicians have proven to be an excellent target market for our services and we plan to continue with this strategy of at least one event per quarter going forward.

 

Our projected rapid growth over the next five years is due in large part to our roll out and utilization of the Patient Access Hub in medical practices.

 

Our marketing efforts towards physicians will emphasize how our systems can provide patient analytics, increase practice revenues, improve office efficiencies, and improve the accuracy of recorded patients’ medical histories.

 

Once a physician agrees to become a paying member, they will put all their patients in a secured portal in the cloud, and email them to claim their profile, update it and bring it in for their next office visit. As mentioned above, access to the HealthLynked Network is free for patients. The physicians then market to their active and inactive patients.

 

In combination with our telesales efforts described above, we intend to also utilize internet based search engine marketing an optimization (SEM/SEO) to increase our presence in certain targeted geographical areas. These campaigns will be focused on both physicians and patients. We believe that direct to consumer marketing through email campaigns will be an effective way to build interest and drive patient and physician demand for our services. We anticipate that we will be able to foster faster market penetration and increase demand for our services by marketing to “both sides”, the consumer and the practitioner once the telesales model is solidified.

 

Our campaigns will direct patients to look for physicians in the HealthLynked Network to ensure that they maintain the accuracy and completeness of their medical records. Our system will further allow patients to search for “in-network” physician providers and schedule online “real-time” appointments via our system. We believe that physicians in the HealthLynked Network will see an increase in new patients as a result of their participation and as more patients claim their profiles from the use of the PAH and the physicians’ initial emails to patients, the value to physicians of joining our network will increase from not only existing patient marketing, but also for acquisition of new patients in the HealthLynked Network.

 

We believe that affiliated marketing campaigns will be very helpful in attracting new users and increasing market awareness. We intend to partner with pharmaceutical companies, medical distributors, insurance companies; medical societies and others to cross market our products.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We have registered “HealthLynked” and our corporate logo as a service mark with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (the “USPTO”). We also filed a provisional patent application for the use of our Patient Access Hub filed on March 6, 2019 with the USPTO.

 

Research and Development

 

Our research and development efforts consist of building, developing, and enhancing the HealthLynked Network, including comprehensive marketing to active and inactive patients, the real time scheduling of appointments through our new mobile application, regular appointment scheduling, telemedicine appointment scheduling, sharing of secured documents between physicians and patients, and devise independent access mobile, tablet and web browser. Further, we are developing our systems to provide for secured date storage, drug interaction alerts, and the barcoding of documents for retrieval and storage.

 

Professional and General Liability Coverage

 

We maintain professional and general liability insurance policies with third-party insurers generally on a claims-made basis, subject to deductibles, policy aggregates, exclusions, and other restrictions, in accordance with standard industry practice. We believe that our insurance coverage is appropriate based upon our claims experience and the nature and risks of our business. However, no assurance can be given that any pending or future claim against us will not be successful or if successful will not exceed the limits of available insurance coverage. Our business entails an inherent risk of claims of medical malpractice against our affiliated physicians and us. We contract and pay premiums for professional liability insurance that indemnifies us and our affiliated healthcare professionals generally on a claims-made basis for losses incurred related to medical malpractice litigation. Professional liability coverage is required in order for our physicians to maintain hospital privileges.

 

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Employees

 

As of March 30, 2020, we had 37 employees. None of our employees are covered by a collective bargaining agreement. We consider our relationship with our employees to be excellent.

 

Competition

 

The markets for our products and services are highly competitive, and are characterized by rapidly evolving technology and product standards, as well as frequent introduction of new products and services. All of our competitors are more established, benefit from greater name recognition, and have substantially greater financial, technical, and marketing resources than we do.

 

Our principal existing competitors include, but are not limited to, ZocDoc, Inc., AthenaHealth Inc., All-scripts Healthcare Solutions, Inc., Cerner Corporation, Epic Systems Corporation, Teledoc Health Inc. and Veritone Inc. In addition, we expect that major software information systems companies, large information technology consulting service providers, start-up companies, managed care companies and others specializing in the health care industry may offer competitive products and services. 

 

We believe that we differ from our competitors in that we are not practice management software or an EMR provider. Companies like AthenaHealth Inc., Allscripts Healthcare Solutions, Inc., Cerner and Epic Systems Corporation offer software solutions to operate and manage a medical practice. Functions of these systems include patient billing, monitoring patient account balances and payments, tracking of appointments and creating encounter visits for each patient seen. HealthLynked works in conjunction with these practice management software systems and does not seek to replace them. Patients’ medical encounters created by these systems are uploaded to the patient’s profile in the HealthLynked Network. The HealthLynked Network can incorporate any physical or digital documents into a patient’s medical record history and thus allow it to be utilized across all healthcare platforms. HealthLynked provides an online appointment scheduling application that is similar to ZocDoc, Inc.’s offering, but in addition offers telemedicine appointments through our own patient interface. 

 

The advantage of having a healthcare network independent of any one practice management or EMR software allows the HealthLynked system to be fully utilized across the entire medical community. Integration and participation by both patients and healthcare providers in a unified platform offers significant advantages in the quality and nature of healthcare delivery in the future. To our knowledge a unified healthcare network like HealthLynked currently does not exist in the market.

 

Amazon, Google, and Apple have also announced their intention to enter into the digital healthcare space, including in the area of patient health records.

 

Government Regulation

 

The healthcare industry is governed by a framework of federal and state laws, rules and regulations that are extensive and complex and for which, in many cases, the industry has the benefit of only limited judicial and regulatory interpretation. If we are found to have violated these laws, rules, or regulations, our business, financial condition, and results of operations could be materially adversely affected. Moreover, healthcare reform continues to attract significant legislative interest, regulatory activity, new approaches, legal challenges, and public attention that create uncertainty and the potential for additional changes. Healthcare reform implementation, additional legislation or regulations, and other changes in government policy or regulation may affect our reimbursement, restrict our existing operations, limit the expansion of our business, or impose additional compliance requirements and costs, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and the trading price of our common stock. 

 

Healthcare Reform

 

Health care laws and regulations are rapidly evolving and may change significantly in the future, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. In March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the accompanying Health Care and Education Affordability Reconciliation Act, collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), were enacted. The ACA includes a variety of health care reform provisions and requirements, which became effective at varying times since its enactment and substantially changed the way health care is financed by both governmental and private insurers.

 

In January 2017, President Donald Trump issued an executive order titled “Minimizing the Economic Burden of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Pending Repeal.” The order directed agencies with authorities and responsibilities under the ACA to waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay the implementation of any provision of the ACA that would impose a fiscal or regulatory burden on states, individuals, health care providers, health insurers, or manufacturers of pharmaceuticals or medical devices. In October 2017, President Trump issued a second executive order relating to the ACA titled “Promoting Healthcare Choice and Competition Across the United States,” which further directs federal agencies to modify how the ACA is implemented, and soon after announced the termination of the cost-sharing subsidies that reimburse insurers under the ACA. To date, Congressional efforts to completely repeal and replace the ACA have been unsuccessful. However, the individual mandate for health insurance coverage under the ACA was repealed by Congress as part of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that was signed into law on December 22, 2017.

 

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Other proposed changes and reforms to the ACA have included, or may include the following: prohibiting the federal government from operating health insurance marketplaces; eliminating the advanced premium tax credits, and cost sharing reductions for low income individuals who purchase their health insurance through the marketplaces; expanding and encouraging the use of private health savings accounts; providing for insurance plans that offer fewer and less extensive health insurance benefits than under the ACA’s essential health benefits package, including broader use of catastrophic coverage plans, or short-term health insurance; establishing and funding high risk pools or reinsurance programs for individuals with chronic or high cost conditions; and allowing insurers to sell insurance across state lines.

 

Because of the continued uncertainty about the implementation of the ACA, including the timing of and potential for legal challenges, repeal or amendment of that legislation and future of the health insurance exchanges, we cannot quantify or predict with any certainty the likely impact of the ACA on our business, financial condition, operating results and prospects.

 

Licensing and Certification 

 

Our clinical personnel are subject to numerous federal, state, and local licensing laws and regulations, relating to, among other things, professional credentialing and professional ethics. Penalties for non-compliance with these laws and standards include loss of professional license, civil or criminal fines and penalties, and exclusion from participation in various governmental and other third-party healthcare programs. Our clinical professionals are also subject to state and federal regulation regarding prescribing medication and controlled substances. Every physician who administers, prescribes, or dispenses any controlled substance must be registered with the Drug Enforcement Administration (“DEA”). Additionally, our clinical personnel are required to meet applicable Medicaid and Medicare provider requirements, as set forth under state and federal laws, rules, and regulations. Further, our facilities are also subject to federal, state, and local licensing regulations: we may have to obtain regulatory approval, including certificates of need, before establishing certain types of healthcare facilities, offering certain services, or expending amounts in excess of statutory thresholds for healthcare equipment, facilities or programs. Our ability to operate profitably will depend, in part, upon our ability and the ability of our clinicians and facilities to obtain and maintain all necessary licenses, certifications, accreditations, and other approvals.

 

Fraud and Abuse Provisions 

 

Existing federal laws, as well as similar state laws, relating to government-sponsored or funded healthcare programs, or “GHC Programs,” impose a variety of fraud and abuse prohibitions on healthcare companies like us. These laws are interpreted broadly and enforced aggressively by multiple government agencies, including the Office of Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Justice (the “DOJ”) and various state agencies. In addition, in the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, Congress established a Medicaid Integrity Program to enhance federal and state efforts to detect Medicaid fraud, waste, and abuse and provide financial incentives for states to enact their own false claims legislation as an additional enforcement tool against Medicaid fraud and abuse. Since then, a growing number of states have enacted or expanded healthcare fraud and abuse laws. 

 

The fraud and abuse provisions include extensive federal and state laws, rules and regulations applicable to us, particularly on the services offered through NWC. In particular, the federal anti-kickback statute has criminal provisions relating to the offer, payment, solicitation or receipt of any remuneration in return for either referring Medicaid, Medicare or other GHC Program business, or purchasing, leasing, ordering, or arranging for or recommending any service or item for which payment may be made by GHC Programs. In addition, the federal physician self-referral law, commonly known as the “Stark Law,” applies to physician ordering of certain designated health services reimbursable by Medicare from an entity with which the physician has a prohibited financial relationship. These laws are broadly worded and have been broadly interpreted by federal courts, and potentially subject many healthcare business arrangements to government investigation and prosecution, which can be costly and time consuming. Violations of these laws are punishable by substantial penalties, including monetary fines, civil penalties, administrative remedies, criminal sanctions (in the case of the anti-kickback statute), exclusion from participation in GHC Programs and forfeiture of amounts collected in violation of such laws, any of which could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.  

 

There are a variety of other types of federal and state fraud and abuse laws, including laws authorizing the imposition of criminal, civil and administrative penalties for filing false or fraudulent claims for reimbursement with government healthcare programs. These laws include the civil False Claims Act (“FCA”), which prohibits the submission of, or causing to be submitted, false claims to GHC Programs, including Medicaid, Medicare, TRICARE (the program for military dependents and retirees), the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program, and insurance plans purchased through ACA exchanges. Substantial civil fines and multiple damages, along with other remedies, can be imposed for violating the FCA. Furthermore, proving a violation of the FCA requires only that the government show that the individual or company that submitted or caused to be submitted an allegedly false claim acted in “reckless disregard” or in “deliberate ignorance” of the truth or falsity of the claim or with “willful disregard,” notwithstanding that there may have been no specific intent to defraud the government program and no actual knowledge that the claim was false (which typically are required to be shown to sustain a criminal conviction). The FCA also applies to the improper retention of known overpayments and includes “whistleblower” provisions that permit private citizens to sue a claimant on behalf of the government and thereby share in the amounts recovered under the law and to receive additional remedies. In recent years, many cases have been brought against healthcare companies by such “whistleblowers,” which have resulted in judgments or, more often, settlements involving substantial payments to the government by the companies involved. It is anticipated that the number of such actions against healthcare companies will continue to increase with the enactment or enhancement of a growing number of state false claims acts, certain amendments to the FCA and enhanced government enforcement.

 

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Further, HIPAA established a national Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program under the joint direction of the Attorney General and the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), acting through the Inspector General, designed to coordinate federal, state, and local law enforcement activities with respect to health care fraud and abuse. Under HIPAA, a healthcare benefit program includes any private plan or contract affecting interstate commerce under which any medical benefit, item, or service is provided. A person or entity that knowingly and willfully obtains the money or property of any healthcare benefit program by means of false or fraudulent representations in connection with the delivery of healthcare services is subject to a fine or imprisonment, or both. In addition, HIPAA authorizes the imposition of civil money penalties against entities that employ or enter into contracts with excluded Medicare or Medicaid program participants if such entities provide services to federal health program beneficiaries.

 

In addition, federal and state agencies that administer healthcare programs have at their disposal statutes, commonly known as “civil money penalty laws,” that authorize substantial administrative fines and exclusion from government programs in cases where an individual or company that filed a false claim, or caused a false claim to be filed, knew or should have known that the claim was false or fraudulent. As under the FCA, it often is not necessary for the agency to show that the claimant had actual knowledge that the claim was false or fraudulent in order to impose these penalties.

 

The civil and administrative false claims statutes are being applied in an increasingly broader range of circumstances. For example, government authorities have asserted that claiming reimbursement for services that fail to meet applicable quality standards may, under certain circumstances, violate these statutes. Government authorities also often take the position, now with support in the FCA, that claims for services that were induced by kickbacks, Stark Law violations or other illicit marketing schemes are fraudulent and, therefore, violate the false claims statutes. Many of the laws and regulations referenced above can be used in conjunction with each other.

 

If we were excluded from participation in any government-sponsored healthcare programs, not only would we be prohibited from submitting claims for reimbursement under such programs, but we also would be unable to contract with other healthcare providers, such as hospitals, to provide services to them. It could also adversely affect our ability to contract with, or to obtain payment from, non-governmental payors.

 

Although we intend to conduct our business in compliance with all applicable federal and state fraud and abuse laws, many of the laws, rules and regulations applicable to us, including those relating to billing and those relating to financial relationships with physicians and hospitals, are broadly worded and may be interpreted or applied by prosecutorial, regulatory or judicial authorities in ways that we cannot predict. Accordingly, we cannot assure you that our arrangements or business practices will not be subject to government scrutiny or be alleged or found to violate applicable fraud and abuse laws. Moreover, the standards of business conduct expected of healthcare companies under these laws and regulations have become more stringent in recent years, even in instances where there has been no change in statutory or regulatory language. If there is a determination by government authorities that we have not complied with any of these laws, rules and regulations, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially, adversely affected.

 

Government Reimbursement Requirements

 

In order to participate in the various state Medicaid programs and in the Medicare program, we must comply with stringent and often complex enrollment and reimbursement requirements. Moreover, different states impose differing standards for their Medicaid programs. While we believe that we adhere to the laws, rules and regulations applicable to the government programs in which we participate, any failure to comply with these laws, rules and regulations could negatively affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

In addition, GHC Programs are subject to statutory and regulatory changes, administrative rulings, interpretations and determinations, requirements for utilization review and new governmental funding restrictions, all of which may materially increase or decrease program payments, as well as affect the cost of providing services and the timing of payments to providers. Moreover, because these programs generally provide for reimbursement on a fee-schedule basis rather than on a charge-related basis, we generally cannot increase our revenue by increasing the amount we charge for our services. To the extent our costs increase, we may not be able to recover our increased costs from these programs, and cost containment measures and market changes in non-governmental insurance plans have generally restricted our ability to recover, or shift to non-governmental payors, these increased costs. In attempts to limit federal and state spending, there have been, and we expect that there will continue to be, a number of proposals to limit or reduce Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement for various services. Our business may be significantly and adversely affected by any such changes in reimbursement policies and other legislative initiatives aimed at reducing healthcare costs associated with Medicaid, Medicare and other government healthcare programs.

 

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Our business also could be adversely affected by reductions in or limitations of reimbursement amounts or rates under these government programs, reductions in funding of these programs or elimination of coverage for certain individuals or treatments under these programs.

 

HIPAA and Other Privacy Laws

 

Numerous federal and state laws, rules, and regulations govern the collection, dissemination, use, and confidentiality of protected health information, including HIPAA, and its implementing regulations, violations of which are punishable by monetary fines, civil penalties and, in some cases, criminal sanctions. As part of the HealthLynked Network and our medical record keeping, third-party billing and other services, we collect and maintain protected health information on the patients that we serve.

 

Pursuant to HIPAA, the HHS has adopted standards to protect the privacy and security of individually identifiable health information, known as the Privacy Standards and Security Standards. HHS’ Privacy Standards apply to medical records and other individually identifiable health information in any form, whether electronic, paper or oral, that is used or disclosed by healthcare providers, hospitals, health plans and healthcare clearinghouses, which are known as “covered entities.” HHS’ Security Standards require healthcare providers to implement administrative, physical and technical safeguards to protect the integrity, confidentiality and availability of individually identifiable health information that is electronically received, maintained or transmitted (including between us and our affiliated practices). Further, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 (“HITECH”) strengthened and expanded HIPAA, increased penalties for violations, gave patients new rights to restrict uses and disclosures of their health information, and imposed a number of privacy and security requirements directly on business associates that perform functions or services on behalf of covered entities. Specifically, HITECH requires that covered entities report any unauthorized use or disclosure of protected health information that meets the definition of a “breach” to the affected individuals, HHS, and, depending on the number of affected individuals, the media for the affected market. In addition, HITECH requires that business associates report breaches to their covered entity customers. HITECH also authorizes state Attorneys General to bring civil actions in response to violations of HIPAA that threaten the privacy of state residents. Final regulations implementing the HITECH requirements were issued in January 2013.

 

In addition to the federal HIPAA and HITECH requirements, numerous other state and certain other federal laws protect the confidentiality of patient information, including state medical privacy laws, state social security number protection laws, state genetic privacy laws, human subjects research laws and federal and state consumer protection laws.

 

Compliance Programs

 

Organizations that receive reimbursement from a federal or state government payor are expected by the federal government to have a compliance program. Specifically, compliance programs are integral to identifying and rectifying fraud and abuse risk areas, billing and coding violations, and educating employees about the law and other legal requirements or restrictions within the scope of their practice. We maintain a program to monitor compliance with federal and state laws and regulations applicable to healthcare entities. We believe that our compliance program meets the relevant standards provided by the Office of Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services.

 

Environmental Regulations

 

Our healthcare operations generate medical waste that must be disposed of in compliance with federal, state and local environmental laws, rules and regulations. Our office-based operations are subject to compliance with various other environmental laws, rules and regulations. Such compliance does not, and we anticipate that such compliance will not, materially affect our capital expenditures, financial position or results of operations.

 

Fair Debt Collection Practices Act

 

Some of our operations may be subject to compliance with certain provisions of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and comparable state laws. Under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, a third-party collection company is restricted in the methods it uses to contact consumer debtors and elicit payments with respect to placed accounts. Requirements under state collection agency statutes vary, with most requiring compliance similar to that required under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Florida’s Consumer Collection Practices Act is broader than the federal legislation, applying the regulations to “creditors” as well as “collectors,” whereas the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act is applicable only to collectors. This prohibits creditors who are attempting to collect their own debts from engaging in behavior prohibited by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and Consumer Collection Practices Act. The Consumer Collection Practices Act has very specific guidelines regarding which actions debt collectors and creditors may engage in to collect unpaid debt.

 

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Government Investigations

 

We expect that audits, inquiries and investigations from government authorities, agencies, contractors and payors will occur in the ordinary course of business. Such audits, inquiries and investigations and their ultimate resolutions, individually or in the aggregate, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and the trading price of our common stock.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

All statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, other than statements of historical facts, that address future activities, events or developments, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “PSLRA”), including, but not limited to, statements containing the word “believe,” “anticipate,” “expect” and word of similar import. These statements are based on certain assumptions and analyses made by the Company in light of its experience and assessment of historical trends, current conditions and expected future developments as well as other factors the Company believes are appropriate under the circumstances. Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from those projected. The Company cautions investors that any forward-looking statements made by the Company are not guarantees of future performance and that actual results may differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include, without limitation: established competitors who have substantially greater financial resources and operating histories, regulatory delays or denials, ability to compete as a start-up company in a highly competitive market, and access to sources of capital.

 

FINANCIAL AND GENERAL BUSINESS RISKS

  

Our business may be materially and adversely affected by the spread of the novel coronavirus COVID-19.

 

A novel strain of coronavirus, COVID-19, that was first identified in China in December 2019, has surfaced in several regions across the world and resulted in travel restrictions and business slowdowns or shutdowns in affected areas. The further spread of COVID-19, and the requirement to take action to limit the spread of the illness, may impact our ability to carry out our business as usual and may materially adversely impact global economic conditions, our business and financial condition, including our potential to conduct financings on terms acceptable to us, if at all. 

 

In addition, the outbreak of COVID-19 could disrupt our operations due to absenteeism by infected or ill members of management or other employees, or absenteeism by members of management and other employees who elect not to come to work due to the illness affecting others in our offices. COVID-19 could also impact members of our board of directors resulting in absenteeism from meetings of the directors or committees of directors and making it more difficult to convene the quorum of the full board of directors needed to conduct meetings for the management of our affairs. The extent to which COVID-19 may impact our business will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, such as the ultimate geographic spread of the disease, the duration of the outbreak, travel restrictions and social distancing in the United States and other countries, business closures or business disruptions and the effectiveness of actions taken in the United States and other countries to contain and treat the disease.

 

Our subsidiary the Naples Women’s Center has incurred losses in the past and may not be able to achieve profitability in the future.

 

Our subsidiary, NWC, was established in 1996, and is subject to many of the risks inherent in the practice of medicine. We cannot give any assurance that NWC’s operations will continue as currently intended and no assurance can be given that we can continue to receive reimbursement from third party payers. Further, changes in Healthcare regulations in the coming years may negatively impact our operations. NWC realized segment loss from operations for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018. During the second half of 2018, we had one physician who did not renew her contract, one leave due to an unexpected disability, and a third leave due to early retirement. In 2019, we replaced all three physicians and had one of the new physicians depart.

 

We may never be able to implement our proposed online personal medical information and archiving system and as such, an investment in us at this stage of our business is extremely risky.

 

The HealthLynked Network was launched in 2018 with positive early results. We have over 200 physicians “in network” and over 475,000 patients. We continually develop additional functionality of the Network. However, we cannot predict the scale of how many physicians and patients will adopt our technology, or even when they do, the timing of such large-scale adoption. Further, it is possible that other competitors with greater resources could enter the market and make it more difficult for us to attract or keep customers. Consequently, at this phase of our development, our future is speculative and depends on the proper execution of our business model, including our deployment of the Patient Access Hub.

 

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No assurance can be given that we will be able to timely repay the amounts due on convertible notes outstanding.

 

At the present time, no assurance can be given that we will earn sufficient revenues or secure the necessary financing, if needed, to timely pay the amounts owed under convertible notes outstanding. Certain of our convertible notes issued in 2016 and 2017 with an aggregate face value of $711,000 are secured by substantially all of our assets, including, but not limited to, receivables of NWC, machinery, equipment, contracts rights, and letters of credits. If we fail to timely repay the amounts owed under the these convertible notes, which mature on December 31, 2020, a default may allow the lender under the relevant instruments to accelerate the related debt and to exercise their remedies under these agreements, which will typically include the right to declare the principal amount of that debt, together with accrued and unpaid interest and other related amounts, immediately due and payable, to exercise any remedies the lender may have to foreclose on assets that are subject to liens securing that debt. As of December 31, 2019, we had convertible notes payable with an aggregate face value of $2,335,994 with maturities between April 11, 2020 and December 31, 2020. We expect to repay these obligations from outside funding sources, including but not limited to amounts available upon the exercise of the Put Right granted to us under the Investment Agreement, sales of our equity, loans from related parties and others, or to satisfy convertible notes payable through the issuance of shares upon conversion pursuant to the terms of the respective convertible notes payable. No assurances can be given that we will be able to access sufficient outside capital in a timely fashion in order to repay the convertible notes payable before they mature. In order to access cash available under the Investment Agreement or satisfy the convertible notes payable through the issuance of shares upon conversion, our common stock must be listed on a recognized stock exchange or market and the shares underlying the arrangement must be subject to an effective registration statement. If we are unable to meet these requirements, we will not have access to funds under this arrangement.

 

We have substantial future capital needs and our ability to continue as a going concern depends upon our ability to raise additional capital and achieve profitable operations.

 

We currently anticipate that our available cash resources will be sufficient to meet our presently anticipated working capital requirements through the third quarter of 2020. As of December 31, 2019, we had a working capital deficit of $4,906,041 and accumulated deficit $16,029,654. For the year ended December 31, 2019, we had a net loss of $5,528,599 and net cash used by operating activities of $2,362,851. We anticipate that we will need an additional $5,300,000 in 2020 to properly execute our business and acquisition plan and service debt maturing in 2020, of which most matures December 31, 2020. We may also need to raise additional funds in order to support more rapid expansion, develop new or enhanced services and products, make acquisitions, hire employees, respond to competitive pressures, acquire technologies or respond to unanticipated requirements. Management’s plans include attempting to improve our profitability and our ability to generate sufficient cash flow from operations to meet our operating needs on a timely basis, obtaining additional working capital funds through equity and debt financing arrangements, and restructuring on-going operations to eliminate inefficiencies to increase our cash balances. However, there can be no assurance that these plans and arrangements will be sufficient to fund our ongoing capital expenditures, working capital, and other requirements. Management intends to make every effort to identify and develop sources of funds. The outcome of these matters cannot be predicted at this time. There can be no assurance that any additional financings will be available to the Company on satisfactory terms and conditions, if at all. If adequate funds are not available on acceptable terms, we may be unable to develop or enhance our services and products, take advantage of future opportunities or respond to competitive pressures or unanticipated requirements, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results. Further, we may seek to raise additional funds through the issuance of equity securities, in which case, the percentage ownership of our shareholders will be reduced and holders may experience additional dilution in net book value per share.

 

Our future success depends on our ability to execute our business plan by fully developing our online medical records platform and recruiting physicians and patients to adopt and use the system. However, there is no guarantee that we will be able to successfully implement our business plan.

 

Our operations to date have been limited to the medical services provided by NWC. We have not yet demonstrated our ability to successfully develop or market the online medical records platform we seek to provide through the HealthLynked Network. We have not entered into any agreements with third party doctors or patients to use our system for their medical records and there is no assurance that we will be able to enter into such agreements in the future.

  

We may not be able to effectively control and manage our growth.

 

Our strategy envisions a period of potentially rapid growth in our physician network over the next five years based on aggressively increasing our marketing efforts. We currently maintain a small in-house programming, IT, administrative and sales personnel. The capacity to service the online medical records platform and our expected growth, including growth via acquisition, may impose a significant burden on our future planned administrative and operational resources. The growth of our business may require significant investments of capital and increased demands on our management, workforce and facilities. We will be required to substantially expand our administrative and operational resources and attract, train, manage and retain qualified employees, management and other personnel. Failure to do so, or to satisfy such increased demands would interrupt or have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

 

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The departure or loss of Dr. Michael Dent could disrupt our business.

 

During 2018 and 2019, we depended heavily on the continued efforts of Dr. Michael Dent, our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board. Dr. Dent is essential to our strategic vision and day-to-day operations and would be difficult to replace. While we have entered into a four-year written employment contract with Dr. Dent effective July 1, 2016, we cannot be certain that Dr. Dent will continue with us for any particular period of time. Dr. Dent also provided us with a total of $-0- and $101,450 in working capital during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The departure or loss of Dr. Dent, or the inability to hire and retain a qualified replacement, could negatively impact our ability to manage our business.

 

In 2018 eliminated our direct sales force and moved to a telesales model, which may not be successful.

 

We eliminated our entire sales force in the fourth quarter of 2018 and adopted a telesales model. Although this change reduced our annual burn rate by an estimated $650,000 annually, there is no assurance that our more cost-efficient telesales model will be effective, and this could have a negative effect on the business and its growth.

 

The healthcare industry is highly regulated, and government authorities may determine that we have failed to comply with applicable laws, rules, or regulations.

 

The healthcare industry, healthcare information technology, the online medical records platform services that we provide, and the physicians’ medical practices we engage in through NWC are subject to extensive and complex federal, state, and local laws, rules and regulations, compliance with which imposes substantial costs on us. Of particular importance are the provisions summarized as follows:

 

  federal laws (including the federal False Claims Act) that prohibit entities and individuals from knowingly or recklessly making claims to Medicaid, Medicare and other government-funded programs that contain false or fraudulent information or from improperly retaining known overpayments;
     
  a provision of the Social Security Act, commonly referred to as the “anti-kickback” statute, that prohibits the knowing and willful offer, payment, solicitation or receipt of any bribe, kickback, rebate or other remuneration, in cash or in kind, in return for the referral or recommendation of patients for items and services covered, in whole or in part, by federal healthcare programs, such as Medicaid and Medicare;
     
  a provision of the Social Security Act, commonly referred to as the Stark Law, that, subject to limited exceptions, applies when physicians refer Medicare patients to an entity for the provision of certain “designated health services” if the physician or a member of such physician’s immediate family has a direct or indirect financial relationship (including a compensation arrangement) with the entity;
     
  similar state law provisions pertaining to anti-kickback, fee splitting, self-referral and false claims issues, which typically are not limited to relationships involving government-funded programs;
     
  provisions of the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as amended (“HIPAA”) that prohibit knowingly and willfully executing a scheme or artifice to defraud a healthcare benefit program or falsifying, concealing or covering up a material fact or making any material false, fictitious or fraudulent statement in connection with the delivery of or payment for healthcare benefits, items or services;
     
  state laws that prohibit general business corporations from practicing medicine, controlling physicians’ medical decisions or engaging in certain practices, such as splitting fees with physicians;

 

  federal and state healthcare programs may deny our application to become a participating provider that could in turn cause us to not be able to treat those patients or prohibit us from billing for the treatment services provided to such patients;
     
  federal and state laws that prohibit providers from billing and receiving payment from Medicaid or Medicare for services unless the services are medically necessary, adequately and accurately documented and billed using codes that accurately reflect the type and level of services rendered;
     
  federal and state laws pertaining to the provision of services by non-physician practitioners, such as advanced nurse practitioners, physician assistants and other clinical professionals, physician supervision of such services and reimbursement requirements that may be dependent on the manner in which the services are provided and documented; and
     
  federal laws that impose civil administrative sanctions for, among other violations, inappropriate billing of services to federally funded healthcare programs, inappropriately reducing hospital care lengths of stay for such patients, or employing individuals who are excluded from participation in federally funded healthcare programs.

 

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In addition, we believe that our business, including the business conducted through our Health Services segment, will continue to be subject to increasing regulation, the scope and effect of which we cannot predict.

 

We may in the future become the subject of regulatory or other investigations or proceedings, and our interpretations of applicable laws, rules and regulations may be challenged. For example, regulatory authorities or other parties may assert that our arrangements with the physicians using the HealthLynked Network constitute fee splitting and seek to invalidate these arrangements, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and the trading price of our common stock. Regulatory authorities or other parties also could assert that our relationships violate the anti-kickback, fee splitting or self-referral laws and regulations. Such investigations, proceedings and challenges could result in substantial defense costs to us and a diversion of management’s time and attention. In addition, violations of these laws are punishable by monetary fines, civil and criminal penalties, exclusion from participation in government-sponsored healthcare programs, and forfeiture of amounts collected in violation of such laws and regulations, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our overall business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and the trading price of our common stock.

 

Furthermore, changes in these laws and regulations, or administrative and judicial interpretations thereof, may require us to change our business practices which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Because of the complex and far-reaching nature of these laws, there can be no assurance that we would not be required to alter one or more of our practices to be in compliance with these

 

Federal and state laws that protect the privacy and security of protected health information may increase our costs and limit our ability to collect and use that information and subject us to penalties if we are unable to fully comply with such laws.

 

Numerous federal and state laws and regulations govern the collection, dissemination, use, security and confidentiality of individually identifiable health information. These laws include:

 

  Provisions of HIPAA that limit how healthcare providers may use and disclose individually identifiable health information, provide certain rights to individuals with respect to that information and impose certain security requirements;
     
  The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (“HITECH”), which strengthens and expands the HIPAA Privacy Standards and Security Standards and imposes data breach notification obligations;
     
  Other federal and state laws restricting the use and protecting the privacy and security of protected health information, many of which are not preempted by HIPAA;
     
  Federal and state consumer protection laws; and
     
  Federal and state laws regulating the conduct of research with human subjects.

 

Through the HealthLynked Network, we collect and maintain protected health information in paper and electronic format. New protected health information standards, whether implemented pursuant to HIPAA, HITECH, congressional action or otherwise, could have a significant effect on the manner in which we handle healthcare-related data and communicate with third parties, and compliance with these standards could impose significant costs on us, or limit our ability to offer certain services, thereby negatively impacting the business opportunities available to us.

 

In addition, if we do not comply with existing or new laws and regulations related to protected health information, we could be subject to remedies that include monetary fines, civil or administrative penalties, civil damage awards or criminal sanctions.

 

RISKS RELATED TO THE HEALTHLYNKED NETWORK

 

The market for Internet-based personal medical information and record archiving systems may not develop substantially further or develop more slowly than we expect, harming the growth of our business.

 

It is uncertain whether personal medical information and record archiving systems will achieve and sustain the high levels of demand and market acceptance we anticipate. Further, even though we expect NWC patients and physicians to use the HealthLynked Network, our success will depend, to a substantial extent, on the willingness of unaffiliated patients, physicians and hospitals to use our services. Some patients, physicians and hospitals may be reluctant or unwilling to use our services, because they may have concerns regarding the risks associated with the security and reliability, among other things, of the technology model associated with these services. If our target users do not believe our systems are secure and reliable, then the market for these services may not expand as much or develop as quickly as we expect, either of which would significantly adversely affect our business, financial condition, or operating results.

 

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If we do not continue to innovate and provide services that are useful to our target users, we may not remain competitive, and our revenues and operating results could suffer.

 

Our success depends on our ability to keep pace with technological developments, satisfy increasingly sophisticated client requirements, and obtain market acceptance. Our competitors are constantly developing products and services that may become more efficient or appealing to our clients and users. As a result, we will be required to invest significant resources in research and development in order to enhance our existing services and introduce new high-quality services that clients and users will want, while offering these services at competitive prices.

 

If we are unable to predict user preferences or industry changes, or if we are unable to modify our services on a timely or cost-effective basis, we may lose clients and target users. Our operating results would also suffer if our innovations are not responsive to the needs of our clients and users, are not appropriately timed with market opportunity, or are not effectively brought to market. As technology continues to develop, our competitors may be able to offer results that are, or that are perceived to be, substantially similar to or better than those generated by our services. This may force us to compete on additional service attributes and to expend significant resources in order to remain competitive.

 

Failure to manage our rapid growth effectively could increase our expenses, decrease our revenue, and prevent us from implementing our business strategy.

 

To manage our anticipated future growth effectively, we will need to enhance our information technology infrastructure and financial and accounting systems and controls, as well as manage expanded operations in geographically distributed locations. We also must engage and retain a significant number of qualified professional services personnel, software engineers, technical personnel, and management personnel. Failure to manage our rapid growth effectively could lead us to over-invest or under-invest in technology and operations; result in weaknesses in our infrastructure, systems, or controls; give rise to operational mistakes, losses, or loss of productivity or business opportunities; reduce client or user satisfaction; limit our ability to respond to competitive pressures; and could also result in loss of employees and reduced productivity of remaining employees. Our growth could require significant capital expenditures and may divert financial resources and management attention from other projects, such as the development of new or enhanced services. If our management is unable to effectively manage our growth, our expenses may increase more than expected, our revenue could decline or may grow more slowly than expected, and we may be unable to implement our business strategy.

 

We may be unable to adequately protect, and we may incur significant costs in enforcing, our intellectual property and other proprietary rights.

 

Our success depends in part on our ability to enforce our intellectual property and other proprietary rights. We expect to rely upon a combination of copyright, trademark, trade secret, and unfair competition laws, as well as license and access agreements and other contractual provisions, to protect these rights.

 

Our attempts to protect our intellectual property through copyright, patent, and trademark registration may be challenged by others or invalidated through administrative process or litigation. While we have submitted the application for our first provisional patent for our Patient Access Hub and intend to submit other patent applications covering our integrated technology, the scope of issued patents, if any, may be insufficient to prevent competitors from providing products and services similar to ours, our patents may be successfully challenged, and we may not be able to obtain additional meaningful patent protection in the future. There can be no assurance that our patent registration efforts will be successful.

 

Our expected agreements with clients, users, vendors and strategic partners will limit their use of, and allow us to retain our rights in, our intellectual property and proprietary information. Further, we anticipate that these agreements will grant us ownership of intellectual property created in the performance of those agreements to the extent that it relates to the provision of our services. In addition, we require certain of our employees and consultants to enter into confidentiality, non-competition, and assignment of inventions agreements. We also require certain of our vendors and strategic partners to agree to contract provisions regarding confidentiality and non-competition. However, no assurance can be given that these agreements will not be breached, and we may not have adequate remedies for any such breach. Further, no assurance can be given that these agreements will be effective in preventing the unauthorized access to, or use of, our proprietary information or the reverse engineering of our technology. Agreement terms that address non-competition are difficult to enforce in many jurisdictions and may not be enforceable in any particular case. In any event, these agreements do not prevent our competitors from independently developing technology or authoring clinical information that is substantially equivalent or superior to our technology or the information we distribute.

 

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To the extent that our intellectual property and other proprietary rights are not adequately protected, third parties might gain access to our proprietary information, develop and market products or services similar to ours, or use trademarks similar to ours, each of which could materially harm our business. Existing U.S. federal and state intellectual property laws offer only limited protection. In addition, if we resort to legal proceedings to enforce our intellectual property rights or to determine the validity and scope of the intellectual property or other proprietary rights of others, the proceedings could be burdensome and expensive, even if we were to prevail. Any litigation that may be necessary in the future could result in substantial costs and diversion of resources and could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, or financial condition.

 

In addition, our platforms incorporate “open source” software components that are licensed to us under various public domain licenses. While we believe that we have complied with our obligations under the various applicable licenses for open source software that we use, open source license terms are often ambiguous, and there is little or no legal precedent governing the interpretation of many of the terms of certain of these licenses. Therefore, the potential impact of such terms on our business is somewhat unknown. For example, some open source licenses require that those using the associated code disclose modifications made to that code and such modifications be licensed to third parties at no cost. We monitor our use of open source software in an effort to avoid uses in a manner that would require us to disclose or grant licenses under our proprietary source code. However, there can be no assurance that such efforts will be successful, and such use could inadvertently occur.

 

We may be sued by third parties for alleged infringement of their proprietary rights.

 

The software and Internet industries are characterized by the existence of a large number of patents, trademarks, and copyrights and by frequent litigation based on allegations of infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights. We may receive in the future communications from third parties claiming that we, our technology, or components thereof, infringe on the intellectual property rights of others. We may not be able to withstand such third-party claims against our technology, and we could lose the right to use third-party technologies that are the subject of such claims. Any intellectual property claims, whether with or without merit, could be time-consuming and expensive to resolve, divert management attention from executing our business plan, and require us to pay monetary damages or enter into royalty or licensing agreements. Although we intend that many of our third-party service providers will be obligated to indemnify us if their products infringe the rights of others, such indemnification may not be effective or adequate to protect us or the indemnifying party may be unable to uphold its contractual obligations.

 

Moreover, any settlement or adverse judgment resulting from such a claim could require us to pay substantial amounts of money or obtain a license to continue to use the technology or information that is the subject of the claim, or otherwise restrict or prohibit our use of the technology or information. There can be no assurance that we would be able to obtain a license on commercially reasonable terms, if at all, from third parties asserting an infringement claim; that we would be able to develop alternative technology on a timely basis, if at all; that we would be able to obtain a license to use a suitable alternative technology or information to permit us to continue offering, and our clients to continue using, our affected services; or that we would not need to change our product and design plans, which could require us to redesign affected products or services or delay new offerings. Accordingly, an adverse determination could prevent us from implementing our strategy or offering our services and products, as currently contemplated.

 

We may not be able to properly safeguard the information on the HealthLynked Network.

 

Information security risks have generally increased in recent years because of new technologies and the increased activities of perpetrators of cyber-attacks resulting in the theft of protected health, business or financial information. A failure in, or a breach of our information systems as a result of cyber-attacks could disrupt our business, result in the release or misuse of confidential or proprietary information, damage our reputation, and increase our administrative expenses. Further, any such breaches could result in exposure to liability under U.S. federal and state laws and could adversely impact our business. Although we have robust information security procedures and other safeguards in place, as cyber threats continue to evolve, we may be required to expend additional resources to continue to enhance our information security measures or to investigate and remediate any information security vulnerabilities. Any of these disruptions or breaches of security could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Our employees may not take all appropriate measures to secure and protect confidential information in their possession.

 

Each of our employees is advised that they are responsible for the security of the information in our systems and to ensure that private information is kept confidential. Should an employee not follow appropriate security measures, including those that have been put in place to prevent cyber threats or attacks, the improper release of protected health information could result. The release of such information could have a material adverse effect our reputation and our business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.

 

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RISKS RELATED TO THE PROVISION OF MEDICAL SERVICES BY NWC

 

Any state budgetary constraints could have an adverse effect on our reimbursement from Medicaid programs.

 

As a result of slow economic growth and volatile economic conditions, many states are continuing to collect less revenue than they did in prior years and as a consequence are facing budget shortfalls and underfunded pension and other obligations. Although the shortfalls for the more recent budgetary years have declined, they are still significant by historical standards. The financial condition in Florida or other states in which we may in the future could lead to reduced or delayed funding for Medicaid programs and, in turn, reduced or delayed reimbursement for physician services, which could adversely affect our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

 

Healthcare reform may have a significant effect on our business.

 

The ACA contains a number of provisions that could affect us over the next several years. These provisions include the establishment of health insurance exchanges to facilitate the purchase of qualified health plans, and expansion of healthcare fraud and abuse laws. Further, under the ACA, payment modifiers are being developed that will differentiate payments to physicians under federal healthcare programs based on quality and cost of care. In addition, other provisions authorize voluntary demonstration projects relating to the bundling of payments for episodes of hospital care and the sharing of cost savings achieved under the Medicare program.

 

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) issued a final rule under the ACA that is intended to allow physicians, hospitals and other health care providers to coordinate care for Medicare beneficiaries through Accountable Care Organizations (“ACOs”). ACOs are entities consisting of healthcare providers and suppliers organized to deliver services to Medicare beneficiaries and eligible to receive a share of any cost savings the entity can achieve by delivering services to those beneficiaries at a cost below a set baseline and based upon established quality of care standards. We will continue to evaluate the impact of the ACO regulations on our business and operations.

 

The ACA also allows states to expand their Medicaid programs through an increase in the Medicaid eligibility income limit from a state’s current eligibility levels to 133% of the federal poverty level. It remains unclear to what extent states will expand their Medicaid programs by raising the income limit to 133% of the federal poverty level.

 

The ACA also remains subject to continuing legislative scrutiny, including efforts by Congress to further amend or repeal a number of its provisions as well as administrative actions delaying the effectiveness of key provisions. As a result, we cannot predict with any assurance the ultimate effect of the ACA on our Company, nor can we provide any assurance that its provisions will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

Government-funded programs or private insurers may limit, reduce or make retroactive adjustments to reimbursement amounts or rates.

 

A portion of the net patient service revenue derived from services rendered through NWC is from payments made by Medicare and Medicaid and other government-sponsored or funded healthcare programs (the “GHC Programs”). These government-funded programs, as well as private insurers, have taken and may continue to take steps, including a movement toward increased use of managed care organizations, value-based purchasing, and new patient care models to control the cost, eligibility for, use and delivery of healthcare services as a result of budgetary constraints and cost containment pressures due to unfavorable economic conditions, rising healthcare costs and for other reasons. These government-funded programs and private insurers may attempt other measures to control costs, including bundling of services and denial of, or reduction in, reimbursement for certain services and treatments. As a result, payments from government programs or private payors may decrease significantly. Also, any adjustment in Medicare reimbursement rates may have a detrimental impact on our reimbursement rates not only for Medicare patients, but also because Medicaid and other third-party payors often base their reimbursement rates on a percentage of Medicare rates. Our business may also be materially affected by limitations on, or reductions in, reimbursement amounts or rates or elimination of coverage for certain individuals or treatments. Moreover, because government-funded programs generally provide for reimbursements on a fee-schedule basis rather than on a charge-related basis, we generally cannot increase our revenues from these programs by increasing the amount we charge for services rendered by NWC’s physicians. To the extent our costs increase, we may not be able to recover our increased costs from these programs, and cost containment measures and market changes in non-government-funded insurance plans have generally restricted our ability to recover, or shift to non-governmental payors, these increased costs. In addition, funds we receive from third-party payors are subject to audit with respect to the proper billing for physician and ancillary services and, accordingly, our revenue from these programs may be adjusted retroactively. Any retroactive adjustments to our reimbursement amounts could have a material effect on our financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and the trading price of our common stock.

 

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We may become subject to billing investigations by federal and state government authorities.

 

Federal and state laws, rules and regulations impose substantial penalties, including criminal and civil fines, exclusion from participation in government healthcare programs and imprisonment, on entities or individuals (including any individual corporate officers or physicians deemed responsible) that fraudulently or wrongfully bill government-funded programs or other third-party payors for healthcare services. CMS issued a final rule requiring states to implement a Medicaid Recovery Audit Contractor (“RAC”) program effective January 1, 2012. States are required to contract with one or more eligible Medicaid RACs to review Medicaid claims for any overpayments or underpayments, and to recoup overpayments from providers on behalf of the state. In addition, federal laws, along with a growing number of state laws, allow a private person to bring a civil action in the name of the government for false billing violations. We believe that audits, inquiries and investigations from government agencies will occur from time to time in the ordinary course of NWC’s operations, which could result in substantial defense costs to us and a diversion of management’s time and attention. We cannot predict whether any future audits, inquiries or investigations, or the public disclosure of such matters, would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and the trading price of our common stock.

 

We may not appropriately record or document the services provided by our physicians.

 

We must appropriately record and document the services our doctors provide to seek reimbursement for their services from third-party payors. If our physicians do not appropriately document, or where applicable, code for their services, we could be subjected to administrative, regulatory, civil, or criminal investigations or sanctions and our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be adversely affected.

 

We may not be able to successfully recruit and retain qualified physicians, who are key to NWC’s revenues and billing.

 

During the second half of 2018, we had one physician who did not renew her contract, one leave due to an unexpected disability, and a third leave due to early retirement. In 2019, we replaced all three physicians and had one of the new physicians depart. As part of our business plan, we may acquire other medical practices as we see fit to further develop, test and deploy the HealthLynked Network into new strategic regional areas throughout the country. We compete with many types of healthcare providers, including teaching, research and government institutions, hospitals and health systems and other practice groups, for the services of qualified doctors. We may not be able to continue to recruit new physicians or renew contracts with existing physicians on acceptable terms. If we do not do so, our ability to service execute our business plan may be adversely affected.

 

A significant number of NWC physicians could leave our practice and we may be unable to enforce the non-competition covenants of departed employees.

 

We have entered into employment agreements with the current NWC physicians. Certain of our employment agreements can be terminated without cause by any party upon prior written notice. In addition, substantially all of our physicians have agreed not to compete with us within a specified geographic area for a certain period after termination of employment. The law governing non-compete agreements and other forms of restrictive covenants varies from state to state. Although we believe that the non-competition and other restrictive covenants applicable to our affiliated physicians are reasonable in scope and duration and therefore enforceable under applicable state law, courts and arbitrators in some states are reluctant to strictly enforce non-compete agreements and restrictive covenants against physicians. Our physicians may leave our practices for a variety of reasons, including providing services for other types of healthcare providers, such as teaching, research and government institutions, hospitals and health systems and other practice groups. If a substantial number of our physicians leave our practices or we are unable to enforce the non-competition covenants in the employment agreements, our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be materially, and adversely affected. We cannot predict whether a court or arbitration panel would enforce these covenants in any particular case.

 

We may be subject to medical malpractice and other lawsuits not covered by insurance.

 

Our business entails an inherent risk of claims of medical malpractice against our affiliated physicians and us. We may also be subject to other lawsuits which may involve large claims and significant defense costs. Although we currently maintain liability insurance coverage intended to cover professional liability and other claims, there can be no assurance that our insurance coverage will be adequate to cover liabilities arising out of claims asserted against us. Liabilities in excess of our insurance coverage, including coverage for professional liability and other claims, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and the trading price of our common stock. See “Professional and General Liability Coverage.”

 

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We may not be able to collect reimbursements for our services from third-party payors in a timely manner.

 

A significant portion of our net patient service revenue is derived from reimbursements from various third-party payors, including GHC Programs, private insurance plans and managed care plans, for services provided by NWC physicians. We are responsible for submitting reimbursement requests to these payors and collecting the reimbursements, and we assume the financial risks relating to uncollectible and delayed reimbursements. In the current healthcare environment, payors continue their efforts to control expenditures for healthcare, including revisions to coverage and reimbursement policies. Due to the nature of our business and our participation in government-funded and private reimbursement programs, we are involved from time to time in inquiries, reviews, audits and investigations by governmental agencies and private payors of our business practices, including assessments of our compliance with coding, billing and documentation requirements. We may be required to repay these agencies or private payors if a finding is made that we were incorrectly reimbursed, or we may be subjected to pre-payment reviews, which can be time-consuming and result in non-payment or delayed payment for the services we provide. We may also experience difficulties in collecting reimbursements because third-party payors may seek to reduce or delay reimbursements to which we are entitled for services that our affiliated physicians have provided. In addition, GHC Programs may deny our application to become a participating provider that could prevent us from providing services to patients or prohibit us from billing for such services. If we are not reimbursed fully and in a timely manner for such services or there is a finding that we were incorrectly reimbursed, our revenue, cash flows and financial condition could be materially, adversely affected.

 

Certain federal and state laws may limit our effectiveness at collecting monies owed to us from patients.

 

We utilize third parties to collect from patients any co-payments and other payments for services that are provided by NWC physicians. The federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act restricts the methods that third-party collection companies may use to contact and seek payment from consumer debtors regarding past due accounts. State laws vary with respect to debt collection practices, although most state requirements are similar to those under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. The Florida Consumer Collection Practices Act, is broader than the federal legislation, applying the regulations to “creditors” as well as “collectors,” whereas the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act is applicable only to collectors. This prohibits creditors who are attempting to collect their own debts from engaging in behavior prohibited by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and Florida Consumer Collection Practices Act. The Act has very specific guidelines regarding which actions debt collectors and creditors may engage in to collect unpaid debt. If our collection practices or those of our collection agencies are inconsistent with these standards, we may be subject to actual damages and penalties. These factors and events could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may not be able to maintain effective and efficient information systems.

 

The profitability of our business, including the services provided by NWC, is dependent on uninterrupted performance of our information systems. Failure to maintain reliable information systems, disruptions in our existing information systems or the implementation of new systems could cause disruptions in our business operations, including errors and delays in billings and collections, disputes with patients and payors, violations of patient privacy and confidentiality requirements and other regulatory requirements, increased administrative expenses and other adverse consequences.

 

RISKS RELATING TO OUR ORGANIZATION

 

Our articles of incorporation authorize our board to create a new series of preferred stock without further approval by our stockholders, which could adversely affect the rights of the holders of our common stock.

 

Our board of directors has the authority to fix and determine the relative rights and preferences of preferred stock. Our board of directors also has the authority to issue preferred stock without further stockholder approval. As a result, our board of directors could authorize the issuance of a series of preferred stock that would grant to holders the preferred right to our assets upon liquidation, the right to receive dividend payments before dividends are distributed to the holders of common stock and the right to the redemption of the shares, together with a premium, prior to the redemption of our common stock. In addition, our board of directors could authorize the issuance of a series of preferred stock that has greater voting power than our common stock or that is convertible into our common stock, which could decrease the relative voting power of our common stock or result in dilution to our existing stockholders.

 

Stockholders’ ability to influence corporate decisions may be limited because Michael Dent, our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board, currently owns a controlling percentage of our common stock.

 

Currently, our officer and directors as a group beneficially own approximately 49.79% of our outstanding common stock, including 46.68% owned by our Chairman and CEO, Dr. Dent. As a result of this stock ownership, our officer and directors can control all matters submitted to our stockholders for approval, including the election of directors and approval of any merger, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets. This concentration of voting power could delay or prevent an acquisition of our company on terms that other stockholders may desire. In addition, as the interests of our officer and directors and our minority stockholders may not always be the same, this large concentration of voting power may lead to stockholder votes that are inconsistent with the best interests of our minority stockholders or the best interest of the Company as a whole.

 

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If we fail to establish and maintain an effective system of internal control, we may not be able to report our financial results accurately or to prevent fraud. Any inability to report and file our financial results accurately and timely could harm our reputation and adversely impact the trading price of our common stock.

 

Effective internal control is necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and prevent fraud. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, we may not be able to manage our business as effectively as we would if an effective control environment existed, and our business and reputation with investors may be harmed. As a result, our small size and any current internal control deficiencies may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operation and access to capital. We have not performed an in-depth analysis to determine if historical un-discovered failures of internal controls exist, and may in the future discover areas of our internal control that need improvement.

 

We are required to comply with the SEC’s rules implementing Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which require our management to certify financial and other information in our quarterly and annual reports and provide an annual management report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. However, our independent registered public accounting firm is not yet required to formally attest to the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting, and will not be required to do so for as long as we are an “emerging growth company” pursuant to the provisions of the JOBS Act.

 

Public company compliance may make it more difficult to attract and retain officers and directors.

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act and rules subsequently implemented by the SEC have various requirements with regard to the corporate governance practices of public companies. As a public company, we expect these rules and regulations to increase our compliance costs and to make certain activities more time consuming and costly. As a public company, we also expect that these rules and regulations may make it more difficult and expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance in the future and we may be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. As a result, it may be more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified persons to serve on our board of directors or as executive officers.

 

The public market for our common stock is limited.  Failure to develop or maintain a trading market could negatively affect its value and make it difficult or impossible for you to sell your shares.

 

Our common stock has traded on the OTCQB under the symbol “HLYK” since May 10, 2017.  There is a limited public market for our common stock and a more active public market for our common stock may not develop.  Failure to develop or maintain an active trading market could make it difficult to sell shares or recover any part of an investment in our common shares.  Even if a market for our common stock does develop, the market price of our common stock may be highly volatile.  In addition to the uncertainties relating to future operating performance and the profitability of operations, factors such as variations in interim financial results or various, as yet unpredictable, factors, many of which are beyond our control, may have a negative effect on the market price of our common stock.

 

Our common stock is subject to the “penny stock” rules of the SEC and the trading market in the securities is limited, which makes transactions in our common stock cumbersome and may reduce the value of an investment in our common stock. 

  

Rule 15g-9 under the Exchange Act establishes the definition of a “penny stock,” for the purposes relevant to us, as any equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share or with an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions.  For any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, the rules require: (a) that a broker or dealer approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks; and (b) the broker or dealer receive from the investor a written agreement to the transaction, setting forth the identity and quantity of the penny stock to be purchased.

 

In order to approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, the broker or dealer must: (a) obtain financial information and investment experience objectives of the person and (b) make a reasonable determination that the transactions in penny stocks are suitable for that person and the person has sufficient knowledge and experience in financial matters to be capable of evaluating the risks of transactions in penny stocks.

  

The broker or dealer must also deliver, prior to any transaction in a penny stock, a disclosure schedule prescribed by the SEC relating to the penny stock market, which, in highlight form: (a) sets forth the basis on which the broker or dealer made the suitability determination; and (b) confirms that the broker or dealer received a signed, written agreement from the investor prior to the transaction.  Generally, brokers may be less willing to execute transactions in securities subject to the “penny stock” rules.  This may make it more difficult for investors to dispose of our Common Stock and cause a decline in the market value of our Common Stock.

  

Disclosure also has to be made about the risks of investing in penny stocks in both public offerings and in secondary trading and about the commissions payable to both the broker or dealer and the registered representative, current quotations for the securities and the rights and remedies available to an investor in cases of fraud in penny stock transactions. Finally, monthly statements have to be sent disclosing recent price information for the penny stock held in the account and information on the limited market in penny stocks.

 

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Drawdowns under the Investment Agreement may cause dilution to existing shareholders.

 

Iconic Holdings, LLC (“Iconic”), an investor, has committed to purchase up to $3,000,000 worth of shares of our common stock pursuant to the terms of an Investment Agreement entered into by and between the Company and Iconic, dated July 11 2016 (the “Investment Agreement”). From time to time during the term of the Investment Agreement, and at our sole discretion, we may present Iconic with a put notice requiring Iconic to purchase shares of our common stock. The purchase price to be paid by Iconic will be 80% of the lowest volume weighted average price of our common stock during the five consecutive trading days prior to the date on which written notice is sent by us to the investor stating the number of shares that the Company is selling to the investor, subject to certain adjustments. As a result, our existing shareholders will experience immediate dilution upon the purchase of any of the shares by Iconic. The issue and sale of the shares under the Investment Agreement may also have an adverse effect on the market price of the common shares. Iconic may resell some, if not all, of the shares that we issue to it under the Investment Agreement and such sales could cause the market price of the common stock to decline significantly. To the extent of any such decline, any subsequent puts would require us to issue and sell a greater number of shares to Iconic in exchange for each dollar of the put amount. Under these circumstances, the existing shareholders of our company will experience greater dilution. The effect of this dilution may, in turn, cause the price of our common stock to decrease further, both because of the downward pressure on the stock price that would be caused by a large number of sales of our shares into the public market by Iconic, and because our existing stockholders may disagree with a decision to sell shares to Iconic at a time when our stock price is low, and may in response decide to sell additional shares, further decreasing our stock price. If we draw down amounts under the Investment Agreement when our share price is decreasing, we will need to issue more shares to raise the same amount of funding. During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, we issued 5,074,068 and 2,440,337 shares pursuant to draws under the Investment Agreement, respectively, for gross proceeds of $929,986 and $440,523, respectively.

 

There is no guarantee that we will be able to fully utilize the Investment Agreement, if at all.

 

The purchase price and number of shares we can sell to Iconic under the Investment Agreement shall depend on our stock price and stock volume, and we cannot guarantee that our stock price and trading volume will be adequate to allow us to raise sufficient funds under the agreement. The purchase price for shares sold to Iconic shall be 80% of the lowest volume weighted average price of our common stock during the five consecutive trading days prior to the date on which written notice is sent by us to the investor, subject to certain discounts and adjustments. The maximum Put Amount that the Company shall be entitled to put to Iconic per any applicable put notice is an amount of shares of common stock up to or equal to 100% of the average of the daily trading volume for the ten consecutive trading days immediately prior to the applicable put notice date, so long as such amount is at least $5,000 and does not exceed $150,000, as calculated by multiplying the Put Amount by the average daily weighted average price of our common stock for the ten consecutive trading days immediately prior to the applicable put notice date. In order to access cash available under the Investment Agreement, our common stock must be listed on a recognized stock exchange or market and the shares underlying the arrangement must be subject to an effective registration statement. We must also have complied with our obligations and otherwise not be in material breach or default of the Convertible Notes and warrants issued to Iconic. If we are unable to meet these requirements, we will not have access to funds under this arrangement. There can be no assurances that we will be able to meet these requirements.

 

Certain restrictions on the extent of puts and the delivery of advance notices may have little, if any, effect on the adverse impact of our issuance of shares in connection with the Investment Agreement and as such, Iconic may sell a large number of shares, resulting in substantial dilution to the value of shares held by existing stockholders.

 

Iconic has agreed, subject to certain exceptions listed in the investment agreement with Iconic, to refrain from holding a number of shares which would result in Iconic or its affiliates owning more than 9.99% of the then-outstanding shares of our common stock at any one time. These restrictions, however, do not prevent Iconic from selling shares of our common stock received in connection with a put, and then receiving additional shares of our common stock in connection with a subsequent put. In this way, Iconic could sell more than 9.99% of the outstanding common stock in a relatively short time frame while never holding more than 9.99% at one time.

 

We may not be able to refinance, extend or repay our substantial indebtedness, which would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and ability to continue as a going concern.

 

We anticipate that we will need to raise a significant amount of debt or equity capital in the near future in order to repay our outstanding debt obligations when they mature. As of December 31, 2019, we had convertible notes payable with an aggregate face value of $2,335,994 with maturities between April 30, 2020 and December 31, 2020. If we are unable to raise sufficient capital to repay these obligations at maturity and we are otherwise unable to extend the maturity dates or refinance these obligations, we would be in default. We cannot provide any assurances that we will be able to raise the necessary amount of capital to repay these obligations or that we will be able to extend the maturity dates or otherwise refinance these obligations. Upon a default, the holder of certain convertible notes payable with aggregate face value of $711,000 would have the right to exercise its rights and remedies to collect, which would include foreclosing on our assets. Accordingly, a default would have a material adverse effect on our business and, if our senior secured lender exercises its rights and remedies, we would likely be forced to seek bankruptcy protection.

 

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As an “emerging growth company” under applicable law, we will be subject to lessened disclosure requirements, which could leave our shareholders without information or rights available to shareholders of more mature companies.

 

For as long as we remain an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act, we have elected to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies” including, but not limited to:

 

  not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act;
     
  being permitted to provide only two years of audited financial statements with correspondingly reduced “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” disclosure;
     
  taking advantage of an extension of time to comply with new or revised financial accounting standards;
     
  reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports, proxy statements and registration statements; and
     
  exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved.

 

We expect to take advantage of these reporting exemptions until we are no longer an “emerging growth company.” Because of these lessened regulatory requirements, our shareholders would be left without information or rights available to shareholders of more mature companies. We cannot predict whether investors will find our common stock less attractive if we rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock and our stock price may be more volatile.

 

We are also a “smaller reporting company” as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and have elected to follow certain scaled disclosure requirements available to smaller reporting companies.

 

Because we have elected to use the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards for an “emerging growth company” our financial statements may not be comparable to companies that comply with public company effective dates.

 

We have elected to use the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards under Section 102(b)(1) of the JOBS Act. This election allows us to delay the adoption of new or revised accounting standards that have different effective dates for public and private companies until those standards apply to private companies. While we are not currently delaying the implementation of any relevant accounting standards, in the future we may avail ourselves of this right, and as a result of this election, our financial statements may not be comparable to companies that comply with public company effective dates. Because our financial statements may not be comparable to companies that comply with public company effective dates, investors may have difficulty evaluating or comparing our business, performance or prospects in comparison to other public companies, which may have a negative impact on the value and liquidity of our common stock.

 

Our stockholders are subject to significant dilution upon the occurrence of certain events which could result in a decrease in our stock price.

 

As of March 30, 2020, we had approximately 83,056,144 shares of our common stock reserved or designated for future issuance upon the exercise of outstanding options and warrants, and conversion of outstanding convertible debt. Future sales of substantial amounts of our common stock into the public and the issuance of the shares reserved for future issuance, in payment of our debt, and/or upon exercise of outstanding options and warrants, will be dilutive to our existing stockholders and could result in a decrease in our stock price.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

 

None.

 

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Item 2. Properties

 

The Company leases its operating facilities pursuant to four separate lease agreements for properties located in Naples, Florida. First, the Company entered into an operating lease for its NWC practice office in Naples, Florida. The lease commenced on August 1, 2013 and expires July 31, 2020. The lease is for a 6,901 square-foot space. The base rent for the first full year of the lease term is $251,287 per annum with increases during the period. Second, the Company entered into another operating lease in the same building for an additional 361 square feet space for use of the medical equipment for the same period. The base rent for the first full year of the lease term is $13,140 per annum. Third, the Company leases on a month-to-month basis approximately 2,500 square feet of office space in Naples, FL used for Digital Services division administration. Monthly rent is approximately $3,300. Fourth, the Company leases approximately 3,700 square feet for its NCFM practice office in Naples, Florida. The lease commenced on April 5, 2019 and expires May 30, 2022. Base rent for the first full year of the lease term is $66,825 per annum with scheduled increases in years two and three.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

 

From time to time, we may become involved in various lawsuits and legal proceedings, which arise, in the ordinary course of business. However, litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and an adverse result in these or other matters may arise from time to time that may harm our business. We are not aware of any such legal proceedings that we believe will have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosure

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II.

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock was initially eligible for quotation and trades on the OTCPink on May 5, 2017 under the symbol “HLYK.” Since May 10, 2017, our common stock has been eligible for quotation and trades on the OTCQB under the symbol “HLYK.” 

 

Holders

 

As of March 30, 2020, we had 145 record holders of our common stock.

 

Dividend Policy

 

We have never declared or paid cash dividends on our common stock, and we do not intend to pay any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. Rather, we expect to retain future earnings (if any) to fund the operation and expansion of our business and for general corporate purposes.

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

The following table summarizes the total number of outstanding options and shares available for other future issuances of options under the 2016 Equity Incentive Plan (the “EIP”) as of December 31, 2019. All of the outstanding awards listed below were granted under the EIP.

 

    Number of Shares to be Issued Upon Exercise of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights     Weighted-Average Exercise Price of Outstanding Options,
Warrants and Rights
    Number of Shares Remaining Available for Future Issuance Under the Equity Compensation Plan (Excluding Shares in First Column)  
Equity compensation plans approved by stockholders                  
Equity compensation plans not approved by stockholders     3,326,750     $ 0.21       10,360,368  

 

On January 1, 2016, the Company instituted the EIP for the purpose of having equity awards available to allow for equity participation by its employees. The EIP allows for the issuance of up to 15,503,680 shares of the Company’s common stock to employees, which may be issued in the form of stock options, stock appreciation rights, or restricted shares. The EIP is governed by the Company’s board of directors, or a committee that may be appointed by the board of directors in the future. During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company made grants totaling 135,313 and 440,000 shares, respectively, of restricted common stock pursuant to the EIP. During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company also made grants pursuant to the EIP totaling 1,078,750 and 1,383,000 shares of common stock underlying stock options. Certain of the stock options grants are subject to time-based vesting requirements, generally over a period of 4 years, and certain of the stock options are subject to performance-based vesting requirements based on future company revenue and earnings metrics as well as individual performance goals.

 

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Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities

 

Except as previously disclosed in a Current Report on Form 8-K, or as set forth below, the Company has not sold securities that were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), during the year ended December 31, 2019:

 

On January 15, 2019, we issued 28,000 common shares to the holder of a $78,000 convertible promissory note as an inducement to enter into the convertible promissory note transaction.

 

During February 7, 2019, we issued 2,512,821 common shares to a convertible note holder upon conversion of outstanding principal by the note holder.

 

On February 13, 2019, the investor in the July 18, 2018 private placement transaction exercised the remaining 2,098,427 of pre-funded warrants. We did not receive any proceeds from the transaction.

 

On February 21, 2019, we issued 20,000 common shares to a third-party consultant as partial compensation for professional services.

 

On March 19, 2019, we issued 250,000 common shares to a third-party consultant as partial compensation for professional services.

 

On April 12, 2019, we issued 3,968,254 shares to the seller as partial consideration for our acquisition of HCFM.

 

On April 16, we issued 50,000 common shares to accredited investors as an inducement to enter into convertible promissory note transactions.

 

On May 9, 2019, we issued 30,000 common shares to a third-party consultant as partial compensation for professional services.

 

During May and June 2019, we issued 740,002 common shares to a convertible note holder upon conversion of outstanding principal by the note holder.

 

On July 11, 2019, we sold 250,000 shares of common stock in private placement transactions to an investor and received $50,000 in proceeds from the sale. The shares were issued at a share price of $0.20 per share. In connection with the stock sale, we also issued 125,000 five-year warrants to purchase shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.30 per share.

 

On July 15, 2019, we issued a total of 32,500 common shares to two accredited investors as an inducement to enter into convertible promissory note transactions.

 

On July 18, 2019, we issued 330,892 common shares to a convertible note holder upon conversion of outstanding principal and interest by the note holder.

 

On July 22, 2019, we issued 200,000 common shares to a third-party consultant as partial compensation for professional services.

 

On August 13, 2019, we issued 30,000 common shares to a third-party consultant as partial compensation for professional services.

 

On October 14, 2019, we sold 166,667 shares of common stock in private placement transactions to an investor and received $25,000 in proceeds from the sale. The shares were issued at a share price of $0.15 per share. In connection with the stock sale, we also issued 83,334 five-year warrants to purchase shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.25 per share.

 

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On October 22, 2019, we issued 539,759 common shares to a convertible note holder upon conversion of a convertible note payable.

 

On October 22, 2019, we sold 23,256 shares of common stock in private placement transactions to an investor and received $5,000 in proceeds from the sale. The shares were issued at a share price of $0.215 per share. In connection with the stock sale, we also issued 11,628 five-year warrants to purchase shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.315 per share.

 

On November 1, 2019, we issued 636,430 common shares to a convertible note holder upon conversion of a convertible note payable.

 

On November 20, 2019, we issued 30,000 common shares to a third-party consultant as partial compensation for professional services.

 

On December 2, 2019, we issued 30,000 common shares to an accredited investor as an inducement to enter into a convertible promissory note transaction.

 

On December 5, 2019, we issued 306,595 common shares to a convertible note holder upon conversion of a convertible note payable.

 

On December 9, 2019, we sold 625,000 shares of common stock in private placement transactions to an investor and received $50,000 in proceeds from the sale. The shares were issued at a share price of $0.12 per share. In connection with the stock sale, we also issued 208,333 five-year warrants to purchase shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.22 per share.

 

On December 11, 2019, we sold 416,667 shares of common stock in private placement transactions to an investor and received $5,000 in proceeds from the sale. The shares were issued at a share price of $0.215 per share. In connection with the stock sale, we also issued 11,628 five-year warrants to purchase shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.315 per share.

 

On December 13, 2019, we issued 348,361 common shares to a convertible note holder upon conversion of a convertible note payable.

 

On December 19, 2019, we issued 418,033 common shares to a convertible note holder upon conversion of a convertible note payable.

 

On December 31, 2019, we issued 500,000 common shares to a convertible note holder upon conversion of a convertible note payable.

 

The sales of the above securities were exempt from registration under the Securities Act in reliance upon Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act, as transactions by an issuer not involving any public offering. The recipients of the securities in each of these transactions represented their intentions to acquire the securities for investment only and not with a view to or for sale in connection with any distribution thereof, and appropriate legends were placed upon the stock certificates issued in these transactions.

 

Recent Repurchases of Securities.

 

On October 3, 2018, we bought back 100,000 shares of our common stock from a shareholder for a total purchase price of $5,000. The shares were retired. The selling shareholder was the brother of our CEO Dr. Michael Dent.

 

On August 28, 2019, we bought back 15,000 shares of our common stock from a shareholder for a total purchase price of $1,200. The selling shareholder was a former employee.

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

 

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and are not required to provide the information required under this item.

 

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with our financial statements and the related notes appearing elsewhere in this report. In addition to historical information, this discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Our actual results may differ materially from those discussed below. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those identified below, and those discussed in the section titled “Item 1A. Risk Factors” included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. All amounts in this report are in U.S. dollars, unless otherwise noted.

 

Overview

 

HealthLynked Corp. (the “Company,” “we,” “our, or “us”) was incorporated in the State of Nevada on August 4, 2014. We currently operate in two distinct divisions: Health Services and Digital Healthcare. Our Health Services division is comprised of the operations of (i) Naples Women’s Center (“NWC”), a multi-specialty medical group including OB/GYN (both Obstetrics and Gynecology), and General Practice, and (ii) Naples Center for Functional Medicine (“NCFM”), a Functional Medical Practice acquired in April 2019 that is engaged in improving the health of its patients through individualized and integrative health care. Our Digital Healthcare division develops and plans to operate an online personal medical information and record archive system, the “HealthLynked Network,” which will enable patients and doctors to keep track of medical information via the Internet in a cloud-based system.

 

Recent Developments

 

In January 2020, we launched BTG, our new physical therapy practice in Bonita Springs, Florida. BTG employs two doctors who provide hands-on functional manual therapy techniques to speed patients’ recovery and manage pain without pain medication or surgery.

 

On February 5, 2020, we entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger to acquire CHM and its subsidiary AHP. CHM is a healthcare enablement company that empowers local providers to own and operate in a franchise-like model that extends their reach and capabilities to maximize revenue, deliver quality care and improve patient outcomes. CHM’s resources and solutions are administered as an extension of providers’ current in-practice resources, expanding care coordination, care management services and value-based analytics. These solutions support financial success within both traditional payment models and expansion to new services, allowing partners to succeed within current and ever emerging value-based payment models. AHP is an ACO with providers around the U.S. participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program. AHP was formed to benefit the patients (Medicare Fee-for-Service Beneficiaries), providers and the communities it serves. AHP is built on a model of coordinated care to ensure that patients, especially the chronically ill and the elderly, receive the right care at the right time, avoiding unnecessary duplication of services and prevention of medical errors. Following completion of the acquisition, the business of CHM and AHP will constitute a new ACO division.

 

Critical accounting policies and significant judgments and estimates

 

This management’s discussion and analysis of the Company’s financial condition and results of operations is based on the Company’s consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, or GAAP. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires the Company to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements, as well as the reported expenses incurred during the reporting periods. The Company’s estimates are based on historical experience and on various other factors that the Company believes are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. The Company believes that the accounting policies discussed below are critical to understanding the Company’s historical and future performance, as these policies relate to the more significant areas involving management’s judgments and estimates.

 

Adopted Accounting Pronouncements 

 

Effective January 1, 2019, we adopted Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-02, Leases (“ASU 2016-02”) using the required modified retrospective approach. ASU 2016-02 requires lessees to record most leases on their balance sheets but recognize expenses on their income statements in a manner similar to current accounting. See “Leases” below for additional discussion of the impact on our financial statements and related disclosures.

 

Effective January 1, 2019, we adopted ASU 2018-07, Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting. ASU 2018-07 expands the scope of Topic 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees and supersedes the guidance in Subtopic 505-50, Equity - Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact our financial statements and related disclosures.

 

Patient Service Revenue

 

Patient service revenue is reported at the amount that reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for providing patient care. These amounts are due from patients and third-party payors (including health insurers and government programs) and includes variable consideration for retroactive revenue adjustments due to settlement of audits, reviews, and investigations. Generally, the Company bills patients and third-party payors within days after the services are performed and/or the patient is discharged from the facility. Revenue is recognized as performance obligations are satisfied.

 

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Performance obligations are determined based on the nature of the services provided by the Company. Revenue for performance obligations satisfied over time is recognized based on actual charges incurred in relation to total expected charges. The Company believes that this method provides a faithful depiction of the transfer of services over the term of the performance obligation based on the inputs needed to satisfy the obligation. Revenue for performance obligations satisfied at a point in time is recognized when goods or services are provided and the Company does not believe it is required to provide additional goods or services to the patient.

 

The Company determines the transaction price based on standard charges for goods and services provided, reduced by contractual adjustments provided to third-party payors, discounts provided to uninsured patients in accordance with the Company’s policy, and/or implicit price concessions provided to uninsured patients. The Company determines its estimates of contractual adjustments and discounts based on contractual agreements, its discount policies, and historical experience. The Company determines its estimate of implicit price concessions based on its historical collection experience with this class of patients.

 

Agreements with third-party payors typically provide for payments at amounts less than established charges. A summary of the payment arrangements with major third-party payors follows:

 

Medicare: Certain inpatient acute care services are paid at prospectively determined rates per discharge based on clinical, diagnostic and other factors. Certain services are paid based on cost-reimbursement methodologies subject to certain limits. Physician services are paid based upon established fee schedules. Outpatient services are paid using prospectively determined rates.

 

Medicaid: Reimbursements for Medicaid services are generally paid at prospectively determined rates per discharge, per occasion of service, or per covered member.

 

Other: Payment agreements with certain commercial insurance carriers, health maintenance organizations, and preferred provider organizations provide for payment using prospectively determined rates per discharge, discounts from established charges, and prospectively determined daily rates.

 

Laws and regulations concerning government programs, including Medicare and Medicaid, are complex and subject to varying interpretation. As a result of investigations by governmental agencies, various health care organizations have received requests for information and notices regarding alleged noncompliance with those laws and regulations, which, in some instances, have resulted in organizations entering into significant settlement agreements. Compliance with such laws and regulations may also be subject to future government review and interpretation as well as significant regulatory action, including fines, penalties, and potential exclusion from the related programs. There can be no assurance that regulatory authorities will not challenge the Company’s compliance with these laws and regulations, and it is not possible to determine the impact, if any, such claims or penalties would have upon the Company. In addition, the contracts the Company has with commercial payors also provide for retroactive audit and review of claims.

 

Settlements with third-party payors for retroactive adjustments due to audits, reviews or investigations are considered variable consideration and are included in the determination of the estimated transaction price for providing patient care. These settlements are estimated based on the terms of the payment agreement with the payor, correspondence from the payor and the Company’s historical settlement activity, including an assessment to ensure that it is probable that a significant reversal in the amount of cumulative revenue recognized will not occur when the uncertainty associated with the retroactive adjustment is subsequently resolved. Estimated settlements are adjusted in future periods as adjustments become known, or as years are settled or are no longer subject to such audits, reviews, and investigations.

 

The Company also provides services to uninsured patients, and offers those uninsured patients a discount, either by policy or law, from standard charges. The Company estimates the transaction price for patients with deductibles and coinsurance and from those who are uninsured based on historical experience and current market conditions. The initial estimate of the transaction price is determined by reducing the standard charge by any contractual adjustments, discounts, and implicit price concessions. Subsequent changes to the estimate of the transaction price are generally recorded as adjustments to patient service revenue in the period of the change.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

For financial statement purposes, the Company considers all highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less to be cash and cash equivalents.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Trade receivables are carried at their estimated collectible amounts. Trade credit is generally extended on a short-term basis; thus trade receivables do not bear interest. Trade accounts receivable are periodically evaluated for collectability based on past collectability of the insurance companies, government agencies, and customers’ accounts receivable during the related period which generally approximates 48% of total billings. Trade accounts receivable are recorded at this net amount.

 

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Inventory

 

Inventory consisting of supplements, is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined by the first-in, first-out method. Outdated inventory is directly charged to cost of goods sold.

 

Leases

 

Effective January 1, 2019, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-02, Leases (“ASU 2016-02”) using the required modified retrospective approach. ASU 2016-02 requires lessees to record most leases on their balance sheets but recognize expenses on their income statements in a manner similar to current accounting.

 

Upon transition under ASU 2016-02, the Company elected the suite of practical expedients as a package applied to all of its leases, including (i) not reassessing whether any expired or existing contracts are or contain leases, (ii) not reassessing the lease classification for any expired or existing leases, and (iii) not reassessing initial direct costs for any existing leases. For new leases, the Company will determine if an arrangement is or contains a lease at inception. Leases are included as right-of-use (“ROU”) assets within other assets and ROU liabilities within accrued expenses and other liabilities and within other long-term liabilities on the Company’s consolidated balance sheets.

 

ROU assets and liabilities are recognized at commencement date based on the present value of lease payments over the lease term. The Company’s leases do not provide an implicit rate. The Company uses its incremental borrowing rate based on the information available at commencement date in determining the present value of lease payments. The ROU asset also includes any lease payments made and excludes lease incentives. Lease expense for lease payments is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

  

Concentrations of Credit Risk

 

The Company’s financial instruments that are exposed to a concentration of credit risk are cash and accounts receivable. There are no patients/customers that represent 10% or more of the Company’s revenue or accounts receivable. Generally, the Company’s cash and cash equivalents are in checking accounts.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost. When retired or otherwise disposed, the related carrying value and accumulated depreciation are removed from the respective accounts and the net difference less any amount realized from disposition, is reflected in earnings. For consolidated financial statement purposes, property and equipment are recorded at cost and depreciated using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives of 5 to 7 years. The cost of repairs and maintenance is expensed as incurred; major replacements and improvements are capitalized.

 

The Company examines the possibility of decreases in the value of fixed assets when events or changes in circumstances reflect the fact that their recorded value may not be recoverable. The Company recognizes an impairment loss when the sum of expected undiscounted future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset. The amount of impairment is measured as the difference between the asset’s estimated fair value and its book value.

 

Convertible Notes

 

Convertible notes are regarded as compound instruments, consisting of a liability component and an equity component. The component parts of compound instruments are classified separately as financial liabilities and equity in accordance with the substance of the contractual arrangement. At the date of issue, the fair value of the liability component is estimated using the prevailing market interest rate for a similar non-convertible instrument. This amount is recorded as a liability on an amortized cost basis until extinguished upon conversion or at the instrument’s maturity date. The equity component is determined by deducting the amount of the liability component from the fair value of the compound instrument as a whole. This is recognized as additional paid-in capital and included in equity, net of income tax effects, and is not subsequently remeasured. After initial measurement, they are carried at amortized cost using the effective interest method. Convertible notes for which the maturity date has been extended and that qualify for debt extinguishment treatment are recorded at fair value on the extinguishment date and then revalue at the end of each reporting period, with the change recorded to the statement of operations under “Change in Fair Value of Debt.”

 

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Derivative Financial Instruments

 

The Company reviews the terms of convertible debt, equity instruments and other financing arrangements to determine whether there are embedded derivative instruments, including embedded conversion options that are required to be bifurcated and accounted for separately as a derivative financial instrument. Also, in connection with the issuance of financing instruments, the Company may issue freestanding options or warrants that may, depending on their terms, be accounted for as derivative instrument liabilities, rather than as equity. Derivative financial instruments are initially measured at their fair value. For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported as charges or credits to income. To the extent that the initial fair values of the freestanding and/or bifurcated derivative instrument liabilities exceed the total proceeds received, an immediate charge to income is recognized, in order to initially record the derivative instrument liabilities at their fair value. The discount from the face value of convertible debt instruments resulting from allocating some or all of the proceeds to the derivative instruments is amortized over the life of the instrument through periodic charges to income.

 

The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is reassessed at the end of each reporting period. If reclassification is required, the fair value of the derivative instrument, as of the determination date, is reclassified. Any previous charges or credits to income for changes in the fair value of the derivative instrument are not reversed. Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument could be required within twelve months of the balance sheet date. The Company does not use derivative instruments to hedge exposures to cash flow, market, or foreign currency risks.

 

Fair Value of Assets and Liabilities

 

Fair value is the price that would be received from the sale of an asset or paid to transfer a liability (i.e. an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market in an orderly transaction between market participants. In determining fair value, the accounting standards have established a three-level hierarchy that distinguishes between (i) market data obtained or developed from independent sources (i.e., observable data inputs) and (ii) a reporting entity’s own data and assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability (i.e., unobservable data inputs). Financial assets and financial liabilities measured and reported at fair value are classified in one of the following categories, in order of priority of observability and objectivity of pricing inputs:

 

  Level 1 – Fair value based on quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities

 

  Level 2 – Fair value based on significant directly observable data (other than Level 1 quoted prices) or significant indirectly observable data through corroboration with observable market data. Inputs would normally be (i) quoted prices in active markets for similar assets or liabilities, (ii) quoted prices in inactive markets for identical or similar assets or liabilities or (iii) information derived from or corroborated by observable market data.

 

  Level 3 – Fair value based on prices or valuation techniques that require significant unobservable data inputs. Inputs would normally be a reporting entity’s own data and judgments about assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability

 

The fair value measurement level for an asset or liability is based on the lowest level of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement. Valuation techniques should maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company accounts for our stock based compensation under ASC 718 “Compensation – Stock Compensation” using the fair value based method. Under this method, compensation cost is measured at the grant date based on the value of the award and is recognized over the service period, which is usually the vesting period. This guidance establishes standards for the accounting for transactions in which an entity exchanges it equity instruments for goods or services. It also addresses transactions in which an entity incurs liabilities in exchange for goods or services that are based on the fair value of the entity’s equity instruments or that may be settled by the issuance of those equity instruments.

 

The Company uses the fair value method for equity instruments granted to non-employees and use the Black-Scholes model for measuring the fair value of options. The stock based fair value compensation is determined as of the date of the grant or the date at which the performance of the services is completed (measurement date) and is recognized over the vesting periods.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company follows Accounting Standards Codification subtopic 740-10, Income Taxes (“ASC 740-10”) for recording the provision for income taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are computed based upon the difference between the financial statement and income tax basis of assets and liabilities using the enacted marginal tax rate applicable when the related asset or liability is expected to be realized or settled. Deferred income tax expenses or benefits are based on the changes in the asset or liability during each period. If available evidence suggests that it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized, a valuation allowance is required to reduce the deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. Future changes in such valuation allowance are included in the provision for deferred income taxes in the period of change. Deferred income taxes may arise from temporary differences resulting from income and expense items reported for financial accounting and tax purposes in different periods. Deferred taxes are classified as current or non-current, depending on the classification of assets and liabilities to which they relate. Deferred taxes arising from temporary differences that are not related to an asset or liability are classified as current or non-current depending on the periods in which the temporary differences are expected to reverse and are considered immaterial.

 

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Recurring Fair Value Measurements

 

The carrying value of the Company’s financial assets and financial liabilities is their cost, which may differ from fair value. The carrying value of cash held as demand deposits, money market and certificates of deposit, marketable investments, accounts receivable, short-term borrowings, accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximated their fair value.

 

Net Income (Loss) per Share 

 

Basic net income (loss) per common share is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Outstanding stock options, warrants and other dilutive securities are excluded from the calculation of diluted net loss per common share if inclusion of these securities would be anti-dilutive.

 

Common stock awards

 

The Company grants common stock awards to non-employees in exchange for services provided. The Company measures the fair value of these awards using the fair value of the services provided or the fair value of the awards granted, whichever is more reliably measurable. The fair value measurement date of these awards is generally the date the performance of services is complete. The fair value of the awards is recognized on a straight-line basis as services are rendered. The share-based payments related to common stock awards for the settlement of services provided by non-employees is recorded on the consolidated statement of comprehensive loss in the same manner and charged to the same account as if such settlements had been made in cash.

 

Warrants

 

In connection with certain financing, consulting and collaboration arrangements, the Company has issued warrants to purchase shares of its common stock. The outstanding warrants are standalone instruments that are not puttable or mandatorily redeemable by the holder and are classified as equity awards. The Company measures the fair value of the awards using the Black-Scholes option pricing model as of the measurement date. Warrants issued in conjunction with the issuance of common stock are initially recorded at fair value as a reduction in additional paid-in capital of the common stock issued. All other warrants are recorded at fair value as expense over the requisite service period or at the date of issuance, if there is not a service period. Warrants granted in connection with ongoing arrangements are more fully described in Note 13, Shareholders’ Deficit.

 

Business Segments

 

The Company uses the “management approach” to identify its reportable segments. The management approach designates the internal organization used by management for making operating decisions and assessing performance as the basis for identifying the Company’s reportable segments. Using the management approach, the Company determined that it has two operating segments: Health Services (multi-specialty medical group including OB/GYN and General Practice) and Digital Healthcare (develops and markets the “HealthLynked Network,” an online personal medical information and record archive system).

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers — Topic 606, which supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in FASB ASC 605. The new guidance primarily states that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods and services. In January 2017 and September 2017, the FASB issued several amendments to ASU 2014-09, including updates stemming from SEC Accounting Staff Announcement in July 2017. The amendments and updates included clarification on accounting for principal versus agent considerations (i.e., reporting gross versus net), licenses of intellectual property and identification of performance obligations. These amendments and updates do not change the core principle of the standard but provide clarity and implementation guidance. We adopted this standard on January 1, 2018 and selected the modified retrospective transition method. We have modified our accounting policies to reflect the requirements of this standard, however, the planned adoption did not materially impact the Company’s financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-01, Financial Instruments — Overall: Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities. The guidance affects the accounting for equity investments, financial liabilities under the fair value option and the presentation and disclosure requirements of financial instruments. The guidance is effective in the first quarter of fiscal 2019. We adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2019. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact our financial statements and related disclosures.

 

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In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-11, Earnings Per Share, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity and Derivatives and Hedging, which changes the accounting and earnings per share for certain instruments with down round features. The amendments in this ASU should be applied using a cumulative-effect adjustment as of the beginning of the fiscal year or retrospective adjustment to each period presented and is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those periods. We adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2019. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact our financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In February 2018, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASC Update No 2018-02 (Topic 220) Income Statement – Reporting Comprehensive Income: Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income.  This ASC update allows for a reclassification into retained earnings of the stranded tax effects in accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) resulting from the enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“TCJA”). The updated guidance is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018.  We adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2019. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact our financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting, to expand the scope of Topic 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees and supersedes the guidance in Subtopic 505-50, Equity - Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees. Under ASU 2018-07, equity-classified nonemployee share-based payment awards are measured at the grant date fair value on the grant date The probability of satisfying performance conditions must be considered for equity-classified nonemployee share-based payment awards with such conditions. ASU 2018-07 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted. We adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2019. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact our financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-09 to provide clarification and correction of errors to the Codification. The amendments in this update cover multiple Accounting Standards Updates. Some topics in the update may require transition guidance with effective dates for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018. We adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2019. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact our financial statements and related disclosures.

 

Results of Operations: Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

The following table summarizes the changes in our results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2019 compared with the year ended December 31, 2018:

 

    Years Ended December 31,     Change  
    2019     2018     Increase (Decrease) in $     Increase (Decrease) in %  
Patient service revenue, net   $ 4,018,818     $ 2,259,002     $ 1,759,816       78 %
                                 
Operating Expenses                                
Practice salaries and benefits     2,393,954       1,446,243       947,711       66 %
Other practice operating costs     1,845,070       916,408       928,662       101 %
General and administrative     2,915,419       2,844,715       70,704       2 %
Depreciation and amortization     73,385       23,782       49,603       209 %
Loss from operations     (3,209,010 )     (2,972,146 )     (236,864 )     -8 %
                                 
Other Income (Expenses)                                
Loss on extinguishment of debt     (1,229,777 )     (393,123 )     (836,654 )     -213 %
Change in fair value of debt     (121,508 )     (140,789 )     19,281       14 %
Financing cost     (135,528 )     (1,221,911 )     1,086,383       89 %
Amortization of original issue and debt discounts on notes payable and convertible notes     (1,260,513 )     (763,616 )     (496,897 )     -65 %
Change in fair value of derivative financial instruments     671,822       (106,141 )     777,963       733 %
Interest expense     (244,085 )     (193,109 )     (50,976 )     -26 %
Total other expenses     (2,319,589 )     (2,818,689 )     499,100       18 %
                                 
Net loss   $ (5,528,599 )   $ (5,790,835 )   $ 262,236       5 %

 

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Patient service revenue increased by $1,759,816, or 78%, from 2018 to 2019, primarily as a result of $2,061,032 revenue from NCFM, which was acquired on April 12, 2019, offset by lower revenue from NWC operations of $301,216 due to physician turnover, disability and retirement.

 

Practice salaries and benefits increased by $947,711, or 66%, in 2019 primarily as a result of new practice salary and benefits expense from the acquisition of NCFM.

 

Other practice operating costs increased by $928,662, or 101%, from 2018 to 2019, primarily as a result of added practice-related costs such as rent, supplies and lab fees incurred at NCFM following its acquisition in April 2019.

 

General and administrative costs increased by $70,704, or 2%, in 2019 primarily due to higher stock-based consulting fees and professional costs in 2019 and higher legal, professional and accounting costs related in part to the acquisition and integration of NCFM, offset by lower salary expense associated with a shift from a direct sales to an indirect sale approach for our Digital Healthcare segment.

 

Depreciation and amortization increased by $49,603, or 209%, in 2019 primarily as a result of depreciation of assets acquired in the NCFM acquisition, offset by lower depreciation from the adoption of ASU 2016-02 in 2019, which resulted in charges associated with a capital lease that were previously recorded as depreciation being charged to general and administrative expense.

 

Loss from operations increased by $236,864, or 8%, in 2019 primarily as a result of lower NWC revenue due to physician turnover, disability and retirement, offset by additional revenue and profit from the operation of NCFM from the acquisition date of April 12, 2019 through December 31, 2019.

 

Loss on extinguishment of debt increased by $836,654, or 213%, in 2019. Loss on extinguishment of debt in 2018 arose from an extinguishment loss in the amount of $348,938 related to the extension of debt issued to Dr. Michael Dent, as well as extinguishment losses totaling $152,415 related to the extension of convertible notes, and gains of $126,525 related to the write-off of derivative liabilities associated with nine convertible notes repaid during the period. Loss on extinguishment of debt in 2019 arose from losses associated with the extension of convertible notes and related party notes payable totaling $1,037,352 and losses associated with conversion of convertible notes payable of $358,513, offset by gains of $166,088 related to the write-off of derivative liabilities associated with convertible notes repaid in cash during the period.

 

Change in fair value of debt decreased by $19,281, or 14%, and results from certain convertible notes and notes payable to Dr. Michael Dent that were extended in previous periods and treated as an extinguishment and reissuance for accounting purposes, requiring these notes to be subsequently carried at fair value. The change in fair value at the end of each reporting period is recorded as “Change in fair value of debt.”

 

Financing cost decreased by $1,086,383, or 89%, in 2019. Financing cost in 2018 arose from the excess of fair value of derivative instruments over net proceeds received from the July 2018 Private Placement transaction, as well as from the issuance of 12 convertible promissory notes with a floating conversion rate that gave rise to an ECF derivative instrument with a fair value greater than the face value of the notes. Financing cost in 2019 arose from the issuance of 11 convertible promissory notes with a floating conversion rate.

 

Amortization of original issue and debt discounts increased by $496,897, or 65%, in 2019 as a result of the amortization of convertible notes with larger average discount balances being amortized in 2019.

 

Change in fair value of derivative financial instruments decreased by $777,963, or 733%, from a loss of $106,141 in 2018 to a gain of $671,822 in 2019. The 2018 loss related primarily to a $385,856 loss associated with the revaluation and reclassification to equity of derivatives associated with warrants issued in the July 2018 Private Placement. The 2019 gains result primarily from a decrease in the fair value of derivatives associated with floating-rate convertible notes payable.

 

Interest expense increased by $50,976, or 26%, in 2019 as a result of higher average balance on convertible notes and notes payable to related parties during 2019.

 

Total other expenses decreased by $499,100, or 18%, in 2019 primarily as a result of large financing costs in 2018 related to the July 2018 Private Placement transaction, a loss on the change in fair value of derivative financial instruments incurred in 2018 related to the July 2018 Private Placement transaction, and a large loss on debt extinguishment related to the extension of debt in 2018, offset in part by higher losses on debt extinguishment resulting primarily from the extension of convertible notes and related party notes and the conversion of convertible notes payable and higher amortization of discounts on convertible notes.

 

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Net loss decreased by $262,236, or 5%, in 2019 primarily as a result of large financing costs in 2018 related to the July 2018 Private Placement transaction, a loss on the change in fair value of derivative financial instruments incurred in 2018 related to the July 2018 Private Placement transaction, a large loss on debt extinguishment related to the extension of debt in 2018, and profits generated by NCFM in 2019, offset in part by higher operating expenses due in part to the operations of NCFM in 2019.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Going Concern

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had a working capital deficit of $4,906,041 and accumulated deficit $16,029,654. For the year ended December 31, 2019, we had a net loss of $5,528,599 and net cash used by operating activities of $2,362,851. Net cash used in investing activities was $475,056, comprised principally of the cash portion of paid for the acquisition of NCFM totaling $465,000 (net of cash acquired). Net cash provided by financing activities was $2,812,570, resulting principally from resulting principally from $2,175,000 net proceeds from the issuance of convertible notes and $1,658,986 proceeds from the sale of common stock.

 

Our cash balance and revenues generated are not currently sufficient and cannot be projected to cover our operating expenses for the next twelve months from the date of this report. These matters raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans include attempting to improve its business profitability and its ability to generate sufficient cash flow from its operations to meet its needs on a timely basis, obtaining additional working capital funds through equity and debt financing arrangements, and restructuring on-going operations to eliminate inefficiencies to raise cash balance in order to meet our anticipated cash requirements for the next twelve months from the date of this report. However, there can be no assurance that these plans and arrangements will be sufficient to fund our ongoing capital expenditures, working capital, and other requirements. Management intends to make every effort to identify and develop sources of funds. The outcome of these matters cannot be predicted at this time. There can be no assurance that any additional financings will be available to us on satisfactory terms and conditions, if at all.

 

Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon our ability to raise additional capital and achieve profitable operations. The accompanying consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability or classification of asset-carrying amounts or the amounts and classification of liabilities that may result should we be unable to continue as a going concern. 

 

As further discussed below in “Significant Liquidity Events,” in July 2018, we completed a Private Placement (the “July 2018 Private Placement”) and received net proceeds of $1,774,690. Moreover, in July 2016, we entered into an Investment Agreement (the “Investment Agreement”) pursuant to which the investor has agreed to purchase up to $3,000,000 of our common stock over a three-year period starting upon registration of the underlying shares, with such shares put to the investor by us pursuant to a specified formula that limits the number of shares able to be put to the investor to the number equal to the average trading volume of our common shares for the ten consecutive trading days prior to the put notice being issued. During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, we received $929,986 and $440,767, respectively, from the proceeds of the sale of 5,074,068 and 2,440,337 shares, respectively, pursuant to the Investment Agreement.

 

We intend that the cost of implementing our development and sales efforts related to the HealthLynked Network, as well as maintaining our existing and expanding overhead and administrative costs, will be financed from (i) profits generated by NCFM and, upon completion of the acquisition, from Cura and AHP, and (ii) outside funding sources available to us, including the put rights associated with the Investment Agreement, issuance of convertible notes, sales of our common stock, and loans from related parties. We expect to repay our outstanding convertible notes, which have an aggregate face value of $2,335,994 as of December 31, 2019, from outside funding sources, including but not limited to new convertible notes payable, amounts available upon the exercise of the put rights granted to us under the Investment Agreement, sales of equity, loans from related parties and others, or through the conversion of the convertible notes into equity. No assurances can be given that we will be able to access sufficient outside capital in a timely fashion in order to repay the convertible notes before they mature. If necessary funds are not available, our business and operations would be materially adversely affected and in such event, we would attempt to reduce costs and adjust our business plan.

 

Significant Liquidity Events

 

Through December 31, 2019, we have funded our operations principally through a combination of convertible promissory notes, private placements of our common stock, promissory notes and related party debt, as described below.

 

July 2018 Private Placement

 

On July 17, 2018, we completed the July 2018 Private Placement pursuant to which we sold the following securities: (1) an aggregate of 3,900,000 shares of our common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, (2) Pre-Funded Warrants to purchase an aggregate of 4,100,000 shares of our common stock with an exercise price of $0.0001 and a term of five-years, (3) Series A Warrants to purchase up to an aggregate of 8,000,000 shares of our common stock with an exercise price of $0.25 per share (subsequently reset to $0.2233 on the Repricing Date) and a term of five years, and (4) Series B Warrants to purchase up to a maximum of 17,000,000 shares of our common stock (subsequently reset at 2,745,757 pursuant to the terms of such warrants) at an exercise price of $0.0001. Net proceeds to the Company were $1,774,690. The Company also issued to the placement agent 640,000 Series A Warrants with the same terms as the investor’s Series A Warrants and Series B Warrants to purchase up to a maximum of 219,661 shares of Company common stock at an exercise price of $0.0001.

 

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Investment Agreement

 

On July 7, 2016, we entered into the Investment Agreement with an accredited investor pursuant to which an accredited investor agreed to invest up to $3,000,000 to purchase the Company’s common stock, par value of $.0001 per share. The purchase price for such shares shall be 80% of the lowest volume weighted average price of our common stock during the five consecutive trading days prior to the date on which written notice is sent by us to the investor stating the number of shares that the Company is selling to the investor, subject to certain discounts and adjustments. Further, pursuant to an Amended Investment Agreement dated March 22, 2017, we granted to the investor warrants to purchase an aggregate of seven (7) million shares of common stock with the following fixed exercise prices: (i) four million shares at $0.25 per share; (ii) two million shares at $0.50 per share; and (iii) one million shares at $1.00 per share. The warrants also contain a “cashless exercise” provision and the shares underlying the warrants will not be registered. During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, we received proceeds from the sale of shares pursuant to the Investment Agreement totaling $929,986 (5,074,068 shares) and $440,523 (2,440,337 shares), respectively.

 

Other Sales of Common Stock

 

During 2018, we sold 3,534,891 shares of common stock in six separate private placement transactions. We received $417,500 in proceeds from the sales, which were transacted at share prices between $0.085 and $0.35 per share. In connection with these stock sales, we also issued 2,649,798 five-year warrants to purchase shares of common stock at exercise prices between $0.15 and $0.45 per share.

 

During 2019, we sold 3,239,924 shares of common stock in eight separate private placement transactions. We received $670,000 in proceeds from the sales, which were transacted at share prices between $0.12 and $0.30 per share. In connection with these stock sales, we also issued 1,619,962 five-year warrants to purchase shares of common stock at exercise prices between $0.22 and $0.40 per share and 250,000 three-year warrants to purchase shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.50 per share.

 

Convertible Notes Payable

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had outstanding convertible notes payable with aggregate face value of $2,335,994 maturing between July and December 2020, as follows:

 

                Conversion        
          Interest     Price/        
    Face Value     Rate     Discount     Term  
$550k Note - July 2016   $ 550,000       6 %   $ 0.08       December 31, 2020  
$50k Note - July 2016     50,000       10 %   $ 0.10       December 31, 2020  
$111k Note - May 2017     111,000       10 %   $ 0.35       December 31, 2020  
$357.5k Note - April 2019     357,500       10 %   $ 0.20       December 31, 2020  
$154k Note - June 2019     50,000       10 %     39 %     June 3, 2020  
$136k Notes - July 2019     135,850       10 %     25 %     April 11, 2020  
$78k Note III - July 2019     78,000       10 %     39 %     April 30, 2020  
$230k Note - July 2019     230,000       10 %     35 %     July 18, 2020  
$103.5k Note - August 2019     108,947       10 %     25 %     August 26, 2020  
$142.5k Note - October 2019     142,500       10 %     39 %     October 1, 2020  
$103k Note V - October 2019     103,000       10 %     39 %     August 15, 2020  
$108.9k Note II - October 2019     108,947       10 %     25 %     October 30, 2020  
$128.5k Note - October 2019     128,500       10 %     39 %     October 30, 2020  
$103k Note VI - November 2019     103,000       10 %     39 %     September 15, 2020  
$78.8k Note II - December 2019     78,750       10 %     25 %     December 5, 2020  
    $ 2,335,994                          

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we repaid eight convertible notes payable with aggregate face value of $813,500 for total cash payments of $1,020,491 and holders converted principal in the amount of $533,000 on four other notes payable.

 

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Plan of operation and future funding requirements

 

Our plan of operations is to operate NWC and continue to invest in our cloud-based online personal medical information and record archiving system, the “HealthLynked Network,” which enables patients and doctors to keep track of medical information via the Internet in a cloud-based system.

 

We intend to market the HealthLynked Network via direct sales force targeting physicians’ offices, direct to patient marketing, affiliated marketing campaigns, co-marketing with online medical supplies retailer MedOffice Direct, and expanded southeast regional sales efforts. We intend that our initial primary sales strategy will be direct physician sales through the use of regional sales representatives whom we will hire as access to capital allows. In combination with our direct sales, we intend to also utilize Internet based marketing to increase penetration to targeted geographical areas. These campaigns will be focused on both physician providers and patient members.

 

If we fail to complete the development of, or successfully market, the HealthLynked Network, our ability to realize future increases in revenue and operating profits could be impacted, and our results of operations and financial position would be materially adversely affected.

 

The capital from the July 2018 Private Placement was raised for the purpose of technology enhancement, sales and marketing initiatives and to fund a portion of the first phase of our planned acquisition strategy. In 2019, we began implementation of our plan to acquire health service businesses and offer physician owners cash, stock, and deferred compensation. On April 15, 2019, we acquired HCFM for $750,000 in cash, $750,000 in shares of Company common stock and $500,000 in a three-year performance-based payout.

 

Currently, we are focusing on acquiring profitable ACOs with a concentration on physician-based ACOs in Florida, the Southeast, Texas, New York and Michigan. ACOs’ objectives are to reduce patients’ healthcare costs while improving their health. Our initial targets are physician-based Florida Medicare ACOs. Profitable ACOs have shared savings, which are payments made by the Medicare governing body CMS to ACOs whose Medicare patients have aggregate total savings over the regional threshold for all Medicare patients in the territory and that meet CMS’ quality standards. Given HealthLynked’s goal to improve healthcare and reduce healthcare costs for all patients, we anticipate that the ACO acquisition model can help us expand both physician and patient utilization of the HealthLynked Network while continuing to add incremental revenue and profit from to our health services and ACO segments. To this end, on February 5, 2020, we entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger to acquire Jacksonville, Florida-based CHM and its subsidiary AHP. CHM is a healthcare enablement company that empowers local providers to own and operate in a franchise-like model that extends their reach and capabilities to maximize revenue, deliver quality care and improve patient outcomes. CHM’s subsidiary AHP is an ACO with providers around the U.S. participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program.

 

We plan to raise additional capital to fund our ongoing acquisition strategy. In addition, we have extended a significant portion of our outstanding debt until December 31, 2020. Specifically, all of Dr. Michael Dent’s notes payable with an aggregate face value of $646,000 and convertible notes payable held by Iconic Holdings LLC with an aggregate face value of $1,068,000 have been extended until December 31, 2020.

 

Historical Cash Flows

 

    Years Ended December 31,  
    2019     2018  
Net cash (used in) provided by:            
Operating activities   $ (2,362,851 )   $ (2,356,186 )
Investing Activities     (475,056 )     (3,002 )
Financing activities     2,812,570       2,444,960  
Net increase (decrease) in cash   $ (25,337 )   $ 85,772  

 

Operating Activities – During the year ended December 31, 2019, we used cash from operating activities of $2,362,851, as compared with $2,356,186 in the same period of 2018. The increase in cash usage resulted primarily from increased general and administrative expenses offset by positive cash flow from operations of $261,446 generated by NCFM after the acquisition and through December 31, 2019.

 

Investing Activities – During the year ended December 31, 2019, we used $465,000 for the acquisition of HCFM (net of $35,000 cash received). 2018 cash used in investing activities was comprised of acquisition of furniture and fixtures in the amount of $3,002.

 

Financing Activities – During the year ended December 31, 2019, we realized $1,658,986 from the proceeds of the sale of shares of common stock to investors and pursuant to the Investment Agreement and $2,175,000 net proceeds from the issuance of convertible notes, while making repayment on convertible notes payable of $1,020,491. During the year ended December 31, 2018, we realized $1,255,500 net proceeds from the issuance of convertible notes, $2,632,956 from the proceeds of the sale of shares of common stock to investors and pursuant to the Investment Agreement, $101,450 proceeds from related party loans, and $73,500 from notes payable. We also made repayments of $1,388,560 against convertible notes, $199,067 against notes payable, $9,000 against related party loans and $16,819 on capital lease obligations.

 

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Exercise of Warrants and Options

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we generated $275 from the exercise of 2,745,757 warrants. There were no proceeds generated from the exercise of warrants or options during the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Other Outstanding Obligations at December 31, 2019

 

Warrants

 

As of December 31, 2019, 47,056,293 shares of our Common Stock are issuable pursuant to the exercise of warrants with exercise prices ranging from $0.0001 to $1.00.

 

Options

As of December 31, 2019, 3,269,250 shares of our Common Stock are issuable pursuant to the exercise of options with exercise prices ranging from $0.08 to $0.31.

 

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

None.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

Our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2019 were as follows:

 

    Operating     Capital     Total  
    Leases     Leases     Commitments  
2020   $ 234,891     $ 4,587     $ 239,478  
2021     75,019             75,019  
2022     28,443             28,443  
2023                  
Total lease payments     338,353       4,587       342,940  
Less interest     (60,802 )     (105 )     (60,907 )
Present value of lease liabilities   $ 277,551     $ 4,482     $ 282,033  

 

Operating lease commitments relate to three leases in Naples, Florida. First, the Company entered into an operating lease for its NWC practice office in Naples, Florida. The lease commenced on August 1, 2013 and expires July 31, 2020. The lease is for a 6,901 square-foot space. The base rent for the first full year of the lease term is $251,287 per annum with increases during the period. Second, the Company entered into another operating lease in the same building for an additional 361 square feet space for use of the medical equipment for the same period. The base rent for the first full year of the lease term is $13,140 per annum. Third, the Company leases on a month-to-month basis approximately 2,500 square feet of office space in Naples, FL used for Digital Services division administration. Monthly rent is approximately $3,300. Fourth, the Company leases approximately 3,700 square feet for its NCFM practice office in Naples, Florida. The lease commenced on April 5, 2019 and expires May 30, 2022. Base rent for the first full year of the lease term is $66,825 per annum with scheduled increases in years two and three.

 

Capital lease commitments are comprised of a capital equipment finance lease for Ultra Sound equipment with Everbank. There was no interest on this lease. The monthly payment is $1,529 for 60 months ending in March 2020.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

Pursuant to Item 305(e) of Regulation S-K (§229.305(e)), the Company is not required to provide the information required by this Item as it is a “smaller reporting company,” as defined by Rule 229.10(f)(1).

 

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

    Page
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm   F-2
Consolidated balance sheets at December 31, 2019 and 2018   F-3
Consolidated statements of operations for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018   F-4
Consolidated statements of changes in shareholders’ deficit for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018   F-5
Consolidated statements of cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018   F-6
Notes to consolidated financial statements   F-8

 

F-1

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of

HealthLynked Corporation and Subsidiaries

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of HealthLynked Corporation and Subsidiaries (collectively, the “Company”) as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders’ deficit and cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2019, and the related notes and schedules (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2019, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Change in Accounting Principles

 

As discussed in Note 2 and Note 9 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company changed its method of accounting for leases in 2019 due to the adoption of ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), as amended, effective January 1, 2019, using the modified retrospective approach.

 

The Company’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 3 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements, the Company has suffered recurring losses from operations, generated negative cash flows from operating activities, has an accumulated deficit and has stated that substantial doubt exists about Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s evaluation of the events and conditions and management’s plans in regarding these matters are also described in Note 3. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

  

/s/ RBSM LLP

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2014.

 

New York, New York

March 30, 2020


 

F-2

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

    December 31,  
    2019     2018  
ASSETS            
Current Assets            
Cash   $ 110,441     $ 135,778  
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $13,972 and $13,972 as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively     83,251       114,884  
Inventory     70,460        
Prepaid expenses     119,328       28,542  
Deferred offering costs     19,203       96,022  
Total Current Assets     402,683       375,226  
                 
Property, plant and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $749,316  and $752,173 as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively     513,788       42,597  
Goodwill and intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization of $5,908  and $0 as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively     1,336,958        
ROU lease assets and deposits     293,125       9,540  
                 
Total Assets   $ 2,546,554     $ 427,363  
                 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT                
                 
Current Liabilities                
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   $ 836,465     $ 394,333  
Capital lease, current portion           19,877  
Lease liability, current portion     201,523        
Due to related party, current portion     493,457       429,717  
Notes payable to related party, current portion     743,955       672,471  
Convertible notes payable, net of original issue discount and debt discount of  $777,668 and $386,473 as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively     1,542,036       1,042,314  
Contingent acquisition consideration     500,000        
Derivative financial instruments     991,288       800,440  
Total Current Liabilities     5,308,724       3,359,152  
                 
Long-Term Liabilities                
Capital leases, long-term portion           3,058  
Lease liability, long term portion     80,510        
                 
Total Liabilities     5,389,234       3,362,210  
                 
Shareholders’ Deficit                
Common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, 500,000,000 shares authorized, 109,894,490 and 85,178,902 shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively     10,990       8,518  
Common stock issuable, $0.0001 par value; 1,047,904 and 114,080 shares as of                
December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively     159,538       26,137  
Additional paid-in capital     13,016,446       7,531,553  
Accumulated deficit     (16,029,654 )     (10,501,055 )
Total Shareholders’ Deficit     (2,842,680 )     (2,934,847 )
                 
Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Deficit   $ 2,546,554     $ 427,363  

 

See the accompanying notes to these Consolidated Financial Statements

 

F-3

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

 

    Years Ended December 31,  
    2019     2018  
Revenue            
Patient service revenue, net   $ 4,018,818     $ 2,259,002  
                 
Operating Expenses                
Practice salaries and benefits     2,393,954       1,446,243  
Other practice operating costs     1,845,070       916,408  
General and administrative     2,915,419       2,844,715  
Depreciation and amortization     73,385       23,782  
Total Operating Expenses     7,227,828       5,231,148  
                 
Loss from operations     (3,209,010 )     (2,972,146 )
                 
Other Income (Expenses)                
Gain (loss) on extinguishment of debt     (1,229,777 )     (393,123 )
Change in fair value of debt     (121,508 )     (140,789 )
Financing cost     (135,528 )     (1,221,911 )
Amortization of original issue and debt discounts on notes payable and convertible notes     (1,260,513 )     (763,616 )
Change in fair value of derivative financial instrument     671,822       (106,141 )
Interest expense     (244,085 )     (193,109 )
Total other expenses     (2,319,589 )     (2,818,689 )
                 
Net loss before provision for income taxes     (5,528,599 )     (5,790,835 )
                 
Provision for income taxes            
                 
Net loss   $ (5,528,599 )   $ (5,790,835 )
                 
                 
Net loss per share, basic and diluted:                
Basic   $ (0.06 )   $ (0.07 )
Fully diluted   $ (0.06 )   $ (0.07 )
                 
Weighted average number of common shares:                
Basic     99,059,677       78,816,272  
Fully diluted     99,059,677       78,816,272  

   

See the accompanying notes to these Consolidated Financial Statements

 

F-4

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

    Number of Shares           Common     Additional           Total  
    Common     Common     Stock     Paid-in     Accumulated     Shareholders’  
    Stock     Stock     Issuable     Capital     Deficit     Deficit  
    (#)     ($)     ($)     ($)     ($)     ($)  
Balance at December 31, 2017     72,302,937       7,230       8,276       2,638,311       (4,705,230 )     (2,051,413 )
                                                 
Sale of common stock     9,875,228       988             2,450,180             2,451,168  
Fair value of warrants allocated to proceeds of common stock                       181,788             181,788  
Fair value of shares issued with convertible notes payable     35,000       4             5,593             5,597  
Fair value of warrants issued to extend convertible notes payable                       229,900             229,900  
Fair value of warrants issued to retire convertible notes payable                       143,014             143,014  
Conversion of convertible notes payable to common stock     384,839       38             42,173             42,211  
Derivative liabilities transferred to additional paid-in capital                       2,846,921             2,846,921  
Fair value of warrants issued for professional services                       296,447             296,447  
Consultant fees payable with common shares and warrants     277,147       28       17,869       31,659             49,556  
Fair value of warrants issued to extend related party notes payable                       337,467             337,467  
Shares and options issued pursuant to employee equity incentive plan     403,750       40       (8 )     102,598             102,630  
Sale of common stock initially allocated to derivative financial instruments                       (1,774,298 )           (1,774,298 )
Exercise of stock warrants     2,000,001       200             (200 )            
Repurchase and retirement of treasury shares     (100,000 )     (10 )                 (4,990 )     (5,000 )
Net loss                             (5,790,835 )     (5,790,835 )
                                                 
Balance at December 31, 2018     85,178,902       8,518       26,137       7,531,553       (10,501,055 )     (2,934,847 )
                                                 
Acquisition of Hughes Center for Functional Medicine     3,968,254       397             999,603             1,000,000  
Sale of common stock     8,313,992       832       59,000       1,444,504             1,504,336  
Fair value of warrants allocated to proceeds of common stock                       154,650             154,650  
Shares issued with convertible notes payable     140,500       14             28,303             28,317  
Fair value of warrants allocated to proceeds of convertible notes payable                       225,323             225,323  
Fair value of warrants issued and modifications of beneficial conversion feature to extend convertible notes payable                       1,046,399             1,046,399  
Conversion of convertible notes payable to common stock     6,332,893       633             1,218,922             1,219,555  
Fair value of warrants issued for professional services                       54,257             54,257  
Consultant fees payable with common shares and warrants     560,000       56       67,240       108,026             175,322  
Shares and options issued pursuant to employee equity incentive plan     349,063       35       7,161       206,336             213,532  
Exercise of stock options     113,141       11             (11 )            
Exercise of stock warrants     4,937,745       494             (219 )           275  
Repurchase of treasury stock                       (1,200 )           (1,200 )
Net loss                             (5,528,599 )     (5,528,599 )
                                                 
Balance at December 31, 2019     109,894,490       10,990       159,538       13,016,446       (16,029,654 )     (2,842,680 )

 

See the accompanying notes to these Consolidated Financial Statements

 

F-5

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

 

    Years Ended December 31,  
    2019     2018  
Cash Flows from Operating Activities            
Net loss   $ (5,528,599 )   $ (5,790,835 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:                
Depreciation and amortization     73,385       23,782  
Stock based compensation, including amortization of prepaid fees     519,930       474,231  
Amortization of original issue discount and debt discount on convertible notes     1,260,513       763,616  
Financing cost     135,528       1,221,911  
Change in fair value of derivative financial instruments     (671,822 )     106,141  
Loss on extinguishment of debt     1,229,777       393,123  
Change in fair value of debt     121,508       140,789  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:                
Accounts receivable     31,633       (1,535 )
Inventory     1,654        
Prepaid expenses and deposits     (96,696 )     53,350  
ROU lease assets     282,372        
Accounts payable and accrued expenses     492,212       193,400  
Lease liability     (278,017 )      
Due to related party, current portion     63,771       65,841  
Net cash used in operating activities     (2,362,851 )     (2,356,186 )
                 
Cash Flows from Investing Activities                
Acquisition of property and equipment     (10,056 )     (3,002 )
Acquisition, net of cash acquired     (465,000 )      
Net cash used in investing activities     (475,056 )     (3,002 )
                 
Cash Flows from Financing Activities                
Proceeds from sale of common stock     1,658,986       2,632,956  
Proceeds from exercise of warrants     275        
Proceeds from issuance of convertible notes     2,175,000       1,255,500  
Repayment of convertible notes     (1,020,491 )     (1,388,560 )
Proceeds from related party loans           101,450  
Repayment of related party loans           (9,000 )
Proceeds from notes payable and bank loans           73,500  
Repayment of notes payable and bank loans           (199,067 )
Payments on capital leases           (16,819 )
Repurchase and retirement of treasury stock     (1,200 )     (5,000 )
Net cash provided by financing activities     2,812,570       2,444,960  
                 
Net (decrease) increase in cash     (25,337 )     85,772  
Cash, beginning of period     135,778       50,006  
                 
Cash, end of period   $ 110,441     $ 135,778  

  

(continued)

 

F-6

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

 

    Years Ended December 31,  
    2019     2018  
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:            
Cash paid during the period for interest   $ 38,126     $ 79,844  
Cash paid during the period for income tax   $     $  
Schedule of non-cash investing and financing activities:                
Initial derivative liability and fair value of beneficial conversion feature and original issue discount allocated to proceeds of variable convertible notes payable   $ 1,870,234     $ 1,848,098  
Common stock issuable issued during period   $ 35     $ 13,799  
Fair value of warrants issued for professional service   $ 54,257     $ 130,306  
Conversion of convertible note payable to common shares   $ 1,219,555     $ 62,036  
Fair value of common shares issued with convertible notes payable   $ 28,318     $ 5,593  
Cashless exercise of options and warrants   $ 230     $ 200  
Adoption of lease obligation and ROU asset   $ 560,050     $  
Fair value of shares issued as acquisition consideration   $ 1,000,000     $  
Value of contingent acquisition consideration   $ 500,000     $  
Fair value of warrants issued and modifications of beneficial conversion feature to extend convertible notes payable   $ 703,267     $ 229,902  
Fair value of warrants issued to extend related party notes payable   $ 274,801     $ 337,466  
Fair value of warrants issued to extinguish convertible notes payable   $     $ 143,014  
Derivative liabilities written off with repayment of convertible notes payable   $ 608,390     $ 1,102,882  
Derivative liabilities written off at end of warrant repricing period   $     $ 2,783,372  
Derivative liabilities reclassified into additional paid in capital for convertible notes payable conversion into shares   $     $ 63,549  
Fair value of warrants allocated to proceeds of fixed convertible notes payable   $ 225,323     $  

   

See the accompanying notes to these Consolidated Financial Statements

 

F-7

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 1 – BUSINESS AND BUSINESS PRESENTATION

 

HealthLynked Corp. (the “Company”) was incorporated in the State of Nevada on August 4, 2014. On September 2, 2014, the Company filed Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation with the Secretary of State of Nevada setting the total number of authorized shares at 250,000,000 shares, which included up to 230,000,000 shares of common stock and 20,000,000 shares of “blank check” preferred stock. On February 5, 2018, the Company filed an Amendment to its Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation with the Secretary of State of Nevada to increase the number of authorized shares of common stock to 500,000,000 shares.

 

On September 5, 2014, the Company entered into a share exchange agreement (the “Share Exchange Agreement”) with Naples Women’s Center LLC (“NWC”), a Florida Limited Liability Company (“LLC”), acquiring 100% of the LLC membership units of NWC through the issuance of 50,000,000 shares of Company common stock to the members of NWC (the “Restructuring”). NWC is a multi-specialty medical group including OB/GYN (both Obstetrics and Gynecology), and General Practice located in Naples, Florida.

 

On June 28, 2018, the Company formed wholly-owned subsidiary HLYK FL LLC (“Merger Sub”) to act as the acquiring entity in the acquisition of Hughes Center for Functional Medicine, P.A. (the “HCFM”). The acquisition of HCFM was completed on April 12, 2019. At the time of the acquisition, HCFM was renamed and rebranded as Naples Center for Functional Medicine (“NCFM”). See “Note 4 – Acquisition.” NCFM is a Functional Medical Practice located in Naples, Florida and is engaged in improving the health of its patients through individualized and integrative health care. NWC and NCFM comprise the Company’s “Health Services” segment.

 

The Company also develops and operates an online personal medical information and record archive system, the “HealthLynked Network,” which enables patients and doctors to keep track of medical information via the Internet in a cloud-based system. Patients complete a detailed online personal medical history including past surgical history, medications, allergies, and family history. Once this information is entered patients and their treating physicians are able to update the information as needed to provide a comprehensive medical history. Business activities surrounding the HealthLynked Network comprise the Company’s “Digital Healthcare” segment.

 

These consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments including normal recurring adjustments, which, in the opinion of management, are necessary to present fairly the financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented in accordance with the GAAP.

 

All significant intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated upon consolidation. In addition, certain amounts in the prior periods’ consolidated financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation.

 

NOTE 2 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

A summary of the significant accounting policies applied in the presentation of the accompanying consolidated financial statements follows:

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“US GAAP”).

 

All amounts referred to in the notes to the consolidated financial statements are in United States Dollars ($) unless stated otherwise.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect certain reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Accordingly, actual results could differ from those estimates. Significant estimates include assumptions about collection of accounts receivable, the valuation and recognition of stock-based compensation expense, valuation allowance for deferred tax assets, borrowing rate consideration for right-of-use (“ROU”) lease assets including related lease liability and useful life of fixed assets.

 

F-8

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 2 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

 

Effective January 1, 2019, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-02, Leases (“ASU 2016-02”) using the required modified retrospective approach. ASU 2016-02 requires lessees to record most leases on their balance sheets but recognize expenses on their income statements in a manner similar to current accounting. See discussion below under the caption “Leases” in this Note 2 and in Note 9 for more detail on the Company’s accounting policy with respect to lease accounting.

 

Effective January 1, 2019, the Company adopted ASU 2018-07, Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting. ASU 2018-07 expands the scope of Topic 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees and supersedes the guidance in Subtopic 505-50, Equity - Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact the Company’s financial statements and related disclosures.

 

Patient Service Revenue

 

Patient service revenue is reported at the amount that reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for providing patient care. These amounts are due from patients and third-party payors (including health insurers and government programs) and includes variable consideration for retroactive revenue adjustments due to settlement of audits, reviews, and investigations. Generally, the Company bills patients and third-party payors within days after the services are performed and/or the patient is discharged from the facility. Revenue is recognized as performance obligations are satisfied.

 

Performance obligations are determined based on the nature of the services provided by the Company. Revenue for performance obligations satisfied over time is recognized based on actual charges incurred in relation to total expected charges. The Company believes that this method provides a faithful depiction of the transfer of services over the term of the performance obligation based on the inputs needed to satisfy the obligation. Revenue for performance obligations satisfied at a point in time is recognized when goods or services are provided and the Company does not believe it is required to provide additional goods or services to the patient.

 

The Company determines the transaction price based on standard charges for goods and services provided, reduced by contractual adjustments provided to third-party payors, discounts provided to uninsured patients in accordance with the Company’s policy, and/or implicit price concessions provided to uninsured patients. The Company determines its estimates of contractual adjustments and discounts based on contractual agreements, its discount policies, and historical experience. The Company determines its estimate of implicit price concessions based on its historical collection experience with this class of patients.

 

Agreements with third-party payors typically provide for payments at amounts less than established charges. A summary of the payment arrangements with major third-party payors follows:

 

Medicare: Certain inpatient acute care services are paid at prospectively determined rates per discharge based on clinical, diagnostic and other factors. Certain services are paid based on cost-reimbursement methodologies subject to certain limits. Physician services are paid based upon established fee schedules. Outpatient services are paid using prospectively determined rates.

 

Medicaid: Reimbursements for Medicaid services are generally paid at prospectively determined rates per discharge, per occasion of service, or per covered member.

 

Other: Payment agreements with certain commercial insurance carriers, health maintenance organizations, and preferred provider organizations provide for payment using prospectively determined rates per discharge, discounts from established charges, and prospectively determined daily rates.

 

Laws and regulations concerning government programs, including Medicare and Medicaid, are complex and subject to varying interpretation. As a result of investigations by governmental agencies, various health care organizations have received requests for information and notices regarding alleged noncompliance with those laws and regulations, which, in some instances, have resulted in organizations entering into significant settlement agreements. Compliance with such laws and regulations may also be subject to future government review and interpretation as well as significant regulatory action, including fines, penalties, and potential exclusion from the related programs. There can be no assurance that regulatory authorities will not challenge the Company’s compliance with these laws and regulations, and it is not possible to determine the impact, if any, such claims or penalties would have upon the Company. In addition, the contracts the Company has with commercial payors also provide for retroactive audit and review of claims.

 

F-9

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 2 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

Settlements with third-party payors for retroactive adjustments due to audits, reviews or investigations are considered variable consideration and are included in the determination of the estimated transaction price for providing patient care. These settlements are estimated based on the terms of the payment agreement with the payor, correspondence from the payor and the Company’s historical settlement activity, including an assessment to ensure that it is probable that a significant reversal in the amount of cumulative revenue recognized will not occur when the uncertainty associated with the retroactive adjustment is subsequently resolved. Estimated settlements are adjusted in future periods as adjustments become known, or as years are settled or are no longer subject to such audits, reviews, and investigations.

 

The Company also provides services to uninsured patients, and offers those uninsured patients a discount, either by policy or law, from standard charges. The Company estimates the transaction price for patients with deductibles and coinsurance and from those who are uninsured based on historical experience and current market conditions. The initial estimate of the transaction price is determined by reducing the standard charge by any contractual adjustments, discounts, and implicit price concessions. Subsequent changes to the estimate of the transaction price are generally recorded as adjustments to patient service revenue in the period of the change. Patient services provided by NCFM are provided on a cash basis and not submitted through third party insurance providers.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

For financial statement purposes, the Company considers all highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less to be cash and cash equivalents.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Trade receivables are carried at their estimated collectible amounts. Trade credit is generally extended on a short-term basis; thus trade receivables do not bear interest. Trade accounts receivable are periodically evaluated for collectability based on past collectability of the insurance companies, government agencies, and customers’ accounts receivable during the related period which generally approximates 48% of total billings. Trade accounts receivable are recorded at this net amount. As of and December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company’s gross accounts receivable were $174,531 and $244,956, respectively, and net accounts receivable were $83,251 and $114,884, respectively, based upon net reporting of accounts receivable. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company’s allowance of doubtful accounts was $13,972 and $13,972, respectively.

 

Leases

 

Upon transition under ASU 2016-02, the Company elected the suite of practical expedients as a package applied to all of its leases, including (i) not reassessing whether any expired or existing contracts are or contain leases, (ii) not reassessing the lease classification for any expired or existing leases, and (iii) not reassessing initial direct costs for any existing leases. For new leases, the Company will determine if an arrangement is or contains a lease at inception. Leases are included as ROU assets within other assets and ROU liabilities within accrued expenses and other liabilities and within other long-term liabilities on the Company’s consolidated balance sheets.

 

ROU assets and liabilities are recognized at commencement date based on the present value of lease payments over the lease term. The Company’s leases do not provide an implicit rate. The Company uses its incremental borrowing rate based on the information available at commencement date in determining the present value of lease payments. The ROU asset also includes any lease payments made and excludes lease incentives. Lease expense for lease payments is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Adoption of ASU 2016-02 had an impact of $277,678 and $282,033 on the Company’s assets and liabilities, respectively, and had no material impact on cash provided by or used in operating, investing or financing activities on the Company’s consolidated statements of cash flows.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory consisting of supplements, is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined by the first-in, first-out method. Outdated inventory is directly charged to cost of goods sold.

 

Goodwill and Intangible Assets

 

Goodwill is recognized as the excess cost of an acquired entity over the net amount assigned to assets acquired and liabilities assumed. Goodwill is not amortized, but rather tested for impairment on an annual basis and more often if circumstances require. Impairment losses are recognized whenever the implied fair value of goodwill is less than its carrying value.

 

F-10

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 2 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

The Company recognizes an acquired intangible apart from goodwill whenever the intangible arises from contractual or other legal rights, or whenever it can be separated or divided from the acquired entity and sold, transferred, licensed, rented or exchanged, either individually or in combination with a related contract, asset or liability. Such intangibles are amortized over their estimated useful lives unless the estimated useful life is determined to be indefinite. Amortizable intangible assets are being amortized primarily over useful lives of five years. The straight-line method of amortization is used as it has been determined to approximate the use pattern of the assets. Impairment losses are recognized if the carrying amount of an intangible that is subject to amortization is not recoverable from expected future cash flows and its carrying amount exceeds its fair value.

 

The Company also maintains intangible assets with indefinite lives, which are not amortized. These intangibles are tested for impairment on an annual basis and more often if circumstances require. Impairment losses are recognized whenever the implied fair value of these assets is less than their carrying value. No impairment charges were recognized in the years ended December 31, 2019 or 2018.

 

Concentrations of Credit Risk

 

The Company’s financial instruments that are exposed to a concentration of credit risk are cash and accounts receivable. There are no patients/customers that represent 10% or more of the Company’s revenue or accounts receivable. Generally, the Company’s cash and cash equivalents are in checking accounts.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost. When retired or otherwise disposed, the related carrying value and accumulated depreciation are removed from the respective accounts and the net difference less any amount realized from disposition, is reflected in earnings. For consolidated financial statement purposes, property and equipment are recorded at cost and depreciated using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives of 5 to 7 years. The cost of repairs and maintenance is expensed as incurred; major replacements and improvements are capitalized.

 

The Company examines the possibility of decreases in the value of fixed assets when events or changes in circumstances reflect the fact that their recorded value may not be recoverable. The Company recognizes an impairment loss when the sum of expected undiscounted future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset. The amount of impairment is measured as the difference between the asset’s estimated fair value and its book value. There was no impairment as of December 31, 2019 or 2018. 

 

Convertible Notes

 

Convertible notes are regarded as compound instruments, consisting of a liability component and an equity component. The component parts of compound instruments are classified separately as financial liabilities and equity in accordance with the substance of the contractual arrangement. At the date of issue, the fair value of the liability component is estimated using the prevailing market interest rate for a similar non-convertible instrument. This amount is recorded as a liability on an amortized cost basis until extinguished upon conversion or at the instrument’s maturity date. The equity component is determined by deducting the amount of the liability component from the fair value of the compound instrument as a whole. This is recognized as additional paid-in capital and included in equity, net of income tax effects, and is not subsequently remeasured. After initial measurement, they are carried at amortized cost using the effective interest method. Convertible notes for which the maturity date has been extended and that qualify for debt extinguishment treatment are recorded at fair value on the extinguishment date and then revalue at the end of each reporting period, with the change recorded to the statement of operations under “Change in Fair Value of Debt.”

 

F-11

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 2 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

Derivative Financial Instruments

 

The Company reviews the terms of convertible debt, equity instruments and other financing arrangements to determine whether there are embedded derivative instruments, including embedded conversion options that are required to be bifurcated and accounted for separately as a derivative financial instrument. Also, in connection with the issuance of financing instruments, the Company may issue freestanding options or warrants that may, depending on their terms, be accounted for as derivative instrument liabilities, rather than as equity. Derivative financial instruments are initially measured at their fair value. For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported as charges or credits to income. To the extent that the initial fair values of the freestanding and/or bifurcated derivative instrument liabilities exceed the total proceeds received, an immediate charge to income is recognized, in order to initially record the derivative instrument liabilities at their fair value. The discount from the face value of convertible debt instruments resulting from allocating some or all of the proceeds to the derivative instruments is amortized over the life of the instrument through periodic charges to income.

 

The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is reassessed at the end of each reporting period. If reclassification is required, the fair value of the derivative instrument, as of the determination date, is reclassified. Any previous charges or credits to income for changes in the fair value of the derivative instrument are not reversed. Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument could be required within twelve months of the balance sheet date. The Company does not use derivative instruments to hedge exposures to cash flow, market, or foreign currency risks.

 

Fair Value of Assets and Liabilities

 

Fair value is the price that would be received from the sale of an asset or paid to transfer a liability (i.e. an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market in an orderly transaction between market participants. In determining fair value, the accounting standards have established a three-level hierarchy that distinguishes between (i) market data obtained or developed from independent sources (i.e., observable data inputs) and (ii) a reporting entity’s own data and assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability (i.e., unobservable data inputs). Financial assets and financial liabilities measured and reported at fair value are classified in one of the following categories, in order of priority of observability and objectivity of pricing inputs:

 

Level 1 – Fair value based on quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;

 

Level 2 – Fair value based on significant directly observable data (other than Level 1 quoted prices) or significant indirectly observable data through corroboration with observable market data. Inputs would normally be (i) quoted prices in active markets for similar assets or liabilities, (ii) quoted prices in inactive markets for identical or similar assets or liabilities or (iii) information derived from or corroborated by observable market data;

 

Level 3 – Fair value based on prices or valuation techniques that require significant unobservable data inputs. Inputs would normally be a reporting entity’s own data and judgments about assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability.

 

The fair value measurement level for an asset or liability is based on the lowest level of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement. Valuation techniques should maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation under ASC 718 “Compensation – Stock Compensation” using the fair value based method. Under this method, compensation cost is measured at the grant date based on the value of the award and is recognized over the service period, which is usually the vesting period. This guidance establishes standards for the accounting for transactions in which an entity exchanges it equity instruments for goods or services. It also addresses transactions in which an entity incurs liabilities in exchange for goods or services that are based on the fair value of the entity’s equity instruments or that may be settled by the issuance of those equity instruments.

 

The Company uses the fair value method for equity instruments granted to non-employees and use the Black-Scholes model for measuring the fair value of options. The stock based fair value compensation is determined as of the date of the grant or the date at which the performance of the services is completed (measurement date) and is recognized over the vesting periods.

 

F-12

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 2 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company follows Accounting Standards Codification subtopic 740-10, Income Taxes (“ASC 740-10”) for recording the provision for income taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are computed based upon the difference between the financial statement and income tax basis of assets and liabilities using the enacted marginal tax rate applicable when the related asset or liability is expected to be realized or settled. Deferred income tax expenses or benefits are based on the changes in the asset or liability during each period. If available evidence suggests that it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized, a valuation allowance is required to reduce the deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. Future changes in such valuation allowance are included in the provision for deferred income taxes in the period of change. Deferred income taxes may arise from temporary differences resulting from income and expense items reported for financial accounting and tax purposes in different periods. Deferred taxes are classified as current or non-current, depending on the classification of assets and liabilities to which they relate. Deferred taxes arising from temporary differences that are not related to an asset or liability are classified as current or non-current depending on the periods in which the temporary differences are expected to reverse and are considered immaterial. No Income Tax has been provided for the year ended December 31, 2019, since the Company has sustained a loss for the period. Due to the uncertainty of the utilization and recoverability of the loss carry-forwards (including the year ended December 31, 2019) and other deferred tax assets, management has determined a full valuation allowance for the deferred tax assets, since it is more likely than not that the deferred tax assets will not be realizable.

 

Recurring Fair Value Measurements

 

The carrying value of the Company’s financial assets and financial liabilities is their cost, which may differ from fair value. The carrying value of cash held as demand deposits, money market and certificates of deposit, marketable investments, accounts receivable, short-term borrowings, accounts payable, accrued liabilities, and derivative financial instruments approximated their fair value.

 

Net Loss per Share 

 

Basic net income (loss) per common share is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company reported a net loss and excluded all outstanding stock options, warrants and other dilutive securities from the calculation of diluted net loss per common share because inclusion of these securities would have been anti-dilutive. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, potentially dilutive securities were comprised of (i) 47,056,293 and 46,161,463 warrants outstanding, respectively, (ii) 3,269,250 and 3,707,996 stock options outstanding, respectively, (iii) 23,210,423 and 15,517,111 shares issuable upon conversion of convertible notes, respectively, and (iv) 332,500 and 540,000 unissued shares subject to future vesting requirements granted pursuant to the Company’s Employee Incentive Plan. 

 

Common stock awards

 

The Company grants common stock awards to non-employees in exchange for services provided. The Company measures the fair value of these awards using the fair value of the services provided or the fair value of the awards granted, whichever is more reliably measurable. The fair value measurement date of these awards is generally the date the performance of services is complete. The fair value of the awards is recognized on a straight-line basis as services are rendered. The share-based payments related to common stock awards for the settlement of services provided by non-employees is recorded on the consolidated statement of comprehensive loss in the same manner and charged to the same account as if such settlements had been made in cash.

 

Warrants

 

In connection with certain financing, consulting and collaboration arrangements, the Company has issued warrants to purchase shares of its common stock. The outstanding warrants are standalone instruments that are not puttable or mandatorily redeemable by the holder and are classified as equity awards. The Company measures the fair value of the awards using the Black-Scholes option pricing model as of the measurement date. Warrants issued in conjunction with the issuance of common stock are initially recorded at fair value as a reduction in additional paid-in capital of the common stock issued. All other warrants are recorded at fair value as expense over the requisite service period or at the date of issuance, if there is not a service period. Warrants granted in connection with ongoing arrangements are more fully described in Note 13, Shareholders’ Deficit.

 

F-13

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 2 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

Business Segments

 

The Company uses the “management approach” to identify its reportable segments. The management approach designates the internal organization used by management for making operating decisions and assessing performance as the basis for identifying the Company’s reportable segments. Using the management approach, the Company determined that it has two operating segments: Health Services (multi-specialty medical group including the NWC OB/GYN practice and the NCFM practice acquired in April 2019) and Digital Healthcare (develops and markets the “HealthLynked Network,” an online personal medical information and record archive system).

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

Effective January 1, 2019, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-02, Leases (“ASU 2016-02”) using the required modified retrospective approach. ASU 2016-02 requires lessees to record most leases on their balance sheets but recognize expenses on their income statements in a manner similar to current accounting. See discussion below under the caption “Leases” in this Note 2 and in Note 9 for more detail on the Company’s accounting policy with respect to lease accounting.

 

Effective January 1, 2019, the Company adopted ASU 2018-07, Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting. ASU 2018-07 expands the scope of Topic 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees and supersedes the guidance in Subtopic 505-50, Equity - Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact the Company’s financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers — Topic 606, which supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in FASB ASC 605. The new guidance primarily states that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods and services. In January 2017 and September 2017, the FASB issued several amendments to ASU 2014-09, including updates stemming from SEC Accounting Staff Announcement in July 2017. The amendments and updates included clarification on accounting for principal versus agent considerations (i.e., reporting gross versus net), licenses of intellectual property and identification of performance obligations. These amendments and updates do not change the core principle of the standard but provide clarity and implementation guidance. We adopted this standard on January 1, 2018 and selected the modified retrospective transition method. We have modified our accounting policies to reflect the requirements of this standard, however, the planned adoption did not materially impact the Company’s financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-01, Financial Instruments — Overall: Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities. The guidance affects the accounting for equity investments, financial liabilities under the fair value option and the presentation and disclosure requirements of financial instruments. The guidance is effective in the first quarter of fiscal 2019. We adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2019. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact our financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-11, Earnings Per Share, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity and Derivatives and Hedging, which changes the accounting and earnings per share for certain instruments with down round features. The amendments in this ASU should be applied using a cumulative-effect adjustment as of the beginning of the fiscal year or retrospective adjustment to each period presented and is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those periods. We adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2019. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact our financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In February 2018, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASC Update No 2018-02 (Topic 220) Income Statement – Reporting Comprehensive Income: Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income.  This ASC update allows for a reclassification into retained earnings of the stranded tax effects in accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) resulting from the enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“TCJA”). The updated guidance is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018.  We adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2019. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact our financial statements and related disclosures. 

 

F-14

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 2 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting, to expand the scope of Topic 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees and supersedes the guidance in Subtopic 505-50, Equity - Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees. Under ASU 2018-07, equity-classified nonemployee share-based payment awards are measured at the grant date fair value on the grant date The probability of satisfying performance conditions must be considered for equity-classified nonemployee share-based payment awards with such conditions. ASU 2018-07 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted. We adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2019. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact our financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-09 to provide clarification and correction of errors to the Codification. The amendments in this update cover multiple Accounting Standards Updates. Some topics in the update may require transition guidance with effective dates for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018. We adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2019. The adoption of this guidance did not materially impact our financial statements and related disclosures.

 

NOTE 3 – GOING CONCERN MATTERS AND LIQUIDITY

 

As of December 31, 2019, the Company had a working capital deficit of $4,906,041 and accumulated deficit $16,029,654. For the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company had a net loss of $5,528,599 and net cash used by operating activities of $2,362,851. Net cash used in investing activities was $475,056. Net cash provided by financing activities was $2,812,570, resulting principally from resulting principally from $2,175,000 net proceeds from the issuance of convertible notes and $1,658,986 proceeds from the sale of common stock.

 

The Company’s cash balance and revenues generated are not currently sufficient and cannot be projected to cover its operating expenses for the next twelve months from the date of this report. These matters raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans include attempting to improve its business profitability and its ability to generate sufficient cash flow from its operations to meet its needs on a timely basis, obtaining additional working capital funds through equity and debt financing arrangements, and restructuring on-going operations to eliminate inefficiencies to raise cash balance in order to meet its anticipated cash requirements for the next twelve months from the date of this report. However, there can be no assurance that these plans and arrangements will be sufficient to fund the Company’s ongoing capital expenditures, working capital, and other requirements. Management intends to make every effort to identify and develop sources of funds. The outcome of these matters cannot be predicted at this time. There can be no assurance that any additional financings will be available to the Company on satisfactory terms and conditions, if at all.

 

The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent upon its ability to raise additional capital and achieve profitable operations. The accompanying consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability or classification of asset-carrying amounts or the amounts and classification of liabilities that may result should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern. 

 

A novel strain of coronavirus, COVID-19, that was first identified in China in December 2019, has surfaced in several regions across the world and resulted in travel restrictions and business slowdowns or shutdowns in affected areas. The further spread of COVID-19, and the requirement to take action to limit the spread of the illness, may impact our ability to carry out our business as usual and may materially adversely impact global economic conditions, our business and financial condition, including our potential to conduct financings on terms acceptable to us, if at all. The extent to which COVID-19 may impact our business will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, such as the ultimate geographic spread of the disease, the duration of the outbreak, travel restrictions and social distancing in the United States and other countries, business closures or business disruptions and the effectiveness of actions taken in the United States and other countries to contain and treat the disease. 

 

The Company intends that the cost of implementing its development and sales efforts related to the HealthLynked Network, as well as maintaining existing and expanding overhead and administrative costs, will be financed from (i) profits generated by NCFM and, upon completion of the acquisition, from Cura and AHP, and (ii) outside funding sources, including the put rights associated with the Investment Agreement, issuance of convertible notes, sales of common stock, and loans from related parties. The Company expects to repay our outstanding convertible notes, which have an aggregate face value of $2,335,994 as of December 31, 2019, from outside funding sources, including but not limited to new convertible notes payable, amounts available upon the exercise of the put rights granted under the Investment Agreement, sales of equity, loans from related parties and others, or through the conversion of convertible notes into equity. No assurances can be given that the Company will be able to access sufficient outside capital in a timely fashion in order to repay the convertible notes before they mature. If necessary funds are not available, the Company’s business and operations would be materially adversely affected and in such event, the Company would attempt to reduce costs and adjust its business plan.

 

F-15

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 4 – ACQUISITION

 

On April 12, 2019 the Company acquired a 100% interest in HCFM, a medical practice engaged in improving the health of its patients through individualized and integrative health care. Under the terms of acquisition, the Company paid HCFM shareholders $500,000 in cash, issued 3,968,254 shares of the Company’s common stock and agreed to an earn-out provision of $500,000 that may be earned based on the performance of HCFM in fiscal years ended December 31, 2019, 2020, and 2021.  The total consideration represents a transaction value of $2,000,000. The Company accounted for the transaction as an acquisition of a business pursuant to ASC 805, “Business Combinations” (“ASC 805”).

 

Following the acquisition, HCFM was rebranded as NCFM and was combined with NWC to form the Company’s Health Services segment. As a result of the acquisition, the Company is expected to be a leading provider of Functional Medicine in Southwest Florida. The Company also expects to reduce costs in its Health Services segment through economies of scale.

 

The following table summarizes the consideration paid for HCFM and the value of assets acquired that were recognized at the acquisition date. There were no liabilities assumed in the acquisition of HCFM.

 

Cash   $ 500,000  
Common Stock (3,968,254 shares)     1,000,000  
Earn Out Agreement     500,000  
         
Fair Value of Total Consideration   $ 2,000,000  

 

The fair value of the 3,968,254 common shares issued as part of the acquisition consideration was determined using the intraday volume weighted average price of the Company’s common shares on the acquisition date. The terms of the earn out require the Company to pay the former owner of HCFM up to $100,000, $200,000 and $200,000 on the first, second and third anniversary, respectively, based on achievement by NCFM of revenue of at least $3,100,000 (50% weighting) and EBITDA of at least $550,000 (50% weighting) in the year preceding each anniversary date.

 

The following table summarizes the estimated fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed at the acquisition date.

 

Cash   $ 35,000  
Hyperbaric Chambers     452,289  
Medical Equipment     29,940  
Computer Equipment/Software     19,739  
Office Furniture & Equipment     23,052  
Inventory     72,114  
Leasehold Improvements     25,000  
Website     41,000  
Patient Management Platform Database     1,230,000  
Goodwill     71,866  
         
Fair Value of Identifiable Assets Acquired   $ 2,000,000  

 

Goodwill of $71,866 arising from the acquisition consists of value associated with the legacy name. None of the goodwill recognized is expected to be deductible for income tax purposes. The fair value of the website of $41,000 was determined based upon the cost to reconstruct and put into use applying current market rates.

 

The fair value of the Patient Management Platform Database of $1,230,000 was estimated by applying the income approach. Under the income approach, the expected future cash flows generated by the Patient Management Platform Database are estimated and discounted to their net present value at an appropriate risk-adjusted rate of return. Significant factors considered in the calculation of the rate of return are the weighted average cost of capital and return on assets, as well as the risks inherent in the business. Cash flows were estimated based on EBITDA using forecasted revenue and costs. The measure is based on significant inputs that are not observable in the market (i.e. Level 3 inputs). Key assumptions include (i) a capitalization rate of 11.75% (ii) sustainable growth of 5% and (iii) a benefit stream using EBITDA cash flow.

 

F-16

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 4 – ACQUISITION (CONTINUED)

 

The amounts of revenue and net income of HCFM included in the Company’s consolidated income statement from the acquisition date to the period ending December 31, 2019 are as follows:

 

Revenue   $ 2,061,032  
Net income   $ 152,981  

 

The following represents the pro forma consolidated income statement as if HCFM had been included in the consolidated results of the Company for the entire years ending December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

    Year Ended December 31,  
    2019     2018  
             
Revenue   $ 4,914,468     $ 5,282,346  
Net loss     (5,457,676 )     (5,564,186 )

 

These amounts have been calculated after applying the Company’s accounting policies and adjusting the results of HCFM to reflect (i) the additional depreciation and amortization that would have been charged assuming the fair value adjustments to property, plant and equipment and intangible assets had been applied on January 1, 2019 and 2018, respectively, and (ii) financing charges related directly to the acquisition of HCFM that would have been incurred in 2018 if the acquisition had been completed on January 1, 2018.

 

NOTE 5 – DEFERRED OFFERING COSTS AND PREPAID EXPENSES

 

Deferred Offering Costs

 

On July 7, 2016, the Company entered into the Investment Agreement with an accredited investor, pursuant to which an accredited investor agreed to invest up to $3,000,000 to purchase the Company’s common stock, par value of $.0001 per share. The purchase price for such shares shall be 80% of the lowest volume weighted average price of the Company’s common stock during the five consecutive trading days prior to the date on which written notice is sent by the Company to the investor stating the number of shares that the Company is selling to the investor, subject to certain discounts and adjustments. Further, for each $50,000 that the investor tenders to the Company for the purchase of shares of common stock, the investor was to be granted warrants for the purchase of an equivalent number of shares of common stock. The warrants were to expire five (5) years from their respective grant dates and have an exercise price equal to 130% of the weighted average purchase price for the respective “$50,000 increment.”

 

On March 22, 2017, the Company and the investor entered into an Amended Investment Agreement (the “Amended Investment Agreement”) whereby the parties agreed to modify the terms of the Investment Agreement by providing that in lieu of granting the investor warrants for each $50,000 that the investor tenders to the Company, the Company granted to the investor warrants to purchase an aggregate of 7,000,000 shares of common stock. The warrants have the following fixed exercise prices: (i) 4,000,000 shares at $0.25 per share; (ii) 2,000,000 shares at $0.50 per share; and (iii) 1,000,000 shares at $1.00 per share. The warrants also contain a “cashless exercise” provision and the shares underlying the warrants will not be registered. The fair value of the warrants was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $56,635, with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 1.95%, expected life of 5 years, volatility of 40%, and expected dividend yield of zero.

 

On June 7, 2017, the Company also granted warrants to purchase 200,000 shares at $0.25 per share, 100,000 shares at $0.50 per share and 50,000 shares at $1.00 per share to an advisor as a fee in connection with the Amended Investment Agreement. The fair value of the warrants was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $96,990, with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 1.74%, expected life of 5 years, volatility of 40%, and expected dividend yield of zero.

 

This fair value of the warrants described above was recorded as a deferred offering cost and is being amortized over the period during which the Company can access the financing, which begins the day after a registration statement registering shares underlying the Investment Agreement is declared effective by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), and ends 3 years from that date. On May 15, 2017, the SEC declared effective a registration statement registering shares underlying the Investment Agreement. During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company recognized $51,208 and $51,208, respectively, in general and administrative expense related to the cost of the warrants.

 

F-17

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 5 – DEFERRED OFFERING COSTS AND PREPAID EXPENSES (CONTINUED) 

 

Prepaid Expenses

 

On June 6, 2018, the Company granted three-year warrants to purchase 600,000 shares at an exercise price of $0.15 per share to two advisors for services to be provided over a six-month period. The fair value of the warrants was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $94,844, with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 2.65%, expected life of 3 years, volatility of 286.98%, and expected dividend yield of zero. During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company recognized $-0- and $94,844, respectively, in general and administrative expense related to the cost of these warrants.

 

On December 6, 2018, the Company granted additional three-year warrants to purchase 240,000 shares at an exercise price of $0.20 per share to two advisors for services to be provided over a three-month period. The fair value of the warrants was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $35,462, with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 2.76%, expected life of 3 years, volatility of 285.22%, and expected dividend yield of zero. During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company recognized $25,612 and $9,850, respectively, in general and administrative expense related to the cost of these warrants.

 

During December 2019, the Company completed stock subscription agreements totaling $59,000 for the sale of 479,762 shares of common stock. The funds were received and shares were issued in January and February 2020.

  

NOTE 6 – PROPERTY, PLANT, AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property, plant and equipment at December 31, 2019 and 2018 were as follows:

 

    December 31,  
    2019     2018  
Capital lease equipment   $ 251,752     $ 343,492  
Medical equipment     482,229        
Telephone equipment     12,308       12,308  
Furniture, transport and office equipment     516,815       438,970  
                 
Total property, plant and equipment     1,263,104       794,770  
Less: accumulated depreciation     (749,316 )     (752,173 )
                 
Property, plant and equipment, net   $ 513,788     $ 42,597  

 

Depreciation expense during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $67,477 and $23,782, respectively.

 

NOTE 7 – GOODWILL AND INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

Goodwill and intangible assets at December 31, 2019 and 2018 were as follows:

 

    December 31,  
    2019     2018  
Medical database   $ 1,230,000     $  
Website     41,000        
                 
Total intangible assets     1,271,000        
Less: accumulated amortization     (5,908 )      
                 
Intangible assets, net     1,265,092          
Plus: goodwill     71,866          
                 
Goodwill and intangible assets, net   $ 1,336,958     $  

 

F-18

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 7 – GOODWILL AND INTANGIBLE ASSETS (CONTINUED)

 

Goodwill and intangible assets arose from the acquisition of NCFM in April 2019. The medical database is assumed to have an indefinite life and is not amortized. The website is being amortized on a straight-line basis over its estimated useful life of five years. Goodwill represents the excess of consideration transferred over the fair value of the net identifiable assets acquired related to the acquisition of NCFM.

 

Amortization expense in the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $5,908 and $-0-, respectively. No impairment charges were recognized related to goodwill and intangible assets in the years ended December 31, 2019 or 2018.

 

NOTE 8 – NOTES PAYABLE AND OTHER AMOUNTS DUE TO RELATED PARTY

 

Amounts due to related parties as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 were comprised of the following:

 

    December 31,  
    2019     2018  
Due to related party:                
Deferred compensation, Dr. Michael Dent   $ 300,600     $ 300,600  
Accrued interest payable to Dr. Michael Dent     192,857       129,117  
Total due to related party     493,457       429,717  
                 
Notes payable to related party:                
Notes payable to Dr. Michael Dent, current portion   $ 743,955     $ 672,471  

 

Dr. Michael Dent

 

Our founder and CEO, Dr. Michael Dent, has made loans to the Company from time to time in the form of unsecured promissory notes payable. The carrying values of notes payable to Dr. Dent as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 were as follows:

 

        Interest     December 31,  
Inception Date   Maturity Date   Rate     2019     2018  
January 12, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %   $ 38,378 *   $ 40,560  
January 18, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %     21,904 *     23,165  
January 24, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %     54,696 *     57,839  
February 9, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %     32,715 *     34,586  
April 20, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %     10,754 *     11,357  
June 15, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %     34,560 *     36,464  
August 17, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %     20,997 *     20,000  
August 24, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %     39,312 *     37,500  
September 7, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %     36,586 *     35,000  
September 21, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %     27,621 *     26,500  
September 29, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %     12,487 *     12,000  
December 21, 2017   December 31, 2020     10 %     14,318 *     14,000  
January 8, 2018   December 31, 2020     10 %     76,415 *     75,000  
January 11, 2018   December 31, 2020     10 %     9,164 *     9,000  
January 26, 2018   December 31, 2020     10 %     17,712 *     17,450  
January 3, 2014   December 31, 2020     10 %     296,336 *     222,050  
                             
                $ 743,955     $ 672,471  

 

* Denotes that note payable is reflected at fair value

 

Interest accrued on the above unsecured promissory notes as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $192,888 and $129,117, respectively.

 

F-19

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 8 – NOTES PAYABLE AND OTHER AMOUNTS DUE TO RELATED PARTY (CONTINUED)

 

On February 12, 2018, the Company issued a five-year warrant to purchase 6,678,462 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.065 per share to Dr. Dent (the “2018 Warrant”) as an inducement to (i) extend the maturity dates of up to $439,450 loaned by Dr. Dent to the Company in 2017 and 2018 in the form of unsecured promissory notes, including $75,000 loaned from Dr. Dent to the Company in January 2018 to allow the Company to retire an existing convertible promissory note payable to a third party before such convertible promissory note became eligible for conversion, and (ii) provide continued loans to the Company. The fair value of the warrant was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $337,466, with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 2.56%, expected life of 5 years, volatility of 268.90%, and expected dividend yield of zero. On March 28, 2018, Dr. Dent agreed to extend the maturity dates of promissory notes with an aggregate face value of $177,500, which were originally scheduled to mature before September 30, 2018, by one year from the original maturity date. Because the fair value of the warrants was greater than 10% of the present value of the remaining cash flows under the modified promissory notes, the transaction was treated as a debt extinguishment and reissuance of new debt instruments pursuant to the guidance of ASC 470-50 “Debt – Modifications and Extinguishments” (“ASC 470-50”). A loss on debt extinguishment was recorded in the amount of $348,938, equal to the fair value of the warrants of $337,466, plus the excess of $11,472 of the fair value of the reissued debt instruments over the carrying value of the existing debt instruments at the time of extinguishment. The change in fair value of the reissued debt instruments subsequent to the reissuance date, which is included on the statement of operations in “Change in fair value of debt,” was $24,098 and $15,029 in the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

On July 18, 2018, in connection with a $2,000,000 private placement by a third-party investor, Dr. Dent agreed to extend the maturity date on all of the above notes until December 31, 2019 for no additional consideration.

 

On December 31, 2019, Dr. Dent agreed to further extend the maturity date on all of the above notes until December 31, 2020 in exchange for (i) a new five-year warrant to purchase 1,157,143 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.014 per share, and (ii) an extension of the expiration date on the 2018 Dr. Dent Warrant from February 12, 2023 to January 1, 2025. The fair value of the warrant was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $133,943, with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 1.69%, expected life of 5 years, volatility of 119.72%, and expected dividend yield of zero. The incremental fair value of the extended 2018 Dr. Dent Warrant was $66,572, being the excess Black-Scholes fair value of the warrant immediately after the change in terms over the Black-Scholes fair value immediately before the change in terms. Because the fair value of consideration issued was greater than 10% of the present value of the remaining cash flows under the modified promissory notes, the transaction was treated as a debt extinguishment and reissuance of new debt instruments pursuant to the guidance of ASC 470-50. A loss on debt extinguishment was recorded in the amount of $247,871, equal to the fair value of the warrant consideration of $200,515, plus the excess of $47,356 of the fair value of the reissued debt instruments over the carrying value of the existing debt instruments at the time of extinguishment. There was no change in fair value of the reissued debt instruments subsequent to the reissuance date, since the extinguishment transaction occurred on December 31, 2019.

 

During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company paid Dr. Dent’s spouse $139,423 and $150,577, respectively, in consulting fees pursuant to a consulting agreement.

 

MedOffice Direct

 

During 2017, the Company entered into an agreement with MedOffice Direct (“MOD”), a company majority-owned by the Company’s CEO and largest shareholder, Dr. Michael Dent, pursuant to which the Company agreed to pay rent to MOD in the amount of $2,040 per month for office space in MOD’s facility used by the Company and its employees for the period from January 1, 2017 through July 31, 2018. The agreement terminated on July 31, 2018. During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company recognized rent expense to MOD in the amount of $-0- and $18,360, respectively, pursuant to this agreement.

 

During 2017, the Company entered into a separate Marketing Agreement with MOD pursuant to which MOD agreed to market the HealthLynked Network to its physician practice clients, in exchange for a semi-annual fee of $25,000. This agreement was terminated effective April 1, 2018. During years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company recognized general and administrative expense in the amount of $-0- and $12,500, respectively, pursuant to this agreement. On July 1, 2018 the Company and MOD signed a marketing and service agreement pursuant to which the Company will include MOD offering as part of its product offering to physicians and the Company will receive 8% of revenue for new sales related to MOD products sold through the HealthLynked Network.

 

Stock Repurchase

 

On October 3, 2018, the Company bought back 100,000 shares of common stock from a shareholder for a total purchase price of $5,000. The shares were retired. The selling shareholder was the brother of our CEO Dr. Michael Dent.

 

On August 28, 2019, the Company bought back 15,000 shares of common stock from a shareholder for a total purchase price of $1,200. The selling shareholder was a former employee.

 

F-20

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 9 – LEASES

 

The Company has two operating leases for office space and equipment that expire in July 2020 and a separate operating lease for office space that expires in May 2022. The Company’s weighted-average remaining lease term relating to its operating leases is 1.4 years, with a weighted-average discount rate of 18.88%.

 

The Company is also lessee in a capital equipment finance lease for medical equipment entered into in March 2015 and expiring in March 2020. The Company’s weighted-average remaining lease term relating to its financing lease is 0.2 years, with a weighted-average discount rate of 9.38%. The Company’s lease agreements generally do not provide an implicit borrowing rate, therefore an internal incremental borrowing rate is determined based on information available at lease commencement date for purposes of determining the present value of lease payments.

 

The table below summarizes the Company’s lease-related assets and liabilities as of December 31, 2019:

 

    As of December 31, 2019  
    Operating     Financing     Total  
    Leases     Leases     Leases  
Lease assets   $ 273,196     $ 4,482     $ 277,678  
                         
Lease liabilities                        
Lease liabilities (short term)   $ 197,041     $ 4,482     $ 201,523  
Lease liabilities (long term)     80,510             80,510  
Total lease liabilities   $ 277,551     $ 4,482     $ 282,033  

 

The Company incurred lease expense of $343,894 for the year ended December 31, 2019, of which $325,546 related to operating leases and $18,348 related to financing leases.

 

Maturities of operating and capital lease liabilities were as follows as of December 31, 2019:

 

    Operating     Capital     Total  
    Leases     Leases     Commitments  
2020   $ 234,891     $ 4,587     $ 239,478  
2021     75,019             75,019  
2022     28,443             28,443  
2023                  
Total lease payments     338,353       4,587       342,940  
Less interest     (60,802 )     (105 )     (60,907 )
Present value of lease liabilities   $ 277,551     $ 4,482     $ 282,033  

 

NOTE 10 – NOTES PAYABLE

 

On December 20, 2017, the Company entered into a Merchant Cash Advance Factoring Agreement (“MCA”) pursuant to which the Company received an advance of $75,000 before closing fees (the “December 2017 MCA”). The Company was required to repay the advance, which acts like an ordinary note payable, at the rate of $4,048 per week until the balance of $102,000 was repaid. At inception, the Company recognized a note payable in the amount of $102,000 and a discount against the note payable of $28,500. The discount was being amortized over the life of the instrument. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company made installment payments of $89,048 on the December 2017 MCA. The December 2017 MCA was repaid on June 1, 2018. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company recognized amortization of the discount in the amount of $26,881, including $2,267 recognized to amortize the remaining discount at retirement.

 

On June 1, 2018, the Company entered into an MCA pursuant to which the Company received an advance of $75,000 before closing fees (the “December 2018 MCA”). The Company was required to repay the advance at the rate of $4,048 per week until the balance of $102,000 has been repaid in November 2018. At inception, the Company recognized a note payable in the amount of $102,000 and a discount against the note payable of $28,500. The discount was being amortized over the life of the instrument. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company recognized amortization of the discount in the amount of $28,500. The December 2018 MCA was repaid in full in November 2018.

 

F-21

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE

 

Convertible notes payable as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 were comprised of the following:

 

    December 31,  
    2019     2018  
             
$550k Note - July 2016   $ 548,010  *   $ 594,813  
$50k Note - July 2016     56,866  *     60,312  
$111k Note - May 2017     118,606  *     125,190  
$171.5k Note - October 2017           186,472  
$103k Note I - October 2018           103,000  
$103k Note II - November 2018           103,000  
$153k Note - November 2018           153,000  
$103k Note III - December 2018           103,000  
$357.5k Note - April 2019     328,728 *      
$154k Note - June 2019     50,000        
$136k Notes - July 2019     135,850        
$78k Note III - July 2019     78,000        
$230k Note - July 2019     230,000        
$108.9k Note - August 2019     108,947        
$142.5k Note - October 2019     142,500        
$103k Note V - October 2019     103,000        
$108.9k Note II - October 2019     108,947        
$128.5k Note - October 2019     128,500        
$103k Note VI - November 2019     103,000        
$78.8k Note II - December 2019     78,750        
      2,319,704       1,428,787  
Less: unamortized discount     (777,668 )     (386,473 )
Convertible notes payable, net of original issue discount and debt discount   $ 1,542,036     $ 1,042,314  

 

* - Denotes that convertible note payable is carried at fair value

 

F-22

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Interest expense and amortization of debt discount recognized on each convertible note outstanding during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 were as follows:

 

    Interest Expense     Amortization of Debt Discount  
    Year Ended December 31,     Year Ended December 31,  
    2019     2018     2019     2018  
                         
$550k Note - July 2016   $ 33,000     $ 33,090     $     $  
$50k Note - July 2016     5,000       5,014              
$111k Note - May 2017     16,537       16,537             6,931  
$53k Note - July 2017           116             1,520  
$35k Note - September 2017           614             7,972  
$55k Note - September 2017           1,085             10,849  
$53k Note II - October 2017           1,568             20,443  
$171.5k Note - October 2017     1,786       17,150             140,875  
$57.8k Note - January 2018           3,786             37,925  
$112.8k Note - February 2018           5,746             57,456  
$83k Note - February 2018           4,184             41,841  
$105k Note - March 2018           5,121             51,205  
$63k Note I - April 2018           3,124             39,594  
$57.8k Note II - April 2018           2,895             28,954  
$90k Note - April 2018           3,156             31,562  
$53k Note III - April 2018           2,657             33,794  
$68.3k Note - May 2018           3,366             33,566  
$37k Note - May 2018           1,815             18,145  
$63k Note II - May 2018           3,107             31,240  
$78.8k Note - May 2018           3,938             38,836  
$103k Note I - October 2018     2,653       2,088       33,972       26,744  
$103k Note II - November 2018     3,584       1,383       44,952       17,344  
$153k Note - November 2018     7,008       1,761       91,451       23,538  
$103k Note III - December 2018     4,261       790       42,611       7,901  
$78k Note I - January 2019     3,889             52,000        
$78k Note II - January 2019     3,868             47,858        
$103k Note III - April 2019     5,108             56,323        
$104.5k Note - April 2019     5,768             58,246        
$104.5k Note II - April 2019     5,325             53,107        
$357.5k Note - April 2019     33,550             257,821        
$103k Note IV - May 2019     4,120             63,118        
$154k Note - June 2019     8,526             85,027        
$67.9k Note I - July 2019     3,220             34,765        
$67.9k Note II - July 2019     3,220             34,765        
$78k Note III - July 2019     3,590             45,343        
$230k Note - July 2019     10,460             104,317        
$108.9k Note - August 2019     3,791             31,560        
$142.5k Note - October 2019     1,366             35,430        
$103k Note V - October 2019     2,568             28,213        
$108.9k Note II - October 2019     1,851             14,805        
$128.5k Note - October 2019     2,183             21,768        
$103k Note VI - November 2019     1,609             17,989        
$78.8k Note II - December 2019     626             5,072        
                                 
    $ 178,464     $ 124,090     $ 1,260,513     $ 708,235  

 

F-23

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Unamortized debt discount on outstanding convertible notes payable as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 are comprised of the following:

 

    Unamortized Discount as of December 31,  
    2019     2018  
$103k Note I - October 2018   $     $ 76,256  
$103k Note II - November 2018           85,656  
$153k Note - November 2018           129,462  
$103k Note III - December 2018           95,099  
$154k Note - June 2019     21,175        
$67.9k Note - July 2019     20,497        
$67.9k Note II - July 2019     20,497        
$78k Note III - July 2019     32,657        
$230k Note - July 2019     125,684        
$103.5k Note - August 2019     59,392        
$142.5k Note - October 2019     107,070        
$103k Note V - October 2019     70,686        
$108.9k Note II - October 2019     72,592        
$128.5k Note - October 2019     106,732        
$103k Note VI - November 2019     81,740        
$78.8k Note II - December 2019     58,946        
                 
    $ 777,668     $ 386,473  

 

Certain of our convertible notes payable are also carried at fair value and revalued at each period end, with changes to fair value recorded to the statement of operations under “Change in Fair Value of Debt.” The changes in fair value during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 and the fair value as of the years then ended on such instruments were as follows:

 

    Change in Fair Value of Debt     Fair Value of Debt as of  
    Year Ended December 31,     December 31,  
    2019     2018     2019     2018  
$550k Note - July 2016   $ 70,285     $ 96,787     $ 548,010     $ 594,813  
$50k Note - July 2016     7,125       13,257       56,866       60,312  
$111k Note - May 2017     14,789       10,474       118,606       125,190  
$171.5k Note - October 2017     1,781       5,241             186,472  
$104.5k Note II - April 2019     3,431                    
                                 
    $ 97,411     $ 125,759     $ 723,482     $ 966,787  

 

Extensions of Iconic Convertible Notes Payable – December 2019

 

Between 2016 and 2019, the Company issued and amended certain terms and conditions of the following convertible notes payable to Iconic Holdings, LLC (“Iconic”): a 6% fixed convertible secured promissory note dated July 7, 2016 with a face value of $550,000 (the “$550k Note”), a 10% fixed convertible commitment fee promissory note dated July 7, 2016 with a face value of $50,000 (the “$50k Note”), a 10% fixed convertible secured promissory note dated May 22, 2017 with a face value of $111,000 (the “$111k Note”), and a 10% fixed convertible note dated April 15, 2019 with a face value of $357,500 (the “$357.5k Note”). During the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, the terms and conditions of the above notes were amended as described below.

 

F-24

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

On March 28, 2018, in exchange for a five-year warrant to purchase 125,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.05 per share, Iconic and the Company agreed to extend the maturity date from January 22, 2018 until July 11, 2018. The fair value of the warrants using Black/Scholes was $10,199 with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 2.59%, expected life of 5 years, volatility of 578.45%, and expected dividend yield of zero. The issuance of the warrants in exchange for the maturity extension was treated as an extinguishment and reissuance of existing debt pursuant to the guidance of ASC 470-50. A loss on debt extinguishment was recorded in the amount of $19,014 and the $111k Note was subsequently carried at fair value and revalued at each period end, with changes to fair value recorded to the statement of operations under “Change in Fair Value of Debt.”

 

On July 11, 2018, Iconic and the Company entered into an Amendment agreement related to the $550k Note, the $50k Note and the $111k Note, pursuant to which the holder agreed to extend the maturity date of the three notes until July 31, 2019 in exchange for (i) a three-year warrant to purchase 200,000 of our common shares at an exercise price of $0.25, and (ii) a three-year warrant to purchase 300,000 of our common shares at an exercise price of $0.50. The fair value of the warrants using Black/Scholes was $133,019 with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 2.67%, expected life of 3 years, volatility of 287.57%, and expected dividend yield of zero. The issuance of the warrants in exchange for the maturity extension was treated as an extinguishment and reissuance of existing debt pursuant to the guidance of ASC 470-50. A loss on debt extinguishment was recorded in the amount of $90,624.

 

On July 13, 2018, Iconic and the Company entered into a second Amendment agreement, pursuant to which the holder agreed to further extend the maturity date of the $550k Note, the $50k Note and the $111k Note until December 31, 2019 in exchange for (i) three-year warrant to purchase 175,000 of our common shares at an exercise price of $0.25, and (ii) three-year warrant to purchase 75,000 of our common shares at an exercise price of $0.50. The fair value of the warrants using Black/Scholes was $60,401 with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 2.66%, expected life of 3 years, volatility of 287.77%, and expected dividend yield of zero. The issuance of the warrants in exchange for the maturity extension was treated as an extinguishment and reissuance of existing debt pursuant to the guidance of ASC 470-50. A loss on debt extinguishment was recorded in the amount of $42,777.

 

On December 31, 2019, Iconic and the Company agreed to extend the maturity date of the $550k Note, the $50k Note, the $111k Note and the $357.5k Note until December 31, 2020 in exchange for (i) a new five-year warrant to Iconic to purchase 1,907,143 shares at an exercise price of $0.14 per share, (ii) extension of the expiration date on 12,586,111 warrants held by Iconic until January 1, 2025, (iii) repricing of the exercise price 3,508,333 warrants held by Iconic from various prices above $0.50 to $0.25, (iv) a reduction of the conversion price of the $111k Note from $0.35 to $0.15 and of the $357.5k Note from $0.20 to $0.15, and (v) the Company agreed to allow a one-time conversion of up to $30,000 on the $111k Note at a reduced conversion rate.

 

The fair value of consideration issued was calculated as follows: (i) the new warrant was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $220,758, (ii) the incremental fair value of the extended warrants was $395,158 and the incremental fair value of the repriced warrants was $87,351, being the excess of the fair value of the warrants immediately after the change in terms over the fair value immediately before the change in terms, (iii) the incremental fair value of the reduction in conversion price, which represented a change to the beneficial conversion feature, was $142,617, being the excess of the fair value of the conversion feature immediately after the change in terms over the fair value immediately before the change in terms, and (iv) the one-time conversion feature was valued using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $29,642. Because the fair value of consideration issued was greater than 10% of the present value of the remaining cash flows under the modified promissory notes, the transaction was treated as a debt extinguishment and reissuance of new debt instruments pursuant to the guidance of ASC 470-50. A loss on debt extinguishment was recorded in the amount of $697,722, equal to the fair value of the consideration issued of $875,526, less the excess of $177,804 of the carrying value of the existing debt instruments at the time of extinguishment over the fair value of the reissued debt instruments. As a result of the agreement, the $357.5k Note will subsequently be carried at fair value and revalued at each period end. The $550k Note, the $50k Note and the $111k Note were already carried at fair value due to previous extinguishment and reissuance transactions. There was no change in fair value of the reissued debt instruments subsequent to the reissuance date, since the extinguishment transaction occurred on December 31, 2019.

 

F-25

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Note Payable ($550,000) – July 2016

 

On July 7, 2016, the Company entered into a 6% fixed convertible secured promissory note with an investor with a face value of $550,000. The $550k Note is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock at the discretion of the note holder at a fixed price of $0.08 per share, or 6,875,000 of the Company’s common shares, and is secured by all of the Company’s assets. The Company received $500,000 net proceeds from the note after a $50,000 original issue discount. The $550k Note matures on December 31, 2020. The discount from the original issue discount, warrants and embedded conversion feature (“ECF”) associated with the $550k Note was amortized over the original life of the note. The $550k Note is carried at fair value due to an extinguishment and reissuance recorded in 2017 and is revalued at each period end, with changes to fair value recorded to the statement of operations under “Change in Fair Value of Debt.”

 

Convertible Note Payable ($50,000) – July 2016

 

On July 7, 2016, the Company entered into a 10% fixed convertible commitment fee promissory note with an investor with a face value of $50,000. The $50k Note matures on December 31, 2020. The $50k note was issued as a commitment fee payable to the Investment Agreement investor in exchange for the investor’s commitment to enter into the Investment Agreement, subject to registration of the shares underlying the Investment Agreement. The $50k Note is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock at the discretion of the note holder at a fixed price of $0.10 per share, or 500,000 of the Company’s common shares. The $50k Note is carried at fair value due to an extinguishment and reissuance recorded in 2017 and is revalued at each period end, with changes to fair value recorded to the statement of operations under “Change in Fair Value of Debt.”

 

Convertible Note Payable ($111,000) – May 2017

 

On May 22, 2017, the Company entered into a 10% fixed convertible secured promissory note with an investor with a face value of $111,000. The $111k Note is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock at the discretion of the note holder at a fixed price of $0.15 per share, or 740,000 of the Company’s common shares, and is secured by all of the Company’s assets. The Company received $100,000 net proceeds from the note after an $11,000 original issue discount. At inception, the investors were also granted a five-year warrant to purchase 133,333 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.75 per share. The $111k Note matures on December 31, 2020.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($53,000) – July 2017

 

On July 10, 2017, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $53,000 convertible note (the “$53k Note”). On January 8, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $53k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $74,922. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $16,188, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($35,000) – September 2017

 

On September 7, 2017, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $35,000 convertible note (the “$35k Note”). On March 5, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $35k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $49,502. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $11,778, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($55,000) – September 2017

 

On September 11, 2017, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $55,000 convertible note (the “$55k Note”). On March 13, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $55k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $85,258. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $14,763, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

F-26

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Note Payable ($53,000) – October 2017

 

On October 23, 2017, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $53,000 convertible note (the “$53k Note II”) to PULG. On April 18, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $53k Note II, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $75,000. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $16,865, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($171,500) – October 2017

 

On October 27, 2017, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $171,500 convertible note (the “$171.5k Note”) to an individual lender. The $171.5k Note included a $21,500 original issue discount, for net proceeds of $150,000. On October 31, 2018, the holder of the $171.5k Note agreed to extend the maturity date from the original date of October 26, 2018 until December 31, 2019 in exchange for (i) a three-year warrant to purchase 75,000 shares of Company common stock at an exercise price of $0.25 per share, and (ii) a three-year warrant to purchase 25,000 shares of Company common stock at an exercise price of $0.50 per share. The fair value of the warrants using Black/Scholes was $26,282 with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 2.93%, expected life of 3 years, volatility of 291.52%, and expected dividend yield of zero. The issuance of the warrants in exchange for the maturity extension was treated as an extinguishment and reissuance of existing debt pursuant to the guidance of ASC 470-50. Accordingly, the $171.5k Note was carried at fair value subsequent to the extinguishment date and is revalued at each period end.

 

On February 7, 2019, the holder of the $171.5k Note converted the entire principal balance of $171,500 into 2,512,821 shares of Company common stock. In connection with the conversion, the Company recognized a loss on debt extinguishment of $139,798, representing the excess of the fair value of the shares issued at conversion over the carrying value of the host instrument and the bifurcated conversion feature at the time of conversion.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($57,750) – January 2018

 

On January 2, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $57,750 convertible note (the “$58k Note”). The transaction closed on January 3, 2018. The $58k Note included a $5,250 original issue discount and $2,500 fee for net proceeds of $50,000. The $58k Note had an interest rate of 10% and a default interest rate of 18% and was scheduled to mature on January 2, 2019. The $58k Note was convertible into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time after the issuance date, subject to a 4.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a conversion price per share equal to 28% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the twenty (20) trading days prior to the conversion date. On June 26, 2018, the holder agreed, without consideration, to reduce the discount to 28% of the volume weighted average price of the Company’s common stock for the 10 days prior to the conversion date. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the holder converted the entire principal balance of $57,750, as well as accrued interest in the amount of $3,786, into 384,839 shares of Company common stock.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($112,750) – February 2018

 

On February 2, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $112,750 convertible note (the “$113k Note”). On August 7, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $113k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $151,536. In connection with the extinguishment, the Company also issued the holder a 3-year warrant to purchase 100,000 shares of Company common stock at an exercise price of $0.25. The fair value of the warrant was $50,614. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $2,014, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount and fair value of the warrant issued, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

F-27

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Note Payable ($83,000) – February 2018

 

On February 13, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $83,000 convertible note (the “$83k Note”). On August 16, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $83k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $111,596. In connection with the extinguishment, the Company also issued the holder a 5-year warrant to purchase 237,143 shares of Company common stock at an exercise price of $0.35. The fair value of the warrant was $92,400. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a loss on debt extinguishment of $51,251, equal to the excess of the payment amount and fair value of the warrant issued over the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($105,000) – March 2018

 

On March 5, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $105,000 convertible note (the “$105k Note”). On August 30, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $105k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $140,697. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $51,804, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($63,000) – April 2018

 

On April 2, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $63,000 convertible note (the “$63k Note”). On September 28, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $63k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $89,198. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $25,856, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($57,750) – April 2018

 

On April 16, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $57,750 convertible note (the “$57.8k Note II”). On October 16, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $57.8k Note II, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $81,850. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $24,427, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($90,000) – April 2018

 

On April 18, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $90,000 convertible note (the “$90k Note”). On August 24, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $90k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $119,240. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $38,508, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($53,000) – April 2018

 

On April 18, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $53,000 convertible note (the “$53k Note III”). On October 18, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $53k Note III, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $75,039. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $20,945, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($68,250) – May 2018

 

On May 3, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $68,250 convertible note (the “$68.3k Note”). On October 30, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $68.3k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $91,644. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $36,420, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

F-28

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Note Payable ($37,000) – May 2018

 

On May 7, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $37,000 convertible note (the “$37k Note”). On November 2, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $37k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $49,144. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $18,579, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($63,000) – May 2018

 

On May 9, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $63,000 convertible note (the “$63k Note II”). On November 5, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $63k Note II, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $89,198. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $26,166, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($78,750) – May 2018

 

On May 24, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $78,750 convertible note (the “$78.8k Note”). On November 20, 2018, the Company prepaid the balance on the $78.8k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $104,738. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $38,705, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($103,000) – October 2018

 

On October 18, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $103,000 convertible note (the “$103k Note I”). On April 4, 2019, the Company prepaid the balance on the $103k Note I, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $134,500. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $28,169, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($103,000) – November 2018

 

On November 12, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $103,000 convertible note (the “$103k Note II”). On May 7, 2019, the Company prepaid the balance on the $103k Note II, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $134,888. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $23,821, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($153,000) – November 2018

 

On November 19, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $153,000 convertible note (the “$153k Note”). The $153k Note included $3,000 fees for net proceeds of $150,000. The $153k Note had an interest rate of 10% and a default interest rate of 22% and was scheduled to mature on August 19, 2019. The $153k Note may be converted into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time after the 6-month anniversary of the issuance date, subject to a 4.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a conversion price per share equal to a 25% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the ten (10) trading days prior to the conversion date. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s failure to deliver shares upon a conversion pursuant to the terms of the note, 300% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s breach of any other events of default specified in the note, 150% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the holder of the $153k Note converted the full principal in the amount of $153,000 and $8,768 of accrued interest into 1,070,894 shares of Company common stock. In connection with the conversion, the Company recognized a loss on debt extinguishment of $44,993, representing the excess of the fair value of the shares issued at conversion over the carrying value of the host instrument and the bifurcated conversion feature at the time of conversion.

 

F-29

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Note Payable ($103,000) – December 2018

 

On December 3, 2018, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $103,000 convertible note (the “$103k Note III”). On May 31, 2019, the Company prepaid the balance on the $103k Note III, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $135,029. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $20,445, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($78,000) – January 2019

 

On January 14, 2019, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $78,000 convertible note (the “$78k Note”). On July 15, 2019, the Company prepaid the balance on the $78k Note, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $102,321. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a loss on debt extinguishment of $6,258, equal to the excess of the payment amount over the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over, in the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($78,000) – January 2019

 

On January 24, 2019, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $78,000 convertible note (the “$78k Note II”). On July 24, 2019, the Company prepaid the balance on the $78k Note II, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $102,255. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $11,162, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($103,000) – April 2019

 

On April 3, 2019, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $103,000 convertible note (the “$103k Note III”). On October 1, 2019, the Company prepaid the balance on the $103k Note III, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $135,099. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $7,728, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($104,500) – April 2019

 

On April 11, 2019, the Company entered into securities purchase agreements for the sale of a $104,500 convertible note (the “$104.5k Note I”). The $104.5k Note I included $4,500 fees for net proceeds of $100,000. The $104.5k Note I has an interest rate of 10% and a default interest rate of 22%, matures on April 11, 2020, and may be converted into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time after the 6-month anniversary of the issuance date, subject to a 4.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a conversion price per share equal to a 25% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the ten (10) trading days prior to the conversion date. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s failure to deliver shares upon a conversion pursuant to the terms of the note, 300% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s breach of any other events of default specified in the note, 150% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the holder of the $104.5k Note I converted the full principal in the amount of $104,500 and $5,768 of accrued interest into 1,176,189 shares of Company common stock. In connection with the conversion, the Company recognized a loss on debt extinguishment of $98,193, representing the excess of the fair value of the shares issued at conversion over the carrying value of the host instrument and the bifurcated conversion feature at the time of conversion.

 

F-30

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Note Payable ($104,500) – April 2019

 

On April 11, 2019, the Company entered into securities purchase agreements for the sale of a second $104,500 convertible note (the “$104.5k Note II”). The $104.5k Note II included $4,500 fees for net proceeds of $100,000. The $104.5k Note II has an interest rate of 10% and a default interest rate of 22%, matures on April 11, 2020, and may be converted into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time after the 6-month anniversary of the issuance date, subject to a 4.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a conversion price per share equal to a 25% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the ten (10) trading days prior to the conversion date. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s failure to deliver shares upon a conversion pursuant to the terms of the note, 300% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s breach of any other events of default specified in the note, 150% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due.

 

On October 14, 2019, the holder entered into a forbearance agreement (pursuant to which the Lender agreed to forbear its right to convert the $104.5k Note II until October 31, 2019 in exchange for an increase to the principal of the note to $142,500. Because the fair value of consideration issued was greater than 10% of the present value of the remaining cash flows under the modified note, the transaction was treated as a debt extinguishment and reissuance of new debt instruments pursuant to the guidance of ASC 470-50. A loss on debt extinguishment was recorded in the amount of $91,760, equal to the fair value of the consideration issued of $80,725 (comprised of the value of the modified ECF), plus the excess of $11,035 of the fair value of the reissued debt instruments over the carrying value of the existing debt instruments at the time of extinguishment. As a result of the agreement, the $104.5k Note II was subsequently carried at fair value.

 

On October 31, 2019, the Company prepaid the balance on the $104.5k Note II, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $142,500. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $69,472, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note and derivative embedded conversion feature over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($357,500) – April 2019

 

On April 15, 2019, the Company issued a fixed convertible note with a face value of $357,500 (the “$357.5k Note”). The $357.5k Note included $32,500 fees for net proceeds of $325,000. The $357.5k Note has an interest rate of 10%, matures on December 31, 2020, and may be converted into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time, subject to a 9.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a fixed conversion price per share of $0.15 (originally $0.20), or 2,383,333 shares. At inception, the investors were also granted a five-year warrant to purchase 600,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.25 per share. Upon an event of default, 140% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due and the conversion price resets to a 40% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the twenty (20) trading days prior to the conversion date.

 

The fair value of the warrants was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $150,782, with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 2.37%, expected life of 5 years, volatility of 191.68%, and expected dividend yield of zero. The net proceeds from the issuance of the $357.5k Note, being $325,000 after the original issue discount, were then allocated to the warrants and the convertible note instrument based on their relative fair values, of which $96,411 was allocated to the warrants and $228,589 to the convertible note. The intrinsic value of the embedded conversion feature of the $357.5k Note was then calculated as $128,911. The original issue discount, warrants and embedded conversion feature were then allocated and recorded as discounts against the carrying value of the $357.5k Note. The final allocation of the proceeds at inception was as follows:

 

Original issue discount   $ 32,500  
Warrants     96,411  
Embedded conversion feature     128,911  
Convertible note     99,678  
         
Gross proceeds   $ 357,500  

 

F-31

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Note Payable ($103,000) – April 2019

 

On May 7, 2019, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $103,000 convertible note (the “$103k Note IV”). On November 5, 2019, the Company prepaid the balance on the $103k Note IV, including accrued interest, for a one-time cash payment of $133,900. In connection with the repayment, the Company recognized a gain on debt extinguishment of $11,549, equal to the excess of the carrying value of the note, derivative embedded conversion feature and accrued interest over the payment amount, in the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($154,000) – June 2019

 

On June 3, 2019, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $154,000 convertible note (the “$154k Note”). The $154k Note included $4,000 fees for net proceeds of $150,000. The $154k Note has an interest rate of 10% and a default interest rate of 22% and was scheduled to mature on February 28, 2020. The $154k Note may be converted into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time after the 6-month anniversary of the issuance date, subject to a 4.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a conversion price per share equal to a 39% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the fifteen (15) trading days prior to the conversion date. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s failure to deliver shares upon a conversion pursuant to the terms of the Note, 200% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s breach of any other events of default specified in the Note, 150% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the holder of the $154k Note converted $104,000 of principal into 1,572,989 shares of Company common stock. In connection with the conversion, the Company recognized a loss on debt extinguishment of $75,529, representing the excess of the fair value of the shares issued at conversion over the carrying value of the host instrument and the bifurcated conversion feature at the time of conversion.

 

Convertible Note Payable ($67,925) – July 2019

 

On July 11, 2019, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $67,925 convertible note (the “$67.9k Note I”). The $67.9k Note I included $2,925 fees for net proceeds to the Company of $65,000. The $67.9k Note I had an interest rate of 10% and a default interest rate of 22%, a maturity date of April 11, 2020, and may be converted into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time after the 6-month anniversary of the issuance date, subject to a 4.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a conversion price per share equal to a 25% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the thirteen (13) trading days prior to the conversion date. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s failure to deliver shares upon a conversion pursuant to the terms of the note, 300% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s breach of any other events of default specified in the note, 150% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due.

 

The fair value of the ECF was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $48,866 with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 1.97%, expected life of 0.75 years, volatility of 140.57%, and expected dividend yield of zero. In connection with the $67.9k Note I, the Company also issued to the holders 16,250 shares of Company common stock valued at $3,471, which was recorded to equity. The ECF qualifies for derivative accounting and bifurcation under ASC 815, “Derivatives and Hedging.” The final allocation of the proceeds at inception was as follows:

 

Embedded conversion feature   $ 48,866  
Original issue discount and fees     2,925  
Fair value of shares recorded to equity     3,471  
Convertible note     12,663  
         
Gross proceeds   $ 67,925  

 

F-32

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Note Payable ($67,925) – July 2019

 

On July 11, 2019, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a second $67,925 convertible note (the “$67.9k Note II”). The $67.9k Note II included $2,925 fees for net proceeds to the Company of $65,000. The $67.9k Note II had an interest rate of 10% and a default interest rate of 22%, a maturity date of April 11, 2020, and may be converted into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time after the 6-month anniversary of the issuance date, subject to a 4.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a conversion price per share equal to a 25% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the thirteen (13) trading days prior to the conversion date. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s failure to deliver shares upon a conversion pursuant to the terms of the note, 300% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s breach of any other events of default specified in the note, 150% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due.

 

The fair value of the ECF was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $48,866 with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 1.97%, expected life of 0.75 years, volatility of 140.57%, and expected dividend yield of zero. In connection with the $67.9k Note II, the Company also issued to the holders 16,250 shares of Company common stock valued at $3,471, which was recorded to equity. The ECF qualifies for derivative accounting and bifurcation under ASC 815, “Derivatives and Hedging.” The final allocation of the proceeds at inception was as follows:

 

Embedded conversion feature   $ 48,866  
Original issue discount and fees     2,925  
Fair value of shares recorded to equity     3,471  
Convertible note     12,663  
         
Gross proceeds   $ 67,925  

 

Convertible Note Payable ($78,000) – July 2019

 

On July 16, 2019, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement for the sale of a $78,000 convertible note (the “$78k Note III”). The $78k Note II included $3,000 fees for net proceeds of $75,000. The $78k Note III has an interest rate of 10% and a default interest rate of 22% and matures on April 30, 2020. The $78k Note III may be converted into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time after the 6-month anniversary of the issuance date, subject to a 4.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a conversion price per share equal to a 39% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the fifteen (15) trading days prior to the conversion date. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s failure to deliver shares upon a conversion pursuant to the terms of the note, 300% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s breach of any other events of default specified in the note, 150% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due.

 

The fair value of the ECF of the $78k Note III was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $76,763 with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 2.00%, expected life of 0.79 years, volatility of 140.36%, and expected dividend yield of zero. Because the fair value of the ECF exceeded the net proceeds from the note, a charge was recorded to “Financing cost” for the excess of the fair value of the fair value of the ECF of $76,763 over the net proceeds from the note of $75,000, for a net charge of $1,763. The ECF qualifies for derivative accounting and bifurcation under ASC 815, “Derivatives and Hedging.” The final allocation of the proceeds at inception was as follows:

 

Embedded conversion feature   $ 76,763  
Original issue discount and fees     3,000  
Financing cost     (1,763 )
Convertible note      
         
Gross proceeds   $ 78,000  

 

F-33

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Note Payable ($230,000) – July 2019

 

On July 18, 2019, the Company entered into securities purchase agreements for the sale of a convertible note with a face value of $230,000 (the “$230k Note”). The $230k Note included $20,000 fees and discounts for net proceeds to the Company of $210,000. The $230k Note has an interest rate of 10% and a default interest rate of 24%, matures on July 18, 2020, and may be converted into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time after the 6-month anniversary of the issuance date, subject to a 4.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a conversion price per share equal to a 35% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the fifteen (15) trading days prior to the conversion date. Upon an event of default, the amount of principal shall increase by between 10 and 50% depending on the nature of the default.

 

The fair value of the ECF of the $230k Note was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $220,246 with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 1.90%, expected life of 1.00 year, volatility of 140.13%, and expected dividend yield of zero. Because the fair value of the ECF exceeded the net proceeds from the note, a charge was recorded to “Financing cost” for the excess of the fair value of the fair value of the ECF of $220,246 over the net proceeds from the note of $210,000, for a net charge of $10,246. The ECF qualifies for derivative accounting and bifurcation under ASC 815, “Derivatives and Hedging.” The final allocation of the proceeds at inception was as follows:

 

Embedded conversion feature   $ 220,246  
Original issue discount and fees     20,000  
Financing cost     (10,246 )
Convertible note      
         
Gross proceeds   $ 230,000  

 

Convertible Note Payable ($108,947) – August 2019

 

On August 26, 2019, the Company entered into securities purchase agreements for the sale of a convertible note with a face value of $108,947 (the “$108.9k Note”). The $108.9k Note included $8,947 fees and discounts for net proceeds to the Company of $100,000. The $108.9k Note has an interest rate of 10% and a default interest rate of 22%, matures on August 26, 2020, and may be converted into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time after the 6-month anniversary of the issuance date, subject to a 4.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a conversion price per share equal to a 25% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the thirteen (13) trading days prior to the conversion date. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s failure to deliver shares upon a conversion pursuant to the terms of the note, 300% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s breach of any other events of default specified in the note, 150% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due.

 

The fair value of the ECF of the $108.9k Note was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $77,904 with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 1.75%, expected life of 1.00 year, volatility of 130.74%, and expected dividend yield of zero. The ECF qualifies for derivative accounting and bifurcation under ASC 815, “Derivatives and Hedging.” The final allocation of the proceeds at inception was as follows:

 

Embedded conversion feature   $ 82,004  
Original issue discount and fees     8,947  
Convertible note     17,996  
         
Gross proceeds   $ 108,947  

 

F-34

 

 

HEALTHLYNKED CORPORATION

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

NOTE 11 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Note Payable ($142,500) – October 2019

 

On October 1, 2019, the Company entered into securities purchase agreements for the sale of a convertible note with a face value of $142,500 (the “$142.5k Note”). The $142.5k Note included $7,500 fees and discounts for net proceeds to the Company of $135,000. The $142.5k Note has an interest rate of 10% and a default interest rate of 20%, matures on October 1, 2020, and may be converted into common stock of the Company by the holder at any time after the 6-month anniversary of the issuance date, subject to a 4.99% beneficial ownership limitation, at a conversion price per share equal to a 39% discount to the lowest bid or trading price of the Company’s common stock during the fifteen (15) trading days prior to the conversion date. Upon an event of default caused by the Company’s failure to deliver shares upon a conversion pursuant to the terms of the note, 125% of the outstanding principal and any interest due amount shall be immediately due and the conversion discount shall increase by 10%.

 

The fair value of the ECF of the $142.5k Note was calculated using the Black-Scholes pricing model at $137,205 with the following assumptions: risk-free interest rate of 1.73%, expected life of 1.00 year, volatility of 119.04%, and expected dividend yield of zero. Because the fair value of the ECF exceeded the net proceeds from the note, a charge was recorded to “Financing cost” for the excess of the fair value of the fair value of the ECF of $137,205 over the net proceeds from the note of $135,000, for a net charge of $2,205. The ECF qualifies for derivative accounting and bifurcation under ASC 815, “Derivatives and Hedging.” The final allocation of the proceeds at inception was as follows: