UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
FORM 10-K
 
 
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2020
OR
 
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the Transition Period From                  to                 
 
Commission File Number 001-11048
 
 
 
ENVELA CORPORATION
(EXACT NAME OF REGISTRANT AS SPECIFIED IN ITS CHARTER)
 
 
NEVADA
 
88-0097334
(STATE OF INCORPORATION)
 
(I.R.S. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NO.)
 
1901 GATEWAY DRIVE, STE 100. IRVING, TX 75038
(ADDRESS OF PRINCIPAL EXECUTIVE OFFICES)
 
(972) 587-4049
(REGISTRANT’S TELEPHONE NUMBER, INCLUDING AREA CODE)
 
www.envela.com
 
 
 
 
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Title of each class
 
Trading Symbol
 
Name of exchange on which registered
 
 
 
 
 
COMMON STOCK, par value $0.01 per share
 
ELA
 
NYSE American
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: NONE
 
 
 
 
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ☐    No  ☒
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.    Yes  ☐    No  ☒
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ☒    No  ☐
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  ☒    No  ☐
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer ☐
 
Accelerated filer ☐
Non-accelerated filer ☒
 
Smaller reporting company ☒
 
 
Emerging growth company ☐
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  
 
As of June 30, 2020, the aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was $45.132 million based on the closing sale price as reported on the NYSE American. As of March 22, 2021, there were 26,924,631 shares of common stock outstanding.
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
 
Part III incorporates certain information by reference from the registrant’s definitive proxy statement for the 2021 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which definitive proxy statement will be filed by the registrant with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the end of the registrant’s fiscal year ended December 31, 2020.
 

 
 
 
ENVELA CORPORATION
 
FORM 10-K
 
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2020
 
INDEX
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5
 
 
 
 
 
 
12
 
 
 
 
 
 
18
 
 
 
 
 
 
18
 
 
 
 
 
 
19
 
 
 
 
 
 
19
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20
 
 
 
 
 
 
21
 
 
 
 
 
 
21
 
 
 
 
 
 
28
 
 
 
 
 
 
29
 
 
 
 
 
 
55
 
 
 
 
 
 
55
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
55
 
 
 
 
 
 
56
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
56
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
59
 
 
 
 
 
62
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
63
 
 
 
 
Unless the context indicates otherwise for one of our specific operating segments, references to “we,” “us,” “our,” the “Company”, “Envela” refer to the consolidated business operations of Envela Corporation, the parent, and all of its direct and indirect subsidiaries.
 
Note About Forward-Looking Statements
 
This annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 (this “Form 10-K”), including but not limited to “Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” below, information concerning our business prospects or future financial performance, anticipated revenues, expenses, profitability or other financial items, and our strategies, plans and objectives, together with other statements that are not historical facts, includes “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Forward-looking statements generally can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology, such as “may,” “will,” “would,” “expect,” “intend,” “could,” “estimate,” “should,” “anticipate,” “typical,” “projection,” “plan,” “target,” “mission,” “intend,” “believe” or similar words. We intend that all forward-looking statements be subject to the safe harbors created by these laws. All statements other than statements of historical information provided herein are forward-looking and may contain information about financial results, economic conditions, trends, and known uncertainties. All forward-looking statements are based on current expectations regarding important risk factors. Many of these risks and uncertainties are beyond our ability to control, and, in many cases, we cannot predict all of the risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. Actual results could differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements, and readers should not regard those statements as a representation by us or any other person that the results expressed in the statements will be achieved. Important risk factors that could cause results or events to differ from current expectations are described under “Item 1A. Risk Factors” below and elsewhere in this Form 10-K. These factors are not intended to be an all-encompassing list of risks and uncertainties that may affect the operations, performance, development and results of our business. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof. We undertake no obligation to release publicly the results of any revisions to these forward-looking statements which may be made to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereon, including without limitation, changes in our business strategy or planned capital expenditures, store growth plans, or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.
 
 
PART I
Item 1
 
 
PART I
 
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
 
OUR MISSION
 
Envela’s mission is to empower recommerce buyers and sellers to extend the useful life of goods by reselling previously owned or used goods, or recycling goods’ materials, elements or components for sale and reuse.
 
OVERVIEW
 
Envela is a holding company owning subsidiaries engaged in the recommercialization of goods. Envela’s recommerce operations in each subsidy reconditions previously owned or used goods for resale, or recycles products’ value by extracting materials, elements or components that can be sold. Envela’s recommerce businesses is conducted on both a retail basis and a wholesale basis through distributors, resellers, dedicated stores and online. Envela’s subsidiaries also operate a number of other related businesses and brands engaged in a variety of activities, as identified herein. Envela is domiciled in the state of Nevada, and its corporate headquarters are located in Irving, Texas.
 
OPERATING SEGMENTS
 
Envela operates through two recommerce business segments represented by its two direct subsidiaries. DGSE, LLC (“DGSE”) focuses on the recommercialization of luxury hard assets, and ECHG, LLC (“ECHG”) focuses on the recommercialization of business IT equipment and consumer electronic devices.
 
DGSE operates the Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange, Charleston Gold & Diamond Exchange and Bullion Express brands and primarily buys and resells or recycles luxury hard assets like jewelry, diamonds, gemstones, fine watches, rare coins and related collectibles, precious-metal bullion products, gold, silver and other precious-metals. Buying and selling items for their precious-metals content is a major method by which DGSE markets itself. DGSE also offers jewelry repair services, custom-made jewelry and consignment items, and maintains relationships with refiners for precious-metal items that are not appropriate for resale.
 
ECHG owns and operates Echo Environmental Holdings, LLC (“Echo”), ITAD USA Holdings, LLC (“ITAD USA”) and Teladvance, LLC (“Teladvance”), through which it primarily buys and resells or recycles consumer electronic components and IT equipment. Echo focuses on end-of-life electronics recycling and sustainability, ITAD USA provides IT equipment disposition, including compliance and data sanitization services, and Teladvance operates as a value-added reseller by providing offerings and services to companies looking either to upgrade capabilities or dispose of equipment. Like DGSE, ECHG also maintains relationships with refiners or recyclers to which it sells valuable materials it extracts from electronics and IT equipment that are not appropriate for resale or reuse.
 
During the first quarter of fiscal year 2020, Envela revised the way it reviews its financial information to align more closely with its strategy to engage in diverse recommerce activities through the two principal business segments mentioned above—DGSE and ECHG. Although our Company’s overall strategy is recommerce, we feel there are distinct segments within recommerce. DGSE buys luxury hard assets, and ECHG buys consumer electronics and IT equipment, for either resale or recycling. Envela will continue to report its revenue and operating expenses based on its DGSE and ECHG operating segments, and beginning in fiscal year 2020, Envela disaggregated its revenue, within the operating segments, based on its resale and recycle presentation basis. The Company’s historical disaggregation of revenue has been recast to conform to our current presentation.
 
The Company includes segment information in the notes to the financial statements. The objective of segment reporting is to provide a management approach that identifies different types of businesses within the Company and how we have organized the segments to make financial decisions.
 
DGSE SEGMENT
 
DGSE buys to resell or recycle luxury hard assets, including jewelry, diamonds, fine watches, rare coins and currency, precious-metal bullion as well as items for their precious-metals content, and other valuables. DGSE reconditions items for resale as a whole good or component parts, or recycles them by selling recovered precious metals to refiners. These metals include gold, silver, platinum and palladium, with gold constituting the majority of our purchases and resales. DGSE resells through its retail locations or wholesale contacts. Where resale or wholesale is not appropriate, such as for crafted-precious-metal items at the end of their useful lives, the items are sent to a third-party refiner and analyzed for metal content, after which they can be recycled and either sold or recrafted into new jewelry or bullion products. In addition to purchase and resale, DGSE offers on-site jewelry and watch repair and restoration services at its Dallas flagship location, located at 13022 Preston Road, Dallas, Texas 75240, and also partners with a number of consignment vendors which expands offerings at DGSE’s retail locations. DGSE also designs and offers custom bridal and fashion jewelry. As referenced above, DGSE also purchases items for their precious-metal content. Buying and selling precious metal is a major method by which DGSE markets itself.
 
 
5
 
PART I
Item 1 
 
For over 40 years, DGSE has been a destination location for those seeking value and liquidity in reselling or trading jewelry, and in recycling the precious metals of items it determines are not appropriate to sell as a whole good or as component parts. DGSE’s in-house staff of experts, including horologists, gemologists and authenticators, inspect items for authenticity and value, and share their market knowledge with its customers.
 
DGSE operates six retail locations: five Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange stores throughout the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex and the Charleston Gold & Diamond Exchange in Mt Pleasant, South Carolina. In the fourth quarter of 2020, DGSE moved its Southlake, Texas location to Grapevine, Texas, and opened a new location in Lewisville, Texas—both suburbs of Dallas. DGSE purchased its Grapevine and Lewisville buildings; it leases its stores in Charleston, South Carolina and the three other locations in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. DGSE’s Dallas flagship location offers on-site jewelry-repair and watch-restoration services.
 
We believe that the most successful DGSE locations will be those that can sustain our full retail “exchange” model: engaging in both buying and selling luxury hard assets and maintaining a robust and diverse inventory across all jewelry categories, fine watches and monetary collectibles. Also, to help extend the life of luxury goods, our stores offer repair and restoration services for jewelry and watches. Examples of luxury hard assets that we buy and sell are estate and designer jewelry, fine timepieces, rare and numismatic coins, diamonds, gold, silver and other precious metals. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and AnalysisDGSE Precious Metals Pricing and Business Impact” for more information.
 
In recent years, DGSE has maintained several brick-and-mortar stores throughout Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, making our experts accessible to provide our customers guidance and insight. We are now focusing on bringing the DGSE experience to a wider customer base through an expanded footprint. Brick-and-mortar expansion remains a top priority and strong growth opportunity for DGSE. Purchasing the Lewisville and Grapevine stores were part of that focus. We want to continue adding new merchandise daily to an already inviting product selection and providing omnichannel and immersive consumer experiences to customers in existing and new locations.
 
We will continue to focus on evolving our business across the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex and in Charleston, South Carolina in an effort to drive efficiency across our geographical footprint and maximize profitability.
 
DGSE views e-commerce as a supplement, but not a replacement, to its retail locations and other operations. For more information, see “—Sales and Marketing” below.
 
ECHG SEGMENT
 
ECHG owns and operates Echo, ITAD USA and Teladvance, through which it buys to resell or recycle consumer electronics and IT equipment from businesses and other organizations, such as school districts. Items designated for resale as a whole or as component parts get extended operational life by first having any existing data erased and then being refurbished before resale. ECHG recycles goods by removing usable components for resale as components, or by extracting the valuable metals (or other materials) for sale to downstream recycling and refining companies that further process the metal or other materials for subsequent resale. Our customers include companies and organizations that are based domestically and internationally. A significant amount of ECHG’s refining revenue comes through Echo from a refining partner with an international refining facility.
 
ECHG’s goal is to extend the useful life of electronics through recommerce whenever possible. Resale and reuse conserves energy and raw materials required to make new products and turns obsolete IT assets into revenue.
 
Echo and ITAD USA (the “Echo Entities”) were formed in connection with the purchases on May 20, 2019 of the assets of Echo Environmental, LLC and ITAD USA, LLC (the “Echo Legacy Entities”). Teladvance was subsequently acquired on August 2, 2019.
 
Echo and ITAD USA each operate in separate leased warehouses in Carrollton, Texas. These leases were originally assigned in connection with the asset acquisition from the Echo Legacy Entities. Teladvance also primarily operates out of the same Carrollton location as Echo.
  
Through ECHG and its subsidiaries, Envela plays a larger role in environmental sustainability. It is our mission to solve problems for our clients and leave the planet a better place than we found it. The world is quickly shifting its priorities to better manage our global resources, and it is our drive to work with our customers to design a flexible, convenient, hassle-free recycling solution that accommodates their specific needs.
 
For more information about ECHG’s business drivers, see “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and AnalysisDGSE Business Drivers and Impacts.”
 
 
 
6
 
PART I
Item 1
 
CUSTOMER TYPES
 
DGSE Retail Business
 
DGSE’s products and services are marketed through six retail locations in Texas and South Carolina. As noted above, the brick-and-mortar retail locations operate under the Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange and Charleston Gold & Diamond Exchange brands. DGSE markets bullion products online under the Bullion Express brand.
 
DGSE Wholesale Business
 
DGSE transacts a significant amount of business with wholesalers in its industry. These wholesale transactions occur at industry-specific trade shows held periodically throughout the year, during in-person and telephonic sales calls, and through industry-trade websites.
 
ECHG Business
 
ECHG provides custom electronics recycling solutions to meet the needs of diverse clients, including Fortune 500 companies, municipalities, school districts, individual consumers and other organizations. ECHG helps consumers realize maximum value for their used electronics and in the process helps protect the environment through responsible recycling.
 
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
 
DGSE Buy Sell Trade
 
DGSE provides a marketplace that delivers what we believe to be unparalleled value and liquidity for those seeking to buy, sell or trade luxury hard assets like jewelry, watches and diamonds, as well as most numismatic items, discussed below. DGSE buys and sells merchandise in every major jewelry category, including bridal jewelry, fashion jewelry, custom-made jewelry, diamonds and other gemstones, findings (jewelry components) and fine watches.
 
Much of our jewelry and fine-watch inventory is purchased directly from individual and wholesale customers at our retail locations. We process these purchased items at a central location where expert jewelers, gemologists, precious metal dealers and watchmakers sort them into three main resale categories: retail appropriate, wholesale appropriate and refiner appropriate. Following a determination of retail appropriateness, jewelry and fine watches are cleaned, serviced and repaired by our experienced jewelers and watchmakers so they’re in like-new condition and suitable for resale. Most of these items are then individually tagged and sent to one of our retail locations for sale. Items determined to be not appropriate for our retail locations but suitable for wholesale are grouped into wholesale lots and liquidated through either wholesale contacts or via in-person dealer-to-dealer sales. Items that are not appropriate for retail or wholesale are sold to a third-party refiner.
 
The higher-quality diamonds and gemstones that we purchase are typically submitted for independent assessment and certification by the Gemological Institute of America (“GIA”) and other third-party certifying authorities. This process helps us resell the diamonds and gemstones individually or as components of our custom bridal and fashion jewelry. Mid-quality diamonds and gemstones are often also utilized in our custom fashion jewelry or packaged with lower-quality stones and sold to wholesalers across the country. DGSE utilizes jewelry makers to design and create custom fashion jewelry for sale at its locations, including to customer specifications.
 
 
 
 
7
 
PART I
Item 1
 
 
 
In addition to our own inventory of reconditioned luxury hard assets that we offer for sale, we maintain relationships with numerous commercial consignment vendors across the country who supply us with new and pre-owned jewelry on consignment. This supplements our over-the-counter jewelry purchases and enhances our overall jewelry offering. Sales of this consignment jewelry are settled with our consignment vendors on a weekly or monthly basis.
 
DGSE also buys and sells most numismatic items, including rare coins, currency, medals, tokens and other monetary collectibles. Most of our rare coins, currency and monetary collectibles are purchased directly from individual customers. We then resell them through our retail activities or wholesale contacts.
 
DGSE Bullion
 
Our bullion-trading operation buys and sells all forms of gold, silver, platinum and palladium products, including United States and other government-issue coins, private-mint medallions, art bars and trade unit bars. All of our store locations conduct retail bullion transactions. Wholesale bullion transactions are conducted through our main bullion-trading operation in Dallas, Texas, through which DGSE maintains numerous vendor relationships with major industry wholesalers, mints and institutions.
 
We purchase bullion products from a variety of vendors and sell them based on current precious-metal market pricing. Bullion inventory is subject to market-value changes created by underlying commodity markets. While we believe that we effectively manage commodity risk associated with our bullion business, including by periodically entering into futures contracts to hedge our exposure against market-price changes, there are national and international factors beyond our control that may affect margins, customer demand and transactional volume. These factors include, but are not limited to, U.S. Federal Reserve policies, inflation rates, global economic uncertainty, and government and private-mint supply.
 
DGSE Other Products & Services
 
We maintain a jewelry-repair center at our Dallas flagship location. We accept repair, polishing and service orders through all of our retail locations which are routed to our Dallas flagship location for service.
 
ECHG Electronic Recycling
 
ECHG, through its wholly owned subsidiary Echo, offers comprehensive end-of-life electronics recycling. ECHG works with customers to design a flexible, convenient, hassle-free program that accommodates specific customer needs. It offers comprehensive turnkey solutions that include transportation and product tracking.
 
ECHG IT Asset Disposition
 
ECHG, through its wholly owned subsidiary ITAD USA, offers wide-ranging IT equipment disposition services for diverse clients that want to replace and remarket their IT equipment. ITAD USA helps companies carefully navigate the maze of local compliance and regulations associated with technology disposition. From secure logistics and transportation to comprehensive reporting tools and data sanitization services, ITAD USA’s solutions cover all enterprise technology types. Depending on an IT asset’s condition, it can be refurbished and redeployed within the customer’s business, remarketed and sold, or donated to charity. When assets are being sold, ITAD USA’s in-house, global-commodity experts help determine market value, and its remarketing network helps ensure clients get maximum value.
 
ECHG Hardware & Cloud Solutions
  
ECHG, through its wholly owned subsidiary Teladvance, operates as a value-added reseller, providing IT equipment offerings and services to companies looking to upgrade their software, hardware or networking capabilities, or dispose of IT equipment during the process of moving to cloud services. ECHG delivers a diverse portfolio of latest-technology products and services for clients’ specific business and technology needs.
 
Moreover, helping new cloud customers recover value from their existing datacenter components, ECHG offers true cradle-to-grave technology solutions.
 
 
8
 
PART I
Item 1
 
 
 
CORPORATE INFORMATION
 
We incorporated in the State of Nevada on September 16, 1965, as Canyon State Mining Corporation of Nevada. During the ensuing 56 years, the Company transformed its business to meet its customers’ needs and changed its name to reflect those transformation, including to the following: Canyon State Corporation (October 13, 1981), The American Pacific Mint, Inc. (July 15, 1986), Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange, Inc. (June 22, 1992), and DGSE Companies Inc. (June 26, 2001). By pursuing diversified business opportunities in the recommerce sector that have potential long-term rewards, we continued to evolve, and on December 12, 2019, we changed our name to Envela Corporation to better reflect our current business operations and diversified recommerce portfolio. These diversified business opportunities include authenticated recommerce retail of luxury hard assets; end-of-life IT asset recycling; data destruction and IT-asset disposition; and provision of products, services and solutions to industrial and commercial companies. Information contained on, or accessible through, our website is not incorporated by reference into and does not constitute a part of this annual report or any other report or documents we file with or furnish to the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”).
 
Our principal executive offices’ address and telephone number are shown on the cover of this document. Our website address, envela.com, reflects corporate information and is intended primarily for investors. Many of our subsidiaries and brands maintain their own websites for commercial purposes, including primarily the following: DGSE.com, CGDEinc.com, echoenvironmental.com, ITADUSA.com and teladvance.com.
 
Envela and its subsidiaries hold well-established trademarks and trade names, including the following:
 
DGSE; Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange; Charleston Gold & Diamond Exchange; Bullion Express;ECHG; ITAD USA; Echo Environmental;and Teladvance.
 
Envela and other trade names, trademarks and service marks of the Company are the property of Envela. Solely for convenience, the trademarks, service marks, logos and trade names referred to in this document are without the “®” and “™” symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate that we waive or will not assert our rights in them.
 
 
 
 
9
 
PART I
Item 1
 
 
 
SALES AND MARKETING
 
In fiscal year 2020, DGSE’s advertising activities continued to rely heavily on digital media, radio and print. Marketing activities centered on each of the major business categories, emphasizing our broad array of products, expertise, and price advantages compared to our local and regional competition. In fiscal year 2020, we spent approximately $253,000 on advertising and marketing in our operations, a 36% year-over-year decrease. Our advertising and marketing spending represent costs for traditional and digital media, in-store displays, brochures and informational pamphlets, production fees, and other related items.
 
In fiscal year 2021, we anticipate our radio, digital and social media presence to remain an integral part of DGSE’s marketing strategy. The website for the Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange has been redesigned to be viewed on a variety of platforms across a multitude of digital devices. We believe our enhanced web platform also facilitates a personalized shopping experience, including recommending inventory, and delivers a seamless digital experience for product research and social sharing. Additionally, we anticipate that social media will continue to play an increasingly larger role in our overall advertising mix. The digital advertising will allow us to target specific customer groups on a wider scale.
 
ECHG’s advertising activities focus primarily on regional and national trade shows. In fiscal year 2020, we spent approximately $27,000 on advertising and marketing, a significant portion of which was spent at regional and national trade shows. In 2021, ECHG expects trade shows will continue to be the largest portion of their advertising budget since downstream recyclers frequent such trade shows to evaluate who can meet their needs or service their projects. Also, at trade shows, representatives of ITAD USA make many contacts with decision makers seeking either to purchase refurbished electronics for their employees or to sell their older electronic devices for recycling and reuse.
 
SEASONALITY
 
DGSE’s retail and wholesale jewelry business is generally seasonal. The time periods around Christmas, Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day are typically the main seasons for jewelry sales.
 
Our businesses of buying and selling bullion, precious metal and rare-coins are less seasonal, though we believe they are directly impacted by several factors outside of our control, including U.S. Federal Reserve policies, inflation rates, global economic uncertainty, governmental and private-mint supply. These factors may affect margins, customer demand and transactional volume.
 
Seasonal swings are rarely sustained or noticed in ECHG’s business of recycling end-of-life assets and refurbishing value-sustaining electronic components.
 
EMPLOYEES
 
As of December 31, 2020, we employed 152 people, all full-time employees. None of our employees are represented by a labor union. We believe that our current employee relations are in good condition. Our management policy is to keep employees informed of material decisions that affect them, encourage employee suggestions, and implement them whenever practicable.
 
GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS, ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS AND IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE
 
Envela buys and resells precious metals, which are generally subject to regulation including conflict mineral tracing. However, in conjunction with legal counsel, we have determined that we do not have sufficient control over manufacturing of any of our products to be included in the group of companies required to provide conflict-minerals disclosure and reporting. If our sourcing processes should change, or if there is a determination that our current practices should be covered by the conflict-minerals reporting and disclosure guidelines, we would need to implement significant additional measures to comply with these rules. See “Item 1A. Risk Factors—The conflict-mineral diligence process, the results from that process and the related reporting obligations could increase costs, adversely affect our reputation and adversely affect our ability to obtain merchandise” for additional information. In addition, Envela partners with refiners for certain of its sales. These refiners are subject to increasingly stringent governmental regulation in their refining operations, and a change or increase in such regulations in the United States or abroad may have an adverse impact on our business.
 
 
10
 
PART I
Item 1
 
 
 
Envela recognizes that climate change is a major risk to society and therefore continues to take steps to reduce its climatic impact. Nevertheless, management believes that climate change has only a limited influence on Envela’s performance and is of limited significance directly to the business. However, as a significant portion of Envela’s business relies on the availability of disposable income for its customers, a change in fuel prices could have a material impact on Envela’s business. See “Item 1A. Risk Factors—Adverse economic conditions in the U.S. or in other key markets, and the resulting declines in consumer confidence and spending, could have a material adverse effect on our operating results” for more information.
 
Envela applied for and received, on April 20, 2020, an approximately $1.67 million federally backed loan with 1% interest, the proceeds of which were intended to pay employees and cover certain rent and utility-related costs during the COVID-19 pandemic (the “Federal Loan”). The Federal Loan is forgivable to the extent that certain criteria are met. We applied for the forgiveness of the Federal Loan during the fourth quarter ending December 31, 2020 and are pending the results of such application. 
 
AVAILABLE INFORMATION
 
Envela files annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, proxy statements and other information with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Such information, and amendments to reports previously filed or furnished, is available free of charge from our corporate website, envela.com, as soon as reasonably practicable after such materials are filed with or furnished to the SEC. The SEC also maintains an internet site at sec.gov that contains the Company’s filings.
 
Additionally, there are complete copies of our policies (Business Code of Conduct & Ethics; Related Party Transaction Policy; and Whistleblower, committee charters (Audit; Compliance, Governance and Nominating; and Compensation), and information about how to communicate with our Board.
 
 
11
PART I
Item 1A
 
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
 
Our operations and financial results are subject to various risks and uncertainties, including those described below, that could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, and the trading price of shares of our common stock, par value $0.01 per share (our “Common Stock”).
 
You should carefully review and consider the risks described below and the forward-looking statements contained in this Form 10-K before evaluating our business or making an investment decision. Our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected by these risks. The trading price of our Common Stock could decline due to any of these risks, and you may lose all or part of your investment. You should also refer to the other information included or incorporated by reference in this report, including our consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto. These risks and uncertainties could cause actual results and events to differ materially from those anticipated. Additional risks which we do not presently consider material, or of which we are not currently aware, may also have an adverse impact on our business. Please also see the section of this Form 10-K entitled “Note About Forward-Looking Statements” on page 2.
 
The voting power in our company is substantially controlled by a small number of stockholders, which may, among other things, delay or frustrate the removal of incumbent directors or a takeover attempt, even if such events may be beneficial to our stockholders.
 
N10TR, LLC (“N10TR”) is our largest shareholder, owning 12,814,727 shares of our Common Stock, representing 47.7% of our total outstanding shares of Common Stock. Eduro Holdings, LLC (“Eduro”) owns 6,365,460 shares of our Common Stock, representing 23.7% of our total outstanding shares of Common Stock. Both N10TR and Eduro are under the common control of John R. Loftus, our CEO, President the Chairman of the Board. Consequently, Mr. Loftus, N10TR and Eduro are in a position to significantly influence any matters that are brought to a vote of the shareholders, including, but not limited to, the election of members of our Board and any action requiring the approval of shareholders, including any amendments to our governing documents, mergers or sales of all or substantially all of our assets. This concentration of ownership also may delay, defer or even prevent a change in control of our company and make some transactions more difficult or impossible without the support of Mr. Loftus, N10TR and Eduro. These transactions might include proxy contests, tender offers, mergers or other purchases of Common Stock that could give stockholders the opportunity to realize a premium over the then-prevailing market price for shares of our Common Stock.
 
In fiscal year 2014, we came to an agreed settlement with the SEC, stemming from an investigation of accounting irregularities. As part of this settlement we agreed to a series of corporate governance reforms, which were independently verified in fiscal year 2015. If we do not comply with the corporate governance reforms, we could face additional enforcement actions by the SEC or other governmental or regulatory bodies, as well as additional shareholder lawsuits, all of which could have significant negative financial or operational implications.
 
 
On April 16, 2012, we filed a Current Report on Form 8-K disclosing that our Board had determined the existence of certain accounting irregularities beginning approximately during the second calendar quarter of 2007 and continuing in periods subsequent thereto (the “Accounting Irregularities”). We brought the Accounting Irregularities to the attention of the SEC in a letter dated April 16, 2012. On June 18, 2012, we received written notice that the SEC had initiated a private investigation into the Accounting Irregularities, to determine whether any persons or entities had engaged in any possible violations of the federal securities laws. On June 2, 2014, we received notice of the entry of an agreed final judgment by the Honorable Judge Jane Boyle (the “Agreed Final Judgment”) in Civil Action No. 3:14-cv-01909-B, entitled Securities and Exchange Commission v. DGSE Companies Inc., et. al., filed on May 27, 2014 in Federal District Court for the Northern District of Texas (the “Civil Action”). We consented to the Agreed Final Judgment prior to the filing of the Civil Action by the SEC. The Agreed Final Judgment was entered in connection with the conclusion of the investigation against DGSE by the SEC regarding the Accounting Irregularities.
 
 
12
 
PART I
Item 1A
 
 
 
In connection with the Agreed Final Judgment and as remedial measures in connection with the Accounting Irregularities, we agreed to undertake certain corporate governance reforms, all of which we believe to be complete at this time (the “Corporate Governance Reforms”). The Corporate Governance Reforms include the appointment of two new independent directors to the Board, establishing the position of a Lead Independent Director on the Board and establishing reasonable term limits for members of the Board, among other reforms. We engaged a consultant satisfactory to the SEC to confirm implementation of the Corporate Governance Reforms. Due to Board member resignations in the latter half of fiscal year 2015, we were unable to complete our confirmation with the consultant by the initial deadline; however, with the addition of new independent directors, we regained compliance with the Corporate Governance Reforms. If we fall out of compliance with the Corporate Governance Reforms, we may be the subject of additional enforcement actions and further lawsuits, which could be debilitating. The costs of such investigations and of defending lawsuits could be significant and could exceed the amount of any available insurance coverage we have, and we may not have sufficient resources in the future to satisfy such costs. These matters may continue for some time, and we have no way of anticipating when or how they may be resolved. As a result of the investigation and settlement, as well as any future investigations or lawsuits, we could face loss of reputation, decline in confidence from investors, fall in the market price for our shares, inability to acquire capital and failure to continue as a going concern.
 
In the past, our internal controls over financial reporting and procedures related thereto have been deficient. Although we have taken significant remedial measures, our previous deficiencies could have a material adverse effect on our business and on our investors’ confidence in our reported financial information, and there is no guarantee that our internal controls over financial reporting and procedures will not fail in the future.
 
Effective internal controls over financial reporting and disclosure controls and procedures are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and to detect and prevent fraud. In the past, our internal controls and procedures have failed. The remedial measures taken by us may not be sufficient to regain the confidence of investors or any loss of reputation, which could in turn affect our finances and operations. Our disclosure controls and internal controls over financial reporting may not prevent all errors or all instances of fraud. A control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system’s objectives will be met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within our business have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Controls can also be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the controls. The design of any system of controls is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and any design may not succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions or deterioration in the degree of compliance with policies or procedures. Because of the inherent limitation of a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. If there is a failure in any of our internal controls and procedures, we could face investigation or enforcement actions by the SEC and other governmental and regulatory bodies, litigation, loss of reputation and investor confidence, inability to acquire capital and other material adverse effects on our finances and business operations.
 
The market for precious metals is inherently unpredictable.
 
Bullion, crafted precious metal, and other precious metal products are purchased and sold based on current market pricing for precious metals. Bullion and precious metal inventories are subject to market-value changes created by their underlying commodity markets. We periodically enter into futures contracts to hedge our exposure against market-price changes. There are several national and international factors which are beyond our control, but which may affect margins, customer demand and transactional volume in our bullion business. These factors include, but are not limited to, the policies of the U.S. Federal Reserve, inflation rates, global economic uncertainty, and governmental and private mint supply. If we misjudge the commodity markets underlying the bullion inventory, our bullion business could suffer adverse consequences. Substantially lower precious-metal prices could negatively affect our ability to continue purchasing significant volumes of bullion, crafted precious metal, and other precious-metal products, which could negatively affect our profitability.
 
Adverse economic conditions in the U.S. or in other key markets, and the resulting declines in consumer confidence and spending, could have a material adverse effect on our operating results.
 
Our results are dependent on a number of factors impacting consumer confidence and spending, including, but not limited to, the following: general economic and business conditions; wages and employment levels; volatility in the stock market; home values; inflation; consumer-debt levels; availability and cost of consumer credit; economic uncertainty; solvency concerns of major financial institutions; fluctuations in foreign-currency exchange rates; fuel and energy costs and/or shortages; tax issues; and general political conditions, both domestic and abroad.
 
Adverse economic conditions, including declines in employment levels, disposable income, consumer confidence and economic growth, could result in decreased consumer spending that would adversely affect sales of consumer goods, particularly those viewed as discretionary items like many of our products. Adverse economic conditions may arise from general economic factors as well as events such as war, terrorism, natural disasters or outbreaks of disease, as in the case of the coronavirus pandemic which has already adversely affected global economic business conditions. In addition, if any of these events should occur, future sales on products like ours could decline due to increased commodities prices, particularly gold.
 
 
13
 
PART I
Item 1A
 
 
 
The coronavirus pandemic continues to be serious threat to health and economic wellbeing affecting our business, customers and supply chain.
 
On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization announced that infections of the coronavirus COVID-19 had become pandemic, and on March 13, the U.S. President announced a National Emergency relating to the disease. There has been widespread infection in the United States and abroad. National, state and local authorities have implemented social distancing and imposed quarantine and isolation measures on large portions of the population, including temporary mandatory business closures. These measures, while intended to protect human life, are having a serious adverse impact on domestic and foreign economies with unknown duration. The effectiveness of economic stabilization efforts, including government payments to affected citizens and industries, and vaccine distribution and development efforts are uncertain.
 
The sweeping nature of the coronavirus pandemic makes it extremely difficult to predict how our business and operations will be affected in the long term, though the likely overall economic impact of the pandemic is viewed as highly negative to the general economy. The pandemic continues to be a threat, and any potential variant strain that may mutate can cause continued interruptions in travel and business disruptions with respect to us, our customers or our supply chain. This could adversely affect our sales, costs and liquidity position, possibly to a significant degree. We may again become subject to store closures. We are continuing to monitor and assess the progress of vaccines concerning our employees and the public. The effects of the coronavirus pandemic on our business, the ultimate impact remains uncertain and subject to change. The duration of any such impact cannot be predicted.
 
We continue to monitor the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on all aspects of our business. One impact has been, despite the usual correlation of increasing gold prices with precious-metal-recycling revenues for our DGSE business, our revenues in that area are down year over year. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis—DGSE Precious Metals Pricing and Business Impact” for more information.
 
We face intense competition across all markets for our products and services, which may lead to lower revenue or operating margins.
 
The industries in which we operate are highly competitive, and we compete with numerous other companies, a number of which are larger and have significantly greater financial, distribution, advertising and marketing resources. Our products compete on a number of bases, including attractiveness of brand and category assortments as well as pricing competitiveness. Significant increases in these competitive influences could adversely affect our operations through a decrease in the number and dollar volume of sales.
 
For all of our products and services, we compete with a number of comparably sized and smaller firms, as well as a number of larger firms throughout the United States. Many of our competitors attract customers with their reputation and through their industry connections. Additionally, other reputable companies may decide to enter our markets to compete with us. These companies may have greater name recognition and have greater financial and marketing resources than we do. If these companies are successful in entering the markets in which we participate, or if customers choose to go to our competition, we may attract fewer buyers and our revenue could decrease.
 
Jewelry and watch retailing is highly fragmented and competitive. We compete for jewelry sales primarily against specialty jewelers such as Zales, Jared, and Kay’s, as well as other retailers that sell jewelry and watches including department stores, discount stores, apparel outlets, and internet retailers. Participants in the jewelry and watch category compete for a share of our customers’ disposable income with other consumer sectors such as electronics, clothing, furniture, travel and restaurants. This competition for consumers’ discretionary spending is particularly relevant to gift giving, and somewhat to bridal jewelry (e.g. engagement, wedding, and anniversary).
 
Consumers are increasingly shopping for jewelry or starting their jewelry-buying experience online, which makes it easier for them to compare prices with other jewelry retailers. If DGSE’s brands do not offer the same or similar items at the lowest prices, consumers may purchase their jewelry from competitors, which would adversely impact the Company’s sales and results of operations.
 
Our DGSE wholesale and jewelry business is seasonal, with sales traditionally greater during certain holiday seasons, so events and circumstances that adversely affect holiday consumer spending will have a disproportionately adverse effect on our operational results.
 
Our DGSE wholesale and jewelry sales are seasonal by nature. The time periods around Christmas, Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day are typically the main seasons for jewelry sales. Our sales are traditionally greater during significant holidays that occur in late fall, winter or early spring. The amount of net sales and operating income generated during these seasons depends upon the general level of retail sales at such times, as well as economic conditions and other factors beyond our control. Given the timing of our annual seasonality, inclement weather can at times pose a substantial barrier to consumer retail activity and have a material negative impact on our store traffic. If events or circumstances were to occur that negatively impact consumer spending during such holiday seasons, it could have a material adverse effect on our sales, profitability and operating results.
 
 
14
 
PART I
Item 1A
 
 
 
If we misjudge the demand for our products, high inventory levels could adversely affect future operating results and profitability.
 
Consumer demand for our products can affect inventory levels. If consumer demand is lower than expected, inventory levels can rise, causing a strain on operating cash flow. If the inventory cannot be sold through our retail outlets or wholesale contacts, additional write-downs or write-offs to future earnings could be necessary. Conversely, if consumer demand is higher than expected, insufficient inventory levels could result in unfulfilled customer orders, loss of revenue and an unfavorable impact on customer relationships. In particular, volatility and uncertainty related to macro-economic factors make it more difficult for us to forecast customer demand in our various markets. Failure to properly judge consumer demand and properly manage inventory could have a material adverse effect on profitability and liquidity.
 
Changes in our liquidity and capital requirements and our ability to secure financing and credit could materially adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
 
We require continued access to capital, and a significant reduction in cash flows from operations or the availability of credit could materially and adversely affect our ability to achieve our planned growth and operating results. Similarly, if actual costs to build or acquire new stores significantly exceed planned costs, our ability to build or acquire new stores or to operate the same profitably could be materially restricted. Credit and equity markets remain sensitive to world events and macro-economic developments. Therefore, our cost of borrowing may increase, and it may be more difficult to obtain financing for our operations or to refinance long-term obligations as they become payable. Additionally, our borrowing costs can be affected by independent rating agencies’ short- and long-term debt ratings which are based largely on our performance as measured by credit metrics including interest coverage and leverage ratios. A decrease in these ratings would likely increase our borrowing cost and make it more difficult for us to obtain financing. A significant increase in our costs to finance operations may have a material adverse impact on our business results and financial condition.
 
Interest-rate fluctuations could increase our interest expense.
 
Interest rates could rise, which would increase our borrowing cost, or could make it difficult or impossible to secure financing.
 
A failure in our information systems could prevent us from effectively managing and controlling our business or serving our customers.
 
We rely on our information systems to manage and operate our stores and business. These include our telephone phone system, website, point-of-sale application, accounting package and other systems. Each store is part of an information network that permits us to maintain adequate cash inventory, daily reconcile cash balances, and timely report revenues and expenses. Any disruption in the availability of our information systems could adversely affect our operation, the ability to serve our customers and our results of operations.
 
Our success depends on our ability to attract, retain and motivate qualified directors, management and other skilled employees.
 
Our future success and growth depend on the continued services of our directors, key management and employees. Losing services of any of these individuals or any other key employee or contractor could materially affect our business. Our future success also depends on our ability to identify, attract and retain additional qualified personnel. Competition for employees in our industries is intense, and we may not be successful in attracting or retaining them. There are a limited number of people with knowledge of, and experience in, our industries. We do not have employment agreements with many of our key employees. We do not maintain life insurance policies on any of our employees. The loss of key personnel, especially without advance notice, or the inability to hire or retain qualified personnel, could have a material adverse effect on sales and operations. We cannot guarantee that we will continue to retain our key management and skilled personnel, or that we will be able to attract, assimilate and retain other highly qualified personnel in the future.
 
 
15
 
PART I
Item 1A
 
 
 
We have not paid dividends on our Common Stock in the past and do not anticipate paying dividends on our Common Stock in the foreseeable future.
 
We have not paid Common Stock dividends since our inception and do not anticipate paying dividends in the foreseeable future. Our current business plan provides for reinvesting earnings in an effort to complete development of our technologies, inventories and expansion, with the goal of increasing sales and long-term profitability and value.
 
We are subject to new and existing corporate-governance and internal-control reporting requirements, and our costs related to compliance with, or our failure to comply with, existing and future requirements could adversely affect our business.
 
In addition to the Corporate Governance Reforms, we face corporate-governance requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (the ”Dodd-Frank Act”), as well as new rules and regulations subsequently adopted by the SEC, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and the NYSE American (the “Exchange”). These laws, rules and regulations continue to evolve and may become increasingly stringent in the future. We cannot ensure that we will be able to comply fully with these laws, rules and regulations that address corporate governance, internal control reporting and similar matters. Failure to comply with these laws, rules and regulations could subject us to investigation and enforcement actions, and could materially adversely affect our reputation, financial condition and the value and liquidity of our securities.
 
Our websites may be vulnerable to security breaches and similar threats, which could result in our liability for damages and harm to our reputation.
 
Despite the implementation of network security measures, our websites are vulnerable to computer viruses, break-ins and similar disruptive problems caused by internet users. These occurrences could result in our liability for damages, and our reputation could suffer. Circumvention of our security measures may result in the misappropriation of customer or other confidential information. Any such security breach could lead to interruptions, delays and cessation of service to our customers and could result in a decline in revenue and income.
 
Fluctuations in the availability and pricing of commodities, particularly gold, which accounts for the majority of our merchandise costs, could adversely impact our earnings and cash availability.
 
While jewelry manufacturing is a major driver of demand for gold, management believes that the cost of gold is predominantly driven by investment transactions which have resulted in significant changes in that cost over the past decade. Our cost of merchandise and potentially our earnings may be adversely impacted by investment-market considerations that cause the price of gold to significantly increase or decrease.
 
An inability to increase retail prices to reflect higher commodity costs would result in lower profitability. Historically, jewelry retailers have been able, over time, to increase prices to reflect changes in commodity costs. However, in general, particularly sharp increases in commodity costs may result in a time lag before increased commodity costs are fully reflected in retail prices. There is no certainty that such price increases will be sustainable, so downward pressure on gross margins and earnings may occur. Moreover, any sustained increases in the cost of commodities could result in the need to fund a higher level of inventory or to make changes in the merchandise available to customers.
 
A significant portion of our profit is generated from buying and selling pre-owned jewelry or other precious-metal-based products. Significant price fluctuations in precious metals, especially downward, can have a severe impact on this part of our business, as people are less likely to sell these products to us if they believe their merchandise is being undervalued, or if they believe the value is uncertain.
 
The conflict-mineral diligence process, the results from that process and the related reporting obligations could increase costs, adversely affect our reputation and adversely affect our ability to obtain merchandise.
 
In August 2012, the SEC, pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, issued final rules which require annual disclosure and reporting on the source and use of certain minerals, including gold, from the Democratic Republic of Congo and adjoining countries. The gold supply chain is complex, and while our management believes that the rules only cover less than 1% of annual worldwide gold production based upon current estimates, the final rules require certain jewelry retailers and manufacturers that file with the SEC to exercise reasonable due diligence in determining the country of origin of the statutorily designated minerals that are used in kinds of products we sell. Jewelry retailers or manufacturers who meet certain criteria were required to file certain reports with the SEC beginning in May 2014, disclosing their due-diligence measures related to country of origin, the results of those activities, and related determinations. In conjunction with legal counsel, we have determined that we do not have sufficient control over manufacturing of any of our products to be included in the group of companies required to provide conflict-minerals disclosure and reporting.
 
 
16
 
PART I
Item 1A
 
 
 
If our sourcing processes should change, or if there is a determination that our current practices should be covered by the conflict-minerals reporting and disclosure guidelines, we would need to implement significant additional measures to comply with these rules. We cannot be certain of the costs that might be associated with such regulatory compliance. The final rules also cover tungsten, which is contained in a small portion of items that we sell. Other minerals, such as diamonds, could be added to those currently covered by these rules. We may incur reputational risks with customers and other stakeholders if, due to the complexity of the global supply chain, we are unable to sufficiently verify the origin of the relevant metals. Also, if the responses of parts of our supply chain to verification requests were adverse, it could harm our ability to obtain merchandise and add to compliance costs
 
Our customer and vendor concentration in one significant entity could have an adverse impact on our business.
 
A significant amount of DGSE’s revenue and expenses stems from sales to and purchases from one Dallas refining partner, which relationship constitutes Envela’s single largest source of revenues and expenses. In addition, a significant amount of ECHG’s refining revenue comes through Echo from one refining partner with an international refining facility. Any adverse break in either relationship could reduce the flow of refining materials to them and revenue to us. While it remains a developing situation, the coronavirus pandemic and any continuing quarantines, interruptions in travel and business disruptions with respect to us or either refining partner could cause such an adverse break in the relationship and reduce refining revenue to us, possibly to a significant degree. Although we are continuing to monitor and assess the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, including the development and distribution of vaccine, the ultimate impact of COVID-19 and such efforts is highly uncertain and subject to change. The duration of any such impact cannot be predicted.
 
 
17
PART I
Item 1B, 2
 
 
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
None.
 
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
 
We lease and own various properties across the two markets in which DGSE and ECHG currently operate. Eight leased and owned properties are in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex and one in Charleston, South Carolina. The leases have a wide variety of terms, rents and expiration dates. See Note 16 to our consolidated financial statements for more information regarding our leases. DGSE purchased two stand-alone retail buildings in Lewisville, Texas and Grapevine, Texas, both suburbs of Dallas, during fiscal year 2020, and closed the Southlake, Texas retail location due to an expiring lease. Envela also purchased an office building for the Company headquarters in Irving, Texas during fiscal year 2020. We lease unused space of our Company headquarters to other tenants. The Lewisville, Grapevine and Irving locations were purchased with financing from long term debt. For more information on this financing, see Note 10 to our consolidated financial statements. We are constantly evaluating each of our locations in terms of profitability, effectiveness and fit with long-term strategy.
 
Our principal corporate offices have moved from the Dallas location, with an address of 13022 Preston Road, Dallas, Texas 75240, to our newly purchased office building at 1901 Gateway Drive, Ste 100, Irving, Texas, 75038. The Dallas location remains open as DGSE’s flagship retail store.
 
We consider whether to renew or renegotiate our leases based on a variety of factors, including whether current lease options are available. On September 9, 2020, we entered into a new lease for Echo’s Carrollton warehouse location, the initial term for which began January 1, 2021 and will expire on January 31, 2026. The new lease omits provisions in the previous lease requiring a sublet of a portion of the warehouse to a third party and provides us an optional extension of an additional 60 months. The leases for our Dallas flagship location and ITAD’s Carrollton location will expire, with no current lease options, on October 31, 2021 and July 31, 2021, respectively. We continue to evaluate options with respect to renegotiating leases or moving operations conducted at or centrally routed to these locations.
 
The following table provides a summary of all materially significant locations out of which we and our subsidiaries operate as of December 31, 2020:
 
Location
State
Use
Rent/Own
 
SquareFootage
 
Comments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Irving
TX
Envela Corporation
Own
  72,552 
Purchased November 4, 2020.
 
    
 
Lewisville
TX
Dallas Gold & Silver
Own
  3,000 
Purchased July 9, 2020.
 
    
 
Grapevine
TX
Dallas Gold & Silver
Own
  3,412 
Purchased September 14, 2020.
 
    
 
Grand Prairie
TX
Dallas Gold & Silver
Rent
  2,000 
 
 
    
 
Euless
TX
Dallas Gold & Silver
Rent
  4,400 
 
 
    
 
Dallas
TX
Dallas Gold & Silver
Rent
  15,120 
 
 
    
 
Mount Pleasant
SC
Charleston Gold & Diamond
Rent
  4,782 
 
 
    
 
Carrollton
TX
Echo Environmental Holdings, LLC
Rent
  166,000 
 
 
    
 
Carrollton
TX
ITAD USA Holdings, LLC
Rent
  38,338 
 
 
In our opinion, these properties have been well maintained, are in good operating condition and contain all necessary equipment and facilities for their intended purposes.
 
 
18
PART I
Item 3, 4
 
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
There are various claims, lawsuits and pending actions against the Company arising in the normal course of the Company's business. It is the opinion of management that the ultimate resolution of these matters will not have a material effect on the Company's financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
 
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
 
Not applicable.  
 
 
19
PART II
Item 5
 
PART II
 
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS, AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
MARKET AND STOCKHOLDERS
 
Our Common Stock is traded on the Exchange, under the symbol “ELA.” As of March 17, 2021, we had 326 record holders of our Common Stock.
 
SHARE REPURCHASES AND DIVIDENDS
 
We have not declared any dividends with respect to our Common Stock. We intend to retain all earnings to finance future growth; accordingly, it is not anticipated that cash or other dividends will be paid to holders of Common Stock in the foreseeable future.
 
Securities authorized for issuance under equity compensation plans.
 
On December 7, 2016, our shareholders approved the adoption of the 2016 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2016 Plan”), which reserved 1,100,000 shares of our Common Stock for issuance pursuant to awards issued thereunder. As of December 31, 2020, no awards had been made under the 2016 Plan. The Company’s prior 2006 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2006 Plan”) expired according to its terms on December 31, 2019, and as a result no further shares may be issued under the 2006 Plan. No securities issued pursuant to the 2006 Plan remain issuable upon the exercise of any option, warrants or rights. However, 15,000 options issued pursuant to the Company’s 2004 Employee Stock Option Plan (the “2004 Employee Stock Option Plan”) remain unexercised and have no expiration date. For more information, see Note 14 to our consolidated financial statements.
 
 The following table summarizes our equity compensation plan information as of December 31, 2020:
 
Plan Category
 
Column (a):
Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
 
Column (b):
Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
 
Column (c):
Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in column (a))
 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
 
  15,000(1)
  2.17 
  1,100,000(2)
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders
  N/A 
  N/A 
  N/A 
Total
  15,000 
  2.17 
  1,100,000 
 
(1) Represents 15,000 options issued under the 2004 Employee Stock Option Plan, which remain unexercised and have no expiration date.
(2) The total number of securities remaining available for future issuance is solely comprised of shares of Common Stock reserved under the 2016 Plan.
 
Purchases of equity securities by the issuer and affiliates purchases.
 
There have been no purchase made by or on behalf of the issuer or any “affiliated purchaser,” as defined in Rule 10b-18(a)(3) of the Exchange Act of any of our equity securities in the three month’s ended December 31, 2020.
 
 
20
 
PART II
Item 6, 7
 
 
ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
 
Not required because we are a “Smaller Reporting Company” as that term is defined in Rule 12b-2 promulgated under the Exchange Act. 
 
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES THAT MAY AFFECT FUTURE RESULTS
 
Please see the section of this Form 10-K entitled “Note About Forward-Looking Statements” on page 2.
 
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has adversely affected global economic business conditions. Future sales on products like ours could decline, and the ultimate impact is uncertain and subject to change. We took steps during Fiscal 2020 to have as many employees work from home as possible. We also followed governmental directives to wear masks and adopt the social distance guidelines where possible. The duration of this pandemic and the impact, either direct or indirect cannot be predicted. The Company believed additional liquidity was necessary to support ongoing operations during this period of uncertainty. We applied for and received approximately $1.67 million, 1% interest, federally backed loan to pay employees and cover certain rent and utility-related costs during the COVID-19 pandemic (the “Federal Loan”). The loan is forgivable to the extent that certain criteria are met. We have applied for forgiveness and that forgiveness application is currently under review by the SBA.
 
Changes in Financial Presentation During Fiscal Year 2020
 
During the first quarter of fiscal year 2020, we revised the way we review and report our financial information to align more closely with the Company’s strategy to engage in diverse recommerce activities through two principle business segments—DGSE and ECHG. Envela continues to report its revenue and operating expenses based on its DGSE and ECHG operating segments, and beginning in fiscal year 2020, disaggregated its revenue, within the operating segments, based on its resale and recycle presentation basis. The Company’s historical disaggregation of revenue has been recast to conform to our current presentation. For more information, see “Item 1. Business—Operating Segments” above.
 
DGSE Precious Metals Pricing and Business Impact
 
Because DGSE buys and resells precious metals, it is impacted by changes in precious metals pricing which rises and falls based upon global supply and demand dynamics, with the greatest impact on us relating to gold as it represents a significant portion of the precious metals in which we trade. Gold prices stabilized during fiscal year 2019 starting at $1,238 an ounce, as determined by the London AM Fix on January 1, 2019, climbing to $1,523 an ounce, as determined by the London PM Fix on December 31, 2019, representing an increase of 19% during fiscal year 2019. Gold prices surged during the beginnings of the COVID-19 pandemic, starting at $1,523 an ounce, as determined by the London AM Fix on January 1, 2020, and rose strongly during the first half of 2020 peaking at $2,060 an ounce during August. However, gold prices dipped from the peak to close at $1,891 an ounce, as determined by the London PM Fix on December 31, 2020, registering a 24% increase during fiscal year 2020.
 
The World Gold Council (“WGC”), noted that gold demand improved greatly during 2019 due to uncertainty in the global financial markets and rising geopolitical unrest. As noted, gold prices observably surged during the beginnings of the COVID-19 pandemic and price tempered toward the end of the year. According to Stuart Burns of the Industry News, physical demand could pick up during 2021 due to China’s forecasted double-digit growth and world recovery from the pandemic. The WGC has projected the price of gold to remain over $1,800 an ounce this year.
 
The pandemic, economic downturn, and civil unrest, seem to have been affecting the recommerce business in unpredictable ways - there are fewer customers raising money by selling items. This is the opposite of what one might expect when a record number of people are unemployed. Government stimulus checks, eviction moratoriums and forbearances on mortgages and student loans may be contributing to this effect. To date, this drop has been offset by other areas of our business. This diversity, combined with DGSE’s continued focus on disciplined operations, makes us optimistic for DGSE’s continued future success.
 
 
21
 
PART II
Item 7
 
 
When prices rise for gold or other precious metals, DGSE has observed that individual sellers tend to be more likely to sell their unwanted crafted-precious-metal items and at the same time retail customers tend to buy bullion and other gold products so as not to miss out on potential market gains. Tracking the rise in gold prices, DGSE’s crafted-precious-metal purchases increased 45% in fiscal year 2019. In fiscal year 2020, however, DGSE experienced a dip in crafted-precious-metal purchases by 21%. The Company attributes this dip to the impact of the COVID-19 and various shutdown orders, which impacted foot traffic and its retail locations. While the precious metals industry has improved, our focus will be to continue to grow our jewelry, diamond and fine watch business, as well as maintain our business of purchasing crafted-precious-metal items, a diversified strategy which we believe will continue to grow and be a profit engine in the future.
 
For additional information regarding DGSE, see “Item 1. Business—Operating Segments—DGSE Segment.”
 
ECHG Business Drivers and Impacts
 
ECHG owns and operates Echo, ITAD USA and Teladvance, through which it primarily buys and resells or recycles consumer electronic components and IT equipment. Echo focuses on end-of-life electronics recycling and also offers disposal transportation and product tracking, ITAD USA provides IT equipment disposition including compliance and data sanitization services, and Teladvance operates as a value-added reseller by providing offerings and services to companies looking to either upgrade capabilities or dispose of equipment. Like DGSE, ECHG also maintains relationships with refiners or recyclers to which it sells extracted valuable materials from electronics and IT equipment that are not appropriate for resale or reuse.
 
For additional information regarding DGSE, see “Item 1. Business—Operating Segments—ECHG Segment.”
 
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
 
Our significant accounting policies are disclosed in Note 1 of our consolidated financial statements. The following discussion addresses our most critical accounting policies, which are those that are both important to the portrayal of our financial condition and results of operations and that require significant judgment or use of complex estimates. References to fiscal years below are denoted with the word “Fiscal” and the associated year.
 
Inventories: DGSE inventory is valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value (“NRV”). We acquire a majority of our inventory from individual customers, including pre-owned jewelry, watches, bullion, rare coins and monetary collectibles. We acquire these items based on our own internal estimate of the fair market value of the items at the time of purchase. We consider factors such as the current spot market price of precious metals and current market demand for the items being purchased. We supplement these purchases from individual customers with inventory purchased from wholesale vendors. These wholesale purchases can take the form of full asset purchases, or consigned inventory. Consigned inventory is accounted for on our balance sheet with a fully offsetting contra account so that consigned inventory has a net zero balance. The majority of our inventory has some component of its value that is based on the spot market price of precious metals. Because the overall market value for precious metals regularly fluctuates, these fluctuations could have either a positive or negative impact on the value of our inventory and could positively or negatively impact our profitability. We monitor these fluctuations to evaluate any necessary impairment to inventory.
 
The Echo inventory principally includes processed and unprocessed electronic scrap materials. The value of the material is derived from recycling the precious and other scrap metals included in the scrap. The processed and unprocessed materials are carried at the lower of the average cost of the material during the month of purchase or NRV. The in-transit material is carried at lower of cost or market using the retail method. Under the retail method the valuation of the inventory at cost and the resulting gross margins are calculated by applying a cost to retail ratio to the retail value of the inventory.
 
Impairment of Long-Lived and Amortized Intangible Assets: We perform impairment evaluations of our long-lived assets, including property, plant and equipment and intangible assets with finite lives whenever business conditions or events indicate that those assets may be impaired. When the estimated future undiscounted cash flows to be generated by the assets are less than the carrying value of the long-lived assets, the assets are written down to fair market value and a charge is recorded to current operations. Based on our evaluations, no impairment was required as of December 31, 2020 or 2019.
 
 
22
 
PART II
Item 7
 
 
Revenue Recognition: In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards update (ASU) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which superseded revenue recognition requirements in Topic 605, Revenue Recognition. The ASU is based on the principle that revenue is recognized to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The ASU also requires additional disclosure about the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer contracts, including significant judgements and changes in judgements and assets recognized from cost incurred to obtain or fulfill a contract.
 
ASC 606 provides guidance to identify performance obligations for revenue-generating transactions. The initial step is to identify the contract with a customer created with the sales invoice or repair ticket. Secondly, to identify the performance obligations in the contract as we promise to deliver the purchased item or promised repairs in return for payment or future payment as a receivable. The third step is determining the transaction price of the contract obligation as in the full ticket price, negotiated price or a repair price. The next step is to allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations as we designate a separate price for each item. The final step in the guidance of ASC 606 is to recognize revenue as each performance obligation is satisfied.
 
Our over-the-counter sales with the retail public and wholesale dealers are recognized when merchandise is delivered, and payment has been made either by immediate payment or through a receivable obligation at one of our retail locations. We also recognize revenue upon the shipment of goods when retail and wholesale customers have fulfilled their obligation to pay, or promise to pay, through e-commerce or phone sales. We have elected to account for shipping and handling costs as fulfillment costs after the customer obtains control of the goods. Crafted-precious-metal items at the end of their useful lives are sold to a refiner. Since the local refiner is located in the Dallas/Fort Worth area we deliver the metal to the refiner. The metal is melted and assayed, price is determined from the assay and payment is made usually in a day or two. Revenue is recognized from the sale once payment is received.
 
DGSE also offers a structured layaway plan. When a retail customer utilizes the layaway plan, we collect a minimum payment of 25% of the sales price, establish a payment schedule for the remaining balance and hold the merchandise as collateral as security against the customer’s deposit until all amounts due are paid in full. Revenue for layaway sales is recognized when the merchandise is paid in full and delivered to the retail customer. Layaway revenue is also recognized when a customer fails to pay in accordance with the sales contract and the sales item is returned to inventory with the forfeit of deposited funds, typically after 90 days.
 
In limited circumstances, we exchange merchandise for similar merchandise and/or monetary consideration with both dealers and retail customers, for which we recognize revenue in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 845, Nonmonetary Transactions. When we exchange merchandise for similar merchandise and there is no monetary component to the exchange, we do not recognize any revenue. Instead, the basis of the merchandise relinquished becomes the basis of the merchandise received, less any indicated impairment of value of the merchandise relinquished. When we exchange merchandise for similar merchandise and there is a monetary component to the exchange, we recognize revenue to the extent of the monetary assets received and determines the cost of sale based on the ratio of monetary assets received to monetary and non-monetary assets received multiplied by the cost of the assets surrendered.
 
The Company offers the option of third-party financing to customers wishing to borrow money for the purchase. The customer applies on-line with the financing company and upon going through the credit check will be approved or denied. If accepted, the customer is allowed to purchase according to the limits set by the financing company. Once the customer does purchase merchandise, based on their financing agreement, we record and recognize the sale at that point, based on the promise to pay by the finance company up to the customer’s approved limit.
 
We have a return policy (money-back guarantee). The policy covers retail transactions involving jewelry, graded rare coins and currency only. Customers may return jewelry, graded rare coins and currency purchased within 30 days of the receipt of the items for a full refund as long as the items are returned in exactly the same condition as they were delivered. In the case of jewelry, graded rare coins and currency sales on account, customers may cancel the sale within 30 days of making a commitment to purchase the items. The receipt of a deposit and a signed purchase order evidences the commitment. Any customer may return a jewelry item or graded rare coins and currency if they can demonstrate that the item is not authentic, or there was an error in the description of a graded coin or currency piece. Returns are accounted for as a reversal of the original transaction, with the effect of reducing revenues, and cost of sales, and returning the merchandise to inventory. We have established an allowance for estimated returns related to year ended December 31, 2020 (“Fiscal 2020”) and year ended December 31, 2019 (“Fiscal 2019”) sales, which is based on our review of historical returns experience and reduces our reported revenues and cost of sales accordingly. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, our allowance for returns remained the same at approximately $28,000 for both years.
 
 
23
 
PART II
Item 7
 
 
The Echo Entities have several revenue streams and recognize revenue according to ASC 606 at an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entities expect to be entitled in exchange for transferring goods or services to the customer. The revenue streams are as follows.
 
Outright sales are recorded when product is shipped. Once the price is established and the terms are agreed to and the product is shipped, the revenue is recognized. The Echo Entities have fulfilled their performance obligation with an agreed upon transaction price, payment terms and shipping the product.
 
Echo recognizes refining revenue when our inventory arrives at the destination port and the performance obligation is satisfied by transferring the control of the promised goods that are identified in the customer contract. Ninety percent (90%) of our refining revenue is generated from one refining partner that has an international refining facility. This refining partner pays us sixty percent (60%) of an Invoice within five working days upon the receipt of the Ocean Bill of Lading issued by the Ocean Carrier. Our initial Invoice is recognized in full when our performance obligation is satisfied, as stated in the first sentence. Under the guidance of ASC 606, an estimate of the variable consideration that we expect to be entitled is included in the transaction price stated at the current precious metal spot price and weight of the precious metal. An adjustment to revenue is made in the period once the underlying weight and any precious metal spot price movement is resolved, which is usually around six (6) weeks. Any adjustment from the resolution of the underlying uncertainty is netted with the remaining forty percent (40%) due from the original contract.
 
Hard drive sales by the Echo Entities are limited to customers who are required to prepay shipments. Once the commodity price is established and agreed upon by both parties, customers send payment in advance. The Company releases the shipment on the same day when payment receipt is confirmed, and revenue is recognized on day of shipment. If payment is received on the last day of the month and shipment goes out the following day the payment received is deferred revenue and recognized the following month when the shipment is made.
 
The Echo Entities also provide recycling services according to a Scope of Work and services are recognized when promised services are rendered. We have recycling services conducted at the Echo facility and another type of service is conducted at the client’s facility. The Scope of Work will determine the charges and whether it is completed on campus or off campus. Payment terms are also dictated in the Scope of Work.
 
Accounts Receivable: We record trade receivables when revenue is recognized. When appropriate, we will record an allowance for doubtful accounts, which is primarily determined by an analysis of our trade receivables aging. The allowance is determined based on historical experience of collecting past due amounts, based on the degree of their aging. In addition, specific accounts that are doubtful of collection are included in the allowance. These provisions are reviewed to determine the adequacy of the allowance for doubtful accounts. Trade receivables are charged off when there is certainty as to their being uncollectible. Trade receivables are considered delinquent when payment has not been made within contract terms. DGSE had no allowance for doubtful accounts balance for the years ending December 31, 2020 and 2019. The Echo Entities also had no allowance for doubtful accounts balance for the years ending December 31, 2020 and 2019.
 
Note Receivable: We record ECHG’s note receivable as a non-current asset due to the note being quarterly interest only payments, with a maturity date of February 20, 2023. Interest is accrued quarterly and payments are applied against the accruals. From time to time, the balance is increased through amendments to the note. We perform impairment evaluations on the note on December 31 of each year, or whenever business conditions or events indicate that the note receivable may be impaired. The note receivable, in addition, has a warrant and call option agreements to the lender which represents the right of the lender to purchase an equity interest for a certain amount within a certain time. There is no guarantee that the warrant will be exercised. As of December 31, 2020, based on our evaluation, no impairment was required.
 
 
24
 
PART II
Item 7
 
 
Income Taxes: Income taxes are accounted for under the asset and liability method prescribed by ASC 740, Income Taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance is recorded to reduce the carrying amounts of deferred tax assets unless it is more likely than not such assets will be realized.
 
We account for our position in tax uncertainties in accordance with ASC 740, Income Taxes. The guidance establishes standards for accounting for uncertainty in income taxes. The guidance provides several clarifications related to uncertain tax positions. Most notably, a “more likely-than-not” standard for initial recognition of tax positions, a presumption of audit detection and a measurement of recognized tax benefits based on the largest amount that has a greater than 50 percent likelihood of realization. The guidance applies a two-step process to determine the amount of tax benefit to be recognized in the financial statements. First, we must determine whether any amount of the tax benefit may be recognized. Second, we determine how much of the tax benefit should be recognized (this would only apply to tax positions that qualify for recognition.) No additional liabilities have been recognized as a result of the implementation. We have not taken a tax position that, if challenged, would have a material effect on the financial statements or the effective tax rate during Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019, respectively.
 
Results of Operations
 
Year Ended December 31, 2020 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2019
 
Revenue. Revenue related to DGSE’s continuing operations increased by $18,141,237, or 27%, during fiscal 2020, to $85,661,391, as compared to $67,520,154 during Fiscal 2019. Resale revenue, such as bullion, jewelry, watches and rare coins, increased by $19,702,014 in Fiscal 2020, or 33%, to $79,790,419 as compared to $60,088,405 during Fiscal 2019. Recycled-material sales decreased 21% to $5,870,972 for Fiscal 2020, as compared to $7,431,749 for Fiscal 2019. Revenue increased for resale items for Fiscal 2020, compared to Fiscal 2019 primarily due to the apparent increase in consumer demand following the lifting of governmental orders to refrain from selling non-essential items in our retail stores due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the related spiking of gold prices due to the pandemic. The decrease in recycled-materials revenue is primarily due to the spike in resale revenue stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, as we purchased inventory for Fiscal 2020, more inventory was kept for our retail stores as compared to Fiscal 2019, and recycled less.
 
Revenue related to ECHG for Fiscal 2020 was $28,260,624. Resale revenue of $19,395,834 accounted for 69% of the total. Recycled revenue of $8,864,790 accounted for 31% of the total. The assets of the Echo Legacy Entities were acquired on May 20, 2019 and the Echo Entities were formed in connection therewith, and Teladvance was acquired on August 2, 2019; therefore, Fiscal 2019 is not comparable to Fiscal 2020.
 
Gross Margin: Gross margin related to DGSE, increased in Fiscal 2020 by $1,452,046 to $10,369,870, as compared to $8,917,824 during Fiscal 2019. The increase in gross profit was primarily related to a 33% increase in resale revenue although the resale margin decreased from 12.9% in Fiscal 2019 to 11.5% in Fiscal 2020. The gross profit for recycled material sales for Fiscal 2020 compared to Fiscal 2019 stayed relatively the same although sales decreased by 21%. The sales declined but the profit margin increased from 15.6% in Fiscal 2019 to 19.7% in Fiscal 2020.
 
The ECHG profit margin for Fiscal 2020 was $12,699,093. Resale profit margin was 49% or $9,504,607, an overall percentage of 75% of ECHG’s total profit margin. Recycling’s gross margin of 36.0% accounted for $3,194,486, or 25% of the total. The assets of the Echo Legacy Entities were acquired on May 20, 2019 and the Echo Entities were formed in connection therewith, and Teladvance was acquired on August 2, 2019; therefore, Fiscal 2019 is not comparable to Fiscal 2020.
 
The following table represents our historical operating revenue and gross profit results by category:
 
 
 
For the Years Ended
 
 
 
December 31, 2020
 
 
December 31, 2019
 
 
 
Revenues
 
 
Gross Profit
 
 
Margin
 
 
Revenues
 
 
Gross Profit
 
 
Margin
 
DGSE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Resale
 $79,790,419 
  9,215,494 
  11.5%
 $60,088,405 
 $7,760,365 
  12.9%
Recycled
  5,870,972 
  1,154,376 
  19.7%
  7,431,749 
  1,157,459 
  15.6%
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
     Subtotal
  85,661,391 
  10,369,870 
  12.1%
  67,520,154 
  8,917,824 
  13.2%
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
ECHG
    
    
    
    
    
    
Resale
  19,395,834 
  9,504,607 
  49.0%
  8,722,281 
  4,692,114 
  53.8%
Recycled
  8,864,790 
  3,194,486 
  36.0%
  5,782,062 
  2,645,904 
  45.8%
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
    Subtotal
  28,260,624 
  12,699,093 
  44.9%
  14,504,343 
  7,338,018 
  50.6%
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
 
 $113,922,015 
 $23,068,963 
  20.2%
 $82,024,497 
 $16,255,842 
  19.8%
 
 
25
 
PART II
Item 7
 
 
Selling, General and Administrative: Selling, general and administrative expenses for DGSE decreased $551,975 or 7% in Fiscal 2020, to $6,933,259 compared to $7,485,234 in the prior year. The overall decrease in SG&A was primarily through the ability to apply corporate overhead expenses to two reporting segments.
 
Selling, general and administrative expenses for ECHG totaled $8,620,015 for Fiscal 2020. The expenses consist primarily of payroll, payroll taxes and employee benefits of $5,192,492, rent and variable rent costs, net of sublet income, of $813,220, warehouse and office supplies of $202,728, insurance costs of $97,490, travel expenses of $29,623, professional fees of $91,327, Utilities of $228,620 and overhead administrative expenses of $979,767. The assets of the Echo Legacy Entities were acquired on May 20, 2019 and the Echo Entities were formed in connection therewith, and Teladvance was acquired on August 2, 2019; therefore, Fiscal 2019 is not comparable to Fiscal 2020.
 
Depreciation and Amortization: Depreciation and amortization for DGSE increased by $53,160 or 20% in Fiscal 2020 to $321,833 as compared to $268,673 in Fiscal 2019. The increase is primarily due to the added depreciation from two buildings purchased, and associated build-out costs, that were put into service during the fourth quarter of Fiscal 2020.
 
The Depreciation and Amortization expense for ECHG totaled $406,793 for Fiscal 2020. The balance is made up of the amortization of intangibles acquired from the Echo Transaction on May 20, 2019 of $335,600 and depreciation expense of $71,193. The assets of the Echo Legacy Entities were acquired on May 20, 2019 and the Echo Entities were formed in connection therewith, and Teladvance was acquired on August 2, 2019; therefore, Fiscal 2019 is not comparable to Fiscal 2020.
 
Other Income: Other income for DGSE increased by $58,590 in Fiscal 2020, to $113,974 compared to $55,384 in Fiscal 2019. Fiscal 2020, other income of $113,974, was primarily the combination of writing off old vendor checks of approximately $45,000 and half of the rent income allocated from tenants at the new Company headquarters’ of $67,632. Fiscal 2019, other income of $55,384 was primarily the write up of a small plot of land owned by the Company for many years.
 
Other income for ECHG totaled $193,023 in Fiscal 2020. The other income amount of $193,024 is primarily a combination of interest income from note receivable of $114,297 and half of the rent income allocated from tenants at the new Company headquarters’ of $67,632. The assets of the Echo Legacy Entities were acquired on May 20, 2019 and the Echo Entities were formed in connection therewith, and Teladvance was acquired on August 2, 2019; therefore, Fiscal 2019 is not comparable to Fiscal 2020.
 
Interest Expense: Interest expense for DGSE increased by $47,054 or 29% in Fiscal 2020, to $209,295 compared to $162,241 in Fiscal 2019. The increase is due from the promissory note issued by John R. Loftus to pay off an accounts payable – related party balance on May 20, 2019, that has a slightly higher interest rate than the accounts payable – related party had as an imputed rate and the two notes payable associated with the new stand-alone buildings purchased during the second half of 2020.
 
The interest expense for ECHG was $411,204 in Fiscal 2020. The interest is primarily related to the note payable, related party, with an outstanding balance of $6,496,128 as of December 31, 2020. The assets of the Echo Legacy Entities were acquired on May 20, 2019 and the Echo Entities were formed in connection therewith, and Teladvance was acquired on August 2, 2019; therefore, Fiscal 2019 is not comparable to Fiscal 2020.
 
Income Tax Expense: Income tax expense for DGSE decreased $5,498 or 6% in Fiscal 2020, to $89,618 compared to $95,116 in Fiscal 2019. See Note 15 for Federal Income Taxes.
 
Net Income:  We recorded a net income of $6,383,943 in Fiscal 2020, compared to a net income of $2,780,713 in Fiscal 2019, an increase in net income of $3,603,230 is due primarily to an increase of revenue of approximately $32.0 million and the purchase of the assets of the Echo Legacy Entities on May 20, 2019.
 
 
26
 
PART II
Item 7
 
 
Earnings Per Share: Our net income per basic and diluted shares attributable to holders of our Common Stock was $0.24, for Fiscal 2020, compared to $0.10 per basic and diluted shares for Fiscal 2019, an increase of $0.14 per share. The increase is due primarily from the revenue increase of approximately $32.0 million from Fiscal 2019 to Fiscal 2020 and the purchase of the assets of the Echo Legacy Entities on May 20, 2019.
 
Liquidity and Capital Resources: During Fiscal 2020, cash flows provided by operating activities totaled $6,897,091 compared to cash flows used in operating activities totaling $542,828 in Fiscal 2019, an increased cash flows provided by operating activities of $7,439,919. Cash provided by operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2020, was primarily driven by the increase in trade accounts receivable of $151,124, an increase in customer deposits and other liabilities of $263,572 and net income, with depreciation, amortization and stock based compensation to employees of $7,112,894. Offset by the increase of inventories of $497,444, the increase of prepaid expenses of $108,884 and the reduction of accounts payable and accrued accounts payable of $29,332. Cash used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2019, was primarily driven by the increase in trade accounts receivable of $1,877,783, the reduction of accounts payable and accrued accounts payable of $492,952, the reduction of the accounts payable – related party of $3,074,021. Offset by the reduction of inventories of $1,464,843, the increase in operating leases of 124,713 and net income, with depreciation and amortization of $3,301,011.
 
During Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019, cash used in investing activities totaled $7,964,588 and $6,039,505, respectively, an increase of $1,925,083. The cash used in investing for 2020, was a combination of investing in a note receivable of $2,100,000 to CExchange, LLC (“CExchange”), purchasing two new retail locations for DGSE totaling $1,815,000 and associated build out costs, of which $363,000 was cash payments applied against the purchases of the retail locations and the remainder of the balance from the purchases was financed through notes payable, and the purchase of our corporate headquarters totaling $3,521,021, of which $561,021 was cash payments applied against the office building and the remainder of the balance from the purchase was financed through notes payable. The cash used in investing for 2019, was the combination of property and equipment purchases of $102,989, the continual upgrading our point-of-sale system in the amount of $60,000 and acquisition of the assets of the Echo Legacy Entities, net of cash acquired, in the amount of $5,876,516.
 
During Fiscal 2020, cash provided by financing activities totaled $5,774,873, and Fiscal 2019, cash provided by financing activities totaled $9,639,052, a decrease in cash provided by financing activities of $3,864,179. The cash provided by financing activities during Fiscal 2020 is funds provided by loans made by Texas Bank & Trust for the corporate office building in Irving, Texas and the retail building in Grapevine, Texas, both totaling $3,456,000, a loan made by Truist Bank (f/k/a BB&T Bank) for the retail building located in Lewisville, Texas for $956,000 and the proceeds from the Federal Loan of $1,668,200. Offset by principal payments made against the two promissory notes from Mr. Loftus in the amount of $279,210 and principal payments made against the notes payable loans issued for the buildings purchased mentioned in this paragraph of approximately $26,000. The cash provided by financing activities during Fiscal 2019 is funds provided to purchase the assets of the Echo Legacy Entities through a promissory note from John R. Loftus dated May 20, 2019 for $6,925,979. Additionally, funds provided to pay off an accounts payable – related party balance of $3,074,021, evidenced by a promissory note dated May 20, 2019 by John R. Loftus and the drawing on a short-term line of credit from Texas Bank and Trust of $150,000. Offset by principal payments made against the two promissory notes From Mr. Loftus in the amount of $360,948 and the pay down of the short-term line of credit from Texas Bank and Trust for $150,000.
 
On May 17, 2019, the Company secured a twelve month Line of Credit from Texas Bank and Trust for $1,000,000. The Line of Credit was renewed for an additional 24 months and increased to $3,500,000 on May 17, 2020. The Line of Credit is to fund any cash shortfalls that we may have from time-to-time during the next 24 months. We don’t anticipate the need of those funds for operations. Also, from time-to-time, we have adjusted our inventory levels to meet seasonal demand or in order to meet working capital requirements. Management believes we have enough capital resources to meet working capital requirements. If additional working capital is required, additional loans can be obtained from individuals or from other commercial banks. If necessary, inventory levels may be adjusted in order to meet unforeseen working-capital requirements.
 
We expect our capital expenditures to total approximately $100,000 during the next twelve months. These expenditures will be largely driven by the purchase of equipment and the build-out of corporate space in our office building for tenants, As of December 31, 2020, there were no commitments outstanding for capital expenditures.
 
In the event of significant growth in retail and wholesale jewelry sales and recycling demand, whether purchases or services, our demand for additional working capital will increase due to a related need to stock additional jewelry inventory, increases in wholesale accounts receivable and the purchasing of recycled material. Historically we have funded these activities through operations.
 
We have historically renewed, extended or replaced short-term debt as it matures, and management believes that we will be able to continue to do so in the near future.
 
 
27
 
PART II
Item 7, 7A
 
 
On May 20, 2019, we entered into two (2) loan agreements with John R. Loftus, the Company’s CEO, President and Chairman of the Board. The first note of $6,925,979, pursuant to the Echo Legacy Entities asset purchase agreement, is a 5-year promissory note amortized over 20 years at 6% annual interest rate. The second note of $3,074,021 paid off the accounts payable – related party balance to a former Related Party on May 20, 2019. The promissory note is a 5-year note amortized over 20 years at 6% annual interest rate. Both notes are being serviced by operational cash flow.
 
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has adversely affected global economic business conditions. Future sales on products like ours could decline, and the ultimate impact is uncertain and subject to change. The duration of this pandemic and the impact, either direct or indirect cannot be predicted. The Company believed additional liquidity was necessary to support ongoing operations during this period of uncertainty. We applied for and received approximately $1.67 million, 1% interest, Federal Loan to pay employees and cover certain rent and utility-related costs during the COVID-19 pandemic. The loan is forgivable to the extent that certain criteria are met. We have applied for forgiveness and that forgiveness application is currently under review by the SBA.
 
The Company leases certain of its facilities under operating leases. The minimum rental commitments under non-cancellable operating leases as of December 31, 2020 are as follows:
 
Operating Leases
 
 Total
 
 
 2021
 
 
 2022
 
 
 2023
 
 
 2024
 
 
Thereafter
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 DGSE
 $1,205,662 
 $479,161 
 $235,674 
 $212,855 
 $213,885 
 $64,087 
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
 Echo Entities
  4,217,873 
  869,209 
  786,396 
  808,022 
  830,244 
  924,002 
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
   Total
 $5,423,535 
 $1,348,370 
 $1,022,070 
 $1,020,877 
 $1,044,129 
 $988,089 
 
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements.
 
We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to our stockholders.
 
STATEMENT OF MANAGEMENT’S RESPONSIBILITY FOR FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
Management is responsible for the preparation of the consolidated financial statements and related information that are presented in this report. The consolidated financial statements, which include amounts based on management’s estimates and judgments, have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
 
The Company designs and maintains accounting and internal control systems to provide reasonable assurance at reasonable cost that assets are safeguarded against loss from unauthorized use or disposition, and that the financial records are reliable for preparing consolidated financial statements and maintaining accountability for assets. These systems are augmented by written policies, an organizational structure providing division of responsibilities and careful selection and training of qualified personnel.
 
The Company engaged Whitley Penn LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, to audit and render an opinion on the consolidated financial statements in accordance with the standards of the Public Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Management’s report was not subject to attestation by our independent registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the SEC that permit the company to provide only management’s report in this annual report.
 
The Board, through its Audit Committee, consisting solely of independent directors of the Company, meets periodically with management and our independent registered public accounting firm to ensure that the Company is meeting its responsibilities and to discuss matters concerning internal controls and financial reporting. Whitley Penn LLP and our management team each have full and free access to the Audit Committee.
 
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
Not required because we are a “Smaller Reporting Company” as that term is defined in Rule 12b-2 promulgated under the Exchange Act.
 
 
28
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
 
ENVELA CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
 
CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENTS
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
Revenue:
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Sales
 $113,922,015 
 $82,024,497 
   Cost of goods sold
  90,853,052 
  65,768,655 
      Gross margin
  23,068,963 
  16,255,842 
Expenses:
    
    
   Selling, General & Administrative Expenses
  15,553,274 
  12,494,510 
   Depreciation and Amortization
  728,626 
  520,298 
      Total cost of revenue
  16,281,900 
  13,014,808 
 
    
    
Operating income
  6,787,063 
  3,241,034 
Other income, net
  306,997 
  49,756 
Interest expense
  (620,499)
  (414,961)
Income before income taxes
  6,473,561 
  2,875,829 
Income tax expense
  89,618 
  95,116 
 
    
    
Net income
 $6,383,943 
 $2,780,713 
 
    
    
Earnings per share:
    
    
   Basic
 $0.24 
 $0.10 
   Diluted
 $0.24 
 $0.10 
 
    
    
Weighted average shares outstanding:
    
    
   Basic
  26,924,631 
  26,924,381 
   Diluted
  26,939,631 
  26,939,631 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
29
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
ENVELA CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
 
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
 
December 31, 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Cash and cash equivalents
 $9,218,036 
 $4,510,660 
   Trade receivables, net of allowances
  2,846,619 
  2,997,743 
   Inventories
  10,006,897 
  9,509,454 
   Current right-of-use assets from operating leases
  1,157,077 
  1,160,658 
   Prepaid expenses
  281,719 
  172,834 
Total current assets
  23,510,348 
  18,351,349 
Note receivable
  2,100,000 
  - 
Property and equipment, net
  6,888,601 
  1,351,039 
Goodwill
  1,367,109 
  1,367,109 
Intangible assets, net
  2,992,473 
  3,394,073 
Long-term operating lease right-of-use assets, less current portion
  3,522,923 
  2,335,040 
Other long-term assets
  197,638 
  204,784 
Total assets
 $40,579,092 
 $27,003,394 
 
    
    
Liabilities and stockholders’ equity
    
    
Current liabilities:
    
    
   Accounts payable-trade
 $1,510,697 
 $1,467,845 
   Notes payable, related party
  307,032 
  1,084,072 
   Notes payable
  1,813,425 
  - 
   Current operating lease liabilities
  1,148,309 
  1,175,109 
   Accrued expenses
  844,324 
  916,509 
   Customer deposits and other liabilities
  428,976 
  165,404 
Total current liabilities
  6,052,763 
  4,808,939 
Notes payable, related party, less current portion
  9,052,810 
  8,554,980 
Notes payable, less current portion
  4,240,658 
  - 
Long-term operating lease liabilities, less current portion
  3,654,419 
  2,445,301 
Total liabilities
  23,000,650 
  15,809,220 
Commitments and contingencies
    
    
Stockholders’ equity:
    
    
   Common stock, $0.01 par value; 60,000,000 shares authorized;
    
    
      26,924,631 shares and 26,924,381 shares issued and outstanding
    
    
      as of December 31, 2019 and 2020 respectively; Preferred stock, $0.01
    
    
      par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized; 0 shares issued and outstanding
  269,246 
  269,244 
   Additional paid-in capital
  40,173,000 
  40,172,677 
   Accumulated deficit
  (22,863,804)
  (29,247,747)
Total stockholders’ equity
  17,578,442 
  11,194,174 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
 $40,579,092 
 $27,003,394 
 
  The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
30
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
 ENVELA CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
 
CONSOLIDATED CASH FLOW STATEMENTS
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
 $6,383,943 
 $2,780,713 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash from (used in) operations:
    
    
   Depreciation, amortization, and other
  728,626 
  520,298 
   Stock based compensation to employees, officers and directors
  325 
  - 
   Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
    
    
      Trade receivables
  151,124 
  (1,877,783)
      Inventories
  (497,444)
  1,464,843 
      Prepaid expenses
  (108,884)
  (3,375)
      Other assets
  7,145 
  (47,374)
      Accounts payable and accrued expenses
  (29,332)
  (492,952)
      Accounts payable, related party
  - 
  (3,074,021)
      Operating leases
  (1,984)
  124,713 
      Customer deposits and other liabilities
  263,572 
  62,110 
 
    
    
         Net cash provided by (used in) operations
 $6,897,091 
 $(542,828)
 
    
    
Investing
    
    
Investment in note receivable
  (2,100,000)
  - 
Purchase of property and equipment
  (5,864,588)
  (102,989)
Purchase of intangible assets
  - 
  (60,000)
Acquisition of Echo Entities, net of cash acquired
  - 
  (5,876,516)
 
    
    
         Net cash used in investing
  (7,964,588)
  (6,039,505)
 
    
    
Financing
    
    
Short-term financing, line of credit
  - 
  150,000 
Financing for the acquisition of the Echo Entities
  - 
  6,925,979 
Financing to pay off accounts payable, related party
  - 
  3,074,021 
Payments on short-term financing, line of credit
  - 
  (150,000)
Payments on notes payable, related party
  (279,210)
  (360,948)
Payments on notes payable
  (26,117)
  - 
Proceeds from PPP loan
  1,668,200 
  - 
Proceeds from notes payable for retail and office buildings
  4,412,000 
  - 
 
    
    
         Net cash provided by financing
  5,774,873 
  9,639,052 
 
    
    
Net change in cash and cash equivalents
  4,707,376 
  3,056,719 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period
  4,510,660 
  1,453,941 
 
    
    
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period
 $9,218,036 
 $4,510,660 
 
    
    
  Supplemental Disclosures
    
    
  Cash paid during the period for:
    
    
          Interest
 $620,499 
 $390,864 
          Income taxes
 $59,025 
 $43,578 
 
  The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
31
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
ENVELA CORPORATION AND SBDISIARIES
 
CONSOLIDATED STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY STATEMENTS
 
 
 
    Common Stock
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Shares
 
 
  Amount
 
 
  Additional Paid-in Capital
 
 
  Accumulated Deficit
 
 
  Total Stockholders' Equity
 
Balance at December 31, 2018
  26,924,381 
 $269,244 
 $40,172,677 
 $(32,028,460)
 $8,413,461 
 
    
    
    
    
    
 Net income
  - 
  - 
  - 
  2,780,713 
  2,780,713 
 
    
    
    
    
    
Balance at December 31, 2019
  26,924,381 
 $269,244 
 $40,172,677 
 $(29,247,747)
 $11,194,174 
 
    
    
    
    
    
Stock issued to employees, officers and directors
  250 
  2 
  323 
  - 
  325 
 
    
    
    
    
    
 Net income
  - 
  - 
  - 
  6,383,943 
  6,383,943 
 
    
    
    
    
    
Balance at December 31, 2020
  26,924,631 
 $269,246 
 $40,173,000 
 $(22,863,804)
 $17,578,442 
 
 
32
PART II
Item 8
 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
NOTE 1 — ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND NATURE OF OPERATIONS
 
A summary of the significant accounting policies applied in the preparation of the accompanying consolidated financial statements follows. References to fiscal years below are denoted with the word “Fiscal” and the associated year.
 
Principles of Consolidation and Nature of Operations
 
Envela and its subsidiaries engage in diverse business activities within the recommerce sector. These activities include being one of the nation's premier authenticated recommerce retailers of luxury hard assets; providing end-of-life asset recycling; offering data destruction and IT asset management; and providing products, services and solutions to industrial and commercial companies. Envela operates primarily via two business segments. Through DGSE, we operate Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange, Charleston Gold & Diamond Exchange, and Bullion Express brands. Through ECHG we operate Echo Environmental, ITAD USA and Teladvance. Envela is a Nevada corporation, headquartered in Irving, Texas.
 
DGSE primarily buys and resells or recycles luxury hard assets like jewelry, diamonds, gemstones, fine watches, rare coins and related collectibles, precious-metal bullion products, gold, silver and other precious-metals. DGSE operates six jewelry stores at both the retail and wholesale levels, throughout the United States via its facilities in Texas and South Carolina. The Company also maintains a presence in the retail market through our web-sites, www.dgse.com and www.cgdeinc.com.
 
ECHG buys electronic components from businesses and other organizations, such as school districts, for end-of-life recycling or to add life to electronic devices by data destruction and refurbishment for reuse. For end-of–life recycling, we sell to downstream recycling companies who further process our material for end users. The electronic devices saved for reuse are cleaned of prior data, refurbished and sold to businesses or organizations wanting to extend the remaining life and value of recycled electronics. Our customers are companies and organizations that are based domestically and internationally.
 
For additional business operations for both DGSE and ECHG, see “Item 1. Business—Operating Segments” in this annual report on Form 10-K.
 
The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) and include the accounts of the Company and its subsidiaries. All material intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated.
 
The Company operates the business as two operating and reportable segments under a variety of banners. DGSE includes Charleston Gold & Diamond Exchange and Dallas Gold & Silver Exchange. ECHG includes Echo, ITAD USA and Teladvance.
 
Reclassifications
 
Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on previously reported results of operations.
 
Cash and Cash Equivalents
 
The Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with a maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents. The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets approximate fair value.
 
Inventories
 
DGSE’s inventory is valued at the lower of cost or NRV. The Company acquires a majority of its inventory from individual customers, including pre-owned jewelry, watches, bullion, rare coins and collectibles. The Company acquires these items based on its own internal estimate of the fair market value of the items at the time of purchase. The Company considers factors such as the current spot market price of precious metals and current market demand for the items being purchased. The Company supplements these purchases from individual customers with inventory purchased from wholesale vendors. These wholesale purchases of new merchandise can take the form of full asset purchases, or consigned inventory. Consigned inventory is accounted for on the Company’s consolidated balance sheet with a fully offsetting contra account so that consigned inventory has a net zero balance. The majority of the Company’s inventory has some component of its value that is based on the spot market price of precious metals. Because the overall market value for precious metals regularly fluctuates, these fluctuations could have either a positive or negative impact on the value of the Company’s inventory and could positively or negatively impact the profitability of the Company. The Company regularly monitors these fluctuations to evaluate any necessary impairment to its inventory.
 
 
33
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
ECHG’s inventory principally includes processed and unprocessed electronic scrap materials. The value of the material is derived from recycling the precious and other scrap metals included in the scrap. The processed and unprocessed materials are carried at the lower of the average cost of the material during the month of purchase or NRV. The in-transit material is carried at lower of cost or market using the retail method. Under the retail method the valuation of the inventory at cost and the resulting gross margins are calculated by applying a cost to retail ratio to the retail value of the inventory.
 
The inventory listed in Note 3, and for the time period until May 17, 2022, is pledged as collateral against our $3,500,000 short-term line of credit with Texas Bank and Trust.
 
Property and Equipment
 
Property and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation on property and equipment is provided for using the straight-line method over the anticipated economic useful lives of the related property. Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. If circumstances require a long-lived asset or asset group be tested for possible impairment, we first compare undiscounted cash flows expected to be generated by the asset or asset group to its carrying value. If the carrying value of the long-lived asset or asset group is not recoverable on an undiscounted cash flow basis, an impairment is recognized to the extent the carrying value exceeds its fair value. Fair value is determined through various valuation techniques including discounted cash flow models, quoted market values, and third-party independent appraisals, as considered necessary. There were no impairments recorded during Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019.
 
Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are charged against income as incurred; betterments that increase the value or materially extend the life of the related assets are capitalized. When assets are sold or retired, the cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and any gain or loss is recorded to current operating income.
 
Impairment of Long-Lived Assets, Amortized Intangible Assets and Goodwill
 
The Company performs impairment evaluations of its long-lived assets, including property, equipment, and intangible assets with finite lives whenever business conditions or events indicate that those assets may be impaired. When the estimated future undiscounted cash flows to be generated by the assets are less than the carrying value of the long-lived assets, the assets are written down to fair market value and a charge is recorded to current operations. Based on the Company’s evaluations no impairment was required as of December 31, 2020 or 2019.
 
We evaluate goodwill for impairment annually in the fourth quarter, or when there is reason to believe that the value has been diminished or impaired. Evaluations for possible impairment are based upon a comparison of the estimated fair value of the reporting segment to which the goodwill has been assigned, versus the sum of the carrying value of the assets and liabilities of that segment including the assigned goodwill value. Goodwill is tested at the segment level and is the only intangible asset with an indefinite life on the balance sheet.
 
Financial Instruments
 
The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets for cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued expenses approximate fair value because of the immediate or short-term maturity of these financial instruments. The carrying amounts reported for the note receivable and notes payable approximate fair value because the underlying instruments have an interest rate that reflects current market rates. None of these instruments are held for trading purposes.
 
 
34
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
Advertising Costs
 
DGSE’s advertising costs are expensed as incurred and amounted to $240,770 and $392,588 for Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019, respectively.
 
ECHG’s advertising costs are expensed as incurred and amounted to $16,311 and $4,809 For Fiscal 2020 and for the period beginning May 20, 2019 through December 31, 2019, respectively.
 
Accounts Receivable
 
Given the generally low level of accounts receivable for DGSE, the Company uses a simplified approach to calculate a general bad debt reserve. An allowance is calculated for each aging “bucket,” based on the risk profile of that bucket. For example, based on our historical experience, we have chosen to not place any reserve on amounts that are less than 60 days past due. From there the reserve amount escalates: 10% reserve on amounts over 60 but less than 90 days past due, 25% on amounts over 90 but less than 120 past due, and 75% on amounts over 120 days past due. The account receivables past 120 days past due are reviewed quarterly and if they are deemed uncollectable will be written off against the reserve.
 
For Fiscal 2020 and 2019, besides the normal timing to clear credit cards and financing collections, DGSE’s accounts receivable balance consisted of wholesale dealers that are current, therefore no reserve was established at December 31, 2020 and 2019. Once a reserve is established, and an amount is considered to be uncollectable it is to be written off against the reserve. We will revisit the reserve periodically, but no less than annually, with the same analytical approach in order to determine if the reserve needs to be increased or decreased, based on the risk profile of open accounts receivable at that point.
 
ECHG has a more sizable accounts receivable balance of $2,528,215 at December 31, 2020 and $2,383,061 as of December 31, 2019. We use a different approach for allowance for doubtful accounts because customers are generally larger and payable terms are farther out. Once we determine that a balance is uncollectable we reserve that balance but still pursue payment. On the rare occasion we determine a balance is uncollectable we will write off the balance against the reserve. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, we consider the full accounts receivable balance to be fully collectable and feel that a reserve of $0 to be appropriate.
 
As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, there was no allowance for doubtful accounts.
 
A summary of the Allowance for Doubtful Accounts is presented below:
 
 
 
December 31,
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beginning Balance
 $- 
 $- 
Bad debt expense (+)
  37,798 
  - 
Receivables written off (-)
  (37,798)
  - 
Ending Balance
 $- 
 $- 
 
 
35
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
Note Receivable
 
ECHG, LLC, entered into an agreement with CExchange, LLC on February 15, 2020, to lend $1,500,000 bearing interest at eight and one-half percent (8.5%) with interest only payments due quarterly. The loan matures on February 20, 2023. The parties also agreed to warrant and call-option agreements to acquire all of CExchange’s equity interests. On November 7, 2020, the Company entered into an agreement, whereby, increasing the loan from $1,500,000 to $2,100,000. CExchange is the leader in retail trade-in services, providing in-store and online solutions for most of the major consumer electronics retailers in the United States. CExchange helps retailers provide in-store trade-in programs designed to allow customers to exchange their old technology for cash in minutes. This fits well with ECHG’s core business of refurbishing and reusing cell telephones. There is no assurance that the Company will exercise its warrant or call option.
 
Short-Term Financing
 
Envela established a short-term line of credit with Texas Bank and Trust to cover emergency cash needs for $1,000,000 on May 17, 2019. The line of credit was renewed for an additional two years and increased to $3,500,000 on May 17 2020 and expires May 16, 2022. It has a varying interest rate, per annum, based on the Prime Rate. On December 31, 2020, the interest rate was 5% and the balance due on this short-term line of credit was $0.
 
Income Taxes
 
Income taxes are accounted for under the asset and liability method prescribed by Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 740, Income Taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance is recorded to reduce the carrying amounts of deferred tax assets unless it is more likely than not such assets will be realized.
 
The Company accounts for its position in tax uncertainties in accordance with ASC 740. The guidance establishes standards for accounting for uncertainty in income taxes. The guidance provides several clarifications related to uncertain tax positions. Most notably, a “more likely-than-not” standard for initial recognition of tax positions, a presumption of audit detection and a measurement of recognized tax benefits based on the largest amount that has a greater than 50 percent likelihood of realization. ASC 740 applies a two-step process to determine the amount of tax benefit to be recognized in the financial statements. First, the Company must determine whether any amount of the tax benefit may be recognized. Second, the Company determines how much of the tax benefit should be recognized (this would only apply to tax positions that qualify for recognition). The Company has not taken a tax position that, if challenged, would have a material effect on the financial statements or the effective tax rate during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019.
 
The Company currently believes that its significant filing positions are highly certain and that all of its other significant income tax filing positions and deductions would be sustained upon audit or the final resolution would not have a material effect on the consolidated financial statements. Therefore, the Company has not established any significant reserves for uncertain tax positions. The Company recognizes accrued interest and penalties resulting from audits by tax authorities in the provision for income taxes in the consolidated statements of operations. During Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019, the Company did not incur any federal income tax interest or penalties.
 
Revenue Recognition
 
In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which superseded revenue recognition requirements in Topic 605, Revenue Recognition. The ASU is based on the principle that revenue is recognized to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The ASU also requires additional disclosure about the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer contracts, including significant judgements and changes in judgements and assets recognized from cost incurred to obtain or fulfill a contract.
 
 
36
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
ASC 606 provides guidance to identify performance obligations for revenue-generating transactions. The initial step is to identify the contract with a customer created with the sales invoice or a repair ticket. Secondly, to identify the performance obligations in the contract as we promise to deliver the purchased item or promised repairs in return for payment or future payment as a receivable. The third step is determining the transaction price of the contract obligation as in the full ticket price, negotiated price or a repair price. The next step is to allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations as we designate a separate price for each item. The final step in the guidance is to recognize revenue as each performance obligation is satisfied.
 
The following disaggregation of total revenue is listed by sales category and segment for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:
 
 
 
For the Years Ended
 
 
 
December 31, 2020
 
 
December 31, 2019
 
 
 
Revenues
 
 
Gross Profit
 
 
Margin
 
 
Revenues
 
 
Gross Profit
 
 
Margin
 
DGSE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Resale
 $79,790,419 
  9,215,494 
  11.5%
 $60,088,405 
 $7,760,365 
  12.9%
Recycled
  5,870,972 
  1,154,376 
  19.7%
  7,431,749 
  1,157,459 
  15.6%
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
     Subtotal
  85,661,391 
  10,369,870 
  12.1%
  67,520,154 
  8,917,824 
  13.2%
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
ECHG
    
    
    
    
    
    
Resale
  19,395,834 
  9,504,607 
  49.0%
  8,722,281 
  4,692,114 
  53.8%
Recycled
  8,864,790 
  3,194,486 
  36.0%
  5,782,062 
  2,645,904 
  45.8%
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
    Subtotal
  28,260,624 
  12,699,093 
  44.9%
  14,504,343 
  7,338,018 
  50.6%
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
 
 $113,922,015 
 $23,068,963 
  20.2%
 $82,024,497 
 $16,255,842 
  19.8%
 
For DGSE, revenue for monetary transactions (i.e., cash and receivables) with dealers and the retail public are recognized when the merchandise is delivered, and payment has been made either by immediate payment or through a receivable obligation at one of our over-the-counter retail stores. We also recognize revenue upon the shipment of goods when retail and wholesale customers have fulfilled their obligation to pay, or promise to pay, through e-commerce or phone sales. We have elected to account for shipping and handling costs as fulfillment costs after the customer obtains control of the goods. Crafted-precious-metal items at the end of their useful lives are sold to a Dallas refiner, who was a related party until May 20, 2019. Since this refiner is located in the Dallas area, we deliver the metal to the refiner. The metal is assayed, price is determined from the assay and payment is made usually within two days. Revenue is recognized from the sale once payment is received.
 
We also offer a structured layaway plan. When a retail customer utilizes the layaway plan, we collect a minimum payment of 25% of the sales price, establish a payment schedule for the remaining balance and hold the merchandise as collateral as security against the customer’s deposit until all amounts due are paid in full. Revenue for layaway sales is recognized when the merchandise is paid in full and delivered to the retail customer. Layaway revenue is also recognized when a customer fails to pay in accordance with the sales contract and the sales item is returned to inventory with the forfeit of deposited funds, typically after 90 days.
 
 
37
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
In limited circumstances, we exchange merchandise for similar merchandise and/or monetary consideration with both dealers and retail customers, for which we recognize revenue in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 845, Nonmonetary Transactions. When we exchange merchandise for similar merchandise and there is no monetary component to the exchange, we do not recognize any revenue. Instead, the basis of the merchandise relinquished becomes the basis of the merchandise received, less any indicated impairment of value of the merchandise relinquished. When we exchange merchandise for similar merchandise and there is a monetary component to the exchange, we recognize revenue to the extent of the monetary assets received and determines the cost of sale based on the ratio of monetary assets received to monetary and non-monetary assets received multiplied by the cost of the assets surrendered.
 
The Company offers the option of third party financing for customers wishing to borrow money for the purchase. The customer applies on-line with the third party and upon going through the credit check will be approved or denied. If accepted, the customer is allowed to purchase according to the limits set by the financing company. We recognize the revenue of the sale upon the promise of the financing company to pay.
 
We have a return policy (money-back guarantee). The policy covers retail transactions involving jewelry, graded rare coins and currency only. Customers may return jewelry, graded rare coins and currency purchased within 30 days of the receipt of the items for a full refund as long as the items are returned in exactly the same condition as they were delivered. In the case of jewelry, graded rare coins and currency sales on account, customers may cancel the sale within 30 days of making a commitment to purchase the items. The receipt of a deposit and a signed purchase order evidences the commitment. Any customer may return a jewelry item or graded rare coins and currency if they can demonstrate that the item is not authentic, or there was an error in the description of a graded coin or currency piece. Returns are accounted for as a reversal of the original transaction, with the effect of reducing revenues, and cost of sales, and returning the merchandise to inventory. We have established an allowance for estimated returns related to Fiscal 2020 sales, which is based on our review of historical returns experience, and reduces our reported revenues and cost of sales accordingly. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, our allowance for returns remained the same at approximately $28,000 for both years.
 
ECHG has several revenue streams and recognize revenue according to ASC 606 at an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entities expect to be entitled in exchange for transferring goods or services to the customer. The revenue streams are as follows;
 
Outright sales are recorded when product is shipped. Once the price is established and the terms are agreed to and the product is shipped, the revenue is recognized. ECHG has fulfilled its performance obligation with an agreed upon transaction price, payment terms and shipping the product.
 
ECHG recognizes refining revenue when our inventory arrives at the destination port and the performance obligation is satisfied by transferring the control of the promised goods that are identified in the customer contract. Ninety percent (90%) of our refining revenue is generated from one refining partner with an international refining facility. This refining partner pays us sixty percent (60%) of an Invoice within five working days upon the receipt of the Ocean Bill of Lading issued by the Ocean Carrier. Our initial Invoice is recognized in full when our performance obligation is satisfied, as stated in the first sentence. Under the guidance of ASC 606, an estimate of the variable consideration that we expect to be entitled is included in the transaction price stated at the current precious metal spot price and weight of the precious metal. An adjustment to revenue is made in the period once the underlying weight and any precious metal spot price movement is resolved, which is usually around six (6) weeks. Any adjustment from the resolution of the underlying uncertainty is netted with the remaining forty percent (40%) due from the original contract.
 
Hard drive sales by ECHG are limited to customers who are required to prepay shipments. Once the commodity price is established and agreed upon by both parties, customers send payment in advance. The Company releases the shipment on the same day when payment receipt is confirmed and revenue is recognized on day of shipment. If payment is received on the last day of the month and shipment goes out the following day the payment received is deferred revenue and recognized the following month when the shipment is made.
 
ECHG also provides recycling services according to a Scope of Work. Services are recognized based on the number of units processed by a preset price per unit. Activity reports are produced weekly with the counts and revenue is recognized based on the billing from the weekly reports. Recycling services can be conducted at our ECHG facility or we can design and perform the recycling service at the client’s facility. The Scope of Work will determine the charges and whether the service will be completed at ECHG or at the client’s facility. Payment terms are also dictated in the Scope of Work.
 
 
38
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
Shipping and Handling Costs
 
Shipping and handling costs amounted to $1,025,215 and $803,015, for 2020 and 2019, respectively. We have determined that shipping and handling costs should be included in cost of goods sold since inventory is what is shipped to and from store locations or to and from vendors.
 
Taxes Collected from Customers
 
The Company’s policy is to present taxes collected from customers and remitted to governmental authorities on a net basis. The Company records the amounts collected as a current liability and relieves such liability upon remittance to the taxing authority without impacting revenues or expenses.
 
Earnings Per Share
 
Basic earnings per share of our Common Stock is computed by dividing net earnings available to holders of our Common Stock by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the reporting period. Diluted earnings per share reflect the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue Common Stock were exercised or converted into Common Stock. For the calculation of diluted earnings per share, the basic weighted average number of shares is increased by the dilutive effect of stock options and warrants outstanding determined using the treasury stock method.
 
Stock-Based Compensation
 
The Company accounts for stock-based compensation by measuring the cost of the employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments, including grants of stock options, based on the fair value of the award at the date of grant. In addition, to the extent that the Company receives an excess tax benefit upon exercise of an award, such benefit is reflected as cash flow from financing activities in the consolidated statement of cash flows. Stock-based compensation expense for Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019 amounted to $325 and $0 respectively.
 
The following table represents our total compensation cost related to non-vested awards not yet recognized at year end December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019:
 
Date of grant
Employee
 
Price of stock at grant date
 
 
Number of shares granted unvested December 31, 2020
 
 
Unrecognized expense at December 31, 2020
 
 
Number of shares granted unvested December 31, 2019
 
 
Unrecognized expense at December 31, 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
January 23, 2014
Robert Burnside
 $2.18 
  0 
  - 
  250 
 $545.00 
 
    
    
    
    
    
Total cost unrecognized
 
    
    
  - 
    
 $545.00 
 
No stock awards remained unexercised as of December 31, 2020 and only 250 unexercised stock awards remained unexercised as of December 31, 2019.
 
Use of Estimates
 
The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue, and expenses. Examples of estimates and assumptions include: for revenue recognition, determining the nature and timing of satisfaction of performance obligations, and determining the standalone selling price of performance obligations, variable consideration, and other obligations such as product returns and refunds; loss contingencies; the fair value of and/or potential impairment of goodwill and intangible assets for our reporting units; useful lives of our tangible and intangible assets; allowances for doubtful accounts; valuation allowance; the market value of, and demand for, our inventory and the potential outcome of uncertain tax positions that have been recognized on our consolidated financial statements or tax returns. Actual results and outcomes may differ from management’s estimates and assumptions.
 
 
39
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
New Accounting Pronouncements
 
In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment.  This ASU simplifies the accounting for goodwill impairment for all entities by requiring impairment changes to be based on the first step in today’s two-step impairment test, thus eliminating step two from the goodwill impairment test.  In addition, the amendment eliminates the requirements for any reporting unit with a zero or negative carrying amount to perform a qualitative assessment and, if it fails that qualitative test, to perform step two of the goodwill impairment test. For public companies, ASU 2017-04 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019 with early adoption permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017.  We adopted this pronouncement on January 1, 2020. The adoption did not have an impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.
 
On January 1, 2019, we adopted Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) (ASU 2016-02) using the modified retrospective transition approach by applying the new standard to all leases existing at the date of initial application. Results and disclosure requirements for reporting periods beginning after January 1, 2019, are presented under Topic 842, while prior period amounts have not been adjusted and continue to be reported in accordance with our historical accounting under Topic 840. Upon adoption, we recognized right-of-use assets of approximately $2.0 million, with corresponding lease liabilities of approximately $2.0 million on the consolidated balance sheets. The right-of-use assets include adjustments for deferred rent liabilities. The adoption did not impact our beginning retained earnings, or our prior year consolidated statements of income and statements of cash flows.
 
In June 2016, the FASB issued a new credit loss accounting standard ASU 2016-13. The new accounting standard introduces the current expected credit losses methodology (CECL) for estimating allowances for credit losses which will be based on expected losses rather than incurred losses. We will be required to use a forward-looking expected credit loss model for accounts receivable, loans and other financial instruments. The standard will be adopted upon the effective date for us beginning January 1, 2023 by using a modified retrospective transition approach to align our credit loss methodology with the new standard. The company is evaluating the financial statement implications of ASU 2016-13.
 
NOTE 2 — CONCENTRATION OF CREDIT RISK
 
The Company maintains cash balances in financial institutions in excess of federally insured limits.
 
A significant amount of DGSE’s revenue and expenses stem from sales to and purchases from one Dallas refining partner, which relationship constitutes Envela’s single largest source of revenues and expenses. In addition, a significant amount of ECHG’s refining revenue comes from one refining partner with an international refining facility. Any adverse break in either relationship could reduce the flow of refining materials and revenue. While the pandemic continues to be a global threat, any potential interruptions in travel and business disruptions with respect to us, our customers or our supply chain could adversely affect our sales, costs and liquidity position, possibly to a significant degree. The effects of the coronavirus pandemic on our business, the ultimate impact remains uncertain and subject to change. The duration of any such impact cannot be predicted.
 
NOTE 3 — INVENTORIES
 
Inventories consist of the following:
 
 
 
December 31,
 
 
December 31,
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
DGSE
 
 
 
 
 
 
Resale
 $8,971,815 
 $8,213,551 
Recycle
  191,677 
  401,468 
 
    
    
       Subtotal
  9,163,492 
  8,615,019 
 
    
    
ECHG
    
    
Resale
  557,959 
  351,958 
Recycle
  285,446 
  542,477 
 
    
    
       Subtotal
  843,405 
  894,435 
 
    
    
 
 $10,006,897 
 $9,509,454 
 
 
40
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
NOTE 4 — NOTE RECEIVABLE
 
ECHG, LLC, which is wholly owned by the Company, entered into an agreement with CExchange, LLC (“CExchange”) on February 15, 2020, pursuant to which it agreed to loan CExchange $1,500,000 bearing interest at eight and one-half percent (8.5%) with interest only payments due quarterly. The loan matures on February 20, 2023. The parties also agreed to warrant and call-option agreements through which ECHG, LLC may acquire all of CExchange’s equity interests upon the occurrence of certain events and on certain conditions. On November 7, 2020, the Company entered into an amended agreement, whereby, increasing the loan from $1,500,000 to $2,100,000. CExchange is a leader in retail trade-in services, providing in-store and online solutions for most of the major consumer electronics retailers in the United States. CExchange helps retailers provide in-store trade-in programs designed to allow customers to exchange their old technology for cash in minutes. These services and programs fit well with ECHG’s core business of refurbishing and reusing consumer electronics and IT equipment. Starting with the quarter ending June 30, 2020, CExchange helped DGSE facilitate their bullion on-line sales. There is no assurance that the Company will exercise its warrant or call option to acquire all of CExchange’s equity interests.
 
NOTE 5 — PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT
 
Property and equipment consist of the following:
 
 
 
December 31,
 
 
December 31,
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
DGSE
 
 
 
 
 
 
Land
 $720,786 
 $55,000 
Buildings and improvements
  1,317,906 
  - 
Leasehold improvements
  1,435,742 
  1,561,649 
Machinery and equipment
  1,056,315 
  1,039,013 
Furniture and fixtures
  504,430 
  453,699 
Vehicles
  22,859 
  - 
 
  5,058,038 
  3,109,361 
Less: accumulated depreciation
  (2,054,294)
  (1,904,948)
 
    
    
     Sub-Total
  3,003,744 
  1,204,413 
 
    
    
ECHG
    
    
Leasehold improvements
  81,149 
  81,149 
Machinery and equipment
  220,417 
  27,497 
Furniture and fixtures
  93,827 
  93,827 
 
  395,393 
  202,473 
Less: accumulated depreciation
  (71,058)
  (55,847)
 
    
    
     Sub-Total
  324,335 
  146,626 
 
    
    
Envela
    
    
Land
  1,106,664 
  - 
Buildings and improvements
  2,456,324 
  - 
Machinery and equipment
  5,407 
  - 
 
  3,568,395 
  - 
Less: accumulated depreciation
  (7,873)
  - 
 
    
    
     Sub-Total
  3,560,522 
  - 
 
    
    
 
 $6,888,601 
 $1,351,039 
 
Depreciation expense was $327,026 and $264,021 for Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019, respectively.
 
 
41
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
NOTE 6 — ACQUISITION
 
On May 20, 2019, ECHG, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company, entered into an asset purchase agreement with each of Echo Environmental, LLC and its wholly owned subsidiary ITAD USA, LLC (collectively, the “Echo Legacy Entities”), pursuant to which the Echo Legacy Entities agreed to sell all of their assets and rights and interests thereto (the “Acquired Assets”) for $6,925,979 (the “Echo Transaction”). The Echo Legacy Entities were wholly owned subsidiaries of a former Related Party. John R. Loftus is the Company’s CEO, President and Chairman and owned approximately one-third of the equity interests of the former Related Party prior to the Echo Transaction. The Company also paid a closing fee of $85,756 that was not part of the purchase price allocation. The fee is included in selling, general and administrative expenses.
 
On the same day, Mr. Loftus became the largest beneficial owner of the Company’s stock by purchasing all of the Company’s stock beneficially owned by the former Related Party. As part of the transaction of acquiring the stock from the former Related Party, Mr. Loftus no longer owns an equity interest in that entity. As an interested party, Mr. Loftus was familiar with the operations of the Echo Legacy Entities.
 
In connection with the Echo Transaction, on May 20, 2019, ECHG executed and delivered to Mr. Loftus, a promissory note to which ECHG borrowed from Mr. Loftus $6,925,979, the proceeds of which were used to purchase the Acquired Assets.
 
As part of the Echo Transaction, goodwill was realized of $1,367,109, which is the purchase price less the fair value of the net assets purchased, as shown in the purchase price allocation in the following table. Goodwill is not amortized but evaluated for impairment on an annual basis during the fourth quarter of our fiscal year or earlier if events or circumstances indicate the carrying value may be impaired. The Company’s goodwill is related to ECHG only and not the whole Company. The Company has evaluated goodwill based on cash flows for the ECHG segment. For federal income tax purposes, goodwill is amortized and deductible over fifteen years.
 
The purchase price was allocated to the fair value of assets and liabilities acquired as of May 20, 2019:
 
Description
 
Amount
 
 
 
 
 
Assets
 
 
 
Cash
 $1,049,462 
Account receivables
  1,025,615 
Inventories
  1,209,203 
Prepaids
  88,367 
Fixed assets
  191,208 
Right-of-use assets
  2,350,781 
Intangible Assets
  3,356,000 
Other assets
  88,998 
 
    
Liabilities
    
Account payables
  (723,043)
Accrued liabilities
  (721,483)
Operating lease liabilities
  (2,350,781)
Other long-term liabilities
  (5,457)
 
    
Net assets
  5,558,870 
 
    
Goodwill
  1,367,109 
 
    
Total Purchase Price
 $6,925,979 
 
 
42
 
PART II
Item 8
 
The following pro forma presents the Company's results of the Echo Entities and the Company's results of operations for the twelve months ended December 31, 2019 as if they were combined the entire twelve months:
 
 
 
Pro forma Combined
 
 
 
For the Twelve Months Ended
 
 
 
 December 31, 2019
 
 
 
 (unaudited)
 
 
 
 
 
Revenue
 $87,921,642 
 
    
Income (loss) from continuing operations
 $1,931,558 
 
    
Net income
 $1,931,558 
 
    
Basic net income per common share
 $0.07 
 
    
Diluted net income per common share
 $0.07 
 
 
 
43
 
PART II
Item 8
 
 
NOTE 7 — GOODWILL
 
The changes in the carrying amount of goodwill for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, are as follows:
 
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Opening balance
 $1,367,109 
 $- 
Additions
  - 
  1,367,109 
Acquisition adjustment
  - 
  - 
Impairment adjustment
  - 
  - 
 
    
    
   Goodwill
 $1,367,109 
 $1,367,109 
 
Our 2019 acquisition of the assets of the Echo Legacy Entities resulted in the addition to our goodwill balance in 2019. The Company’s goodwill is related to the ECHG segment only and not the whole Company. We evaluate goodwill for impairment annually in the fourth quarter, or when there is reason to believe that the value has been diminished or impaired. Based on the Company’s evaluations, no impairment was required as of December 31, 2020 and 2019.
 
NOTE 8 — INTANGIBLE ASSETS
 
 
Intangible assets consist of:
 
 
 
December 31,
 
 
December 31,
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
DGSE
 
 
 
 
 
 
Domain names
 $41,352 
 $41,352 
Point of sale system
  330,000 
  330,000 
 
  371,352 
  371,352 
Less: accumulated amortization
  (203,502)
  (137,502)
 
    
    
     Subtotal
  167,850 
  233,850 
 
    
    
ECHG
    
    
Trademarks
  1,483,000 
  1,483,000 
Customer Contracts
  1,873,000 
  1,873,000 
 
  3,356,000 
  3,356,000 
Less: accumulated amortization
  (531,377)
  (195,777)
 
    
    
     Subtotal
  2,824,623 
  3,160,223 
 
    
    
    Total
 $2,992,473 
 $3,394,073 
 
Amortization expense was $401,600 and $256,277 for Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019, respectively.
 
 
44
 
PART II
Item 8 
 
The estimated aggregate amortization expense for each of the five succeeding fiscal years follows:
 
 
 
DGSE
 
 
ECHG
 
 
Total
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2021
 $66,000 
 $335,600 
 $401,600 
2022
  66,000 
  335,600 
  401,600 
2023
  30,350 
  335,600 
  365,950 
2024
  5,500 
  335,600 
  341,100 
2025
  - 
  335,600 
  335,600 
Thereafter
  - 
  1,146,623 
  1,146,623 
 
    
    
    
 
 $167,850 
 $2,824,623 
 $2,992,473 
 
NOTE 9 – ACCRUED EXPENSES
 
Accrued expenses consist of the following:
 
 
 
December 31
 
 
December 31,
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
DGSE
 
 
 
 
 
 
Accrued Interest
 $10,057 
 $7,374 
Professional fees
  - 
  125,200 
Board member fees
  7,500 
  7,500 
Insurance
  - 
  30,508 
Payroll
  155,635 
  157,148 
Property tax
  26,435 
  - 
Sales tax
  180,609 
  115,451 
Other administrative expenses
  13,525 
  - 
State income tax
  - 
  33,907 
 
    
    
     Subtotal
  393,761 
  477,088 
 
    
    
ECHG
    
    
Accrued Interest
  17,086 
  16,724 
Professional fees
  - 
  77,900 
Payroll
  119,327 
  79,342 
Property tax
  20,500 
  - 
Sales tax
  - 
  7,852 
Credit card
  - 
  22,279 
Other accrued expenses
  10,574 
  - 
State income tax