UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 20-F
 
(Mark One)
 
REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
OR
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018, 2019 and 2020
 
OR
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
OR
 
SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
Date of event requiring this shell company report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 
For the transition period from
 
to
 
 
Commission file number:
GENOIL INC.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)  
 
Canada
(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)  
 
One Rockefeller Center
11th Floor
New York, NY 10020
Tel 212-688-8868 Contact: David Lifschultz
 
Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
None.  
 
Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act.
 
Common Stock, Fully Paid and Non-Assessable Common Shares Without Par Value quoted on the OTC Markets Quotation System
 
 
1
 
 
SEC 1852 (05-06) 
Persons who respond to the collection of information contained in this form are not required to respond unless the form displays a currently valid OMB control number.
 
Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act.
 
None
 
Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer's classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report.
 
Common Shares: 532,312,029 as of December 31, 2018, 547,303,029 as of December 31, 2019 and 596,178,029 as of December 31, 2020
Preferred shares: (zero) as of December 31, 2020.
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
 
☐  Yes                                 ☒  No
 
If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
 
 
☐  Yes                                 ☒  No
 
Note – Checking the box above will not relieve any registrant required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 from their obligations under those Sections.
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
 
 
☒  Yes                                 ☐  No
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of "accelerated filer and large accelerated filer" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
(Check one):
 
Large accelerated filer  ☐
Accelerated filer  ☐
Non-accelerated filer  ☒
 
Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepared the financial statements included in this filing:
U.S. GAAP x
International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board  
Other ☐
 
 
If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, Indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow
 
☐  Item 17                                 ☐  Item 18
 
If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
 
☐  Yes                                 ☒  No
 
(APPLICABLE ONLY TO ISSUERS INVOLVED IN BANKRUPTCY
PROCEEDINGS DURING THE PAST FIVE YEARS)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed all documents and reports required to be filed by Sections 12, 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 subsequent to the distribution of securities under a plan confirmed by a court.
 
☐  Yes                                 ☐  No
 

 
2
 
 
Contents
 
Item 1.
Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers
4
Item 2.
Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable
4
Item 3.
Key Information
4
Item 4.
Genoil's Information
9
Item 5.
Operating and Financial Review and Prospects
18
Item 6.
Directors, Senior Management and Employees
20
Item 7.
Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions
26
Item 8.
Financial Information
27
Item 9.
The Offer and Listing
28
Item 10.
Additional Information
29
Directors' Conflicts of Interest
30
Borrowing Powers
30
Directors
30
Rights Attached to Shares
31
Alteration of the Rights of Shareholders
31
Shareholders' Meetings
31
U.S. Holder of Common Shares
33
Canadian Federal Income Tax Consequences
34
United States Federal Income Tax Consequences
34
 
 
 
Item 11.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
37
Item 12.
Description of Securities Other than Equity Securities
37
Item 13.
Defaults, Dividends Arrearages and Delinquencies
37
Item 14.
Material Modifications to the Rights of Security Holders and Use of Proceeds
37
Item 15.
Controls and Procedures
37
Item 16.
[Reserved]
39
Item A
Audit Committee Financial Expert
39
Item B
Code of Ethics
39
Item C
Audit Fees
39
 
 
 
Item 17.
Financial Statements
40
Item 19.
Exhibits
40
 
 
3
 
 
PART I
 
 
Item 1.
Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers
 
A.    Directors and senior management.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
B.    Advisers.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
C.    Auditors.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
Item 2.
Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
Item 3.
Key Information
 
A.    Selected financial data.
 
Genoil Inc.'s ("Genoil" or the "Corporation") financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). The following summary financial data should be read together with the Consolidated Financial Statements and the respective notes and the other information contained in this document.
 
The following selected consolidated financial data as of December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016 and for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016 have been derived from Genoil's audited Consolidated Financial Statements, which are included with this document. The selected financial data for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019, and 2018, 2017 and 2016 is presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”).
 
Genoil's Consolidated Financial Statements are stated in United States Dollars ("US$" or "$"). All dollar amounts provided in this annual report are in United States Dollars unless otherwise stated.
 
 
4
 
 
Selected Consolidated Financial Information
 
(All amounts in US dollars, except 2016 which is Canadian dollars)
 
 
 
Years ended December 31
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
2018
 
 
2017
 
 
2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenue
  - 
  - 
  - 
  - 
  - 
 
    
    
    
    
    
Income (Loss) from continuing operations
    
    
    
    
    
 
    
    
    
    
    
 Income (Loss) for the period
  (3,822,753)
  (3,294,314)
  (7,323,820)
  (6,720,177)
  (1,112,137)

    
    
    
    
    
 Income (Loss) per share from continuing operations: Basic and diluted   
  (4,256,284)
  (3,632,162)
  (7,422,318)
  (6,265,070)
  (1,986,724)

    
    
    
    
    
 Income (loss) per share: Basic and diluted
  (0.01)
  (0.01)
  (0.01)
  (0.01)
  0.00 

    
    
    
    
    
 Total assets
  (0.01)
  (0.01)
  (0.01)
  (0.01)
  0.00 
 
    
    
    
    
    
 Net assets
  199,276 
  1,720,148 
  1,663,070 
  992,876 
  1,019,374 

    
    
    
    
    
 Share Capital
  (6,863,296)
  (6,511,239)
  (6,167,969)
  (6,677,165)
  (3,687,065)
 
    
    
    
    
    
Number of Shares Outstanding
  596,178,029 
  547,303,029 
  532,312,029 
  503,793,613 
  465,397,192 
 
    
    
    
    
    
Value
  50,460,594 
  49,847,884 
  49,463,347 
  47,803,672 
  61,660,886 
 
    
    
    
    
    
 Retained earnings (deficit)
  (92,507,622)
  (88,251,338)
  (84,619,176)
  (77,196,858)
  (88,630,931)
 
To date, the Corporation has not issued any dividends to shareholders.
 
 
5
 
 
Number of Shares Issued
 
 
 
Years ended December 31
 
 
 
2019
 
 
2018
 
 
2017
 
 
2016
 
 
2015
 
Shares outstanding
  596,178,029 
  547,303,029 
  532,312,029 
  503,793,613 
  465,397,192 
Shares issued
  48,875,000 
  14,991,000 
  28,518,416 
  38,396,421 
  45,721,520 
 
B.    Capitalization and indebtedness.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
C.    Reasons for the offer and use of proceeds.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
D.    Risk factors.
 
Going Concern
 
To date Genoil has not attained commercially viable operations from its various patents and technology rights.
 
The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent on commercializing its technologies, achieving profitable operations and obtaining the necessary financing in order to develop these technologies further. The outcome of these matters cannot be predicted at this time. The Company will continue to review the prospects of raising additional debt and equity financing to support its operations until such time that its operations become self-sustaining, to fund its research and development activities and to ensure the realization of its assets and discharge of its liabilities. While the Company is expending its best efforts to achieve the above plans, there is no assurance that any such activity will generate sufficient funds for future operations.
 
General Risk Factors
 
An investment in the Corporation's common shares ("Common Shares") should be considered highly speculative. In addition to other information in this Form 20-F, you should carefully consider the following factors when evaluating Genoil and its business.
 
Much of the information included in this annual report includes or is based upon estimates, projections or other "forward-looking statements". Such forward-looking statements include any projections or estimates made by the Corporation and its management in connection with its business operations. While these forward-looking statements, and any assumptions upon which they are based, are made in good faith and reflect Genoil's current judgment regarding the direction of its business, actual results will almost always vary, sometimes materially, from any estimates, predictions, projections, assumptions or other future performance suggested in this document.
 
The section that follows addresses several of the risk factors related to the Corporation's operations in more detail.
 
Genoil has a history of substantial losses and negative cash flows. It expects these losses and negative cash flows to continue in the future. If it is unable to make a profit, the Corporation may not be able to continue to operate its business.
 
Genoil has not earned profits to date and it may not earn profits in the future. Profitability, if achieved, may not be sustained. The commercialization of its technologies requires financial resources and capital infusions and future revenues may not be sufficient to generate the funds required to continue its business development and marketing activities. If the Corporation does not obtain sufficient capital to fund its operations, it may be required to forego certain business opportunities or discontinue operations entirely.
 
 
6
 
 
Genoil has incurred significant losses and expects to continue to incur significantly greater costs than revenue received. Consequently, the Corporation expects to incur losses in the near term. If Genoil achieves profitability, it may not be able to sustain it. The business of initiating, developing and implementing inventive or innovative processes is inherently risky. Manpower and capital employed may not result in the development of a commercial or economic process. Once successfully developed, there is no certainty that the intended market will be receptive to the Corporation's technology. In all areas of its business, Genoil may compete against entities that may have greater technical and financial resources. The Corporation is completely dependent upon external sources of financing which may not be available on acceptable or economic terms.
 
The intellectual property and technology developed by Genoil may not work in the manner anticipated or the market may not be receptive to its technology or other new technologies might be more feasible to implement.
 
Genoil develops technology for use in various industries. Part of the risk in this type of undertaking is that the technology may not perform as expected or its use may not be economical. The development of intellectual property is expensive and time consuming and if the developed product is not marketable, then no revenues will be realized from its development.
 
The marketability of Genoil's technologies depends on the ability of those technologies to meet and adapt to the needs of industry customers. The markets for Genoil's technologies may not develop further and the current level of market acceptance of its products may decrease or may not be sustainable. In order to continue marketing its technology, the Corporation must adapt to rapid changes in technology and customer requirements. The Corporation's success will depend, in part, on its ability to enhance its existing technology, gain market acceptance, and continue to develop its products to meet increasingly demanding customer requirements.
 
Genoil's technology is still experimental so the demand for it is unknown. The Corporation's potential market may not develop as it anticipates and, accordingly, it may not be able to expand its business or operate it profitably.
 
The Corporation's technology has not been proven in any commercial venture and, as such, any market for its technology will depend significantly on its own efforts. As a result, future demand for its technology is unknown. Genoil believes that many of its potential customers are not fully aware of the benefits of its technology. The Corporation must educate potential customers regarding these benefits and convince them of its ability to provide complete and reliable services. The market for its technology may never become viable or grow further. If the market for its technology does not grow or grows more slowly than it currently anticipates, its business, financial condition and operating results would be materially adversely affected.
 
Key contractors may terminate their engagements.
 
Skilled and educated professionals are a fundamental component of the development of intellectual property. If these key contractors terminate their engagements with Genoil, the development of its intellectual property may be hindered or delayed, increasing the expenses associated with technology development. The Corporation's success is dependent on the services of members of its senior management team. The experience and talents of this team will be a significant factor in its continued success and growth. The loss of any senior management member could have a material adverse effect on its operations and business prospects. Given its financial situation, Genoil may not be able to retain or replace its key personnel. The Corporation has no key man insurance.
 
Genoil has issued common share purchase warrants, options, price appreciation certificates(PACs) and convertible debt, the conversion and/or exercise of which would have a dilutive effect on its earnings per share.
 
 
7
 
 
As of December 31, 2020, the following potentially dilutive instruments were outstanding:
 
Warrants
  130,668,838 
 Options
  57,140,000 
  PACs
  505,400,000 
 Notes
  471,176,400 
 
  1,164,385,238 
 Shares o/s
  596,178,029 
 Pot'l Dil'n
  195%
 
Furthermore, the Corporation may enter into commitments in the future which would require the issuance of additional Common Shares, and it may grant additional stock options. The Corporation is authorized to issue an unlimited number of Common Shares. Genoil issues Common Shares for the purpose of raising funds for general working capital requirements, to acquire additional technology, to accommodate strategic partnerships, or for the satisfaction of debts.
 
Third parties may claim that Genoil infringes their proprietary rights.
 
Genoil potentially may be subjected to claims that it has infringed the intellectual property rights of others. As the number of products in the oil and gas technology industry increases, the Corporation may become increasingly subject to infringement claims, including patent and copyright infringement claims. In addition, previous employers of its former, current or future employees may assert claims that such employees have improperly disclosed to Genoil the confidential or proprietary information belonging to those employers. Any such claim, with or without merit, could be time consuming to defend, result in costly litigation, divert management's attention from its core business, require it to stop selling or delay shipping, or cause the redesign of its product. In addition, Genoil may be required to pay monetary amounts as damages, for royalty or licensing arrangements, or to satisfy indemnification obligations that it has with some of its customers.
 
Genoil may not be able to protect its proprietary information.
 
Genoil relies on a combination of copyright, patents and trade secret laws, confidentiality procedures, contractual provisions and other measures to protect its proprietary information. All of these measures afford only limited protection. These measures may be invalidated, circumvented or challenged, and others may develop technologies or processes that are similar or superior to the Corporation's technology. Despite its efforts to protect its proprietary rights, unauthorized parties may attempt to copy Genoil's products or to obtain or use information that it regards as proprietary. Given its size and financial situation, Genoil may not be ultimately effective in preventing misappropriation of its proprietary rights.
 
Genoil's intellectual property may become outdated or surpassed by industry improvements.
 
Genoil is a technology-based company and is involved in developing, improving, and marketing its technology to customers. There is a risk that new developments in Genoil's field of specialty will arise, making its technology products less marketable. To enhance its position in the technology industry, the Corporation must continue to develop and improve its current products and develop product extensions. There may not be a demand for the products or capital available to finance their development in the future.
 
Genoil operates in a competitive market.
 
The business of providing technology-based solutions to industry is highly competitive. Some of Genoil's competitors may have greater financial and marketing resources, greater market share and name recognition than it has, which would allow them to quickly develop market presence in the markets Genoil serves or allow them to expand into new markets that Genoil intends to serve. Given its size and financial position, the Corporation may not be able to effectively compete with these competitors.
 
 
8
 
 
Potential expansion and opportunities may arise.
 
Genoil may continue to expand its operations or product lines through the acquisition of additional businesses, products or technologies. It may not be able to identify, acquire or profitably manage additional businesses or successfully integrate any acquired businesses, products or technologies without substantial expenses, delays or other operational or financial challenges. Furthermore, acquisitions may involve a number of additional risks, including the diversion of management's attention, failure to retain key personnel, unanticipated events or circumstances and legal liabilities, some or all of which could have a material adverse effect on Genoil's business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, acquired businesses, products or technologies, if any, may not achieve anticipated revenues and profitability. Acquisitions could also result in potentially dilutive issuances of equity securities. The Corporation's failure to manage its acquisition strategy could have a material adverse effect on its business, results of operations and financial condition.
 
U.S. investors may have difficulty enforcing judgments against Genoil or its management.
 
Genoil is incorporated in Canada. Substantially all of its assets are located outside the United States. As a result, U.S. investors may not be able to:
 
effect service of process upon the Corporation or these persons within the United States; or
 
enforce against the Corporation or these persons in United States courts, judgments obtained in United States courts, including judgments predicated on the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States; or
 
initiate a derivative suit on the Corporation's behalf.
 
Item 4.
Genoil's Information
 
A.    Genoil's history and development.
 
The Company
 
Genoil was created from an amalgamation on September 5, 1996 under the Canada Business Corporations Act of Genoil Inc. and Continental Fashion Group Inc., a public company whose shares traded on the Alberta Stock Exchange. At the time of the merger, Continental Fashion Group Inc. had no assets, no liabilities and did not carry on any business.
 
The address of its head office is
One Rockefeller Center
11th Floor
New York, NY 10020 
and its phone number is 212-688-8868.
 
Recent History
 
2018
 
On April 4, 2018, the Company signed an agreement to attract finances and evaluate technologies to develop oil and gas fields in the Astrakhan Region of Russia. This agreement is with the license holder of this property; JSC Petroleumgas Company commonly known as "AFB".
 
 
9
 
 
On April 9, 2018, the Company, announced that high sulfur crude oil samples from Pemex (the Mexican State-owned petroleum company) have arrived at Genoil's engineering headquarters in Russia and that the demonstration will be conducted soon in the presence of Pemex engineers at our state-of-the-art multipurpose demonstration facility hosted by the UFA Scientific Research Institute of Petroleum Refining and Petrochemistry located in Bashkortostan. Technical viability has already been proven and the purpose of this commercial demonstration run will validate to Pemex the strength of the economic model created by the Genoil Hydroconversion Process from upgrading Pemex's heavy high sulfur crude oil into valuable light sweet, low sulfur crude oil. The feedstock demonstration will also support the engineering and design of a large-scale commercial GHU facility currently under evaluation by Genoil, to be constructed at the commercial crude center - Palomas in Veracruz Mexico, and additional regions of Mexico as well as other target project locations around the world. Genoil's engineering team is being led by Raushan Telyashev, formerly General Director of Lukoil and in charge of the all Lukoil design and R&D institutes for downstream at the second largest oil company in Russia. In 2012, Raushan was responsible to review all Lukoil Komi upgrading solution strategies, had met with Genoil and had been advising the lead team that had previously endorsed the successful demonstration of Genoil's GHU process on Lukoil Komi crude oil. Future planned demonstration runs shall create significant hard data that support our industry-leading EPC partners as we work toward basic engineering designs for commercial implementation. Correlations with previous tests shall confirm, liquid yield output, reduction of sulfur, acidity, metals and CAPEX costs.
 
On September 5, 2018, the Company announced that Genoil will begin testing of Pemex Heavy Crude Oil upgrading at our demonstration facility in Russia. Our engineers will activate the catalyst and will set up for the test which commenced on September 10, 2018. Genoil will also prepare for a second test.
 
On November 19, 2018, Genoil announced that the corporation has signed an additional contract to represent the Velikoye oil field on behalf of JSC PetroleumGas "AFB" to investors. Genoil has already begun discussions with several financing sources in Russia as well as a few different interested oilfield services providers all of whom expect major financial sponsorship from China on this project. Genoil is to earn a fee for bringing investment to AFB.
 
On November 21, 2018, the Company announced that Emile Heskey the former professional footballer from the United Kingdom joined Genoil to lead the company's business development in the Caribbean region. Mr. Heskey will work through Genoil to raise finance for much needed reconstruction of Islands affected by Hurricane Irma and to help the local economies to get back on their feet. He will assist Genoil in the entire Caribbean region to source project opportunities where Genoil and our partner companies can do energy related development and reconstruction work. Emile has a relationship with many people in Antigua including Prime Minister Gaston Browne who has met with the UK Secretary of State about funding reconstruction of their Islands. The Antiguan government had recently considered building a small refinery and Genoil intends to reopen these important discussions.
 
2019
 
On June 12, 2019, the Company announced that Lic. José E. García Torres, Legal Representative of the company Genoil Inc. and Dr. Fernando Castrejón Vacio, Director of Product Technology of the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo "IMP", met to sign a Memorandum of Understanding, which seeks to establish guidelines for cooperation between Genoil and the IMP to jointly team up to develop business opportunities in matters of improvement of heavy and extra-heavy oils in Mexico. The interest of this Memorandum includes the joint search for business opportunity, as well as the development of potential investments in service projects, the scaling of products, provision of technological services, consulting and specialized advice, promotion of investment, specialized training and marketing in everything related to the Processing of Heavy Crude Oil, as well as for the process of Hydrotreating. Also present for the signing ceremony was Dr. Jorge Ancheyta Juárez, Product Manager for the Transformation of Crude of IMP and Genoil engineer Mario Alberto Carreón Rascón.
 
 
10
 
 
On July 3, 2019, the Company signed an advisory fee agreement with Tuimaada-Neft, which is a leading oil and gas company in Russia with an estimated 850 million tons of oil equivalent. This agreement builds from our previous LOI that was signed in the fourth quarter 2017. Genoil will advise and possibly have a significant role in these development projects, which will include EPC (engineering, procurement and construction), equity and debt financing, oil field services, as well as oil field operations and natural gas development. 
 
On October 7, 2019, the Company announces that the largest bank in China and the largest bank in the world by total assets, deposits, loans, number of customers and number of employees has been formally retained. They have been working for the past several months to bring strategic investors and finance for development the massive Velikoye oil field in Russia.
 
On October 10, 2019, the Company announced that Andrey Sergeev is joining Genoil Inc. (the "Company"), through its United States subsidiary, as Chief Geologist. Mr. Sergeev is a highly experienced geologist whose worldwide career has led him to be well-regarded by his peers throughout the industry.
 
2020
 
Genoil grew its engineering team with the addition of Senior Vice President of Engineering and Projects, Mr. Slavko Scepanovic, who over his 30 year career has gained valuable experience, project management and finance, raising over a billion dollars for energy projects. He was the deputy director of Optima Group, since 2008. Slavko, an expert in financing projects, worked with Zarubezhneft to create the Optima division raising in excess of a billion dollars for them. He has worked on many oil and gas projects in the Russian Federation as well. He conducted technical feasibility studies to determine conditions of financing and to provide funding for those projects.
 
John I. Novak has returned as a special advisor to Genoil. John has more than 25 years of technical and senior management experience within satellite communications at GM Hughes Electronics. Mr. Novak served as Chief Business Strategist of Hughes, where he was responsible for identifying and developing new business campaigns. He is regularly advising Genoil’s top management and is an integral part of new business development in Europe. He is responsible for introducing Genoil to Munich Capital Partners who in turn introduced Genoil to two refineries in Germany. The parties are in discussions with Genoil to develop a refining project utilizing the Genoil GHU technology.
 
Leslie Vanderpool has also joined Genoil’s advisory board. Leslie has extensive contacts in the financial world. She will assist Genoil in introducing Genoil to large funds, assist in business development and public relations. Leslie also knows many bankers, industrialists and oil drillers. She will use many of her contacts to generate interest in Genoil.
 
JR Owens joined Genoil as Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Genoil USA focusing on North America. JR is President of Cat Bottoms Fuel FS INC. ‘J.R.’ has more than thirty-four years of oil industry experience as a consultant, global sourcing advisor, loss control specialist, terminal manager and trader. 
 
Viscount (Lord) Torrington joined Genoil as an advisory board member. He graduated as a geologist from Oxford University in 1964 and after ten years in the mining industry, largely in Southern Africa with Anglo American Corporation and Lonrho, he became CEO of the Attock Oil Company (later Anvil Petroleum), subsequently serving as Chairman of Expro North Sea, a major UK-based international service company.
Lord Torrington also served on the House of Lords European Communities Energy Committee, chairing it from 1984 to 1987. He is currently a non-executive Director of Lansdowne Oil & Gas PLC and involved in wildlife charities in Africa. Mr. Torrington’s career has involved technical, administrative and financial roles in the worldwide natural resources industries and contact or negotiation with financial institutions and governments on all continents.
 
 
11
 
 
On July 7, 2020, the Company agreed to satisfy a total of $3,875,000 then owed to David Lifschultz and Bruce Abbott through (1) Company reduction of a total of $1,676,984 of the Company’s receivable balances from David Lifschultz and Bruce Abbott and (2) Company issuance of new convertible debentures totaling $2,198,016 to David Lifschultz ($1,099,008) and Bruce Abbott ($1,099,008).
 
Beginning on October 1, 2020, the Company agreed to reimburse David Lifschultz and Bruce Abbott for out-of-pocket expenses that they incurred on behalf of the company for occupancy and related costs. The amount is €10,780, or approximately $12,800 per month and is split evenly between David Lifschultz and Bruce Abbott. For the year ended December 31, 2020, the total amount was $38,459.
 
During the first quarter of 2020, the Company sold a total of 20,950,000 shares of common stock (and warrants) in private placements for total proceeds of $209,480.
 
During the first quarter of 2020, the Company issued a total of 3,375,000 shares of common stock as compensation for services. The fair value of the shares issued (at dates of issuance) totaled $69,750.
 
During the second quarter of 2020, the Company sold a total of 8,550,000 shares of common stock (and warrants) in private placements for total proceeds of $85,490.
 
During the second quarter of 2020, the Company issued a total of 150,000 shares of common stock as compensation for services. The fair value of the shares issued (at dates of issuance) totaled $1,500.
 
During the third quarter of 2020, the Company sold a total of 7,950,000 shares of common stock (and warrants) in private placements for total proceeds of $75,500.
 
During the third quarter of 2020, the Company issued a total of 2,800,000 shares of common stock as compensation for services. The fair value of the shares issued (at dates of issuance) totaled $120,000
 
During the fourth quarter of 2020, the Company sold a total of 5,100,000 shares of common stock (and warrants) in private placements for total proceeds of $50,990.
 
Beginning on October 1, 2020, the Company agreed to reimburse David Lifschultz and Bruce Abbott for out-of-pocket expenses that they incurred on behalf of the company for occupancy and related costs. The amount is €10,780, or approximately $12,800 per month and is split evenly between David Lifschultz and Bruce Abbott. For the year ended December 31, 2020, the total amount was $38,459.
 
B.    Business overview.
 
General Development of the Business
 
Genoil's principal business is the development of technologies relating to the oil and gas industry. Its present goal is to commercialize its technologies internationally.
 
The Corporation owns rights to several patented and proprietary technologies. A number of products that have been created from these technologies are under development. None of its technologies have been commercialized. A discussion of these products follows.
 
No consideration has been given to consumer boycotts as a result of operations in Countries of Particular Concern as defined by the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998. Genoil is a Canadian company and as such the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 does not apply to its operations. The Corporation does not produce consumer products.
 
 
12
 
 
Genoil formed a corporation in the Middle East with SBK Commercial Business Group in the United Arab Emirates. The corporation is named “Genoil Emirates”.
 
The purpose of this new corporation is to create projects in the U.A.E. for all of Genoil’s technologies, including: desulfurization, oil upgrading and recycling, water purification port technologies, well testing, and sand cleaning. Currently the United Arab Emirates has the seventh largest oil reserves in the world and is looking to expand production.
 
The Genoil Emirates joint venture between Genoil and SBK Commercial Business Group has significant promise. Genoil Emirates has established its head office in Riyadh, 11321 Kingdome of Saudi Arabia. The address is Building B, Near Gulf Commercial Complex Olaya, P.O. Box: 230032. It also has a branch location at Khober DAMAM, Block 7 Office 32 Khober, Telephone: +96614633181 Facsimile: +96614664763.
 
Pilot Heavy Oil Upgrader
 
Genoil has been primarily involved in the development and commercial applications of its proprietary heavy oil upgrading technology – the Genoil Hydroconversion Upgrader (GHU®).
 
The GHU® converts sour (high sulphur), heavy hydrocarbon feed stocks into lighter oil with higher quality distillates for conventional refining. The GHU® process uses a hydrogen enrichment methodology based on catalytic hydrogenation and flash separation.
 
The GHU®’s unique intellectual property is in its hydroconversion design and mixing devices. A GHU® provides greater mass/heat transfer between hydrogen, crude and catalyst. As a result, hydroconversion can be achieved at mild operating conditions.
 
Sour, acidic, heavy crude and residual by-products are converted into lighter distillates, increasing the API (or lowering the density), while maximizing denitrogenation, desulphurisation and demetalisation to meet new regulatory requirements. The upgraded crude product will have higher yields of naphtha, distillates and vacuum gas oil with reduced levels of contaminants such as sulphur, nitrogen and metals. Genoil’s process is designed specifically to eliminate most of the sulphur from the feed stocks.
 
The Genoil GHU Upgrader has been designed to remove 99.5% of the sulphur, as shown in its latest tests, while lightening the oil at the same time, significantly raising its API gravity. In a January 12, 2009 press release, the cost model, based on data from December 8, 2008, during the height of the market crash, showed a margin of profit of over $15.00 per bbl with a 30% IRR. $15.00 was the low point in relation to the historical margins during the period that oil was over $100.00 per barrel WTI. International regulations will soon require bunker fuel to be upgraded and desulphurized due to serious environmental concerns.
 
The Genoil Upgrading Process yields zero waste and consumes no external energy or hydrogen, deriving its hydrogen and energy from its own residue. The cost structure is therefore much lower than standard upgrading processes in hydrogenation and does not give off a waste byproduct such as coking of 30%.
 
Upgrading heavy oil is essentially a very undeveloped industry in relation to the 900 billion barrels of world heavy oil reserves. Most of the oil presently coming out of the ground is light, in the vicinity of 76 million barrels a day, or 27.5 billion barrels a year. It is readily seen that even if you allow for new oil discoveries and further advances of recovery through technological enhancements in field recovery, the time limit for this light oil reserve will last no more than twenty or thirty years. As light oil productive capability declines, a world pricing crisis may occur. Genoil’s pilot plant in Alberta has progressed through the development stage and the costs of commercialization have been expensed.
 
Oil/Water Separation
 
The Genoil Water Treatment Department has recently increased its significance in the business model of the Corporation. Initially developed for the bilge area of a ship, the Crystal Separator is suitable for a wide range of applications, including off-shore oil platforms, wastewater treatment plants, refineries, gasoline service stations and ports. Genoil’s Crystal Sea oil and water separator is a compact unit that is able to handle small volumes from 2 GPM to 20 GPM using a compartmental process. The Company is in the process of developing scaled up units that can handle larger volumes.
 
 
13
 
 
Genoil has successfully completed testing on its improved Crystal Sea bilge water separator at Testing Service, Inc., in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Crystal Sea units are state-of-the-art bilge separators that have been certified by the US Coast Guard in accordance with the International Maritime Organization Resolution MEPC 107 (49) in 2007. IMO regulations require bilge water separators to have an effluent discharge of less than 15 ppm impurities for territorial water and less than 5 ppm for discharge into inland waters. Subsequently, our bilge oily water separators have been certified by the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS).
 
In the view of management, the Crystal Sea has advantages over competing models including a smaller footprint, a simple operating system, no requirement for back washing or flushing with fresh water or sea water, therefore reduced maintenance, very little use of water and no moving parts, except for a pump. In addition to that, the oil removed using the Genoil bilge cleaner is dry enough and of a quality that it can be reused by other utilities onboard.
 
Genoil has both a US and a Canadian patent for the Crystal technology, as well as a PCT application. There are at least 10 separators in operation in Romania, which were sold by the inventor, before Genoil acquired the rights to the technology.
 
During 2010, Genoil was awarded a major patent for its breakthrough sand decontamination technology by the United States patent office. Genoil provides one of the best commercial, economic and environmentally approved off the shelf solutions for soil and water decontamination. As a result of continued research and development, the sand decontamination patent constitutes a advancement of the reactor design. The improved reactor enhances the sand cleaning process in three stages and increases the rate of hydrocarbons extracted from the sand. Consequently, the amount of hydrocarbons removed increases while resulting in more separation in less time. In addition, the amount of heat energy is also drastically reduced resulting in greater operational savings. The reactor features a method for retaining the dissolved contaminants and blocking their transfer downstream in order to minimize the total dissolved solids in the decontaminated sand. This patent is a result of Genoil’s long term commitment to environmental technologies offering practical solutions to cleanup environmental disasters.
 
The acquisition of 100% of the issued and outstanding common shares of Two Hills Environmental Inc. conveys to Genoil surface title to 147 acres of land, together with certain subsurface mineral rights contained within 2,500 adjacent acres. These multiple salt caverns could potentially be utilized for a variety of purposes including waste oil disposal, gas storage reservoirs and waste water disposal.
 
This site has potential as a waste oil/water disposal and treatment facility due its convenient proximity to several waste disposal companies. Alternatively, several of these massive salt caverns could become natural gas storage facilities. Any development is subject to obtaining the proper permits from the necessary regulatory agencies, further detailed economic analysis and obtaining appropriate financing.
 
Two Hills was initially formed to enter into the oilfield waste disposal industry by capitalizing upon its current undeveloped asset base. This asset base is comprised of a site under which very large salt caverns have been formed in the Lotsberg Formation beneath the earth’s surface. Such caverns are prized in the oilfield disposal industry due to their efficacy and safety as a destination for oilfield wastes.
 
This proven technology has been in operation at multiple locations for over 20 years. Crystal technology is Coast Guard and IMO approved which allows for discharge at sea, and does not require the use of chemicals or filters.
 
Revenues from Product Sales
 
The majority of Genoil's products continue to be at the commercialization stage and have not recently produced revenues.
 
 
14
 
 
Expenditures Relating to the Sale of Products
 
Genoil is primarily involved in the development of its technologies for commercial application. The Company has been building its internal capabilities. Genoil utilizes independent contractors to provide engineering and other services for projects as needed. The operational sites are at – Two Hills AB, and New York, NY, Dubai UAE.
Genoil does not intend to commit to any expenditures of any other nature, beyond expenditures necessary for the development and maintenance of its technologies, in the near future.
 
While Genoil’s primary commercial focus has been on the GHU, it has also recently made advances with respect to potential near term revenue opportunities from its Crystal products. Genoil anticipates sales of Crystal units based on increasingly strict environmental regulations. Therefore, the Company is anticipating the generation of income in the short term from sale of oil/water separation equipment. The Corporation continues to believe that the largest potential for medium and long-term revenue is based on sales of the GHU technology.
 
Geographic Markets
 
The Company markets its technology mainly to potential customers in the Middle East, Russia and China. The markets for Genoil’s products are global.
 
Intellectual Property Rights
 
Genoil has been granted 7 US patents (Patent nos. 6,527,960; 7,001,502; 7,014,756; 5,603,825, 7,510,689, 7,704,400, and, 7,754,076), 2 Canadian patents (No. 2,243,142 and 2,306,069). Genoil either owns or licenses the rights to all intellectual properties used in its products.
 
Genoil has copyright, patent rights and trademarks, which are necessary and contribute significantly to the preservation of its competitive position in the markets which it addresses. It is possible that the Corporation's patents and other intellectual property will be challenged, invalidated or circumvented by third parties in the future. In the future, it may not be able to obtain necessary licenses on commercially reasonable terms. Genoil enters into nondisclosure agreements with its suppliers, contractors and employees, as appropriate, so as to limit access to and disclosure of its proprietary information. These measures may not suffice to deter misappropriation or independent third party development of similar technologies, which may adversely affect the Corporation.
 
Sales, Marketing and Distribution
 
Genoil is presently involved in pursuing sales of its Oil/Water Separator Units. Genoil is pursuing sales of Oil/Water Separators through its international network of agents and various engineering firms that deal with oil and gas companies throughout the world.
 
Genoil intends to market its products and license its GHU technology throughout the world's oil refining and production industry
 
Competition
 
Genoil is aware that several other companies may be presently pursuing the development of technologies in the oil and gas industry. It acknowledges that it is possible that some of these technologies may be similar in nature to its products and technologies. Such companies, should they be involved in selling or developing the same technology as Genoil, may be potential competitors to the Corporation. The Company believes that its patented fixed bed catalyst hydroprocessing technology in the GHU is competitively advantaged in the market by virtue of the expected comparatively low capital and operating costs and high product yields for operators relative to other coking or hydroprocessing products.
 
 
15
 
 
Government Regulations
 
There are several government regulations with which Genoil must comply. Failure to comply with these regulations could adversely affect its business. Certain government regulations require the imposition of standards that are normally a part of industry knowledge, and as such, would be understood and acted upon by the Corporation in the normal course of doing business.
 
Genoil, as a producer of technology and intellectual property, is not generally subject to environmental regulations. Genoil specializes in mechanical processes and as such its regular operations do not fall within the scope of environmental protection legislation.
 
The Corporation was subject to securities regulation in the Canadian jurisdictions in which it was a reporting issuer. As an issuer with securities traded on the TSX Venture Exchange, the Company was subject to its rules. The Corporation's shares are now quoted on the Over the Counter (OTC) Markets Quotation System and as such, the Corporation is subject to the OTC listing requirements.
 
Plan of Operation
 
The Company does not expect to generate significant revenue or cash flow from its technologies or services for the 2021 year, and possibly beyond.
 
The Company expects revenue and cash flow to be generated in staged phases following the execution of definitive agreements for the implementation of the oily water separation technology for marine use or on-shore units for ports and oil reclamation sites.
 
On a larger scale, Genoil also expects to generate revenues for the design, implementation and procurement of its GHU® systems and/or the licensing of its intellectual property.
 
The Corporation has accumulated losses of $92.5 million to year ended December 31, 2020 and is not realizing any cash flow as it has not to date attained commercial operations in connection with its various patents and technology rights.
 
Since inception, Genoil has principally been a technology development company. Since 2005, commercialization efforts have been underway for Genoil’s GHU®. Genoil is marketing its GHU® (and related engineering and design services) to refiners and producers of sour, heavy crude around the world. The Company believes that there is strong market potential for this technology. The commercialization of Genoil’s Crystal units is Genoil’s key short-term goal, while the GHU® represents the next phase in the Company’s long-term growth.
 
The Company continues to focus its efforts on securing commercial applications for its heavy oil upgrading and oil-water separation technologies and exploring new avenues in energy related industries.
 
At the present time intensive efforts are being made in the Middle East, Africa, the Caribbean, Mexico, Canada, and Asia to market the GHU Upgrader and Crystal Sea Bilge Cleaning Units for ports. Agents that are not performing are being changed and new agents are being signed up to accelerate our efforts to roll out the technologies. At the present time David K. Lifschultz, the CEO, is spending most of his time marketing these technologies in Mexico, China, the Middle East and Africa, and progress is being made.
 
Genoil is aggressively marketing its GHU Upgrader technology to those countries and companies that have substantial heavy oil reserves as “peak oil” in light oil already has arrived in our estimation, and a move developing and upgrading heavy oil is around the corner.
 
Genoil is making presentations at the highest levels for both the Crystal units and GHU Upgraders to countries and companies in Mexico, Asia, North and South America, Turkey, the Middle East, and Africa among others, so that it will be in a position to benefit during the transition to heavy oil, which it regards as occurring in the very near future. Planning has to be done well in advance to effectuate this change.
 
 
16
 
 
Genoil has announced that the USPTO has allowed a patent for the reactor of its sand decontamination process. The sand decontamination system has also been patented recently and the two patents form a valuable addition to the intellectual property of Genoil. The reactor plays a key role in the sand decontamination process and its features are designed to effectively remove oil from sand, separate oil from sand and water and recover the oil in the reactor for reuse. An innovative method is utilized for extracting oil from sand and removing the oil from the path of the sand.
 
Also novel is the formation of a blanket of sand of controlled thickness at the bottom of the reactor in order to minimize the carryover of contaminants between adjacent reactors. There is a significant reduction of the amount of water that is being transferred upstream by way of an entirely innovative approach in conveying sand from one reactor to the adjacent one. The reactor is designed to effectively operate at relatively low temperatures resulting in important savings in energy. The reactor also operates in conjunction with means for reducing oil and dissolved contaminants to very low levels in order to meet the most stringent environmental standards. Based on Genoil’s previous experience with the sand washing system of Bear Trap, Alberta, the newly patented reactor and the original approach in sand decontamination should place the technology at the forefront of current efforts to clean and protect the environment.
 
C. Organizational structure.
 
David Lifschultz has headed Genoil as CEO since 2001. Since working for Genoil, David has not received any cash compensation nor has he sold any Genoil stock. Even while the stock was over $1.50 per share he did not sell any shares. No executives or board members of Genoil receive any cash compensation. They only receive shares and options or Price Appreciation Certificates.
 
The Company has been building its internal capabilities. Genoil utilizes independent contractors to provide engineering and other services for projects as needed. The operational sites are at – Two Hills AB, New York, NY and Dubai UAE.
 
The company seeks to work through commission agents who will receive compensation when revenues are generated. Genoil is modeling its operations in a similar way as Microsoft and Google followed when they were in their infancy. 
Some consultants and the agents generally act as representatives on Genoil’s behalf with respect to commercial opportunities in their respective cities and countries. The Corporation intends to rely upon the services of these representatives and to remunerate them by means of sales commissions and incentive stock options.
 
Genoil has the following subsidiaries:
 
Genoil USA Inc., incorporated in Delaware, United States, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of Genoil.
Genoil Emirates LLC, incorporated in the United Arab Emirates, which will focus upon the fields of oil and water processing and treatment in the United Arab Emirates. Emirates LLC is jointly owned by S.B.K. Commercial Business Group LLC and Genoil. As of December 31, 2020, Emirates LLC had not yet commenced operations and holds no assets.
Two Hills Environmental Inc., incorporated in Canada and registered in Alberta, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of Genoil. Two Hills was formed to enter into the oilfield waste disposal industry by capitalizing upon its current undeveloped asset base. The asset base comprises a site under which three salt caverns have been formed in the Lotsberg Formation beneath the earth's surface. Such caverns are used in the oilfield disposal industry as a destination for oilfield wastes.
 
D.    Property, plant and equipment.
 
Human Resources and Facilities
 
The Company has been building its internal capabilities. Genoil utilizes independent contractors to provide engineering and other services for projects as needed. The operational sites are at –Two Hills, Alberta, New York, NY and Dubai UAE.
 
 
17
 
 
The company seeks to work through commission agents who will receive compensation when revenues are generated. Genoil is modeling its operations in a similar way as Microsoft and Google followed when they were in their infancy. 
 
Management has been aggressive at attract real talented individuals who are very experienced, knowledgeable and will assist Genoil in realizing its objectives in different markets.
 
The facilities operated by the Corporation are not subject to environmental protection legislation and to its knowledge no environmental issues exist that would potentially affect its utilization of its assets.
 
Item 4A. Unresolved Staff Comments
 
Not applicable.
 
Item 5.
Operating and Financial Review and Prospects
 
Forward-Looking Statements
 
Statements in this report, or any document filed by Genoil with the different governing authorities, by or on behalf of it, to the extent not directly and exclusively based on historical events, constitute "forward-looking statements". These statements represent the Corporation's intentions, plans, expectations, and beliefs, and no assurance can be given that the results described in such statements will be achieved.
 
Forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements evaluating market and general economic conditions in the following sections, and statements regarding future-oriented revenues, costs and expenditures. Investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which reflect management's analysis only as of the date of this document. These forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially. Such risks and uncertainties with respect to the Corporation include the effects of general economic conditions, changing foreign exchange rates and actions by government authorities, uncertainties associated with legal proceedings and negotiations, industry supply levels, competitive pricing pressures and misjudgements in the course of preparing forward-looking statements.
 
Genoil disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.
 
A.    Operating results
 
Overview
 
Genoil's financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”), audited in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), and are presented in US dollars unless otherwise indicated.
 
Genoil is actively involved in the marketing, development and commercial applications of its proprietary technologies. Its pilot plant is located at Two Hills, Alberta.
 
To December 31, 2020, the Corporation has incurred significant operating losses. The Corporation expects to continue to have operating losses during the next year and expects to fund its operations in the near term from capital stock offerings and project loans.
 
As Genoil’s business has not yet generated revenue from operations, the Company requires cash infusions on a regular basis as it seeks to grow, develop and market its technologies.
 
 
18
 
 
The Corporation will continue to review the prospects of raising additional debt and equity financing to support its operations until such time that its operations become self-sustaining, fund any further research and development activities, and ensure the commercial realization of its assets and discharge of its liabilities. While the Corporation is expending its best efforts to achieve the above plans, there is no assurance that any such activity will generate sufficient funds for operations.
 
Acquisition
 
On November 29, 2010, Genoil announced that it had entered into an agreement to acquire 100% of the issued and outstanding common shares of Two Hills Environmental Inc. This acquisition conveyed to Genoil surface title to 147 acres of land, together with certain subsurface mineral rights contained within 2,500 adjacent acres and access to 388,550 cubic meters of water to be derived yearly from the North Saskatchewan River. This water is critical to the development of local brine production, environmentally acceptable disposal of oil sands and oil well production waste. These multiple salt caverns could potentially be utilized for a variety of purposes including waste oil disposal, gas storage reservoirs and waste water disposal.
 
On February 14, 2011, Genoil advised that it had paid a cash deposit of $100,000, issued 2,500,000 common shares of Genoil to the former shareholder of Two Hills, issued 2,500,000 common shares of Genoil to a debtor and issued an option to purchase 250,000 common shares of Genoil, at market price to an agent as commission for structuring the acquisition.
 
This site has potential as a waste oil/water disposal and treatment facility due its convenient proximity to several waste disposal companies. Alternatively, several of these massive salt caverns could become natural gas storage facilities. Any development is subject to obtaining the proper permits from the necessary regulatory agencies, further detailed economic analysis and obtaining appropriate financing.
 
B.    Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
Genoil’s business is capital intensive, requiring cash infusions on a regular basis as it seeks to grow its business. The Corporation expects to be able to fund its capital expenditure program to the end of 2020 using working capital and, to the extent required or desirable, through funds raised in the capital markets and short term loans.
 
In 2018, the Company sold a total of 17,425,507 shares of common stock (and warrants) in private placements for total proceeds of $879,875.
 
In 2018, the Company issued 11,092,909 shares of common stock as compensation for services. The fair value of the shares issued was $779,800.
 
In 2019, the Company sold a total of 8,836,667 shares of common stock (and warrants) in private placements for total proceeds of $234,490.

In 2019, the Company issued 6,154,333 shares of common stock as compensation for services. The fair value of the shares issued was $150,047.
 
During the first quarter of 2020, the Company sold a total of 20,950,000 shares of common stock (and warrants) in private placements for total proceeds of $209,480.
 
During the first quarter of 2020, the Company issued a total of 3,375,000 shares of common stock as compensation for services. The fair value of the shares issued (at dates of issuance) totaled $69,750.

During the second quarter of 2020, the Company sold a total of 8,550,000 shares of common stock (and warrants) in private placements for total proceeds of $85,490.
 
 
19
 
 
During the second quarter of 2020, the Company issued a total of 150,000 shares of common stock as compensation for services. The fair value of the shares issued (at dates of issuance) totaled $1,500.
 
During the third quarter of 2020, the Company sold a total of 7,950,000 shares of common stock (and warrants) in private placements for total proceeds of $75,500.
 
During the third quarter of 2020, the Company issued a total of 2,800,000 shares of common stock as compensation for services. The fair value of the shares issued (at dates of issuance) totaled $120,000
 
During the fourth quarter of 2020, the Company sold a total of 5,100,000 shares of common stock (and warrants) in private placements for total proceeds of $50,990.
 
There are no restrictions on the ability of the Subsidiaries to transfer funds to Genoil in the form of cash dividends, loans or advances. However, the Subsidiaries are not yet generating income and the Corporation does not consider them as a source of revenue.
 
C. Research and development, patents and licenses, etc.
 
Genoil does not presently plan to conduct any major new research and development, but will continue to refine and fine-tune its present complement of technologies.
 
D.    Trend information.
 
Currently Genoil has no sales inventory or production.
 
E.    Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements.
 
Genoil has no off-balance sheet arrangements.
 
F.
Tabular Disclosure of Contractual Obligations.
 
 
 
Payments due by period
 
 
 
Total
 
 
< 1 year
 
 
1 - 3 years
 
 
4-5 years
 
 
> 5 years
 
Convertible notes
  4,711,764 
  - 
  4,711,764 
  - 
  - 
 
  4,711,764 
  - 
  4,711,764 
  - 
  - 
 
G.    Safe Harbour.
 
Not applicable.
 
Item 6.
Directors, Senior Management and Employees
 
A.    Directors and senior management.
 
At year end, the following were directors and officers of Genoil, their residence, their principal occupations within the past five years, and the periods during which each has served in such capacity.
 
 
20
 
 
Name and Office Held
Principal Occupation For Past Five Years
Date of Birth
Appointment
Number of Securities Controlled by Director and Percentage of Total (*)
David K. LifschultzChairman and CEO
New York, NY
Chief Executive Officer of Genoil Inc. from 2002 to present
23-Nov-45
25-Feb-02
61,254,101 9.38%
 
Chairman of the board of directors of Genoil Inc. from 2002 to present.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bruce S. AbbottDirector and COO
New York, NY
President, COO and Director
27-Sep-76
10-Oct-13
6,540,000 1.00%
 
 
 
 
 
Bengt Koch Director Morbylanga, Sweden
Partner of Merchant Venture Investments
29-Oct-37
10-Oct-03
9,434,620 1.44%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HaiMing Lai Director
Calgary, Alberta
Professional Engineer
(Resigned September 2, 2020)
13-Jan-61
23-Nov-16
Nil
 
 
 
 
 
Thomas F. Bugg
Calgary, Alberta
Director
Business Consultant
30-Sep-50
02-Sep-20
2,000,000
0.31%
 
 
 
 
 
Jose Garcia Torres Director
International Banking
     18-Aug-49
20-Apr-20
 
4,000,000
0.61%
Mexico City, Mexico
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rolando Ramon
Director
Business Consultant
 
       16-Jan-17
28-Jan-19
 
1,750,000
0.27%
Lucas, TX
 
 
 
 
 
 (*) The “Numbers of Securities Controlled” are comprised by common shares as of the most recent date, and options, warrants and convertible notes exercisable/convertible within 60 days from December 31, 2020.
 
21
 
 
B.    Compensation.
 
Share-Based Awards
 
An important part of the Corporation's current compensation program is the granting of share-based awards to the Named Executive Officers (NEOs). These share-based awards have been granted in replacement, or in lieu, of options to purchase Common Shares pursuant to the Corporation's Option Plan. The granting of such awards is approved by the Board upon recommendation from the Compensation Committee. The Board considers previous grants when considering new grants.
 
Further, in lieu of cash compensation the Company has entered into agreements (“Price Appreciation Certificates”) with David Lifschultz and Bruce Abbott whereby, at the request of the executives, the Company agrees to pay the equivalent sum of the rise in the Company’s stock price based on the agreed upon number of shares, from a fixed per share amount to the average of the last 10 trading days (volume weighted average price).
 
The number of shares reflect a potential salary for the two executives that only exist if the price of the shares rise above the price appreciation base amount. The Company has no obligation to pay the two executives if the stock does not rise. The Company, at its exclusive option and benefit, can proceed with a private placement at the share price on the date of exercise and the executive will subscribe to this private placement for the entire sum advanced by the Company.
 
Due to financial constraints, neither of the NEOs has ever received any cash compensation. Historically, the Corporation granted the NEOs option-based awards which were to be renewed upon expiration. The share-based awards granted to Messrs. Lifschultz and Abbott were granted: (i) as current compensation in lieu of options; or (ii) in certain instances, in replacement of expired options granted as compensation for previous years. The outstanding share-based awards represent 17 years of compensation to Messrs. Lifschultz and Abbott, the latter of whom was Mr. Lifschultz's aide before becoming an officer and director of the Corporation. Accordingly, their endeavors for the Corporation are to be rewarded only if the Corporation is successful and that success is reflected in the trading value of the Common Shares, thereby aligning management and Shareholder objectives.
 
Summary Compensation Table
 
The following table and notes thereto set out information concerning the compensation paid to the NEOs for the five most recently completed financial years ended December 31, 2020.
 
 
22
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-equity incentive plan compensation($)
 
 
 
Name andPrincipal Position
Year
Salary($)
Share-based awards($)(1)
Option-based awards($)
 
Annual incentive plans
Long-term incentive plans
Pension value($)
All Other Compensation($)
Total Compensation ($)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
David Lifschultz,
2020
-
1,556,415
-
-
-
-
-
1,556,415
Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer
 
2019
2018
2017
2016
-
-
-
-
-
3,961,045
2,836,365
713,026
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3,961,045
2,836,365
713,026
Bruce Abbott, President and Chief Operating Officer 
2020
2019
2018
2017
-
-
-
-
 1,197,243
2,430,766
2,260,870
1,209,870
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1,197,243
2,430,766
2,260,870
1,209,870
 
2016
-
713,026
155,844
-
-
-
-
868,910
 
Notes:
 
(1)
The Company accounts for Price Appreciation Certificates as an equity instrument due to its exclusive option to require a subscription to the private placement as determined by the fair value of the instruments using a Black-Scholes pricing model.
 
The fair value of Price Appreciation Certificates granted during 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016 was estimated on the dates of grant using the Black-Scholes pricing model.
 
C.    Board practices.
 
Directors are elected annually to the Board of Directors (the “Board”) at the Corporation's Annual General Meeting. Directors may also, between Annual General Meetings, appoint one or more additional Directors, provided such number of additional directors does not exceed 1/3 of the existing number, to serve until the next Annual General Meeting. No Director has a service contract with Genoil providing for benefits upon termination of employment.
 
Duties and Obligations of the Board of Directors
 
The general duty of Genoil's Board of Directors is to oversee the management of Genoil's business and affairs. In particular, the Board of Directors is responsible for the following matters:
 
(a) adopting a strategic planning process which establishes the Corporation's long-term goals and strategies, and monitoring the success of its management in achieving those goals and implementing the strategy;
 
(b) identifying the principal risks with respect to all aspects of the Corporation's business, ensuring that there are systems in place to effectively monitor and manage such risks with a view to its long-term viability, and achieving a proper balance between the risks incurred and the potential return to its members;
 
 
23
 
 
(c) engaging in succession planning, including appointing, training and monitoring senior management (which includes ensuring that objectives are in place against which management's performance can be measured), establishing and maintaining programs to train and develop management, providing for the orderly succession of management, and assessing the performance and contribution of Genoil's Chief Executive Officer against mutually established objectives;
 
(d) ensuring that there are effective controls and information systems in place for the Board of Directors to discharge its responsibilities, such as an audit system which can inform the Board of Directors about the integrity of the data and the compliance of the financial information with appropriate accounting principles, and the timely reporting of developments material to the Corporation.
 
Composition of the Board of Directors
 
As of December 31, 2020, Genoil's Board of Directors consisted of Messrs. David Lifschultz, Rolando Ramon, Bruce Abbott, Bengt Koch, Thomas F. Bugg, and Jose Garcia Torres. Of the Board, Messrs. Koch, Ramon, Torres, Taylor and Bugg are "independent". Mr. David Lifschultz is not independent as he is the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation. Bruce Abbott is not considered to be independent as he is the President.
 
The definition of "independence" that Genoil uses when determining a director's independence is derived from National Instrument 58-101, published by the Canadian Securities Administrators and adopted in all Canadian jurisdictions.
 
The Board facilitates its exercise of independent supervision over management by attempting to meet independently from management when warranted, determining what additional information it needs from management and seeking outside advice and support as it considers appropriate. Generally, the Board attempts to ensure that all board committees are composed in the majority by non-management directors with consideration being had to the Corporation's current size and board composition.
 
Committees of the Board of Directors
 
There are currently two committees of the Board of Directors. The Audit Committee is comprised of two directors, one of whom is a related party. The Compensation Committee is comprised of all directors. The mandate and activities of each committee are as follows:
 
Audit Committee - The Audit Committee consists of Bengt Koch and David Lifschultz. The responsibilities of the Audit Committee include:
 
(a) assisting the directors with meeting their responsibilities with respect to financial reporting;
 
(b) reviewing and reporting to the Board of Directors on all audited financial statements the Corporation prepares and enhancing the credibility and objectivity of all financial reports;
 
(c) reviewing with management and with the external auditor any proposed changes in major accounting policies, in the presentation and impact of significant risks and uncertainties, and in key estimates and judgments of management that may be material to financial reporting;
 
(d) questioning management and the external auditor regarding significant financial reporting issues discussed during the fiscal period and the method of resolution;
 
(e) reviewing any problems experienced by the external auditor in performing the audit, including any restrictions imposed by management or significant accounting issues on which there was a disagreement with management; and
 
(f) reviewing the post-audit or management letters containing the recommendations of the external auditor and management's response, and following up any identified weaknesses.
 
 
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Relevant Education and Experience
 
The members of the Audit Committee have the following relevant education and experience:
 
David K. Lifschultz 
Mr. Lifschultz is the former CEO of Lifschultz Industries which was publicly traded on the NASDAQ Exchange. He had extensive experience on the Lifschultz Industries audit committee. He is presently CEO of the Corporation and has periodically served on the Audit Committee
 
Mr. Lifschultz has experience in finance and supervising the Treasury Department of three public companies: the Corporation, Lifschultz Industries, and Trans-Air Freight System.
 
Mr. Lifschultz's educational experience includes working in the Treasury Department of Arrow-Lifschultz Freight Forwarders working in and supervising the accounting, bookkeeping and all other Treasury functions.
 
Bengt Koch 
Mr. Koch is the former Executive Chairman of Atlantic Container Lines, a leading Swedish container ship line. Mr. Koch will help guide the Corporation's marketing and sales strategies for oil upgrading, bunker fuel desulphurization and Crystal separator markets.
 
Audit Committee Oversight
 
Since the commencement of the Corporation's most recently completed financial year, there have been no recommendations of the Audit Committee to nominate or compensate an external auditor, which were not adopted by the Board.
 
Compensation Committee - The Compensation Committee consists of the entire Board.
 
The Compensation Committee assists the Board in carrying out its oversight responsibility with respect to corporate governance and compensation matters, including making recommendations to the Corporation's Board in respect of compensation issues relating to directors, management and employees of the Corporation. The Board has approved and adopted a formal charter for the Compensation Committee. The Compensation Committee's primary duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to, the following:
 
(a)
reviewing the organization's structure;
 
(b)
management's succession plans for executive management;
 
(c)
developing compensation philosophies and principles; and
 
(d)
 reviewing and reporting to the Board its recommendations and determinations of appropriate compensation of the Corporation's executive officers.
 
Decisions Requiring the Prior Approval of the Board of Directors
 
Each committee of the Board of Directors makes recommendations to the Board on an ongoing basis. Generally, recommendations from a committee of the Board of Directors require the approval of the full Board before they are implemented.
 
D.    Employees.
 
The Company has been building its internal capabilities.
 
 
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Genoil utilizes independent contractors to provide engineering and other services for projects as needed. The operational sites are at – Two Hills, Alberta, New York, NY and Dubai UAE.
 
The company seeks to work through commission agents who will receive compensation when revenues are generated. Genoil is modeling its operations in a similar way as Microsoft and Google followed when they were in their infancy. 
 
Genoil has no labour unions and no temporary staff.
 
E.    Share ownership.
 
There were 596,178,029 Common Shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2020 (2019 – 547,303,029). Information as to share and option information for directors, officers and key employees is discussed above in "Item 6. (A) Directors and Senior Management" and in "Item 6. (B) Compensation."
 
Genoil has established a stock option plan with the objective of advancing its interests by encouraging and enabling the acquisition of a share interests by its directors, officers, employees and consultants, in accordance with the policies and rules of the applicable regulatory authorities. The full text of Genoil's stock option plan is attached as an Exhibit to the Form 20-F for 2006
 
Item 7.
Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions
 
A.    Major shareholders.
 
The following table sets forth information as of May 17, 2021, with respect to each person known to the Corporation to own more than 5% of its Common Shares. As used in this table, "beneficial ownership" means the sole or shared power to vote or direct the voting or to dispose or direct the disposition of any security. For purposes of this table, a person is deemed to be the beneficial owner of securities that can be acquired within 60 days from December 31, 2020, through the exercise of any option or warrant. Shares subject to options or warrants that are currently exercisable or exercisable within 60 days are deemed outstanding for computing the ownership percentage of the person holding such options or warrants, but are not deemed outstanding for computing the ownership percentage of any other person. The amounts and percentages are based upon 596,178,029   Common Shares issued and outstanding.
 
Class of Share
  
Identity of Person or Group
    
Number of Shares Beneficially Owned
    
Percentage of Share Stock Beneficially Owned
Common Shares
  
David K. Lifschultz
    
61,254,101
    
10.27%
 
David Lifschultz has acquired his shareholdings incrementally during the past years through companies under his control and personally by way of a series of purchases on the open market and private placement subscriptions made for the purpose of providing financial assistance to the Corporation so as to ensure it continues to meet its financial obligations. Mr. Lifschultz is a resident in New York.
 
As of the date of this form and to the knowledge of our directors and officers, there is no other person or entity who beneficially owns, directly or indirectly, over more than 5% of the issued and outstanding Common Shares.
 
To the best of its knowledge, Genoil is not directly owned or controlled by another corporation, by any foreign government or by any natural or legal person.
 
To the best of its knowledge, Genoil is not aware of any arrangements which may result in a change of control of Genoil at a subsequent date.
 
 
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B.    Related party transactions.
 
 
 
December 31
2020
 
 
December 31
2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Due from related parties
 $152,719 
 $1,675,625 
Due to related parties
  (6,992,486)
  (8,171,220)
Net
 $(6,839,767)
 $(6,495,595)
 
Transactions with Affiliates, Directors or Officers
 
Genoil's approach for transactions with affiliates is that they must be on terms no less favourable to the Corporation than could be obtained from unaffiliated third parties.
 
In the case of transactions involving a director, any of the Corporation's directors who, in any way, whether directly or indirectly, have an interest in a proposed contract or transaction with it, must disclose the nature and extent of his interest to the Corporation's Board and abstain from voting on the approval of the proposed contract or transaction. If he or she fails to do so, he or she must account to the Corporation for any profit made as a consequence of entering into the contract or transaction, unless the contract was fair and reasonable to the Corporation at the time it was entered into, and after full disclosure of the nature and extent of his or her interest, it is approved by the Corporation's shareholders by way of a resolution passed by a majority of not less than two-thirds of the votes cast at a duly convened shareholders' meeting. In addition, any of the Corporation's directors and officers who holds any office or possesses any property whereby, whether directly or indirectly, duties or interests might be created in conflict with his or her duties or interests as a director or officer, must disclose that fact and the nature and extent of the conflict. In the case of a director, the disclosure must be made at a Board meeting.
 
In the case of transactions involving an officer, the disclosure must be made in writing to the Corporation's Chairman at a Board meeting.
 
C.    Interests of experts and counsel.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
Item 8.
Financial Information
 
A.    Consolidated statements and other financial information.
 
Please see "Item 3 Financial Statements" and Exhibit 19(a) for a list of the financial statements filed as part of this annual report statement.
 
Genoil has neither declared nor paid dividends on any of its outstanding Common Shares, and does not intend to do so in the foreseeable future. It intends to retain any future earnings to finance the expansion of its business. Any future determination to pay dividends will be at the discretion of the Board of Directors and will be dependent upon its earnings, capital requirements and financial position, as well as any other factors deemed relevant by the Board of Directors.
 
B.    Significant changes.
 
At the annual and special meeting of the shareholders of Genoil held on November 14, 2016, a special resolution was passed authorizing the continuance of the Corporation from a corporation existing under the laws of Canada to a corporation existing under the laws of the Country of Curaçao. On May 29, 2019 the Company finally received a letter of satisfaction from Corporations Canada approving Genoil's move to Curacao. However, no such move has been implemented to date.
 
 
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Item 9.
The Offer and Listing
 
A.    Offer and listing details.
 
The following is a summary of the trading history of the Common Shares on the OTC Bulletin Board (in US dollars) for:
 
 
 
the annual high and low market prices for the five most recent full financial years;
 
 
 
the quarterly high and low market prices for the two most recent full financial years and any subsequent period; and
 
 
 
the monthly high and low market prices for the most recent six months.
 
 
 
Price per share on OTC Bulletin Board
(US $)
 
Year
 
High
 
 
Low
 
Fiscal year ended December 31, 2016
 $0.090.09$0.0 
  0.02 
Fiscal year ended December 31, 2017
  0.09 
  0.06 
Fiscal year ended December 31, 2018
  0.06 
  0.04 
Fiscal year ended December 31, 2019
  0.03 
  0.02 
Fiscal year ended December 31, 2020
  0.03 
  0.02 
 
 
Quarter  
 
High
 
 
Low
 
Fiscal year ended December 31, 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
First Quarter
  0.04 
  0.02 
Second Quarter
  0.03 
  0.02 
Third Quarter
  0.03 
  0.02 
Fourth Quarter
  0.03 
  0.02 
Fiscal year ended December 31, 2020
    
    
First Quarter
  0.02 
  0.01 
Second Quarter
  0.03 
  0.01 
Third Quarter
  0.03 
  0.01 
Fourth Quarter
  0.02 
  0.01 
 
Most Recent Six Months  
 
High
 
 
Low
 
November 2020
  0.02 
  0.01 
December 2020
  0.02 
  0.01 
January 2021
  0.02 
  0.01 
February 2021
  0.02 
  0.01 
March 2021
  0.01 
  0.01 
April 2021
  0.01 
  0.01 
 
 
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B.    Plan of distribution.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
C.    Markets.
 
The issued and outstanding Common Shares are listed and posted for trading on the OTC Bulletin Board under the symbol "GNOLF". The Corporation's Common Shares are registered shares.
 
D.    Selling shareholders.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
E.    Dilution.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
F.    Expenses of the issue.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
Item 10.
 Additional Information
 
A.    Share capital.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Exchange Act.
 
B.    Memorandum and articles of association.
 
Genoil was formed by the amalgamation under the Canada Business Corporations Act (the "CBCA") of Genoil Inc. and Continental Fashions Group Inc. ("CFG"), a public company whose shares traded on the Alberta Stock Exchange. At the time of the merger CFG had no assets, no liabilities and did not carry on any business. Genoil was incorporated in April of 1996 under Certificate of Incorporation no. 324649-3. In June of 1996, it amended and altered its Memorandum and Articles of Association. This amendment was made to facilitate a reorganization of its share capital in accordance with the amalgamation referenced above. The Articles of Amalgamation, adopted in September of 1996, replaced the Articles of Incorporation, as amended.
 
At the Annual and Special Meeting of Shareholders of the Corporation, held on May 31, 2006, shareholders of the Corporation passed a special resolution authorizing the Corporation to amend its Articles to create an additional class of share to be designed as "Class A Preferred Shares" and to allow for the appointment of additional directors of the Corporation between shareholder meetings.
 
The Articles of Amalgamation are subject to all the provisions of the CBCA. The CBCA provides that a company incorporated under that Act has all the powers and capacities of a natural person. The CBCA further stipulates that a company must not carry on a business that its articles prohibit. The Corporation's articles contain no prohibitions on the nature of businesses that it may carry out. Thus, it has the power and capacity of a natural person.
 
The following brief description of provisions of the CBCA, the Corporation's amended and restated articles of incorporation and by-laws do not purport to be complete and are subject in all respects to the provisions of the CBCA, the Corporation's restated articles of incorporation and by-laws.
 
Regulation SK Item 702 requires the Corporation to state the general effect of any statute, charter provisions, by-laws, contract or other arrangements under which any controlling persons, director or officer of the registrant is insured or indemnified in any manner against liability which he may incur in his capacity as such.
 
 
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Furthermore, the by-laws of the Corporation provide that except in respect of an action by or on behalf of the Corporation or other entity to procure a judgment in its favour, the Corporation will indemnify a director or officer of the Corporation against all costs, charges, and expenses, including an amount paid to settle an action or satisfy a judgment, reasonably incurred by the individual in respect of any civil, criminal, administrative, investigative or other proceeding in which the individual is involved because of that association with the Corporation or other entity.
 
Directors' Conflicts of Interest
 
Section 120 of the CBCA requires every director who is, in any way, directly or indirectly, interested in one of Genoil's proposed material contracts or transactions, to disclose the nature and extent of the director's interest in writing or by requesting to have it entered in the minutes of the meeting of directors or of meetings of committees of directors.
 
The CBCA further provides that a director or officer who is required to disclose an interest may not vote on any resolution to approve the contract or transaction unless the contract or transaction, (i) relates primarily to the director's or officer's remuneration as one of the Corporation's directors, officers, employees or agents or that of an affiliate, (ii) is for indemnity or insurance for the director against liability incurred by the director or officer acting in his or her capacity as a director or officer, or (iii) is with an affiliate.
 
Borrowing Powers
 
The Corporation's By-Law No. 3 states that the Board of Directors may exercise borrowing powers provided for in this by-law. These powers include borrowing money on credit, issuing bonds, debentures, notes and other indebtedness, giving guarantees on behalf of the Corporation and granting mortgages by the Corporation, among others.
 
Directors
 
The number of directors shall be not less than one and not more than nine. The number of directors may be determined from time to time by an ordinary resolution of the shareholders passed at a duly convened general meeting. A director is not required to own any of the Corporation's shares to be qualified to serve as a director. A director is not required to retire under any age-limit requirement.
 
Upon the termination of each annual general meeting, all the directors are deemed to cease serving as directors. The number of directors to be elected at any such meeting will be the number of directors then in office unless the directors or shareholders otherwise determine.
 
If the shareholders remove any director before the expiration of his or her period of office and appoint another person in his or her place, that person so appointed shall hold office only during the remainder of the time that the director in whose place he or she is appointed would have held the office if he or she had not been removed. If the shareholders do not appoint another director to replace the removed director the vacancy may be filled by the directors.
 
The directors of the Corporation, between annual meetings, may appoint one or more additional directors of the Corporation to serve until the next annual meeting, provided that the number of additional directors of the Corporation shall not at any time exceed one-third of the number of directors who held office at the expiration of the last annual meeting of the Corporation.
 
The directors, or any committee of directors, may take any action required or permitted to be taken by them and may exercise any of the authorities, powers and discretions for the time being vested in or exercisable by them by way of a resolution either passed at a meeting at which a quorum is present or consented to in writing under the applicable section of the CBCA.
 
 The directors may appoint a president, one or more vice-presidents, a secretary, a treasurer and other officers as determined by the Board, including assistants to the Board. The directors may specify the duties of and delegate powers to manage the business and affairs of the directors to these officers. The Corporation may also appoint a chairman of the Board, who must also be a director, and assign the powers and duties assigned to the managing director or president, under the by-laws, or other powers and duties.
 
 
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Rights Attached to Shares
 
The following is a description of the rights, preferences, and restrictions attached to each class of the Corporation's shares:
 
(a) Unlimited Common Shares – Each Common Share carries the right to one vote at any meeting of the Corporation's shareholders. Dividends are payable on the Common Shares in the discretion of the Board of Directors. After a period of six years, dividends that have been paid but remain unclaimed by shareholders shall be forfeited to the Corporation. In the event of the liquidation, dissolution or winding-up of the Corporation or any distribution of Genoil's assets for the purpose of winding up its affairs, the Common Shares shall be entitled to receive Genoil's remaining property. The Common Shares are not redeemable at the Corporation's option or at the option of the holders. There are no sinking fund provisions respecting the Common Shares. The holders of the Common Shares are not liable for any further capital calls on such shares.
 
(b) Up to 10,000,000 Class A Preferred Shares – The Class A Preferred Shares may at any time and from time to time be issued in one or more series, each series consisting of such number of shares as may, before their issuance, be determined by resolution of the directors of the Corporation. Subject to the provisions of the CBCA, the directors of the Corporation may by resolution fix before the issue of Class A Preferred Shares the designation, rights, privileges, restrictions and conditions attaching to each series of the Class A Preferred Shares.
 
Alteration of the Rights of Shareholders
 
No rights, privileges or restrictions attached to the Common Shares may be altered except with the approval by resolution passed by the vote of the holders of not less than two-thirds of the votes cast in respect of a resolution to alter such rights.
 
There are no limitations in Genoil's charter on the rights of non-resident or foreign owners to hold Common Shares of Genoil.
 
Shareholders' Meetings
 
The CBCA requires the directors to call an annual general meeting of shareholders not later than fifteen months after the last annual general meeting and no later than six months after the end of the Corporation's preceding financial year. The directors may, whenever they think fit, convene a special meeting.
 
Notice of a meeting must specify the time and place of a meeting, and, in case of special business, the general nature of that business and the text of any resolution. The accidental omission to give notice of any meeting to, or the non-receipt of any notice by any of the shareholders entitled to receive notice does not invalidate any proceedings at that meeting.
 
All business that is transacted at meetings of shareholders, with the exception of consideration of the financial statements and auditor's report, election of directors, appointment of Genoil's auditor is deemed to be special business.
 
Genoil's Articles stipulate that business shall be conducted at any general meeting if there is quorum present at the opening of the meeting notwithstanding that there ceases to be a quorum present throughout the meeting. A quorum is shareholders entitled to vote or proxy holders representing more than 10% of Genoil's outstanding shares entitled to vote at the meeting.
 
Genoil's Articles stipulate that the Chairman of the Board, or in his absence, the Corporation's Managing Director, or in his absence the Corporation's President shall preside as chairman of every general meeting.
 
Unless the directors otherwise determine, the instrument appointing a proxyholder shall be deposited at a place specified for that purpose in the notice convening the meeting, not less than forty-eight hours before the time for holding the meeting at which the proxyholder proposes to vote.
 
 
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Notice of every general meeting should be sent to:
 
(a) each director;
 
(b) the Corporation's auditor;
 
(c) every shareholder entered in the securities registrar as the holder of a share or shares carrying the right to vote at such meetings on the record date or, if no record date was established by the directors, on the date of mailing such notice; and
 
(d) every person upon whom the ownership of a share devolves by reason of his being a legal personal representative or a trustee in bankruptcy of a shareholder where the shareholder, but for his death or bankruptcy, would be entitled to vote.
 
No other person is entitled to receive notice of general meetings.
 
There are no limitations to the rights of non-resident or foreign shareholders to hold or exercise voting rights associated with Genoil's securities.
 
These provisions do not deviate significantly from U.S. law, insofar as the following matters are concerned:
 
According to Rule 405 of the Securities Act, the term "foreign private issuer" means any foreign issuer other than a foreign government except an issuer meeting the following conditions:
 
(a) More than 50 percent of the outstanding voting securities of such issuer are directly or indirectly owned of record by residents of the United States; and
 
(b) Any of the following:
 
(i)  The majority of the executive officers or directors are United States citizens or residents;
 
(ii) More than 50 percent of the assets of the issuer are located in the United States; or
 
(iii) The business of the issuer is administered principally in the United States.
 
Further, the predominant rule in most U.S. jurisdictions is that an annual meeting must be held every 13 months.
 
C.    Material contracts.
 
Genoil has entered into the following material contracts in the ordinary course of business for the two years preceding this registration statement:
 
2019
 
On July 3, 2019, the Company signed an advisory fee agreement with Tuimaada-Neft, which is a leading oil and gas company in Russia with an estimated 850 million tons of oil equivalent. This agreement builds from the previous LOI that was signed in the fourth quarter 2017. Genoil will advise and possibly have a significant role in these development projects, which will include EPC (engineering, procurement and construction), equity and debt financing, oil field services, as well as oil field operations and natural gas development. 
 
On October 7, 2019, the Company retained the largest bank in China to bring strategic investors and finance for development of the massive Velikoye oil field in Russia.
 
 
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D.    Exchange controls.
 
There is no law or governmental decree or regulation in Canada that restricts the export or import of capital or affects the remittance of dividends, interest or other payments to a non-resident holder of Common Shares, other than withholding tax requirements. See "Taxation".
 
E.    Taxation.
 
Genoil has provided the following summary of the material Canadian federal and U.S. federal income tax considerations generally applicable in respect of the holding or disposing of Common Shares. This summary does not address all possible tax consequences relating to an investment in its Common Shares. There may be provincial, territorial, state and local taxes applicable to a potential shareholder, depending on the shareholder's particular circumstances, which are not addressed in this summary. The tax consequences to any particular holder, including a U.S. Holder of common shares (defined below) will vary according to the status of that holder as an individual, trust, corporation, or member of a partnership, the jurisdiction in which the holder is subject to taxation, the place where the holder is resident and generally, according to the holder's particular circumstances.
 
U.S. Holder of Common Shares
 
References to a "U.S. Holder of common shares" in this section include individuals, corporations, trusts or estates who are holders of Common Shares and who:
 
for purposes of the Income Tax Act (Canada) (the "ITA") and the Canada-United States Income Tax Convention (1980), as amended by the protocol signed on July 29, 1997, (the "Treaty") are residents of the U.S. and have never been residents of Canada;
 
for purposes of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the "Code") are U.S. persons;
 
deal at arm's length with Genoil for purposes of the ITA;
 
will hold the Common Shares as capital property for purposes of the ITA;
 
will hold the Common Shares as capital assets for purposes of the Code;
 
do not and will not hold the Common Shares in carrying on a business in Canada;
 
will not perform independent personal services from a fixed base situated in Canada; and
 
are not or will not be subject to special provisions of Canadian or U.S. federal income tax law, including, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, financial institutions, real estate investment trusts, shareholders that have a functional currency other than the U.S. dollar, shareholders that own shares through a partnership or other pass-through entity, shareholders that hold shares as part of a straddle, hedge or conversion transaction, tax-exempt organizations, qualified retirement plans, insurance companies, shareholders who acquired their shares through the exercise of employee stock options or otherwise as compensation and mutual fund companies.
 
The following summary of Canadian federal and U.S. federal income tax considerations generally applicable to a U.S. Holder of Genoil's Common Shares is based on the following, as at the time of this statement:
 
the ITA and the Income Tax Regulations (Canada) (the "Regulations");
 
published proposals to amend the ITA and the Regulations;
 
published administrative positions and practices of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency;
 
the Code;
 
 
33
 
 
Treasury Regulations;
 
published Internal Revenue Service ("IRS") rulings;
 
published administrative positions of the IRS;
 
published jurisprudence that is considered applicable; and
 
the Treaty.
 
All of the foregoing is subject to material or adverse change, on a prospective or retroactive basis, at any time. The tax laws of the various provinces or territories of Canada and the tax laws of the various state and local jurisdictions of the U.S. are not considered in this summary.
 
This summary is not exhaustive of all possible income tax consequences. The following discussion is for general information only and is not intended to be, nor should it be construed to be, legal or tax advice to any holder or prospective holder of Genoil's Common Shares and no opinion or representation with respect to any such holder or prospective holder with respect to the income tax consequences to any such holder or prospective holder is made. Accordingly, it is recommended that holders and prospective holders of the Corporation's Common Shares consult their own tax advisors about the Canadian federal and provincial and U.S. federal, state, local, and foreign tax consequences of purchasing, owning and disposing of the Corporation's Common Shares.
 
Canadian Federal Income Tax Consequences
 
Disposition of Common Shares
 
Provided that the Common Shares are listed on a "prescribed stock exchange", which currently includes the TSX Venture Exchange but does not include the OTC Markets, a U.S. Holder of Common Shares will not be subject to tax in Canada under the ITA on capital gains realized on the disposition of such Common Shares unless the shares are "taxable Canadian property." Such Common Shares will be taxable Canadian property if, in general, at any time during the sixty month period immediately preceding the disposition, 25% or more of Genoil's issued shares of any class (or an option to acquire 25% or more of the issued shares of any class) were owned by such holder, or by such holder and persons with whom such holder did not deal at arm's length. If the Corporation's shares are taxable Canadian property to a U.S. Holder of Common Shares, 50% of any resulting capital gain realized on the disposition of such shares may be subject to tax in Canada. However, the Treaty provides that gains realized by a U.S. Holder of Common Shares on the disposition of shares of a Canadian corporation will be exempt from federal tax in Canada unless the value of the Canadian corporation is derived principally from real property situated in Canada. It is the current position of the Canada Revenue Agency that a U.S. limited liability company is not entitled to the benefits of the Treaty.
 
Dividend Distributions on Genoil's Shares
 
Dividends paid on Genoil's Common Shares held by a U.S. Holder of Common Shares will be subject to Canadian non-resident withholding tax. The Corporation is required to withhold taxes at source. Under the Treaty, a withholding rate of 5% is applicable to corporations resident in the United States and who are beneficial owners of at least 10% of the voting shares of the Corporation. Under the Treaty, a withholding rate of 15% is applicable in all other cases.
 
United States Federal Income Tax Consequences
 
The U.S. federal income tax consequences related to the disposition and ownership of Common Shares, subject to the Foreign Personal Holding Company Rules, Passive Foreign Investment Company and Controlled Foreign Corporation Rules contained in the Code, are generally as follows:
 
 
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Disposition of Common Shares
 
On a disposition of Common Shares, a U.S. Holder of Common Shares generally will recognize a gain or loss. The gain or loss will be equal to the difference between the amount realized on the sale and the U.S. Holder of Common Share's adjusted tax basis in those shares. Any such gain or loss will be a long-term capital gain or loss if the shareholder has held the shares for more than one year. Otherwise the gain or loss will be a short-term capital gain or loss. However, a gain realized on the disposition of Common Shares may be treated as ordinary income if the company was a "collapsible corporation" within the meaning of the Code. The gain or loss will generally be a U.S. source gain or loss.
 
A collapsible corporation is usually formed to give a short-term venture the appearance of a long-term investment in order to portray income as capital gain rather than profit. Such a corporation is typically formed for the sole purpose of purchasing property and usually dissolved before the property has generated substantial income. The Internal Revenue Service treats the income earned through a collapsible corporation as ordinary income rather than as capital gain.
 
Dividend Distributions on Shares
 
Dividend distributions (including constructive dividends) paid by Genoil will be required to be included in the income of a U.S. Holder of Common Shares to the extent of the Corporation's current or accumulated earnings and profits ("E&P") attributable to the distribution without reduction for any Canadian withholding tax withheld from such distributions. Even if such payment is in fact not converted to U.S. dollars, the amount of any cash distribution paid in Canadian dollars will be equal to the U.S. dollar value of the Canadian dollars on the date of distribution based on the exchange rate on such date. To the extent distributions the Corporation pays on the Common Shares exceed the Corporation's current or accumulated E&P, they will be treated first as a return of capital up to a shareholder's adjusted tax basis in the shares and then as capital gain from the sale or exchange of the shares.
 
Dividends paid on the Common Shares generally will not be eligible for the "dividends received" deduction provided to corporations receiving dividends from certain U.S. corporations. These dividends generally may be subject to backup withholding tax, unless a U.S. Holder of Common Shares furnishes the Corporation with a duly completed and signed Form W-9. The U.S. Holder of Common Shares will be allowed a refund or a credit equal to any amount withheld under the U.S. backup withholding tax rules against the U.S. Holder of Common Share's U.S. federal income tax liability, provided the shareholder furnishes the required information to the IRS.
 
Foreign Tax Credit
 
A U.S. Holder of Common Shares will generally be entitled to a foreign tax credit or deduction in an amount equal to the Canadian tax withheld. Dividends paid by Genoil generally will constitute foreign source dividend income and "passive income" for purposes of the foreign tax credit, which could reduce the amount of foreign tax credits available to shareholders. There are significant and complex limitations that apply to the credit.
 
Foreign Personal Holding Company Rules
 
Special U.S. tax rules apply to a shareholder of a foreign personal holding company ("FPHC"). Genoil would be classified as a FPHC in any taxable year if both of the following tests are satisfied:
 
at least 60% of Genoil's gross income consists of "foreign personal holding company income", which generally includes passive income such as dividends, interest, royalties, gains from shares and commodity transactions and rents; and
 
more than 50% of the total voting power of all classes of voting shares or the total value of outstanding shares is owned directly or indirectly by five or fewer individuals who are U.S. citizens or residents.
 
 
35
 
 
Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules
 
Special U.S. tax rules apply to a shareholder of a Passive Foreign Investment Company ("PFIC"). Genoil could be classified as a PFIC if, after the application of certain "look through" rules, for any taxable year, either:
 
75% or more of the Corporation's gross income for the taxable year is "passive income," which includes interest, dividends and certain rents and royalties; or
 
the average quarterly percentage, by fair market value of the Corporation's assets that produce or are held for the production of "passive income" is 50% or more of the fair market value of all of its assets.
 
To the extent Genoil owns at least 25% by value of the shares of another corporation, it is treated for purposes of the PFIC tests as owning its proportionate share of the assets of such corporation, and as receiving directly its proportionate share of the income of such corporation.
 
Distributions which constitute "excess distributions" from a PFIC and dispositions of Common Shares of a PFIC are subject to the following special rules:
 
the excess distributions (generally any distributions received by a U.S. Holder of Common Shares on the shares in any taxable year that are greater than 125% of the average annual distributions received by such U.S. Holder of Common Shares in the three preceding taxable years, or the U.S. Holder of Common Share's holding period for the shares, if shorter) or gain would be allocated on a pro rata basis over a U.S. Holder of Common Share's holding period for the shares;
 
the amount allocated to the current taxable year and any taxable year prior to the first taxable year in which the Corporation is a PFIC would be treated as ordinary income in the current taxable year; and
 
the amount allocated to each of the other taxable years would be subject to the highest rate of tax on ordinary income in effect for that year and to an interest charge based on the value of the tax deferred during the period during which the shares are owned.
 
U.S. Holders of Common Shares who actually or constructively own shares in a PFIC may be eligible to make certain elections which require them to include income for the PFIC on an annual basis.
 
Controlled Foreign Corporation Rules
 
Generally, if more than 50% of the voting power or total value of all classes of Genoil's shares are owned, directly or indirectly, by U.S. shareholders, who individually own 10% or more of the total combined voting power of all classes of the Corporation's shares, the Corporation could be treated as a controlled foreign corporation ("CFC") under Subpart F of the Code. This classification would require such 10% or greater shareholders to include in income their pro rata shares of its "Subpart F Income," as defined in the Code. In addition, a gain from the sale or exchange of shares by a U.S. Holder of Common Shares who is or was a 10% or greater shareholder at any time during the five year period ending with the sale or exchange will be deemed ordinary dividend income to the extent that the Corporation's E&P is attributable to the shares sold or exchanged.
 
F.    Dividends and paying agents.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Securities Act.
 
G.    Statement by experts.
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Securities Act.
 
H.    Documents on display.
 
No longer required
 
 
36
 
 
I.    Subsidiary information.
 
Genoil has the following subsidiaries:
 
Genoil USA Inc., incorporated in Delaware, United States, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of Genoil.
Genoil Emirates LLC, incorporated in the United Arab Emirates, which will focus upon the fields of oil and water processing and treatment in the United Arab Emirates. Emirates LLC is jointly owned by S.B.K. Commercial Business Group LLC and Genoil. As of December 31, 2019, Emirates LLC had not yet commenced operations and holds no assets.
Two Hills Environmental Inc., incorporated in Canada and registered in Alberta, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of Genoil. Two Hills was formed to enter into the oilfield waste disposal industry by capitalizing upon its current undeveloped asset base. The asset base comprises a site under which three salt caverns have been formed in the Lotsberg Formation beneath the earth's surface. Such caverns are used in the oilfield disposal industry as a destination for oilfield wastes.
 
Item 11.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
 
Genoil is not exposed to cash flow and translation risk due to changes in the Canadian/United States dollar exchange rate and interest rate fluctuations at this time due to the fact it does not currently conduct any material business in Canada or the United States.
 
Item 12.
 Description of Securities Other than Equity Securities
 
Not required as this is an annual report under the Securities Act.
 
 
PART II
 
 
Item 13.
 Defaults, Dividends Arrearages and Delinquencies
 
There have been no material defaults in the payment of interest or principal or any dividend or arrearages or material delinquencies.
 
Item 14.
 Material Modifications to the Rights of Security Holders and Use of Proceeds
 
There has been no material modification to the rights of Genoil's security holders.
 
Item 15.
 Controls and Procedures
 
(a)
Evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures.
 
Disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that all relevant information is gathered and reported to senior management, including the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Chief Financial Officer (CFO), on a timely basis so that appropriate decisions can be made regarding public disclosure.
 
For the year ended December 31, 2020 the CEO and CFO have evaluated the effectiveness of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures as defined in National Instrument 52-109 of the Canadian Securities Administrators and as defined in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)). The Company did not maintain effective segregation of duties over certain transactions leading to ineffective supervision and monitoring; and potential misappropriation of assets. This material weakness affects all significant accounts.
 
 
37
 
 
(b) Management's annual report on internal control over financial reporting.
 
Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal controls over financial reporting of the Company. Internal controls over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of consolidated financial statements for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”).
 
The Company's internal controls over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that
 
I.
pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company;
 
II.
provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with US GAAP, and that receipts and expenditures of the Company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the Company; and
 
III.
provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
 
A material weakness in internal controls is a significant deficiency, or combination of significant deficiencies, such that there is a reasonable possibility that material misstatements of the financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis by the Company.
 
We note, however, that a control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues including instances of fraud, if any, have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the controls. The design of any system of controls also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Over time, our control systems may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected and could be material and require a restatement of our financial statements.
 
Management conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting based on the framework in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).
 
Based on this evaluation, management concluded that the Company's internal controls over financial reporting were not effective as of December 31, 2020 due to the following material weakness:
 
The Company's accounting staff does not have sufficient technical accounting knowledge relating to accounting for income taxes, complex financial instruments and US GAAP and relied on the assistance of its auditors and financial consultants in understanding the related accounting and disclosure requirements on these matters. Management corrected any errors prior to the release of the Company's December 31, 2020 consolidated financial statements.
 
 (c) Changes in internal controls over financial reporting.
 
There has been no change in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the Company’s most recent fiscal period that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
 
 
38
 
 
Item 16.
 [Reserved]
 
Not applicable.
 
Item A
Audit Committee Financial Expert
 
The board of directors has determined that Bengt Koch qualifies as a financial expert. He is an independent director for this purpose.
 
Item B
Code of Ethics
 
Genoil has adopted a Code of Conduct that meets the requirements of the definition of a "Code of Ethics" as that term is defined in Item 16B(b) of Form 20-F. Genoil's Code of Conduct is applicable to all of its employees, including its principal executive officer and principal financial officer. The Corporation does not currently employ a principal accounting officer. Its Code of Conduct has been amended end of December 2007 and copy was attached as Exhibit 11.1 to Form 20-F in that year.
 
 
Item C
Audit Fees
 
 Michael T. Studer CPA P.C. has served as the Corporation’s auditors from 2017 onward. The following table summarizes the aggregate fees for professional audit services and other services rendered by that firm in the past two years.
 
In US dollars
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Audit Fees
 $45,000 
 $45,000 
Audit-Related Fees
  - 
  - 
Tax
  - 
  - 
All Other Fees
  - 
  - 
 
    
    
Total
 $45,000 
 $45,000 
 
Audit Fees
 
Audit fees include fees for professional services rendered in connection with the audit of Genoil's annual financial statements and services provided by the independent auditors in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements. The figure presented for 2019 represents the combined fee for the 2019, 2018 and 2017 fiscal years.
 
Audit Related Fees
 
Audit-related fees are generally fees billed for services that are closely related to the performance of the audit or review of the financial statements.
 
Tax Fees
 
Tax fees are fees for professional services rendered related to tax compliance, tax advice and tax planning.
 
 
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All Other Fees
 
The Company's audit committee is required to pre-approve all audit and non-audit services rendered by and approve the engagement fees and other compensation to be paid to the independent accountant and its affiliates. When deciding whether to approve these items, Genoil's audit committee takes into account whether the provision of any non-audit service is compatible with the independence standards under the guidelines of the SEC and of the Independent Standards Board. To assist in this undertaking, the audit committee requires the independent accountant to submit a report describing all relationships the independent accountant has with the Company and relevant third parties to determine the independent accountant's independence.
 
Item D
Exemptions from the Listing Standards for Audit Committees
 
Not applicable.
 
Item E
Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers
 
Not applicable.
 
Item F 
Change in registrant’s Certifying Accountant
 
    Not applicable.
 
 
PART III
 
Item 17.
Financial Statements
 
The Consolidated Financial Statements for years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018 are attached as Exhibit 15.1.
 
Item 18.
Financial Statements
 
The registrant has elected to provide financial statements using accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) for the 2020, 2019 and 2018 year ends.
 
 
40
 
 
Item 19.
Exhibits
 
(a) 
The Consolidated Financial Statements for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and, 2018
 
(b) 
Exhibits
 
Exhibit Number
 
Description
1.1*
 
Articles of Incorporation of Genoil Inc. dated April 1, 1996
 
 
 
1.2*
 
Articles of Amendment of Genoil Inc. dated June 27, 1996
  
 
  
1.3***
 
Certificate and Articles of Amalgamation of Genoil Inc. dated September 5, 1996
 
 
 
 
Certificate and Articles of Amendment of Genoil Inc. dated May 31, 2006
 
 
 
 
By-laws of Genoil Inc. as adopted on May 2, 2006
 
 
 
2.2**
 
Note and Warrant Purchase Agreement and form of Convertible Note dated December 23, 2004
 
 
 
 
$750,000 Convertible Promissory Note Dated October 24, 2005 with Lifschultz Enterprises Co., LLC.
 
 
 
2.4***
 
$750,000 Convertible Promissory Note Dated December 23, 2005 with Lifschultz Terminal and Leasing Ltd.
 
 
 
 
$968,825.19 Convertible Promissory Notes Dated October 6, 2006 with Lifschultz Enterprises Co., LLC, Lifschultz Family Partnership LP and Sidney B. Lifschultz 1992 Family Trust
 
 
 
 
Stock Option Plan of Genoil Inc., as amended October 25, 2001 and January 13, 2003, March 30, 2004, June 3, 2005, March 1, 2006, May 31, 2006, and May 14, 2007.
 
 
 
 
$1,227,355.84 Convertible Promissory Notes Dated October 6, 2009 with Lifschultz Enterprises Co., LLC, Sidney B. Lifschultz 1992 Family Trust, David K. Lifschultz and Bruce Abbott
 
 
 
 
Convertible Promissory Notes Dated October 6, 2011 with Lifschultz Enterprises Co, LLC, Sidney B. Lifschultz 1992 Family Trust, David K Lifschultz and Bruce Abbott
 
 
 
4.1*
 
Sample Marketing Agreement
 
 
 
 
Funding Agreement with David K Lifschultz
 
 
 
 
Amended Code of Conduct as adopted on December 15, 2007
 
 
 
 
Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
 
 
 
Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350
 
 
 
 
Independent Auditor’s Consent of Michael T. Studer CPA P.C
 
 
 
 
Audited Consolidated Financial Statements December 31, 2020
 
* These exhibits were filed with Genoil's 2003 Form 20-F.
 
** This exhibit was filed with Genoil's 2004 Form 20-F.
 
*** These exhibits were filed with Genoil's 2005 Form 20-F.
 
**** These exhibits were filed with Genoil’s 2006 Form 20-F.
 
*****These exhibits were filed with Genoil’s 2007 Form 20-F.
 
*/ This exhibit was filed with Genoil’s 2009 Form 20-F.
 
*// This exhibit is filed with Genoil’s 2012 Form 20-F/
 
 
41
 
 
SIGNATURES
 
The registrant hereby certifies that it meets all of the requirements for filing on Form 20-F and that it has duly caused and authorized the undersigned to sign this annual report on its behalf.
 
 
GENOIL INC.
 
 
 
 
 
Dated May 13, 2021.
By:  
/s/  David K. Lifschultz
 
 
 
David K. Lifschultz 
 
 
 
Chief Executive Officer 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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