UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

[X] ANNUAL REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

 

[  ] TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE EXCHANGE ACT

 

For the transition period from _____________ to ____________

 

Commission file number 333-209484

 

INTERNATIONAL LAND ALLIANCE, INC.

(Exact name of small business issuer as specified in its charter)

 

Wyoming   46-3752361
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation)   (IRS Employer Identification No.)

 

350 10th Avenue, Suite 1000, San Diego, CA 92101

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

(877) 661-4811

(Issuer’s telephone number)

 

Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act: None.

 

Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: Common Stock, no par value

 

Indicate by check mark if registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in the definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, non-accelerated filer or a small. See definition of “large accelerated filer, accelerated filer and smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer [  ] Accelerated filer [  ] Non-accelerated filer [  ] Smaller reporting company [X]

(Do not check if smaller reporting company)

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [  ]

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2019 was $11,515,046.

 

As of April 2, 2020, there were 21,434,289 shares of Common Stock, $0.001 par value, outstanding.

 

Documents Incorporated By Reference. None.

 

 

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
     
CAUTIONARY NOTE ABOUT FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS  
PART I    
Item 1. Description of Business 3
Item 1A. Risk Factors 6
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 14
Item 2. Properties 14
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 14
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 14
     
PART II    
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 15
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 16
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis Of Financial Condition and Results of Operation 16
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 19
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 19
Item 9. Changes In and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 20
Item 9A (T). Controls and Procedures 20
Item 9B. Other Information 20
     
PART III    
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 21
Item 11. Executive Compensation 23
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 24
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions 25
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services 25
     
PART IV    
Item 15. Exhibits; Financial Statement Schedules 26
     
SIGNATURES 27

 

  2  

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE ABOUT FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

The information contained in this Report includes some statements that are not purely historical and that are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and as such, may involve risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements relate to, among other things, expectations of the business environment in which we operate, perceived opportunities in the market and statements regarding our mission and vision. In addition, any statements that refer to projections, forecasts or other characterizations of future events or circumstances, including any underlying assumptions, are forward-looking statements. You can generally identify forward-looking statements as statements containing the words “anticipates,” “believes,” “continue,” “could,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “might,” “plans,” “possible,” “potential,” “predicts,” “projects,” “seeks,” “should,” “will,” “would” and similar expressions, or the negatives of such terms, but the absence of these words does not mean that a statement is not forward-looking.

 

Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements contained herein are based on various assumptions, many of which are based, in turn, upon further assumptions. Our expectations, beliefs and forward- looking statements are expressed in good faith on the basis of management’s views and assumptions as of the time the statements are made, but there can be no assurance that management’s expectations, beliefs or projections will result or be achieved or accomplished.

 

In addition to other factors and matters discussed elsewhere herein, the following are important factors that, in our view, could cause actual results to differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements: technological advances, impact of competition, dependence on key personnel and the need to attract new management, effectiveness of cost and marketing efforts, acceptances of products, ability to expand markets and the availability of capital or other funding on terms satisfactory to us. We disclaim any obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof.

 

For a discussion of the risks, uncertainties, and assumptions that could affect our future events, developments or results, you should carefully review the “Risk Factors” set forth under “Item 1. Description of Business” below. In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the future events, developments or results described by our forward-looking statements herein could turn to be materially different from those we discuss or imply.

 

PART I

 

Item 1. Description of Business.

 

We are based in San Diego, California, and were incorporated in Wyoming on September 26, 2013. On June 30, 2011, International Land Alliance, SA De CV (“ILA Mexico”) was formed as a Mexican corporation to acquire from Baja Residents Club, S.A., a Mexican corporation, 497 acres south of San Felipe, Baja California, known as the Oasis Park project and 20 acres in Ensenada, Baja California, known as the Valle Divino project. On October 1, 2013 Roberto Jesus Valdez, Jason A. Sunstein and Elizabeth Roemer transferred their interest in Oasis Park and Valle Divino real estate projects to ILA Mexico in exchange for 7,500 shares of ILA Mexico. On October 1, 2013, we issued 3,750,000 shares of our common stock to Roberto Jesus Valdez, 3,750,000 shares of our common stock to Jason Sunstein and 1,000,000 shares of our common stock to Elizabeth Roemer in exchange for all of the outstanding shares of ILA Mexico. As a result of this transaction, ILA Mexico became our wholly owned subsidiary.

 

On March 18, 2019, the Company acquired real property located in Hemet, California, which included approximately 80 acres of land and two structures for $1.1 million. The property includes the main parcel of land with existing structures along with three additional parcels of land which are vacant lots to be used for the purpose of development. The Company is generating Airbnb sales and lease income from this property.

 

In October 2019, the Company entered into an agreement with Valdeland, S.A. de C.V.(Valdeland), a Mexican corporation controlled by our CEO, Robert Valdes, to acquire 1 acre of land at the Bajamar Ocean Front Golf Resort in Ensenada, Baja California, known as the Costa Bajamar. The transfer of title to for this project is subject to approval from the Mexican government in Baja California. Although management believes that the transfer of title to the land will be approved and transferred within the next 60 days, there is no assurance that such transfer of title will be approved in that time frame or at all.

 

Overview

 

We are a residential land development company with target properties located primarily in the Baja California Norte region of Mexico. Our principal activities are purchasing properties, obtaining zoning and other entitlements required to subdivide the properties into residential and commercial building lots, securing financing for the purchase of the lots, improving the properties’ infrastructure and amenities, and selling the lots to homebuyers, retirees, investors and commercial developers. We offer the option of financing (i.e. taking a promissory note from the buyer for all or part of the purchase price) with a guaranteed acceptance on any purchase for every customer.

 

Industry Overview

 

Mexico’s real estate industry has experienced a wave of growth  brought about by foreign investment with the creation of investment trusts in 1993 (“fideicomiso”) and significant changes in regulations, primarily NAFTA in 1994, along with competitive land prices and the significant expansion of new business centers and factories (“maquiladora”) across the country over the last 10 years.

 

  3  

 

Most recently, this continued growth was fueled by Mexico´s enormously strong domestic market, particularly the rising middle class. In 2018, the country’s middle class was estimated to account for almost half of the total households, at about 16 million. They are expected to continue growing, with about 3.8 million more households projected to move into the middle class by 2030. Moreover, most Mexicans who move generally prefer to buy rather than to rent. Around 82% of Mexicans want to buy a property, as opposed to 18% that prefer to rent, according to Lamudi’s recent Real Estate Market Report 2018.

 

Market Opportunity

 

For years, U.S. and Canadian retirees have flocked to Mexico as an alternative overseas retirement destination that was affordable, offered desirable weather and was close to their communities of origin in North America. These attributes have made Mexico the top overseas retirement destination for older Americans, resulting in a building boom that reached its peak in 2005/06 and stretched from Playas de Tijuana-Rosarito and Los Cabos along the Baja California peninsula and from Puerto Peñasco, Sonora to Mazatlán, Sinaloa. In southern Mexico, the real estate focus has been on expanding the Cancún corridor to the Riviera Maya.

 

Mexico remains a viable retirement option for Americans aged 50 years and over, offering a reduced cost of living, lower health care expenses, and proximity to friends and family in the United States. In addition, over half of survey respondents observed that their motivation to purchase a home in Mexico was based on their desire to have a home on or near the coast that would otherwise be unattainable in the United States.

 

In addition to U.S. and Canadian citizens, Baja California has seen a noticeable increase in business from Japan and Europe. With the interest in Baja expected to continue along with Mexico’s overall economic growth, we will be well positioned to offer prospective homebuyers and investors a luxurious residence with breathtaking views for an affordable price.

 

Target Market

 

The Company’s projects will be marketed toward residents of the United States and Canada. Specifically, we will target the influx of Maquiladoras (manufacturing facilities) moving to Mexico as well as the residents of California, Texas, Arizona and Washington for the purpose of appealing to their need for a second home or retirement property within driving distance from Southern California. The targeted market includes residents making over $50,000 or a combined household income of $150,000.

 

Our target home buyers are typically professionals who own an existing property. Many are married without children or married with several children. The target audience enjoys a vacation away from home and often seeks information regarding villas or condominiums as a second home or vacation destination. We plan to provide them with an affordable location for a vacation home in a community that surpasses all their expectations.

 

Growth Strategy

 

We believe that growth of homebuilders in Mexico has created opportunities for smaller companies with long-term experience and relationships in their local markets. We believe that we can utilize our many strengths to benefit our target market. These strengths include:

 

  better knowledge of local demand;
  superior understanding of the entitlement and acquisition process;
  affordable high-quality homes and aggressive marketing;
  long term relationships with local regulatory authorities, landowners, designers and contractors; and
  faster and less cumbersome financing processes.

 

It is our plan to utilize these advantages to move more quickly and address the needs of those in our target market, especially retirees looking to purchase a home in Mexico.

 

Competition

 

The Mexican public real estate market is fragmented and highly competitive. We compete with numerous developers, builders and others for the acquisition of property and with local, regional and national developers, homebuilders and others with respect to the sale of residential properties. We also compete with builders and developers to obtain financing on commercially reasonable terms.

 

The Company is also subject to competition from other entities engaged in the business of resort development, sales and operation, including vacation interval ownership, condominiums, hotels and motels. Some of the world’s most recognized lodging, hospitality and entertainment companies have begun to develop and sell resort properties in the Baja California area. Many of these entities possess significantly greater financial, marketing and other resources than those of the Company. Management believes that recent regulatory developments in the electricity industry and overall growth in the Mexican economy will increase competition in the real estate investment industry.

 

  4  

 

Research & Development

 

The company is in the process of acquiring properties, as well as developing their marketing and sales strategy. The Company is also developing an interactive website and help center to answer questions from potential home buyers.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We currently have no patents, copyrights, trademarks and/or service marks, nor do we have any plans to file applications for such rights.

 

Government Regulation

 

The housing and land development industries are subject to increasing environmental, building, zoning and real estate sales regulations by various authorities. Such regulations affect home building by specifying, among other things, the type and quality of building materials that must be used, certain aspects of land use and building design. Some regulations affect development activities by directly affecting the viability and timing of projects.

 

We must obtain the approval of numerous governmental authorities that regulate such matters as land use and level of density, the installation of utility services, such as water and waste disposal, and the dedication of acreage for open space, parks, schools and other community purposes. If these authorities determine that existing utility services will not adequately support proposed development, building moratoria may be imposed. As a result, we use substantial resources to evaluate the impact of government restrictions imposed upon new residential development. Furthermore, as local circumstances or applicable laws change, we may be required to obtain additional approvals or modifications of approvals previously obtained or we may be forced to stop work. These increasing regulations may result in a significant increase in resources between our initial acquisition of land and the commencement and the completion of developments. In addition, the extent to which we participate in land development activities subjects us to greater exposure to regulatory risks.

 

Additionally, the Mexican real estate industry is subject to substantially different regulation than the U.S. real estate industry. The Mexican constitution of 1917 prohibited foreign ownership of residential real property within approximately 31 miles (approximately 50 km) of any coastline and 62 miles (approximately 100 km) of its natural borders. All of Baja California is included in this “restricted zone.” In 1971 (further expanded in 1989 and 1993) provisions were made for a mechanism that would allow foreigners to own property in the “restricted zone.” Within the “restricted zone,” a foreigner can purchase the beneficial interest in real property through a bank trust or “fideicomiso.” Thus, virtually all property in Mexico is available for purchase by foreigners, keeping in mind that the fideicomiso, or bank trust, must be used when acquiring property within the restricted zone.

 

In this bank trust, the buyer of the property is designated as the “fideicomisario” or the beneficiary of the trust. While legal title is held by the bank, (specifically the trustee of the trust or the “fiduciario,”) the trustee must administer the property in accordance with the instructions of the buyer (the beneficiary of the trust). The property is not an asset of the bank and the trustee is obligated to follow every lawful instruction given by the beneficiary to perform legal actions, i.e. rent it, make improvements, sell it, etc.

 

As long as the foreign buyer of the property adheres to laws and ordinances of Mexico and agrees not to invoke the protection of the government of his country, he may exercise the same rights as a Mexican national with regard to the use of his property.

 

Employees

 

As of the date of this filing, we had seven employees, three of whom are our executive officers. We may in the future rely on independent contractors to assist us in marketing and selling our products.

 

None of our employees are currently bound by agreements for any specific employment term or covenants not to compete. However, we may enter into employment agreements with these persons which will have appropriate non-competition provisions.

 

Recent Developments

 

COVID-19 Pandemic

 

In December 2019, an outbreak of a novel strain of coronavirus originated in Wuhan, China (“COVID-19”) and has since spread worldwide, including to the United States (the “U.S.”) and Mexico, posing public health risks that have reached pandemic proportions (the “COVID-19 Pandemic”). The outbreak of COVID-19 continues to grow both in the U.S., Mexico and globally and related government and private sector responsive actions may adversely affect our business operations. The recent outbreak of COVID-19 could affect our sales process with travel limitations imposed by the State of California and the U.S. for international border crossing. This limits sales prospects from visiting our properties in Baja California from our primary target market, Southern California. In recent days, this outbreak has also resulted in reduced customer traffic from surrounding areas within Baja California and the temporary reduction of sales office operating hours. These recent developments are expected to negatively impact sales and gross margin in the near term. It is impossible to predict the effect and ultimate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic as the situation is rapidly evolving. While it appears that the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States and Mexico is in the early stages, the recent downturn in financial market indices appear to have been primarily driven by uncertainties associated with the pandemic. These uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the potential adverse effect of the pandemic on the economy, construction and material supply partners, travel and transportation services, our employees and customers, customer sentiment in general and traffic to and within geographic areas containing our real estate developments. The pandemic could adversely affect our near-term and long-term revenues, earnings, liquidity and cash flows and may require significant actions in response including but not limited to employee furloughs, reduced store hours, expense reductions or discounting of the pricing of our products, all in an effort to mitigate such impacts. This situation is changing rapidly, and additional impacts may arise that we are not aware of currently.

 

  5  

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

An investment in our securities is highly speculative and subject to numerous and substantial risks. Readers are encouraged to review these risks carefully before making any investment decision.

 

In addition to the other information provided in this filing, you should carefully consider the following risk factors in evaluating our business before purchasing any of our common stock. All material risks are discussed in this section.

 

Risks Related to Our Company

 

There is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. If we do not continue as a going concern, investors will lose their entire investment.

 

Our financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. Our auditor’s report reflects that the ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent upon our ability to raise additional capital and, ultimately, the achievement of significant operating revenues. If we are unable to continue as a going concern, stockholders will lose their investment. We will be required to seek additional capital to fund future growth and expansion. No assurance can be given that such financing will be available or, if available, that it will be on commercially favorable terms. Moreover, favorable financing may be dilutive to investors.

 

The outbreak of the recent coronavirus, COVID-19, or an outbreak of another highly infectious or contagious disease, could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flow, and limit our ability to obtain additional financing.

 

The spread of a highly infectious or contagious disease, such as COVID-19, could cause severe disruptions in the U.S. economy, which could in turn disrupt the business, activities, and operations of our customers, as well as our business and operations. The coronavirus outbreak has caused significant disruption in business activity and the financial markets both globally and in the United States. In March 2020, the Federal Reserve lowered the target range for the federal funds rate to a range from 0 to 0.25 percent, citing concerns about the impact of COVID-19 on markets and stress in the energy sector. Many states and localities have imposed limitations on commercial activity and public gatherings and events, as well as moratoria on evictions. Concern about the spread of COVID-19 has caused and is likely to continue to cause quarantines, business shutdowns, reduction in business activity and financial transactions, labor shortages, supply chain interruptions, increased unemployment and commercial property vacancy rates, reduced ability and incentives for some property owners to make mortgage payments, and overall economic and financial market instability, all of which may result a decrease in our business, sell our products and services and cause our customers to be unable to make scheduled loan payments. Therefore, to the extent that economic activity, business conditions and conditions in the financial markets in which we operate remain poor or deteriorate further, our sales, delinquencies, foreclosures and credit losses may materially increase. Such conditions are likely to exacerbate many of the risks described elsewhere in this “—Risks Related to Our Business” section. Unfavorable economic conditions may also make it more difficult for us to close new sales and obtain additional financing. Furthermore, such conditions may continue to have a material adverse impact on our cash flows and the market value of our investments.

 

If COVID-19, or another highly infectious or contagious disease is not successfully contained, we could experience a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flow. Among the factors outside our control that are likely to affect the impact the COVID-19 pandemic will ultimately have on our business are:

 

the pandemic’s course and severity;
the direct and indirect results of the pandemic, such as recessionary economic trends, including with respect to employment, wages and benefits and commercial activity;
political, legal and regulatory actions and policies in response to the pandemic, including the effects of restrictions on commerce or other public activities, moratoria and restricted international travel;
the timing, magnitude and effect of public spending, directly or through subsidies, its direct and indirect effects on commercial activity and incentives of employers and individuals to resume or increase employment, wages and benefits and commercial activity;
the timing and availability of direct and indirect governmental support for various financial assets, including mortgage loans, and possible related distortions in market values and liquidity for such assets whose markets have or are assumed to have government support versus possibly similar assets that do not;
potential longer-term effects of increased government spending on the interest rate environment and borrowing costs for non-governmental parties;
the ability of our employees and our third-party vendors to work effectively during the course of the pandemic; and
potential longer-term shifts toward telecommuting and telecommerce;

 

We are continuing to monitor the spread of COVID-19 and related risks, although the rapid development and fluidity of situation precludes any prediction as to its ultimate impact on us. However, if the spread continues, such impact could grow and our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be materially adversely affected.

 

  6  

 

Our Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws limit the liability of, and provide indemnification for, our officers and directors.

 

Our Certificate of Incorporation generally limits our officers’ and directors’ personal liability to the Company and its stockholders for breach of fiduciary duty as an officer or director except for breach of the duty of loyalty or acts or omissions not made in good faith or which involve intentional misconduct or a knowing violation of law. Our Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws, provide indemnification for our officers and directors to the fullest extent authorized by the Wyoming Business Corporation Act against all expense, liability, and loss, including attorney’s fees, judgments, fines excise taxes or penalties and amounts to be paid in settlement reasonably incurred or suffered by an officer or director in connection with any action, suit or proceeding, whether civil or criminal, administrative or investigative (hereinafter a “Proceeding”) to which the officer or director is made a party or is threatened to be made a party, or in which the officer or director is involved by reason of the fact that he is or was an officer or director of the Company, or is or was serving at the request of the Company whether the basis of the Proceeding is an alleged action in an official capacity as an officer or director, or in any other capacity while serving as an officer or director. Thus, the Company may be prevented from recovering damages for certain alleged errors or omissions by the officers and directors for liabilities incurred in connection with their good faith acts for the Company. Such an indemnification payment might deplete the Company’s assets. Stockholders who have questions regarding the fiduciary obligations of the officers and directors of the Company should consult with independent legal counsel. It is the position of the Securities and Exchange Commission that exculpation from and indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the rules and regulations there under, is against public policy and therefore unenforceable.

 

We have a potential conflict of interest with a company controlled by one of our officers and directors.

 

We have and will continue to enter into agreements with firms owned or controlled by our officers and directors. A conflict of interest will arise should a dispute occur with the respect of our rights and obligations pursuant to the agreements and those firms.

 

We are dependent on the sale of our securities or debt to fund our operations.

 

We are dependent on the sale of our securities or debt to fund our operations and will remain so until we generate sufficient revenues to pay for our operating costs. Our officers and directors have made no written commitments with respect to providing a source of liquidity in the form of cash advances, loans and/or financial guarantees. There can be no guarantee that we will be able to successfully sell our equity or debt securities.

 

The Company has accumulated deficit of $6,974,958 as of December 31, 2019

 

The Company has never operated at a profit and its loss for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $1,596,086. This loss and deficit may impact the future of the Company in many ways including, but not limited to, making it more difficult to borrow money, sell stock or to maintain a good trading price for our common stock.

 

The Company may not be able to attain profitability without additional funding, which may be unavailable.

 

The Company has limited capital resources. Unless the Company begins to generate sufficient revenues to finance operations as a going concern, the Company may experience liquidity and solvency problems. Such liquidity and solvency problems may force the Company to cease operations if additional financing is not available. No known alternative resources of funds are available in the event we do not generate sufficient funds from operations.

 

  7  

 

Our lack of operations makes evaluating our business difficult.

 

We have almost six years of operational history. Accordingly, our operations are subject to the risks inherent in the establishment of a new business enterprise, including access to capital, successful implementation of our business plan and limited revenue from operations. We cannot assure you that our intended activities or plan of operation will be successful or result in revenue or profit to us and any failure to implement our business plan may have a material adverse effect on the business of the Company.

 

To be profitable, we must:

 

  develop and identify new prospective purchasers of our real estate
  compete with larger, more established competitors in the real estate development industry;
  maintain and enhance our brand recognition; and
  adapt to meet changes in our markets and competitive developments.

 

We may not be successful in accomplishing these objectives. Further, our lack of operating history makes it difficult to evaluate our business and prospects. Our prospects must be considered in light of the risks, uncertainties, expenses and difficulties frequently encountered by companies in their early stages of development, particularly companies in highly competitive industries. The historical information in this report may not be indicative of our future financial condition and future performance. For example, we expect that our future annual growth rate in revenues will be moderate and likely be less than the growth rates experienced in the early part of our history.

 

Risks Related to Our Business

 

There is no guarantee that the Company will be able to complete development of its proposed properties and profitably sell any units.

 

The Company has acquired properties and thereafter, the Company intends to construct and develop proposed resort properties as well as other residential and commercial property. There can be no assurance that the Company will complete the expected development plans or undertake to develop other resorts or complete such development if undertaken. Risks associated with the Company’s development and construction activities may include the risks that: (i) acquisition and/or development opportunities may be abandoned; (ii) construction costs of a property may exceed original estimates, possibly making the resort uneconomical or unprofitable; and (iii) construction may not be completed on schedule, resulting in decreased revenues and increased carrying cost such as taxes and interest expense. In addition, the Company’s construction activities will typically be performed by third-party contractors, the timing, quality and completion of which the Company will be unable to control.

 

Investors will have no discretion in management’s real estate investment decisions.

 

Our management will have complete discretion in making investments on our behalf in a range of real estate, which may include all types of properties. Consequently, prospective investors will not be able to evaluate for themselves the merits of the specific properties that may be acquired in the future and may not like the properties acquired. You will not be entitled to a return of your investment if you do not approve the properties purchased. Our investment decisions are not made through reliance on sophisticated mathematical models or arbitrage programs. Instead, investors are relying on the judgment of our management alone to locate suitable properties that meet our investment criteria.

 

Our proposed ownership of real estate may result in losses if demand for property declines.

 

If and when we acquire real estate, we will be subject to risks incident to the ownership of real estate, including: changes in general economic or local conditions, such as a decrease in demand for residential, commercial and industrial space due to a decrease in population or employment or changes in technology or adverse downturns in the general economy; changes to preferences that reduce the attractiveness of our properties to end users; fluctuation in mortgage rates, building ownership or operating expenses; rises and falls in undeveloped land values; costs of infrastructure, construction or other development costs; changes in supply or demand of competing properties in an area; changes in interest rates, zoning and other governmental regulations and availability of permanent mortgage funds that may render the sale of a property difficult or unattractive; increases in the cost of adequate maintenance, insurance and other operating costs, including real estate taxes, associated with one or more properties, which may occur even when a property is not generating revenue; inflation; and changes in tax laws and rates. A negative change in any of these risks could reduce the demand for any properties we may acquire and a reduction in demand could result in a loss to us in the operation of or upon the sale of any such properties we may acquire.

 

  8  

 

Property improvement costs are difficult to estimate and if costs exceed our budget, we may lose money on the development and sale of a property.

 

Acquisition of any properties for improvement, repositioning and sale entails risks such as those contemplated by us that include the following, any of which could adversely affect our financial performance and the value of your investment: Our estimate of the costs of improving or repositioning an acquired property may prove to be too low, and, as a result, the property may fail to meet our estimates of the profitability of the property, either temporarily or for a longer time. Our pre-acquisition evaluation of each new investment may not detect certain requirements, limitations, defects or necessary improvements until after the property is acquired, which could significantly increase our total costs.

 

Our operating results may suffer because of potential development and construction delays and resultant increased costs and risks which could reduce our revenues or lead to the loss of your investment.

 

We may develop properties, including unimproved real properties, upon which we will construct improvements. We may be subject to uncertainties associated with re-zoning for development, environmental concerns of governmental entities and/or community groups, and our builders’ ability to build in conformity with plans, specifications, budgeted costs and timetables. A builder’s performance may also be affected or delayed by conditions beyond the builder’s control. Delays in completing construction could also give tenants the right to terminate preconstruction leases. We may incur additional risks when we make periodic progress payments or other advances to builders before they complete construction. These and other factors can result in increased costs of a project or loss of our investment.

 

Our real estate development strategies may not be successful which could reduce our revenues or lead to the loss of your investment.

 

We may in the future engage in development activities to the extent attractive development projects become available. To the extent that we engage in development activities, we will be subject to risks associated with those activities that could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and ability to pay distributions on, and the market price of, our common stock, including, but not limited to:

 

  development projects in which we have invested may be abandoned and the related investment will be impaired;
  we may not be able to obtain, or may experience delays in obtaining, all necessary zoning, land-use, building, occupancy and other governmental permits and authorizations;
  we may not be able to obtain land on which to develop;
  we may not be able to obtain financing for development projects, or obtain financing on favorable terms;
  construction costs of a project may exceed the original estimates or construction may not be concluded on schedule, making the project less profitable than originally estimated or not profitable at all (including the possibility of contract default, the effects of local weather conditions, the possibility of local or national strikes and the possibility of shortages in materials, building supplies or energy and fuel for equipment);
  upon completion of construction, we may not be able to obtain, or obtain on advantageous terms, permanent financing for activities that we financed through construction loans; and
  we may not achieve sufficient occupancy levels and/or obtain sufficient rents to ensure the profitability of a completed project.

 

Moreover, substantial development activities, regardless of their ultimate success, typically require a significant amount of management’s time and attention, diverting their attention from our other operations.

 

The real estate market is cyclical, and a downturn of the market could increase the risk of loss of your investment.

 

Investment in real estate involves a high degree of business and financial risk, which can result in substantial losses and accordingly should be considered speculative. The market for property in Mexico and the United States tends to be cyclical, with periods in which the prices of properties rise and fall. Prices have fallen in the past and have done so for a significant period of time. Any downturn in the real estate market in the U.S. or Mexico may have a negative effect on our operations and reduce any return generated upon the sale of our property.

 

Many real estate costs are fixed and must be paid even if the property is not generating revenue which could increase your risk of loss of your investment.

 

Our financial results depend primarily on being able to add value and then sell properties to others on favorable terms. Many costs associated with real estate investment, such as debt service, real estate taxes and maintenance costs, generally are not reduced even when a property is not fully improved or used. Thus, even a small increase in the time to which a real estate property can be sold can result in a significant increase in the carry costs of the property. New properties that we may acquire may not produce any significant revenue immediately, and the cash flow from existing operations may be insufficient to pay the operating expenses and debt service associated with that property until the property is sold.

 

  9  

 

Because there is no liquid market for our properties, we may be unable to sell a property when it planned to, which could increase your risk of loss of your investment.

 

Liquidity relates to our ability to sell a property in a timely manner at a price that reflects the fair value of that property. The illiquidity of properties may adversely affect our ability to dispose of such properties in a timely manner and at a fair price at times when we deem it necessary or advantageous. The timing and likelihood of liquidation events is uncertain and unpredictable and affected by general economic and property-specific conditions. There may not be a market, or the market may be very limited, for the real estate that we will try to sell, even though we will make appropriate efforts to cover the available market. Investments in real properties are generally not liquid. We may not be able to dispose of future properties within its anticipated time schedule and the sales of such properties may not be made at the prices projected by us.

 

We are subject to zoning and environmental controls that may restrict the use of our property.

 

Governmental zoning and land use regulations may exist or be promulgated that could have the effect of restricting or curtailing certain uses of our real estate. Such regulations could adversely affect the value of any of our properties affected by such regulations. In recent years real estate values have also sometimes been adversely affected by the presence of hazardous substances or toxic waste on, under or in the environs of the property. A substance (or the amount of a substance) may be considered safe at the time the property is purchased but later classified by law as hazardous. Owners of properties have been liable for substantial expenses to remedy chemical contamination of soil and groundwater at their properties even if the contamination predated their ownership. Although we intend to exercise reasonable efforts to assure that no properties are acquired that give rise to such liabilities, chemical contamination cannot always be detected through readily available means, and the possibility of such liability cannot be excluded.

 

Under various foreign, federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, we may be required to investigate and clean up certain hazardous or toxic substances released on or in properties we own or operate, and also may be required to pay other costs relating to hazardous or toxic substances. This liability may be imposed without regard to whether we knew about the release of these types of substances or were responsible for their release. The presence of contamination or the failure to remediate property contaminations at any of our properties may adversely affect our ability to sell or lease the properties or to borrow using the properties as collateral. The costs or liabilities could exceed the value of the affected real estate. We have not been notified by any governmental authority, however, of any non-compliance, liability or other claim in connection with any of our properties, and we are not aware of any other environmental condition with respect to any of our properties that management believes would have a material adverse effect on our business, assets or results of operations taken as a whole.

 

Although we will attempt to determine the environmental condition of each property as part of our due diligence, we cannot be certain that this investigation will reveal all conditions that may impose an obligation on us to mitigate the environmental condition. If we were subject to environmental liability, which could be imposed based on our ownership of its property; such liability could adversely affect the value of your investment.

 

We may be subject to partially uninsured losses that may require substantial payments which could reduce the value of your investment.

 

We currently carry a $2,000,000 general liability policy for the Company. On Emerald Grove we have a comprehensive homeowner’s policy which also extends to the 3 vacant parcels. Any ILA, vacant lot buyers or homebuyers will be encouraged to carry their own individual insurance policies. In addition, if losses occur they may exceed insurance policy limits, and policies may contain exclusions with respect to various types of losses or other matters. Consequently, all or a portion of our properties may not be covered by disaster insurance and insurance may not cover all losses which could reduce the value of your investment.

 

  10  

 

We cannot control certain factors affecting the performance and value of a property, which may cause the value of that property and your investment to decline.

 

The economic performance and value of our real estate assets will be subject to the risks described below that are normally associated with changes in national, regional and local political, economic and market conditions. These factors may adversely affect the ability of our customers to buy our real estate. Other local economic conditions that may affect the performance and value of the properties include the local economy of a given real estate project; competition for buyers, including competition based on attractiveness and location of the property; and the quality of amenities a project has to offer. In addition, other factors may affect the performance and value of a property adversely, including changes in laws and governmental regulations (including those governing usage, zoning and taxes), changes in interest rates (including the risk that increased interest rates may result in a decline in the liquidity of our properties), declines in housing or commercial property purchases and the availability of financing. Adverse changes in any of these factors, each of which is beyond our control, could reduce the cash flow that we receive from our properties, and adversely affect the value of your investment.

 

If we choose to carry debt, inability to make secured debt payments could result in loss of mortgaged property and reduce the value of your investment.

 

The Company carries secured and unsecured promissory notes. Debt financing carries many risks, including: refinancing difficulties, loss of mortgaged properties, reduced ability to obtain new financing and increases in interest. We may choose to use debt financing in connection with future properties. If we cannot meet our secured debt obligations, the lender could take the collateral and we would lose both the secured property and the income, if any, it produces. Foreclosure on mortgaged properties or an inability to refinance existing indebtedness would likely have a negative impact on our financial condition and results of operations. We could have to pay substantial legal costs in connection with foreclosure of a property, and thus be subject to a deficiency judgment if the foreclosure sale amount is insufficient to satisfy the mortgage.

 

Rising interest rates could adversely affect our interest expense and cash flow and reduce the value of your investment.

 

We may borrow money at variable interest rates in the future to finance operations. Increases in interest rates would increase our interest expense on our variable rate debt, which would adversely affect cash flow and our ability to service our debt and make distributions to us.

 

Our lack of an established brand name and relative lack of resources could negatively impact our ability to effectively compete in the real estate market, which could reduce the value of your investment.

 

We do not have an established brand name or reputation in the real estate business. We also have a relative lack of resources to conduct our business operations. Thus, we may have difficulty effectively competing with companies that have greater name recognition and resources than we do. Presently, we have no patents, copyrights, trademarks and/or service marks that would protect our brand name or our proprietary information, nor do we have any current plans to file applications for such rights. Our inability to promote and/or protect our brand name may have an adverse effect on our ability to compete effectively in the real estate market.

 

We may make changes to our business, investment, leverage and financing strategies without stockholder consent, which could reduce the value of your investment.

 

Our discussions with various individuals concerning various properties or projects has included general discussions of acquiring properties directly either ourselves or in a joint venture with others or of developing properties either ourselves or in a joint venture with others. As of the date of this filing, all such discussions have been general, and we have no specific plans as to whether we will acquire or develop ourselves or jointly any specific properties or projects. There is no limitation in the amount of funds we may invest in either property acquisition or property development. There is no limitation on or percentage allocation of funds or assets between property acquisition and property development, or between 100% ownership and joint venture ownership. Further, as the market evolves, we may change our business, investment and financing strategies without a vote of, or notice to, our stockholders, which could result in our making investments and engaging in business activities that are different from, and possibly riskier than, the investments and businesses described in this filing. In particular, a change in our investment strategy, including the manner in which we allocate our resources across our portfolio or the types of assets in which we seek to invest, may increase our exposure to interest rate risk, default risk and real estate market fluctuations. In addition, we may in the future use leverage at times and in amounts deemed prudent by our management in its discretion, and such decision would not be subject to stockholder approval. Changes to our strategies with regards to the foregoing could materially and adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations.

 

We depend heavily on key personnel, and turnover of key senior management could harm our business.

 

Our future business and results of operations depend in significant part upon the continued contributions of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer. If we lose their services or if they fail to perform in their current position, or if we are not able to attract and retain skilled employees as needed, our business could suffer. Significant turnover in our senior management could significantly deplete our institutional knowledge held by our existing senior management team. We depend on the skills and abilities of these key officers in managing the product acquisition, marketing and sales aspects of our business, any part of which could be harmed by turnover in the future.

 

  11  

 

Our future results and reputation may be affected by litigation or other liability claims.

 

We have procured a $2,000,000 general liability insurance policy for our business. In addition, we also have in place D&O insurance. To the extent that we suffer a loss of a type which would exceed our limit, we could incur significant expenses in defending any action against us and in paying any claims that result from a settlement or judgment against us. Adverse publicity could result in a loss of consumer confidence in our business or our securities.

 

We may be subject to regulatory inquiries, claims, suits prosecutions which may impact our profitability.

 

Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply with applicable laws and regulations may subject us to regulatory inquiries, claims, suits and prosecutions. We can give no assurance that we will prevail in such regulatory inquiries, claims, suits and prosecutions on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Responding to, defending and/or settling regulatory inquiries, claims, suits and prosecutions may be time-consuming and divert management and financial resources or have other adverse effects on our business. A negative outcome in any of these proceedings may result in changes to or discontinuance of some of our services, potential liabilities or additional costs that could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and future prospects.

 

We are vulnerable to concentration risks because we intend to focus on the residential rather than commercial market.

 

We intend to focus on residential rather than commercial properties. Economic shifts affect residential and commercial property markets, and thus our business, in different ways. A developer with diversified projects in both sectors may be better able to survive a downturn in the residential market if the commercial market remains strong. Our focus on the residential sector can make us more vulnerable than a diversified developer.

 

Risks Related to Our Mexican Operations

 

General economic conditions in Mexico may have an adverse effect on our operations and reduce our revenues.

 

General economic conditions in Mexico have an impact on our business and financial results. The global economy in general and in Mexico remains uncertain. Weak economic conditions could result in lower demand for our properties, resulting in lower sales, earnings and cash flows.

 

The value of our securities may be affected by the foreign exchange rate between U.S. dollars and the currency of Mexico.

 

The value of our common stock may be affected by the foreign exchange rate between U.S. dollars and the currency of Mexico, and between those currencies and other currencies in which our revenues and assets may be denominated. For example, to the extent that we need to convert U.S. dollars into the currency of Mexico for our operational needs, should the currency of Mexico appreciate against the U.S. dollar at that time, our financial position, the business of the Company, and the price of our common stock may be harmed. Conversely, if we decide to convert the currency of Mexico into U.S. dollars for the purpose of declaring dividends on our common stock or for other business purposes and the U.S. dollar appreciates against the currency of Mexico, the U.S. dollar equivalent of our earnings from our subsidiaries in Mexico would be reduced.

 

We are subject to anti-corruption laws in the jurisdictions in which we operate, including the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the “FCPA”), as well as trade compliance and economic sanctions laws and regulations. Our failure to comply with these laws and regulations could subject us to civil and criminal penalties, harm our reputation and materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Doing business in Mexico requires us to comply with the laws and regulations of numerous jurisdictions. These laws and regulations place restrictions on our operations and business practices. In particular, we are subject to the FCPA, which generally prohibits companies and their intermediaries from providing anything of value to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business or securing any improper business advantage, along with various other anti-corruption laws. As a result of doing business in Mexico, we are exposed to a heightened risk of violating anti-corruption laws. Although we have implemented policies and procedures designed to ensure that we, our employees and other intermediaries comply with the FCPA and other anti-corruption laws to which we are subject, there is no assurance that such policies or procedures will work effectively all of the time or protect us against liability under the FCPA or other laws for actions taken by our employees and other intermediaries with respect to our business or any businesses that we may acquire. Any continued international expansion, and any development of new partnerships and joint venture relationships worldwide, increase the risk of FCPA violations in the future.

 

Violations of anti-corruption laws, export control laws and regulations, and economic sanctions laws and regulations are punishable by civil penalties, including fines, as well as criminal fines and imprisonment. If we fail to comply with the FCPA or other laws governing the conduct of international operations, we may be subject to criminal and civil penalties and other remedial measures, which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and liquidity. Any investigation of any potential violations of the FCPA or other anti-corruption laws, export control laws and regulations, and economic sanctions laws and regulations by the United States or foreign authorities could also materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and liquidity, regardless of the outcome of the investigation.

 

Our operations may be affected by social instability in Mexico.

 

Because we have Mexican operations, we are subject to social instability risks which could materially adversely affect our business and our results of operations. Specifically, our business is exposed to the risk of crime that is currently taking place in certain areas in Tijuana. Recent increases in kidnapping and violent drug related criminal activity in Mexico, and in particular Mexican States bordering the United States, may adversely affect our ability to carry on business safely.

 

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

 

  12  

 

We will be subject to penny stock regulations and restrictions and you may have difficulty selling shares of our common stock.

 

The SEC has adopted regulations which generally define so-called “penny stocks” to be an equity security that has a market price less than $5.00 per share or an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exemptions. We are a “penny stock”, and we are subject to Rule 15g-9 under the Exchange Act, or the “Penny Stock Rule”. This rule imposes additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers that sell such securities to persons other than established customers. For transactions covered by Rule 15g-9, a broker-dealer must make a special suitability determination for the purchaser and have received the purchaser’s written consent to the transaction prior to sale. As a result, this rule may affect the ability of broker-dealers to sell our securities and may affect the ability of purchasers to sell any of our securities in the secondary market.

 

For any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, the rules require delivery, prior to any transaction in a penny stock, of a disclosure schedule prepared by the SEC relating to the penny stock market. Disclosure is also required to be made about sales commissions payable to both the broker-dealer and the registered representative and current quotations for the securities. Finally, monthly statements are required to be sent disclosing recent price information for the penny stock held in the account and information on the limited market in penny stock.

 

We may qualify for an exemption from the Penny Stock Rule. In any event, even if our common stock were exempt from the Penny Stock Rule, we would remain subject to Section 15(b)(6) of the Exchange Act, which gives the SEC the authority to restrict any person from participating in a distribution of penny stock, if the SEC finds that such a restriction would be in the public interest.

 

Because we do not have an audit or compensation committee, shareholders will have to rely on the entire board of directors, none of which are independent, to perform these functions.

 

We do not have an audit or compensation committee comprised of independent directors. These functions are performed by the board of directors as a whole. No members of the board of directors are independent directors. Thus, there is a potential conflict in that board members who are also part of management will participate in discussions concerning management compensation and audit issues that may affect management decisions.

 

Our Directors owns a significant percentage of our outstanding voting securities which could reduce the ability of minority shareholders to effect certain corporate actions.

 

Our Chief Executive Officer and Director Roberto Valdes, and our Chief Financial Officer and Director Jason Sunstein, together own 7,750,000 shares of common stock, or approximately 38% of our outstanding voting securities. As a result, currently, and after the filing, they will possess a significant influence and can elect a majority of our board of directors and authorize or prevent proposed significant corporate transactions. Their ownership and control may also have the effect of delaying or preventing a future change in control, impeding a merger, consolidation, takeover or other business combination or discourage a potential acquirer from making a tender offer.

 

Because our Directors hold a significant amount of our shares of common stock, it may not be possible to have adequate internal controls.

 

Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“Section 404”) requires our management to report on the operating effectiveness of the Company’s Internal Controls over financial reporting. We must establish an ongoing program to perform the system and process evaluation and testing necessary to comply with these requirements. However, because our Directors, Roberto Valdes and Jason Sunstein, control approximately 38% of our outstanding voting securities, and will continue to own a significant percentage of our voting securities, it may not be possible to have adequate internal controls. We cannot predict what affect this will have on our stock price.

 

We may, in the future, issue additional shares of common stock, which would reduce investors’ percent of ownership and may dilute our share value.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation authorize the issuance of 75,000,000 shares of common stock. As of the date of this report we had 21,384,289 shares of common stock outstanding. Accordingly, we may issue approximately 53,615,711 additional shares of common stock subject to limitation on reserve amounts for other securities outstanding. The future issuance of common stock may result in substantial dilution in the percentage of our common stock held by our then existing shareholders. We may value any common stock issued in the future on an arbitrary basis. The issuance of common stock for future services or acquisitions or other corporate actions may have the effect of diluting the value of the shares held by our investors and might have an adverse effect on any trading market for our common stock.

 

  13  

 

We are subject to compliance with securities law, which exposes us to potential liabilities, including potential rescission rights.

 

We may offer to sell our common stock to investors pursuant to certain exemptions from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as well as those of various state securities laws. The basis for relying on such exemptions is factual; that is, the applicability of such exemptions depends upon our conduct and that of those persons contacting prospective investors and making the offering. We may not seek any legal opinion to the effect that any such offering would be exempt from registration under any federal or state law. Instead, we may elect to relay upon the operative facts as the basis for such exemption, including information provided by investor themselves.

 

If any such offering did not qualify for such exemption, an investor would have the right to rescind its purchase of the securities if it so desired. It is possible that if an investor should seek rescission, such investor would succeed. A similar situation prevails under state law in those states where the securities may be offered without registration in reliance on the partial preemption from the registration or qualification provisions of such state statutes under the National Securities Markets Improvement Act of 1996. If investors were successful in seeking rescission, we would face severe financial demands that could adversely affect our business and operations. Additionally, if we did not in fact qualify for the exemptions upon which we relied, we may become subject to significant fines and penalties imposed by the SEC and state securities agencies.

 

Because we do not intend to pay any cash dividends on our common stock, our stockholders will not be able to receive a return on their shares unless they sell them.

 

We intend to retain any future earnings to finance the development and expansion of our business. We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. Unless we pay dividends, our stockholders will not be able to receive a return on their shares unless they sell them. There is no assurance that stockholders will be able to sell shares when desired.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

 

None.

 

Item 2. Properties.

 

Our corporate headquarters are located in leased office facilities at 350 10th Ave., Suite 1000, San Diego, CA 92101. Because of the nature of our real estate development operations, significant amounts of property are held as inventory in the ordinary course. Such properties are not included in response to this Item.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

 

The Company presently is not a party to, nor is management aware of, any pending, legal proceedings.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

None.

 

  14  

 

PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

Market Information

 

On March 5, 2019, the Company received its trading symbol from FINRA “ILAL”. On April 4, 2019, the Company was approved to have its common stock traded on the OTCQB. On April 12, 2019, the Company became eligible for electronic clearing and settlement through the Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) in the United States.

 

As of April 7, 2020, there were 148 holders of record of our common stock. As of such date, 21,434,289 shares of our common stock were issued and outstanding.

 

Market for Common Equity

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTC Bulletin Board (“OTCQB”) under the symbol “ILAL”. The following table sets forth the high and low bid prices for our common stock for the two most recently completed fiscal years. Such prices are based on inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, markdown or commission, and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

Fiscal 2019   Low     High  
First Quarter   $ 0     $ 0  
Second Quarter   $ 0.90     $ 5.00  
Third Quarter   $ 0.30     $ 1.10  
Fourth Quarter   $ 0.50     $ 1.30  

 

Fiscal 2020   Low     High  
First Quarter through April 7, 2020   $ 0.60     $ 1.30  

 

Repurchases of Equity Securities

 

None.

 

Penny Stock Considerations

 

Please see our Risk Factor related to Penny Stock

 

Transfer Agent

 

Globex Transfer, LLC, located at 780 Deltona Blvd., Ste. 202, Deltona FL 32725 is the registrar and transfer agent for our common stock.

 

  15  

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

See Note 9 to the financial statements for disclosure of the issuance of unregistered securities for the year ended December 31, 2019

 

On March 12, 2020, the Company issued 20,000 shares of common stock in a warrant exercise to a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $10,000. The total cash proceeds of $10,000 was allocated based upon the cash received. As the exercise occurred within the term of the warrant agreement no gain or loss was recognized.

 

Between January 21, 2020 and March 2, 2020, the Company issued 137,615 shares of common stock in an option exercise to a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $68,807.50. The total cash proceeds of $68,808 was allocated based upon the cash received. As the exercise occurred within the term of the option agreement no gain or loss was recognized.

 

On January 29, 2020, the Company entered into a contract for deed agreement with a third-party investor. Under the contract the Company agreed to the sale of 1 lot of vacant land and associated improvements located at the Valle Divino property in Ensenada, Mexico for a total purchase price of $25,000. This also includes a stock grant of 50,000 shares of common stock.

 

On March 26, 2020, the Company entered into a contract for deed agreement with a third-party investor. Under the contract the Company agreed to the sale of 1 lot of vacant land and associated improvements located at the Valle Divino property in Ensenada, Mexico for a total purchase price of $25,000. This also includes a stock grant of 50,000 shares of common stock.

 

All of the issuances by us of our unregistered securities were made in reliance upon Regulation D and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “1933 Act”). No commissions were paid relating to the issuance of the securities. The entities or individuals listed above that purchased the unregistered securities were known to us and our management, through pre-existing business relationships. They were provided access to all material information, all information necessary to verify such information, and our management in connection with the purchases. The purchaser of the unregistered securities acquired such securities for investment and not with a view toward distribution, acknowledging such intent to us. All certificates or agreements representing such securities that were issued contained restrictive legends, prohibiting further transfer of the certificates or agreements representing such securities, without such securities either being first registered or otherwise exempt from registration in any further resale or disposition.

 

Additional Information

 

We are a fully reporting issuer, subject to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Our Quarterly Reports, Annual Reports, and other filings can be obtained from the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC 20549, on official business days during the hours of 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. You may also obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the Commission at 1-800-SEC-0330. The Commission maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the Commission at http://www.sec.gov. Our internet website address is https://ila.company.

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data.

 

Not required under Regulation S-K for “smaller reporting companies.”

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation.

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements. Our actual results could differ materially from those set forth as a result of general economic conditions and changes in the assumptions used in making such forward-looking statements. The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read together with the audited financial statements and accompanying notes and the other financial information appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The analysis set forth below is provided pursuant to applicable Securities and Exchange Commission regulations and is not intended to serve as a basis for projections of future events. Refer also to “Risk Factors” and “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements” in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Overview of Our Company

 

International Land Alliance, Inc. was incorporated pursuant to the laws of the State of Wyoming on September 26, 2013. We are based in San Diego, California. We are a residential land development company with target properties located primarily in the Baja California Norte region of Mexico and southern California. Our principal activities are purchasing properties, obtaining zoning and other entitlements required to subdivide the properties into residential and commercial building lots, securing financing for the purchase of the lots, improving the properties’ infrastructure and amenities, and selling the lots to homebuyers, retirees, investors and commercial developers. We offer the option of financing (i.e. taking a promissory note from the buyer for all or part of the purchase price) with a guaranteed acceptance on any purchase for every customer.

 

Overview

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had:

 

  Continued our research and marketing efforts to identify potential home buyers in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Asia. Through the formation of a partnership with a similar development company in the Baja California Norte Region of Mexico, we have been able to leverage additional resources with the use of their established and proven marketing plan which can help us with sophisticated execution and the desired results for residential lot sales and development.
     
  Completed development of our interactive website for visitors to view condominium and villa options and allow customization;
     
  Assumed title of the Oasis Park Resort in San Felipe. As progress continues on the development of the Oasis Park Resort, we are expecting the transfer of title on the Villas del Enologo in Rancho Tecate, Valle Divino in Ensenada, Baja California and Costa Bajamar in Ensenada, Baja California in the near future as it continues to follow the necessary steps to complete this legal process.
     
  Continued our efforts to secure the proper financing and capital by exploring various options that will help achieve our goals of advanced development and additional investment opportunities.

 

  16  

 

Results of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Revenues

 

Our total revenue reported for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $463,799, compared with $0 for the year ended December 31, 2018. The change is a result of the sales of lots related to our Oasis Park Resort having assumed title of the property in June 2019.

 

Cost of Revenues

 

Our total cost of revenues for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $21,042 compared with $0 for the year ended December 31, 2018. The change is a result of the cost of associated with the sale of lots at Oasis Park Resort.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses increased to $1,825,369 for the year ended December 31, 2019 from to $593,747 for the year ended December 31, 2018. The detail by major category is reflected in the table below.

 

    Year Ended December 31  
    2019     2018  
             
Sales and marketing   $ 189,187     $ 69,821  
General and administrative     1,636,182       523,926  
                 
Total Operating Expenses   $ 1,825,369     $ 593,747  

 

Sales and marketing costs increased by $119,366 for the year ended December 31, 2019 primarily due to the increased operations of the Company.

 

General and administrative costs increased by $1,112,256 for the year ended December 31, 2019 primarily due to increased salaries, stock based consulting, and professional fees.

 

Net Loss

 

We finished the year ended December 31, 2019 with a net loss of $1,596,086, as compared to a loss of $681,407 for the year ended December 31, 2018, which is primarily the result of the increased professional, marketing, and consulting fees incurred during the 2019 and well as increased interest expense associated with the increase in financing during 2019.

 

The factors that will most significantly affect future operating results will be:

 

The acquisition of land with lots for sale;
The sale price of future lots, compared to the sale price of lots in other resorts in Mexico;
The cost to construct a home on the lots to be transferred, and the quality of construction;
The quality of our amenities; and
The global economy and the demand for vacation homes
The effects of COVID-19 on the US and Global economy
The negotiations to extend or refinance our debt in default

 

Other than the foregoing we do not know of any trends, events or uncertainties that have had, or are reasonably expected to have, a material impact on our revenues or expenses.

 

Capital Resources and Liquidity

 

Cash and cash equivalents were $171,526 at December 31, 2019. As shown in the accompanying financial statements, we recorded a loss of $1,596,086 and $681,407 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Our working capital deficit at December 31, 2019 was $813,222 and net cash flows used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 were $1,214,693. These factors and our limited ability to raise additional capital to accomplish our objectives, raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. We expect our expenses will continue to increase during the foreseeable future as a result of increased operations and the development of our current business operations. We anticipate generating continued revenues over the next twelve months as we continue to market the sale of lots held for sale, now having assumed title of our Oasis Park Resort property; however, we there can be no assurance that such revenue will be sufficient to cover our expenses. Consequently, we expect to be dependent on the proceeds from future debt or equity investments to sustain our operations and implement our business plan. If we are unable to raise sufficient capital, we will be required to delay or forego some portion of our business plan, which would have a material adverse effect on our anticipated results from operations and financial condition. There is no assurance that we will be able to obtain necessary amounts of capital or that our estimates of our capital requirements will prove to be accurate.

 

We presently do not have any significant credit available, bank financing or other external sources of liquidity. Due to our operating losses, our operations have not been a significant source of liquidity. We will need to acquire other profitable properties or obtain additional capital in order to expand operations and become profitable. In order to obtain capital, we may need to sell additional shares of our common stock or borrow funds from private lenders. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in obtaining additional funding.

 

  17  

 

To the extent that we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, the issuance of such securities may result in dilution to existing stockholders. If additional funds are raised through the issuance of debt securities, these securities may have rights, preferences and privileges senior to holders of common stock and the terms of such debt could impose restrictions on our operations. Regardless of whether our cash assets prove to be inadequate to meet our operational needs, we may seek to continue to compensate providers of services by issuance of stock in lieu of cash, which may also result in dilution to existing shareholders. Even if we are able to raise the funds required, it is possible that we could incur unexpected costs and expenses, fail to collect significant amounts owed to us, or experience unexpected cash requirements that would force us to seek alternative financing.

 

No assurance can be given that sources of financing will be available to us and/or that demand for our equity/debt instruments will be sufficient to meet our capital needs, or that financing will be available on terms favorable to us. If funding is insufficient at any time in the future, we may not be able to take advantage of business opportunities or respond to competitive pressures or may be required to reduce the scope of our planned development, any of which could have a negative impact on our business and operating results. In addition, insufficient funding may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, which could require us to:

 

  Curtail our operations significantly, or
  Seek arrangements with strategic partners or other parties that may require us to relinquish significant rights to our development of resorts and correlated services, or
  Explore other strategic alternatives including a merger or sale of our Company.

 

Operating Activities

 

Net cash flows used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $1,214,693 which resulted primarily due to the loss of $1,596,086 offset by debt discount amortization expense of $110,983, depreciation and amortization of $36,707, and stock based compensation of $482,584. Net cash flows used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2018 was $734,603 which resulted primarily due to the loss of $681,407 offset by debt discount amortization expense of $29,232, increase in accounts payable of $11,974 and decrease in accrued expenses of $94,402.

 

Investing Activities

 

Net cash flows used in investing activities was $793,195 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The funds were used for the acquisition of an investment property. There were no investment cash activities for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Financing Activities

 

Net cash flows provided by financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $2,179,443 primarily from cash proceeds from sale of common stocks and warrants of $733,675, and cash proceeds from sale of common stock, warrants and plots of land promised to investors, net of expenses of $136,316, cash proceeds from warrant exercise of $130,000 and cash proceeds from note payable of $2,528,094 and cash proceeds from convertible note payable of $75,000. Net cash flows provided by financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2018 was $721,896 primarily from cash proceeds from sale of common stocks and warrants of $81,000, and cash proceeds from sale of common stock, warrants and plots of land promised to investors, net of expenses of $550,920, cash proceeds from warrant exercise of $11,200 and cash proceeds from note payable of $124,654 and cash proceeds from convertible note payable of $50,000.

 

As a result of these activities, we experienced a decrease in cash and cash equivalents of $171,555 and $12,707 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Our ability to continue as a going concern is still dependent on our success in obtaining additional financing from investors or from sale of our common shares.

 

  18  

 

Critical Accounting Polices

 

In December 2001, the SEC requested that all registrants list their most “critical accounting polices” in the Management Discussion and Analysis. The SEC indicated that a “critical accounting policy” is one which is both important to the portrayal of a company’s financial condition and results, and requires management’s most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain. Our critical accounting policies are disclosed in Note 2 of our audited consolidated financial statements included in the Form 10-K filed with the SEC.

 

Off-balance Sheet Arrangements

 

Since our inception through December 31, 2019, we have not engaged in any off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

The recent accounting pronouncements that are material to our financial statements are disclosed in Note 1 of our consolidated audited financial statements included in the Form 10-K filed with the SEC and in Note 1 of our unaudited consolidated financial statements included herein.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.

 

Not required under Regulation S-K for “smaller reporting companies.”

 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

Our audited consolidated financial statements are set forth in this Annual Report beginning on page F-1.

 

  19  

 

INTERNATIONAL LAND ALLIANCE, INC. INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firms F-2
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-4
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-5
   
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit) for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-6
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Year Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-7
   
Notes to Financial Statements F-8 to F-25

 

  F- 1  

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders

International Land Alliance, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Consolidated Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of International Land Alliance, Inc. (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2019, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ equity (deficit), and cash flows for the year then ended, and the related notes (collectively, the “consolidated financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the financial statements, the Company has suffered recurring losses from operations, has limited financial resources to repay its debt obligations, will require substantial new capital to execute its business plans, and the real estate industry in which it operates faces significant uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans regarding those matters are also described in Note 1. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of audit, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audit included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audit also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

Emphasis of a Matter – Significant Related Party Transactions.

 

As described in Note 5, the Company engages in substantial real estate activities between the Company and other entities controlled by an officer of the Company. The Company has also borrowed funds from an entity controlled by other officers of the Company.

 

/s/ HASKELL & WHITE LLP

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2019.

 

Irvine, California

April 14, 2020

 

  F- 2  

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and

 

Stockholders of International Land Alliance, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of International Land Alliance, Inc. (the Company) as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ equity (deficit), and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2018, and the related notes and schedules (collectively referred to as the financial statements). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2018, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the financial statements, the Company suffered losses from operations which raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Managements plans regarding those matters are also described in Note 1. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

/s/ M&K CPAS, PLLC

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2017.

 

Houston, TX

 

April 24, 2019

 

  F- 3  

 

INTERNATIONAL LAND ALLIANCE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

    December 31, 2019     December 31, 2018  
ASSETS                
Current assets                
Cash   $ 172,526     $ 971  
Total current assets     172,526       971  
                 
Land     271,225       -  
Land Held for Sale     647,399       -  
Buildings, net     880,789       -  
Construction in Process     250,000       -  
Other non-current assets     10,540       -  
                 
Total assets   $ 2,232,479     $ 971  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)                
Current liabilities                
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   $ 100,159     $ 457,912  
Contract liability     50,000       -  
Deposits     82,580       -  
Promissory notes, net     753,009       32,933  
Convertible notes, net of unamortized discounts     -       7,000  
Total current liabilities     985,748       497,845  
                 
Promissory Notes, net of current portion     1,076,937       68,075  
                 
Total liabilities     2,062,685       565,920  
                 
Commitments and Contingencies (Notes 6-8)                
                 
Temporary Equity     293,500       -  
                 
Stockholders’ equity (deficit)                
                 
Preferred stock; $0.001 par value; 2,000,000 shares authorized;                
28,000 Series A shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively     28       28  
1,000 and 0 Series B shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively     1       -  
Common stock; $0.001 par value; 75,000,000 shares authorized;                
20,614,289 and 15,927,901 shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively     20,615       15,928  
Additional paid-in capital     6,702,750       4,762,547  
Stock payable     127,858       35,420  
Accumulated deficit     (6,974,958 )     (5,378,872 )
Total stockholders’ equity (deficit)     (123,706 )     (564,949 )
                 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity (deficit)   $ 2,232,479     $ 971  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

  F- 4  

 

INTERNATIONAL LAND ALLIANCE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

    For the Years Ended  
    December 31, 2019     December 31, 2018  
             
Revenues   $ 463,799     $ -  
                 
Cost of revenues     21,042       -  
                 
Gross profit     442,757       -  
                 
Operating expenses                
Sales and marketing     189,187       69,821  
General and administrative expenses     1,636,182       523,926  
Total operating expenses     1,825,369       593,747  
                 
Loss from operations     (1,382,612 )     (593,747 )
                 
Other income (expense)                
Gain on settlement of debt     83,656       -  
Gain on derivative liability     64,405       -  
Other income     10,540       -  
Interest expense     (372,075 )     (87,660 )
Total other income (expense)     (213,474 )     (87,660 )
                 
Net loss   $ (1,596,086 )   $ (681,407 )
                 
Loss per common share - basic and diluted   $ (0.10 )   $ (0.04 )
                 
Weighted average common shares outstanding - basic and diluted     16,672,181       15,319,906  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

  F- 5  

 

INTERNATIONAL LAND ALLIANCE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

    Series A     Series B                 Additional                 Total  
    Preferred Stock     Preferred Stock     Common Stock     Paid-in     Stock     Accumulated     Stockholders’  
    Shares     Amount     Shares     Amount     Shares     Amount     Capital     payable     Deficit     Deficit  
Balance, December 31, 2017     28,000     $ 28       -     $ -       14,319,901     $ 14,320     $ 4,313,510     $ -     $ (4,697,465 )   $ (369,607 )
Common stock and warrants sold for cash     -       -       -       -       184,000       184       58,316       -       -       58,500  
Common stock, warrants and plots promised for cash, net     -       -       -       -       1,312,000       1,312       379,633       35,420       -       416,365  
Common stock issued for warrant exercise     -       -       -       -       112,000       112       11,088       -       -       11,200  
Net loss     -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       (681,407 )     (681,407 )
Balance, December 31, 2018     28,000     $ 28       -     $ -       15,927,901     $ 15,928     $ 4,762,547     $ 35,420     $ (5,378,872 )   $ (564,949 )
Preferred and Common stock and warrants sold for cash     -       -       1,000       1       1,097,500       1,098       409,076       30,000       -       440,175  
Common stock, warrants and plots promised for cash, net     -       -       -       -       489,200       489       171,247       (35,420 )     -       136,316  
Common stock issued for warrant exercise     -       -       -       -       768,000       768       129,232       -       -       130,000  
Consideration for title transfer of Oasis Park Resort     -       -       -       -       -       -       670,000       -       -       670,000  
Stock issuable upon execution of convertible debts     -       -       -       -       74,723       75       54,595       97,858       -       152,528  
Common stock, warrants and land issued for services     -       -       -       -       2,256,965       2,257       506,053       -       -       508,310  
Net loss     -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       (1,596,086 )     (1,596,086 )
Balance, December 31, 2019     28,000     $ 28       1,000     $ 1       20,614,289     $ 20,615     $ 6,702,750     $ 127,858     $ (6,974,958 )   $ (123,706 )

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

  F- 6  

 

INTERNATIONAL LAND ALLIANCE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

    For the Year Ended  
    December 31, 2019     December 31, 2018  
Cash Flows from Operating Activities                
Net loss   $ (1,596,086 )   $ (681,407 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:                
Stock based compensation     482,584       -  
Gain on settlement of debt     (83,626 )     -  
Depreciation and amortization     36,707       -  
Value of land issued for services in excess of costs     25,726       -  
Loss on derivative liabilities     (64,405 )     -  
Amortization of debt discount     110,983       29,232  
Changes in assets and liabilities                
Increase in accounts payable     (230,691 )     11,974  
Increase in contract liability     122,040       -  
Increase in accrued expenses     -       (94,402 )
Land held for sale     (17,925 )     -  
Net cash used in operating activities     (1,214,693 )     (734,603 )
                 
Cash Flows from investing                
Asset acquisition     (1,398,195 )     -  
Net cash used in investing activities     (1,398,195 )     -  
                 
Cash Flows from Financing Activities                
Common stock and warrants sold for cash     733,675       81,000  
Common stock, warrants and plots promised for cash, net     136,316       550,920  
Common stock issued for warrant exercise     130,000       11,200  
Cash payments on promissory notes     (811,642 )     (52,878 )
Cash proceeds from promissory notes     2,528,094       124,654  
Proceeds from convertible debt     75,000       50,000  
Cash payments on convertible debt     (7,000 )     (43,000 )
Net cash from financing activities     2,784,443       721,896  
                 
Net increase (decrease) in Cash     171,555       (12,707 )
                 
Cash, beginning of period     971       13,678  
                 
Cash, end of period   $ 172,526     $ 971  
                 
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information                
Cash paid for interest   $ 46,504     $ -  
Cash paid for tax   $ -     $ -  
                 
Non-Cash investing and financing transactions                
Lot obligation satisfied for land   $ 20,191     $ -  
Title transfer for Oasis Park Resort   $ 670,000     $ -  
Acquisition and mortgage assumed as part of asset purchase   $ 605,000     $ -  
Shares issued to settle debt   $ 75,000     $ -  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

  F- 7  

 

INTERNATIONAL LAND ALLIANCE, INC.

Notes to Financial Statements

For the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND GOING CONCERN

 

Nature of Operations

 

International Land Alliance, Inc. (the “Company”) was incorporated under the laws of the State of Wyoming on September 26, 2013 (inception). The Company is a residential land development company with target properties located in the Baja California, Norte region of Mexico and southern California. The Company’s principal activities are purchasing properties, obtaining zoning and other entitlements required to subdivide the properties into residential and commercial building plots, securing financing for the purchase of the plots, improving the properties infrastructure and amenities, and selling the plots to homebuyers, retirees, investors and commercial developers.

 

On March 5, 2019, the Company received its trading symbol “ILAL” from FINRA. On April 4, 2019, the Company was approved to have its common stock traded on the OTCQB. On April 12, 2019, the Company became eligible for electronic clearing and settlement through the Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) in the United States. The DTC is a subsidiary of the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation and manages the electronic clearing and settlement of publicly traded companies. Securities that are eligible to be electronically cleared and settled through DTC are considered “DTC eligible.” This electronic method of clearing securities creates efficiency of the receipt of stock and cash, and thus accelerates the settlement process for investors and brokers, enabling the stock to be traded over a much wider selection of brokerage firms by coming into compliance with their requirements. Being DTC eligible is expected to greatly simplify the process of trading and transferring the Company’s common shares on the OTCQB.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business.

 

Management evaluated all relevant conditions and events that are reasonably known or reasonably knowable, in the aggregate, as of the date the consolidated financial statements were available to be issued and determined that substantial doubt exists about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern is dependent on the Company’s ability to generate revenues and raise capital. The Company has faced significant liquidity shortages as shown in the accompanying financial statements. As of December 31, 2019, the Company’s current liabilities exceeded its current assets by $813,222. The Company has recorded a net loss of $1,596,086 for the year ended December 31, 2019 and has an accumulated deficit of $6,974,958 as of December 31, 2019. Net cash used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $(1,214,693). These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

 

The Company has begun to recognize revenues during the year ended December 31, 2019 and is continuing to focus its efforts on increased marketing campaigns to sell the plots of land. Americans and Canadians can own property in Mexico through a Fideicomiso or Bank Trust. Any foreigner can institute a Fideicomiso (the equivalent to an American beneficial trust) through a Mexican bank (ILA has selected Banco Bajio) in order to purchase real estate anywhere in Mexico, including what is commonly called the Restricted Zone. To do so, the buyer requests a Mexican bank to act as a trustee on his/her behalf. Management believes this conveys the same bundle of rights that holding property “fee simple” does in the United States, which allows the property to be willed, leased, sold, rented, or improved in perpetuity and it is irrevocable. This title management system is very common in Mexico.

 

However, management determined in prior reporting periods that it does not fulfill “ownership”, as title is held by Banco Bajio, pursuant to generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America. During 2019, the Company has taken title to all 497 acres fee simple in the name of its wholly-owned subsidiary, International Land Alliance, S.A. de C.V. Banco Bajio will continue to act as Trustee for all Fideimosos on an ongoing basis.

 

The Company has plans to take title fee simple for the Villas del Enologo in Rancho Tecate, Valle Divino in Ensenada, Baja California and Costa Bajamar in Ensenada, Baja California projects, while using Banco Bajio for all Fideicomisos.

 

Management anticipates that the Company’s capital resources will significantly improve if its plots of land gain wider market recognition and acceptance resulting in increased plot sales. If the Company is not successful with its marketing efforts to increase sales and weak demand for purchase of plots continues, the Company will experience a shortfall in cash and it will be necessary to further reduce its operating expenses in a manner or obtain funds through equity or debt financing in sufficient amounts to avoid the need to curtail its future operations subsequent to December 31, 2019. Given the liquidity and credit constraints in the markets, the business may suffer, should the credit markets not improve in the near future. The direct impact of these conditions is not fully known. However, there can be no assurance that the Company would be able to secure additional funds if needed and that if such funds were available on commercially reasonable terms or in the necessary amounts, and whether the terms or conditions would be acceptable to the Company. In such case, the reduction in operating expenses might need to be substantial in order for the Company to generate positive cash flow to sustain the operations of the Company. (See Note 11 regarding subsequent events .)

 

In December 2019, an outbreak of a novel strain of coronavirus originated in Wuhan, China (“COVID-19”) and has since spread worldwide, including to the United States (the “U.S.”) and Mexico, posing public health risks that have reached pandemic proportions (the “COVID-19 Pandemic”). The outbreak of COVID-19 continues to grow both in the U.S., Mexico and globally and related government and private sector responsive actions may adversely affect our business operations. The recent outbreak of COVID-19 could affect our sales process with travel limitations imposed by the State of California and the U.S. for international border crossing. This limits sales prospects from visiting our properties in Baja California from our primary target market, Southern California. In recent days, this outbreak has also resulted in reduced customer traffic from surrounding areas within Baja California and the temporary reduction of sales office operating hours. These recent developments are expected to negatively impact sales and gross margin in the near term. It is impossible to predict the effect and ultimate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic as the situation is rapidly evolving. While it appears that the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States and Mexico is in the early stages, the recent downturn in financial market indices appear to have been primarily driven by uncertainties associated with the pandemic. These uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the potential adverse effect of the pandemic on the economy, construction and material supply partners, travel and transportation services, our employees and customers, customer sentiment in general and traffic to and within geographic areas containing our real estate developments. The pandemic could adversely affect our near-term and long-term revenues, earnings, liquidity and cash flows and may require significant actions in response including but not limited to employee furloughs, reduced store hours, expense reductions or discounting of the pricing of our products, all in an effort to mitigate such impacts. This situation is changing rapidly, and additional impacts may arise that we are not aware of currently.

 

  F- 8  

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company, its wholly-owned subsidiaries, ILA Fund I, LLC (the “ILA Fund”), a company incorporated in the State of Wyoming and International Land Alliance, S.A. de C.V., a company incorporated in Mexico (“ILA Mexico”); the Company has a 100% equity interest in ILA Mexico. ILA Fund includes cash as its only assets with minimal expenses as of December 31, 2019. The sole purpose of this entity is strategic funding for the operations of the Company. ILA Mexico has lots held for sale for the Oasis Park Resort, no liabilities and minimal expenses as of December 31, 2019. All intercompany balances and transactions are eliminated in consolidation.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Management regularly evaluates estimates and assumptions related to the valuation of assets and liabilities. Management bases its estimates and assumptions on current facts, historical experience and various other factors that it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities and the accrual of costs and expenses that are not readily apparent from other sources. The actual results experienced by the Company may differ materially and adversely from managements estimates. To the extent there are material differences between the estimates and the actual results, future results of operations will be affected.

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified for consistency with the current period presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on the reported results of operations.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid instruments with maturity of three months or less at the time of issuance to be cash equivalents. The Company did not have any cash equivalents as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

Fair value of Financial Instruments and Fair Value Measurements

 

Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 820 Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. ASC 820 establishes a fair value hierarchy based on the level of independent, objective evidence surrounding the inputs used to measure fair value. A financial instrument’s categorization within the fair value hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. ASC 820 prioritizes the inputs into three levels that may be used to measure fair value:

 

Level 1

 

Level 1 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

  F- 9  

 

Level 2

 

Level 2 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in markets with insufficient volume or infrequent transactions (less active markets); or model-derived valuations in which significant inputs are observable or can be derived principally from, or corroborated by, observable market data. If the asset or liability has a specified (contractual) term, the Level 2 input must be observable for substantially the full term of the asset or liability.

 

Level 3

 

Level 3 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are unobservable inputs to the valuation methodology that are significant to the measurement of the fair value of the assets or liabilities

 

As defined by ASC 820, the fair value of a financial instrument is the amount at which the instrument could be exchanged in a current transaction between willing parties, other than in a forced or liquidation sale, which was further clarified as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability (“an exit price”) in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date.

 

The reported fair values for financial instruments that use Level 2 and Level 3 inputs to determine fair value are based on a variety of factors and assumptions. Accordingly, certain fair values may not represent actual values of the Company’s financial instruments that could have been realized as of December 31, 2019 or that will be recognized in the future, and do not include expenses that could be incurred in an actual settlement. The carrying amounts of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities, such as cash, accounts payable, accrued liabilities, and related party and third-party notes payables approximate fair value due to their relatively short maturities.

 

Cost Capitalization

 

The cost of buildings and improvements includes the purchase price of the property, legal fees and other acquisition costs. Costs directly related to planning, developing, initial leasing and constructing a property are capitalized and classified as Buildings in the Consolidated Balance Sheets. Capitalized development costs include interest, property taxes, insurance, and other direct project costs incurred during the period of development are also capitalized.

 

A variety of costs are incurred in the acquisition, development and leasing of properties. After determination is made to capitalize a cost, it is allocated to the specific component of a project that is benefited. Determination of when a development project is substantially complete and capitalization must cease involves a degree of judgment. Our capitalization policy on development properties is guided by ASC 835-20 Interest – Capitalization of Interest and ASC 970 Real Estate - General. The costs of land and buildings under development include specifically identifiable costs. The capitalized costs include pre-construction costs essential to the development of the property, development costs, construction costs, interest costs, real estate taxes, salaries and related costs and other costs incurred during the period of development. We consider a construction project as substantially completed and held available for occupancy or sale upon the receipt of certificates of occupancy, but no later than one year from cessation of major construction activity. We cease capitalization on the portion (1) substantially completed and (2) occupied or held available for occupancy, and we capitalize only those costs associated with the portion under construction.

 

Land Held for Sale

 

The Company considers properties to be assets held for sale when (1) management commits to a plan to sell the property; (2) the property is available for immediate sale in its present condition and (3) the property is actively being marketed for sale at a price that is reasonable given our estimate of current market value. Upon designation of a property as an asset held for sale, we record the property’s value at the lower of its’ carrying value or its estimated net realizable value.

 

  F- 10  

 

Land and Buildings

 

Land and buildings are stated at cost. Depreciation is provided by the use of the straight-line and accelerated methods for financial and tax reporting purposes, respectively, over the estimated useful lives of the assets. Buildings will have an estimated useful life of 20 years. Land is an indefinite lived asset that is stated at fair value at date of acquisition.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

On January 1, 2018, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in ASC Topic 605, Revenue Recognition. Results for reporting periods beginning after January 1, 2018 are presented under Topic 606.

 

Under Topic 606, revenue is recognized when control of the promised goods or services is transferred to our customers, in an amount that reflects the consideration we expect to be entitled to in exchange for those goods or services. The new guidance sets forth a new five-step revenue recognition model which replaces the prior revenue recognition guidance in its entirety and is intended to eliminate numerous industry-specific pieces of revenue recognition guidance that have historically existed in U.S. GAAP. The underlying principle of the new standard is that a business or other organization will recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects what it expects to receive in exchange for the goods or services. The standard also requires more detailed disclosures and provides additional guidance for transactions that were not addressed completely in the prior accounting guidance.

 

The Company reviewed all agreements at the date of initial application and elected to use the modified retrospective transition method, where the cumulative effect of the initial application is recognized as an adjustment to opening retained earnings at January 1, 2018. Considering there was no revenue in prior periods, the adoption of the new revenue recognition guidance had no transition impact.

 

The Company determines revenue recognition through the following steps:

 

identification of the agreement, or agreements, with a buyer and/or investor;
identification of the performance obligations in the agreement for the sale of lots including delivering title to the property being acquired from ILA;
determination of the transaction price;
allocation of the transaction price to the lots purchased when issued with equity or warrants to purchase equity in the Company; and
recognition of revenue when, or as, we satisfy a performance obligation such as delivering title to lots purchased.

 

Revenue is measured based on considerations specified in the agreements with our customers. A contract exists when it becomes a legally enforceable agreement with a customer. The contract is based on either the acceptance of standard terms and conditions as stated in our agreement of lot sales or the execution of terms and conditions contracts with third parties and investors. These contracts define each party’s rights, payment terms and other contractual terms and conditions of the sale. Consideration was historically paid prior to transfer of title as stated above and in future land sales, the Company plans to transfer title to buyers at the time consideration has been transferred if the acquisition of the property has been completed by the Company. The Company applies judgment in determining the customer’s ability and intention to pay, however collection risk is mitigated through collecting payment in advance or through escrow arrangements.

 

A performance obligation is a promise in a contract or agreement to transfer a distinct product or item to the customer, which for us is transfer of title to our buyers. Performance obligations promised in a contract are identified based on the property that will be transferred to the customer that are both capable of being distinct and are distinct in the context of the contract, whereby the transfer of the property is separately identifiable from other promises in the contract. We have concluded the sale of property and delivering title is accounted for as the single performance obligation.

 

The transaction price of a contract is allocated to each distinct performance obligation and recognized as revenue when or as the customer receives the benefit of the performance obligation. The transaction price is determined based on the consideration to which we will be entitled to receive in exchange for transferring title to the customer.

 

  F- 11  

 

The Company recognizes revenue when it satisfies a performance obligation in a contract by transferring control over property to a customer when land title is legally transferred by the Company. The Company’s principal activities in the real estate development industry which it generates its revenues is the sale of developed and undeveloped land. The Company began to recognize revenues related to undeveloped land lots sold previously and during year ended December 31, 2019. The Company previously recorded as an accrued liability, the relative fair value of plots of land sold by the Company to investors in conjunction with the sale of common stock and other equity instruments to raise capital. The portion of the proceeds that was allocated to the lot sales, could not be recognized in revenues as the title was not previously owned by the Company, who had a promise to transfer title to the investor once the Company owned the land. This transfer of title took place in June 2019 and as such the performance obligation to deliver the property was satisfied in order to recognize revenues for all lots sold since inception and moving forward for the Oasis Park Resort property.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The fair value of stock options is estimated on the grant date using the Black-Scholes option pricing model, based on weighted average assumptions. Expected volatility is based on historical volatility of our common stock. The Company has elected to use the simplified method described in the Securities and Exchange Commission Staff Accounting Bulletin Topic 14C to estimate the expected term of employee stock options. The risk-free rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant. The value of restricted stock awards is determined using the fair value of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant. The Company accounts for forfeitures as they occur. Compensation expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method in accordance with ASC 740, Income Taxes. The asset and liability method provide that deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax basis of assets and liabilities, and for operating loss and tax credit carry forwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the currently enacted tax rates and laws. The Company records a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that is believed more likely than not to be realized.

 

When tax returns are filed, it is highly certain that some positions taken would be sustained upon examination by the taxing authorities, while others are subject to uncertainty about the merits of the position taken or the amount of the position that would be ultimately sustained. In accordance with the guidance of ASC 740, the benefit of a tax position is recognized in the financial statements in the period during which, based on all available evidence, management believes it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained upon examination, including the resolution of appeals or litigation processes, if any. Tax positions taken are not offset or aggregated with other positions. Tax positions that meet the more-likely-than-not recognition threshold are measured as the largest amount of tax benefit that is more than 50 percent likely of being realized upon settlement with the applicable taxing authority. The portion of the benefits associated with tax positions taken that exceeds the amount measured as described above should be reflected as a liability for unrecognized tax benefits in the accompanying balance sheets along with any associated interest and penalties that would be payable to the taxing authorities upon examination. Management makes estimates and judgments about our future taxable income that are based on assumptions that are consistent with our plans and estimates. Should the actual amounts differ from our estimates, the amount of our valuation allowance could be materially impacted. Any adjustment to the deferred tax asset valuation allowance would be recorded in the income statement for the periods in which the adjustment is determined to be required. Management does not believe that it has taken any positions that would require the recording of any additional tax liability nor does it believe that there are any unrealized tax benefits that would either increase or decrease within the next year.

 

Loss Per Share

 

The Company computes loss per share in accordance with ASC 260 – Earnings per Share. ASC 260 requires presentation of both basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) on the face of the consolidated statements of operations. Basic EPS is computed by dividing net loss available to common shareholders (numerator) by the weighted average number of shares outstanding (denominator) during the period. Diluted EPS gives effect to all dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period using the treasury stock method and convertible notes payable using the if-converted method. Diluted EPS excludes all dilutive potential shares if their effect is antidilutive. During periods of net loss, all common stock equivalents are excluded from the diluted EPS calculation because they are antidilutive.

 

  F- 12  

 

At December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, there were a total 50,000 and 1,075,000 warrants issued and outstanding convertible into common stock, respectively, and all warrants are considered anti-dilutive.

 

Concentration of Credit Risk

 

The Company maintains its cash in bank and financial institution deposits that at times may exceed federally insured limits. The Company has not experienced any losses in such accounts through December 31, 2019.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). The objective of this update is to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements. This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those annual periods and is to be applied utilizing a modified retrospective approach. The Company currently has no leases as a leasee, therefore, there was no impact on the financial statements to record lease assets or liabilities.

 

NOTE 3 – ASSET PURCHASE AND TITLE TRANSFER

 

Emerald Grove Asset Purchase

 

On July 30, 2018, Jason Sunstein, the Chief Financial Officer, entered into a Residential Purchase Agreement (“RPA” or “the Agreement”) to acquire real property located in Hemet, California, which included approximately 80 acres of land and a structure for $1.1 million from an unrelated seller. The property includes the main parcel of land with an existing structure along with three additional parcels of land which are vacant lots to be used for the purpose of development “vacant lots”. The purpose of the transaction was as an investment in real property to be assigned to the Company subsequent to acquisition. The property was acquired by Mr. Sunstein since it was required by the seller to transfer the property for consideration from an individual versus a separate legal entity. The transaction closed on March 18, 2019 and the consideration included a loan financed in the amount of $605,000 (see Note 6 - Pridco) in addition to cash consideration of $524,613 which came from a portion of funds loaned by investors of the Company to be repaid as interest bearing notes payable (see Note 6). On March 18, 2019, Mr. Sunstein assigned the deed of the property to the Company. The mortgage obligation was assumed by the Company, as approval by the Board of Directors in March 2019. The mortgage loan was not assigned to the Company by the lender, however the lender acknowledged that the transfer of the property to the Company did not trigger an event of default. Mr. Sunstein remained a guarantor on the mortgage until the debt was paid in full during the year ended December 31, 2019 through a refinancing transaction (see Note 6 – Velocity). The Company recorded the assets acquired and liabilities assumed at fair value on the date of assignment and assumption.

 

The Company has included all allowed acquisition costs of $22,050 in the value of the capitalized assets. The building and land asset values were assigned using a purchase price allocation based on the appraised land values. The total of the consideration plus acquisition costs assets of $1,122,050 was allocated to land and building in the following amounts: $271,225 – Land; $850,826 – Building. The land is an indefinite long-lived asset that were assessed for impairment as a grouped asset with the building on a periodic basis. The building has an estimated useful life of 20 years and were depreciated on a straight-line basis.

 

  F- 13  

 

Oasis Park Title Transfer

 

On June 18, 2019, Baja Residents Club SA de CV (“BRC”), a related party with common ownership and control by our CEO, Robert Valdes , transferred title to the Company for the Oasis Park property which was part of a previously held land project consisting of 497 acres to be acquired and developed into Oasis Park resort near San Felipe, Baja. It was previously subject to approval by the Mexican government in Baja, California which was finalized in June 2019. As consideration for the promise to transfer title, the Company previously issued 7,500,000 shares of founder’s common stock that was valued at $750,000 or $0.10 per common share. No prior accounting was recorded for this issuance pending resolution of the contingency to transfer title, which was resolved during the year ended December 31, 2019. A portion of this value was allocated to the Oasis Park resort and a portion was allocated to other properties as the Company continues to receive transfer of title. ILA recorded the property held for sale on its balance sheet in the amount of $670,000 and accordingly reduced the value as lots are sold. As of December 31, 2019, the Company reported a balance for assets held for sale of $647,399.

 

The Company transferred title to individual plots of land to the investors since the Company received this approval of change in transfer of title to the ILA. As such, the Company recognized revenue for the plot sales previously executed during the year ended December 31 ,2019.

 

NOTE 4 – LAND AND BUILDING

 

Land and buildings, net as of December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

    Useful life   December 31, 2019     December 31, 2018  
Land – Emerald Grove       $ 271,225     $          -  
Land held for sale       $ 647,399     $ -  
Construction in Process       $ 250,000          
Building – Emerald Grove   20 years   $ 917,496     $ -  
Less: Accumulated depreciation         (36,707 )     -  
Building, net       $ 880,789     $ -  

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, improvements to existing buildings costing $66,670 were completed and increased the carrying cost of purchased building.

 

Additionally, in November and December 2019, $250,000 was paid our CEO, Roberto Valdes, $150,000 for constructing two model Villas at our planned Costa Bajamar development. The Company has not yet taken title to this property, which is currently owned by Valdeland, S.A. de C.V., an entity controlled by Roberto Valdes. The Company intends to purchase the land from this entity and has paid $100,000 to Roberto Valdes as a down payment for this purchase. The $150,000 is the total construction cost budget that is intended to pay the construction contractor. The construction contractor is also an entity controlled by Roberto Valdes. Construction has begun subsequent to the year ended December 31, 2019 (Note 8).

 

Depreciation expense was $36,707 and $0 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

NOTE 5 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

The Company paid to its Chief Executive Officer consulting fees for services directly related to continued operations of $21,000 and $40,805 for years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

The Company paid its Chief Financial Officer consulting fees of $89,681 and $138,079 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively this included personal expenses paid directly by the Company on his behalf. Such amounts were determined by the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as the Company currently does not have employment or consulting agreements.

 

The Company paid to its Secretary consulting fees for services directly related to continued operations of $11,500 and $33,706 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company’s Secretary paid for certain business expenses totaling $12,254 related to the Emerald Grove property for which she will be reimbursed by the Company.

 

  F- 14  

 

On September 18, 2018, the Company obtained financing through one of its existing shareholders, Sylva International, who also provides marketing services to the Company. (See Note 7). As of December 31, 2019, the Company satisfied the remaining balance of the note and any accrued interest in full. The total marketing expense incurred for Sylva was approximately $90,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

The Company’s Chief Financial Officer also facilitated the Emerald Grove asset purchase as described in Note 3.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company entered into definitive Land Purchase Agreement with Valdeland, S.A. de C.V., a Company controlled by our Chief Executive Officer, to acquire approximately one acre of land with plans and permits to build 34 units at the Bajamar Ocean Front Golf Resort located in Ensenada, Baja California (See note 4 and 8).

 

On June 18, 2019, Baja Residents Club SA de CV, a related party with common ownership and control by our Chief Executive Officer, transferred title to the Company for the Oasis Park property which was part of a previously held land project consisting of 497 acres to be acquired and developed into Oasis Park resort near San Felipe, Baja.

 

NOTE 6 – DEBT

 

Cash Call, Inc.

 

On March 19, 2018, the Company issued a promissory note to CashCall, Inc. for $75,000 of cash consideration. The note bears interest at 94%, matures on May 1, 2028. The Company also recorded a $7,500 debt discount due to origination fees due at the beginning of the note. During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company amortized $5,301 and $582 of the debt discount into interest expense, leaving a remaining total debt discount on the note of $1,617 and $6,918, respectively. On December 12, 2019 the loan and outstanding interest was settled for $52,493. As a result of the settlement, the Company recorded a gain on settlement of debt of $64,075. As of December 31, 2019, the remaining principal balance was $46,660. Interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $41,578 and $5,599, respectively.

 

PrideCo

 

As discussed in Note 3, in March 2019, the Company assumed liabilities related to the assigned deeded property Emerald Grove in Hemet, CA. The liabilities include a mortgage entered into with PrideCo Private Mortgage Loan Fund, LP for $605,000 with prepaid interest of $2,353 on the date of closing, March 18, 2019. The mortgage loan was not assigned to the Company by the lender, however the lender acknowledged that the transfer of the property to the Company did not trigger an event of default. Mr. Sunstein remained a guarantor on the mortgage. The amount has been prorated for the days remaining in the month. The mortgage bears interest monthly on the unpaid principal at 10% with interest only payments commencing on May 1, 2019 and applied to interest due prior to any additional principal payments. Any late payments will include an additional 8% based on the principal plus unpaid interest accrued at the time. The loan matures on April 1, 2020 and is secured by the property acquired. There is no prepayment penalty on this loan after the first sixty days and any remaining principal at the maturity of the loan is due in full. Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $22,913. The  loan was refinanced with Velocity in September 2019, and the obligation in no longer outstanding as of December 31, 2019.

 

Yellowstone

 

On August 9, 2018, the Company issued a promissory note to Yellowstone for $12,325 of cash consideration. The note bears interest at 25%, matured on December 9, 2018. The Company also recorded a $4,540 debt discount due to origination fees due at the beginning of the note. This note was previously in default and was being paid down through a debt settlement agency hired by the Company. On April 5, 2019 the Company settled the promissory note with Yellowstone for the remaining total balance with fees for $3,333. The note was satisfied in full with cash on that date with a confirmation that the balance was fully satisfied. As of December 31, 2019, the balance is $0. Interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $0 and $3,081 respectively.

 

  F- 15  

 

EBF

 

On August 10, 2018, the Company issued a promissory note to EBF for $21,750 of cash consideration. The note bears interest at 15%, matured on December 10, 2018. The Company also recorded a $7,475 debt discount due to origination fees due at the beginning of the note. This note was previously in default and was being paid down through a debt settlement agency hired by the Company. The balance was paid in full as of December 31, 2019. Interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $0 and $3,263, respectively.

 

On Deck

 

On April 4, 2018, the Company issued a promissory note to On Deck for $35,000 of cash consideration. The note bears interest at 94% and matured on January 6, 2019. The Company also recorded a $14,140 debt discount due to origination fees due at the beginning of the note. The balance was paid in full as of December 31, 2019. Interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $3,396 and $32,187 respectively.

 

Last Chance Funding

 

On October 10, 2018, the Company issued a promissory note to Last Chance Funding for $7,450 of cash consideration. The note bears interest at 15% and matured on January 5, 2019. The Company also recorded a $2,795 debt discount due to origination fees due at the beginning of the note. This note was previously in default and was being paid down through a debt settlement agency hired by the Company. On April 17, 2019 the Company settled the promissory note with Last Chance Funding with a remaining total balance for $4,928. The note was satisfied in full with cash on that date with a confirmation that the balance was fully satisfied. As of December 31, 2019, the balance is $0. Interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $182 and $1,040 respectively.

 

Velocity

 

In September, 2019, the Company issued a mortgage promissory note to Velocity with a face value of $975,000 whereby the Company received $943,751 in cash consideration, net of issuance and financing costs of $31,249 related to the assigned deeded property in Note 4 (Emerald Grove). The proceeds of the note were largely used to repay the PrideCo mortgage and other liabilities. The mortgage bears interest monthly on the unpaid principal at 10% with payments commencing on November 1, 2019 and applied to interest due prior to any additional principal payments. Any late payments will include an additional 10% based on the principal plus unpaid interest accrued at the time. The loan matures on October 1, 2021 and is secured by the property. There is no prepayment penalty on this loan after the first sixty days and any remaining principal at the maturity of the loan is due in full. Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $26,445.

 

RAS, LLC

 

On October 25, 2019, the Company issued a promissory note to RAS, LLC “RAS”, a company controlled by Jason Sunstein and Lisa Landau who are officers of the Company, for $440,803. The proceeds of the note were largely used to repay shareholder loans and other liabilities. The loan bears interest at 10%. The loan matures on June 25, 2020 and is secured by 2,500,000 common shares and a Second Deed of Trust for property in Hemet, CA (Emerald Grove). Additionally, as in incentive to the note holder, the Company is required to issue to the holder 132,461 shares of common stock valued at $97,858, which was recorded as a debt discount as of December 31, 2019. As of December 31, 2019, $26,871 of the discount has been amortized and the note is shown less amortized discount of $70,987. As of December 31, 2019, the shares have not been issued and recorded as stock payable. Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $7,938.

 

Rushmyfile, Inc

 

On December 5, 2019, the Company issued a promissory note to Rushmyfile, Inc for $129,000 of cash consideration, net of $14,431 in financing costs and secured by property (Emerald Grove Vacant Land). The loan bears interest at 13%. The loan matures on December 1, 2021. Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $1,195.

 

  F- 16  

 

Shareholders

 

In March 2019, the Company entered into short term notes payable with six existing shareholders of the Company totaling $710,000. The notes bear interest at 20% and all notes matured in June 2019. As of December 31, 2019, the loans were paid in full. Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $193,348.

 

On June 26, 2019, the Company entered into a short-term note payable with an existing shareholder of the Company totaling $25,000. During the year ended December 31, 2019 the shareholder advanced an additional $31,723 and the Company made repayments totaling $55,223. The notes bear interest at 10% and is due on March 1, 2020. As of December 31, 2019, the balance on the loan payable was $1,500. Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $682.

 

In December 2019, the Company entered into short term notes payable with six existing shareholders of the Company totaling $345,000. The notes bear interest at 15%, mature in December 2020, and are secured by a Second Deed of Trust on the Emerald Grove property. As of December 31, 2019, the loans had an outstanding balance of $345,000. Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $3,000.

 

NOTE 7 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

Sylva International

 

On September 18, 2018, the Company issued a convertible note to Sylva International for $25,000 of cash consideration. The note is convertible into common stock at a fixed price of $0.50 per share. The note bears interest at 24%, matured on December 19, 2018. The Company evaluated the convertible note and determined that the shares issuable pursuant to the conversion option were determinate due to the fixed conversion price. The Company paid $18,000 leaving a remaining balance of $7,000 at December 31, 2018. As of December 31, 2019, the Company satisfied the remaining balance of the note and any accrued interest in full.

 

Hoyt

 

On August 7, 2019, the Company entered into a convertible promissory note pursuant to which it borrowed $50,000, net of an issuance costs of $8,500. Interest under the convertible promissory note is 20% per annum, and the principal and all accrued but unpaid interest is due on December 7, 2019. The note is convertible at any date after the issuance date at the noteholder’s option into shares of our common stock at a variable conversion price equal to the lower of (i) the lowest trading price during the previous ten (10) Trading Day period immediately preceding the date of the note or (ii) a price equal to the 75% of the lowest trading price during the previous ten (10) Trading Day period immediately preceding the Conversion date. The Company recorded a debt discount in the amount of $50,000 in connection with the original issuance discount, offering costs and initial valuation of the derivative liability related to the embedded conversion option of the Note to be amortized utilizing the effective interest method of accretion over the term of the Note. Further, the Company recognized a derivative liability of $61,664 and an initial loss of $20,164 based on the Black-Scholes pricing model. During the year ended December 31, 2019 the loan was satisfied in full, and a gain of $65,531 was recognized in association with termination of the derivative liability.

 

Gordon

 

On August 7, 2019, the Company entered into a $25,000 convertible promissory note pursuant, net of an issuance costs of $2,125. Interest under the convertible promissory note is 20% per annum, and the principal and all accrued but unpaid interest is due on December 7, 2019. The note is convertible at any date after the issuance date at the noteholder’s option into shares of our common stock at a variable conversion price equal to the lower of (i) the lowest trading price during the previous ten (10) Trading Day period immediately preceding the date of the note or (ii) a price equal to the 75% of the lowest trading price during the previous ten (10) Trading Day period immediately preceding the Conversion date.

 

  F- 17  

 

The Company recorded a debt discount in the amount of $25,000 in connection with the original issuance discount, offering costs and initial valuation of the derivative liability related to the embedded conversion option of the Note to be amortized utilizing the effective interest method of accretion over the term of the Note. Further, the Company recognized a derivative liability of $30,832 and an initial loss of $7,957 based on the Black-Scholes pricing model. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the loan was satisfied in full, and a gain of $32,765 was recognized in association with termination of the derivative liability.

 

The embedded conversion feature in the convertible debt instruments above were convertible at issuance which qualified them as a derivative instrument since the number of shares issuable under the note is indeterminate based on guidance in ASC Topic No. 815-15, “Derivatives and Hedging (“Topic No. 815-15”). Topic No. 815-15 requires the Company to bifurcate and separately account for the conversion features as an embedded derivative contained in the Company’s convertible debt.

 

The Black-Scholes model, adopted by management as an appropriate financial model, utilized the following inputs to value the derivative liabilities at the date of issuance of the convertible note through December 30, 2019:

 

Risk free interest rate     1.88-2.05 %
Expected term (years)     0.263-0.585  
Expected volatility     265%-282 %
Expected dividends     0 %

 

As of December 31, 2019, the Company had no outstanding convertible debt or thereby related derivatives.

 

NOTE 8 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Commitment to Purchase Land

 

There is one remaining land project consisting of 20 acres to be acquired from Baja Residents Club (a Company controlled by our CEO Roberto Valdes) and developed into Valle Divino resort in Ensenada, Baja California, the acquisition of title to the land for this project is subject to approval from the Mexican government in Baja, California. Although management believes that the transfer of title to the land will be approved within the next 60 days, there is no assurance that such transfer of title will be approved in that time frame or at all. The Company has promised to transfer title to the plots of land to the investors who have invested in the Company once the Company receives an approval of change in transfer of title to the Company. As of December 31, 2019, the Company has entered into two contracts for deed agreements to sell 2 lots of land.

 

Land purchase- Costa Bajamar

 

On September 25, 2019, the Company, entered into a definitive Land Purchase Agreement with Valdeland, S.A. de C.V., a Company controlled by our CEO Roberto Valdes, to acquire approximately one acre of land with plans and permits to build 34 units at the Bajamar Ocean Front Golf Resort located in Ensenada, Baja California. Pursuant to the terms of the Agreement, the total purchase price is $1,000,000, payable in a combination of preferred stock ($600,000); common stock ($250,000/250,000 common shares at $1.00/share); a promissory note ($150,000); and an initial construction budget of $150,000 payable upon closing. A recent appraisal valued the land “as is” for $1,150,000. The closing is subject to obtaining the necessary approval by the City of Ensenada and transfer of title, which includes the formation of a wholly owned Mexican subsidiary. As of December 31, 2019, the agreement has not closed.

 

Commitment to Sell Land

 

On September 30, 2019, the Company entered into a contract for deed agreement “Agreement” with IntegraGreen whose principal is also a creditor. Under the agreement the Company agreed to the sale of 20 acres of vacant land and associated improvements located at the Emerald Grove property in Hemet, California for a total purchase price of $630,000, $63,000 was paid upon execution and the balance is payable in a balloon payment on October 1, 2026 with interest only payments of $3,780 due on the 1st of each month beginning April 1, 2020. During the duration of the Agreement the Company retains title and is allowed to encumber the property with a mortgage at its discretion, however IntegraGreen has the right to use the property. The Company may also evict IntegraGreen from the premises in the case of default under the agreement.

 

  F- 18  

 

Due to the nature of the Agreement, the Company’s management deemed that there was an embedded lease feature in the agreement in accordance with ASC 842. As a result, the initial payment of $63,000 was classified as a deposit. Upon an event of default in which case the payment is non-refundable, and the Company no longer has any obligation to provide access to the land. The interest payments will be recognized monthly as lease income. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company recognized $10,540 in lease income.

 

On October 2, 2019, the Company entered into a contract for deed agreement with a third-party investor. Under the contract the Company agreed to the sale of 1 lot of vacant land and associated improvements located at the Valle Divino property in Ensenada, Mexico for a total purchase price of $50,000, $25,000 was paid upon execution and the balance was paid on October 7, 2019.

 

Due to the nature of the agreement, management deemed that there was a customer contract. As a result, the payment of $50,000 was classified as a contract liability under ASC 606, and it will be recognized as revenue when the Company fulfills its performance obligations to provide title to the lot.

 

On November 6, 2019, the Company entered into a contract for deed agreement with a third-party investor. Under the contract the Company agreed to the sale of 1 lot of vacant land and associated improvements located at the Valle Divino property in Ensenada, Mexico for a total purchase price of $35,080, $10,000 was paid upon execution, $9,580 was paid on December 23, 2019, and the balance is due on February 4, 2020. The payments have been classified as a customer deposit on the balance sheet as of December 31, 2019.

 

Litigation Costs and Contingencies

 

From time to time, the Company may become involved in various lawsuits and legal proceedings, which arise in the ordinary course of business. Litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and an adverse result in these or other matters may arise from time to time that may harm business. Management is currently not aware of any such legal proceedings or claims that could have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or operating results.

 

NOTE 9 – STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

The Company’s equity at December 31, 2019 consisted of 75,000,000 authorized common shares and 2,000,000 authorized preferred shares, both with a par value of $0.001 per share.

 

As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, there were 20,164,299 and 15,927,901 shares of common stock issued and outstanding, respectively.

 

On February 11, 2019, the Company’s Board of Directors approved a 2019 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2019 Plan”). In order for the 2019 Plan to grant “qualified stock options” to employees, it required approval by the Corporation’s shareholders within 12 months from the date of the 2019 Plan. The 2019 Plan was never approved by the shareholders. Therefore, any options granted under the 2019 Plan prior to shareholder approval will be “non-qualified”. Pursuant to the 2019 Plan, the Company has reserved a total of 3,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to be available under the plan. As of December 31, 2019, ILA has not granted any options, as such, there is no share-based compensation for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

On October 31, 2019, the Company’s Board of Directors designated 1,000 shares of Preferred B stock with a par value of $0.001.

 

As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, 28,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock were issued and outstanding and 1,000 and 0 shares of Series B Preferred Stock were issued and outstanding, respectively.

 

  F- 19  

 

Common Stock Issued for Services 

 

On April 1, 2019, the Company issued 1,656,000 shares of common stock to be issued for services valued at $165,600.

 

On July 1, 2019, the Company issued 40,000 shares of common stock valued at $40,000 to a consultant for business development and advisory services. The term of the agreement is for a period of 12 months from the date of execution. As of December 31, 2019, the Company has recorded an expense of $40,000.

 

On July 1, 2019, the Company issued 12,000 shares of common stock valued at $12,000 to a consultant for business development and advisory services. The term of the agreement is for a period of twelve months from the date of execution. As of December 31, 2019, the Company has recorded an expense of $12,000.

 

On July 1, 2019, the Company entered into an agreement with a consultant for real-estate advisory services. Under the terms of the agreement the Company agreed to issue 80,000 shares of common stock valued at $74,748, 50,000 warrants valued at $47,823, and two plots of land with a total value of $25,725. The fair value of $47,823 of the warrants was calculated using a Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following assumptions: stock price $1.00, strike price of $0.50, expected term of two years, expected volatility of 262%, and discount rate of 1.78%. The total value of the consideration issued was $155,107. The term of the agreement is for a period of six months from the date of execution. As of December 31, 2019, the Company has recorded an expense of $77,553 related to the agreement and expects to recognize an additional expense of $77,553 in future periods.

 

On July 25, 2019, the Company agreed to issued 100,000 shares valued at $42,000 to an investment banker for advisory services. As of December 31, 2019, the Company has recorded an expense of $10,742 related to the agreement and expects to recognize an additional expense of $31,258 in future periods.

 

On October 8, 2019, the Company entered into an agreement with a consultant for real-estate advisory services. Under the terms of the agreement the Company agreed to issue 300,000 shares of common stock valued at $165,000.

 

On October 10, 2018, the Company entered into an agreement with investment banker for advisory services. The term of the agreement is for a period of twelve months, and automatically renewed on October 10, 2019. Pursuant to this agreement 68,965 shares valued at $40,000 were issued as a finder’s fee related to connecting the company with business contacts.

 

All shares of common stock issued during the year ended December 31, 2019 were unregistered.

 

Common stock issued for warrant exercise

 

On January 28, 2019, the Company received cash proceeds of $40,000 for 400,000 shares of common stock to be issued in a warrant exercise by a third-party investor.

 

On March 13, 2019, the Company received cash proceeds of $6,000 for 48,000 shares of common stock to be issued in a warrant exercise by two (2) third-party investors.

 

On April 4, 2019, the Company issued 95,000 shares of common stock in a warrant exercise by a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $9,500.

 

On April 8, 2019, the Company issued 45,000 shares of common stock in a warrant exercise by a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $4,500.

 

On April 17, 2019, the Company issued 80,000 shares of common stock in a warrant exercise by a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $20,000.

 

  F- 20  

 

On May 2, 2019, the Company issued 104,200 shares of common stock in a warrant exercise by a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $10,420.

 

On May 15, 2019, the Company issued 100,000 shares of common stock in a warrant exercise by a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $50,000. Proceeds were received in the year ended December 31, 2018 and recorded as stock payable until issuance.

 

All shares of common stock issued during the year ended December 31, 2019 were unregistered.

 

Common stock issued for cash

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company issued 747,500 shares for cash proceeds of $203,675.

 

On August 12, 2019, the Company agreed to issue 66,667 shares of common stock to a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $30,000. The shares had not been issued as of December 31, 2019 and stock payable of $30,000 was recorded as a result.

 

All shares of common stock issued during the year ended December 31, 2019 were unregistered.

 

Common Stock sold with a Promise to Deliver Title to Plot of Land and Warrants

 

On February 27, 2019, the Company received cash proceeds of $17,500 for 35,000 shares of common stock to be issued to a third-party investor. In conjunction with this sale of shares, the Company also attached one (1) plot of land. The total cash proceeds of $17,500 was allocated based upon the relative fair value of the shares and one (1) promised plot of land in the following amounts: shares were valued at $9,875; and plot of land was valued at $7,625.

 

On March 8, 2019, the Company issued 50,000 shares of common stock to a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $25,000. In conjunction with this sale of shares, the Company also attached one (1) plot of land and issued 50,000 warrants at an exercise price of $0.50 per share, exercisable over a term of one year from the date of issuance. The fair market value of $18,932 of the warrants was calculated using a Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following assumptions: stock price $0.50, expected term of one year, expected volatility of 232%, and discount rate of 2.72%. The total cash proceeds of $25,000 was allocated based upon the relative fair market value of the shares, warrants and one (1) promised plot of land in the following amounts: shares were valued at $9,446; warrants were valued at $8,750, and plot of land was valued at $6,804.

 

On April 8, 2019, the Company issued 100,000 shares of common stock to a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $50,000. In conjunction with this sale of shares, the Company also attached one (1) plot of land and issued 100,000 warrants at an exercise price of $0.50 per share, exercisable over a term of one year from the date of issuance. The fair value of $37,863 of the warrants was calculated using a Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following assumptions: stock price $0.50, expected term of one year, expected volatility of 232%, and discount rate of 2.72%.

 

On May 2, 2019, the Company issued 50,000 shares of common stock to a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $25,000.

 

On May 24, 2019, the Company issued 100,000 shares of common stock to a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $50,000. In conjunction with this sale of shares, the Company also attached one (1) plot of land and issued 100,000 warrants at an exercise price of $0.50 per share, exercisable over a term of one year from the date of issuance. The fair value of $108,345 of the warrants was calculated using a Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following assumptions: stock price $1.27, expected term of one year, expected volatility of 232%, and discount rate of 2.72%. The total cash proceeds of $50,000 was allocated based upon the relative fair value of the shares, warrants and one (1) promised plot of land in the following amounts: shares were valued at $14,536; warrants were valued at $31,498, and plot of land was valued at $3,966.

 

  F- 21  

 

On August 2, 2019, the Company issued 50,000 shares of common stock to a third-party investor for cash proceeds of $22,500. In conjunction with this sale of shares, the Company also attached one (1) plot of land and issued 50,000 shares. The total cash proceeds of $22,500 was allocated based upon the relative fair value of the shares, warrants and one (1) promised plot of land in the following amounts: shares were valued at $14,007, and plot of land was valued at $8,493.

 

All shares of common stock issued during the year ended December 31, 2019 were unregistered.

 

Common Stock Issued in Relation to Debt

 

On October 25, 2019 the Company issued 28,889 shares of common stock valued at $21,378 to settle $17,172 of outstanding debt.

 

On October 25, 2019 the Company agreed to issue 132,241 shares of common stock valued at $97,858 in connection with securing a loan from a third-party. As of December 31, 2019, the shares were not issued and were recorded as stock payable.

 

On August 7, 2019 the Company agreed issued 10,000 shares of common stock valued at $8,500 to in connection with securing convertible debt. These shares were issued on December 7, 2019.

 

On August 7, 2019 the Company agreed to issued 2,500 shares of common stock valued at $2,125 in connection with securing convertible debt. The shares were issued December 10, 2019.

 

On December 31, 2019 the Company issued 33,000 shares of common stock valued at $22,667 to settle $22,200 of outstanding debt.

 

All shares of common stock issued during the year ended December 31, 2019 were unregistered.

 

Preferred Stock 

 

On November 6, 2019 the Company authorized and issued 1,000 shares of Series B Preferred Stock and 350,000 shares of common stock to Cleanspark Inc in a private equity offering for $500,000. Management evaluated the Series B Preferred stock under ASC 470 and determined that its embedded are more akin to equity than debt and as such recorded the value attributable to the shares of $293,500 as temporary equity on the consolidated balance sheet.

 

All shares of Preferred stock issued during the year ended December 31, 2019 were unregistered.

 

Stock Warrants

 

A summary of the Company’s warrant activity during the year ended December 31, 2019 is presented below:

 

   

Number of

Warrants

   

Weighted

Average

Exercise Price

   

Weighted

Average

Remaining

Contract Term

(Year)

 
                   
Outstanding at December 31, 2018     1,075,200     $ 0.27       0.60  
Granted     390,000       0.49       0.77  
Exercised     (768,000 )     0.41       -  
Forfeit/Canceled     (647,200 )     0.24       -  
Outstanding at December 31, 2019     50,000     $ 0.50       1.75  
                         
Exercisable at December 31, 2019     50,000                  

 

  F- 22  

 

At December 31, 2019, 50,000 warrants were exercisable into common stock. The exercise price of outstanding warrants for common stock was $0.50 per warrant, and the term of exercise of the outstanding warrants was two years from the date of issuance. The aggregate intrinsic value as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 was approximately $0 and $133,000, respectively.

 

NOTE 10 – INCOME TAX

 

Significant components of the Company’s deferred tax assets and liabilities for federal and state income taxes as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 are as follows:

    December 31, 2019     December 31, 2018  
Deferred tax assets:                
Net operating loss carry forward   $ 1,464,741     $ 492,121  
Total gross deferred tax assets     1,464,741       492,121  
Less - valuation allowance     (1,464,741 )     (492,121 )
Net deferred tax assets   $     $  

 

As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company had gross federal net operating loss carryforwards of approximately $6,974,958 and $5,378,872, respectively. The Company expects the limitation placed on the federal net operating loss carryforwards prior to the ownership change will likely expire unused. As of December 31, 2019, all tax years are open for examination by the taxing authorities.

 

Due to the enactment of the Tax Reform Act of 2017, the corporate tax rate for those tax years beginning with 2018 has been reduced to 21%.

 

  F- 23  

 

NOTE 11 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

Common Stock Issued for Services

 

On January 1, 2020, the Company issued 50,000 shares of common stock to be issued for services valued at $25,000.

 

Warrant Exercise

 

On March 12, 2020, the Company received $10,000 in a warrant exercise to a third-party investor to issue 20,000 shares of common stock. As of the date of filing the shares have not been issued.

 

Option Exercise

 

Between January 21, 2020 and March 2, 2020, the Company received $68,808 in a option exercise from a third-party investor to issue 137,615 shares of common stock. As of the date of filing 17,165 shares from the exercise have not been issued.

 

  F- 24  

 

Contract for deed agreement with common stock grant

 

On January 13, 2020, the Company entered into a contract for deed agreement with a third-party investor. Under the contract the Company agreed to the sale of 2 lots of vacant land located at the Valle Divino property in Ensenada, Mexico for a total purchase price of $40,000. This also includes a stock grant of 80,000 shares of common stock. As of the date of filing the shares have not been issued.

 

On January 29, 2020, the Company entered into a contract for deed agreement with a third-party investor. Under the contract the Company agreed to the sale of 1 lot of vacant land located at the Valle Divino property in Ensenada, Mexico for a total purchase price of $25,000. This also includes a stock grant of 50,000 shares of common stock. As of the date of filing the shares have not been issued.

 

 

On March 26, 2020, the Company entered into a contract for deed agreement with a third-party investor. Under the contract the Company agreed to the sale of 1 lot of vacant land located at the Valle Divino property in Ensenada, Mexico for a total purchase price of $25,000. This also includes a stock grant of 50,000 shares of common stock.

 

On November 6, 2019, the Company entered into a contract for deed agreement with a third-party investor. Under the contract the Company agreed to the sale of 1 lot of vacant land located at the Valle Divino property in Ensenada, Mexico for a total purchase price of $35,080, $10,000 was paid upon execution, $9,580 was paid on December 23, 2019, and the balance of $15,500 was paid on February 4, 2020. The payments have been classified as a customer deposit on the balance sheet as of December 31, 2019.

 

On February 24, 2020 IntegraGreen made a payment towards the contract for deed in the amount $32,000 .

 

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the novel strain of coronavirus (COVID-19) a global pandemic and recommended containment and mitigation measures worldwide. The Company is monitoring this closely, and although operations have not been materially affected by the coronavirus outbreak to date, the ultimate severity of the outbreak is uncertain. Operations of the Company are ongoing. Further the uncertain nature of its spread globally may impact our business operations resulting from quarantines of employees, customers, and third-party service providers. At this time, the Company is unable to estimate the impact of this event on its operations.

 

  F- 25  

 

Item 9. Changes In and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.

 

Not Applicable.

 

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

As required by Rule 13a-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, we have carried out an evaluation of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this annual report, being December 31, 2019. This evaluation was carried out under the supervision of, and with the participation of, our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer.

 

Disclosure controls and procedures are controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed or submitted under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our company’s reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Based upon that evaluation, we have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures are not effective as of the end of the period covered by this annual report due to the material weaknesses indicated below. We intend to implement additional procedures to improve disclosure controls.

 

MANAGEMENT’S ANNUAL REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING.

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934). Management has assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019 based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.

 

As a result of this assessment, management concluded that, as of December 31, 2019, our internal control over financial reporting was not effective. Our management identified the following material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, which are indicative of many small companies with limited personnel:

 

  lack of qualified and sufficient personnel, and processes to adequately and timely identify making any and all required public disclosures;

 

  deficiencies in the period-end reporting process and accounting policies;

 

  inadequate internal controls over the application of new accounting principles or the application of existing accounting principles to new transactions;

 

  inadequate internal controls relating to the authorization, recognition, capture, and review of transactions, facts, circumstances, and events that could have a material impact on the Company’s financial reporting process;

 

  inadequate controls over maintenance of records

 

Management has assigned a priority to the short-term and long-term improvement of our internal control over financial reporting.

 

The Company plans to:

 

  Conduct formal training related to key accounting policies, internal controls, and SEC compliance for all key personnel who have an impact on the transactions underlying the financial statements.

 

  Emphasize the importance of, and monitor the sustained compliance with, the execution of our internal controls over financial reporting.

 

  Work with our third-party service provider to ensure that our accounting and reporting for income taxes are timely and accurate.

 

CHANGES IN INTERNAL CONTROLS

 

No change in our system of internal control over financial reporting occurred during the period covered by this report, that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Item 9B. Other Information.

 

Not applicable.

 

  20  

 

PART III

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.

 

Our Bylaws provide that the Board of Directors shall consist of no more than three (3) directors. Each director of the Company serves until his successor is elected and qualified, subject to removal by the Company’s shareholders. Each officer holds office for such term and exercises such powers and performs such duties as are determined by the Board of Directors.

 

Name   Age   Position
Roberto Jesus Valdes   51   President, Principal Executive Officer and a Director
Jason Sunstein   48   Principal Financial and Accounting Officer and a Director
Lisa Landau   57   Chief Operations Officer

 

Roberto Jesus Valdes

 

Mr. Valdes has been the President of Grupo Valcas, Baja Residents Club, S.A. de, C.V. since 2004, and was the Assistant in the Grupo Valcas Design Department from 1989 to 1991. From 1991 through 2004, Mr. Valdes was a member of the Board of Directors, DUBCSA – Bajamar Ocean Front Resort Master Developer. During his term as a Director, he acted as Project Director for Grupo Valcas. His projects have included:

 

  La Serena Condominiums, Ensenada, 1992-1994
  La Quinta Bajamar Condominiums, Ensenada, 1994-1996
  Oceano at Bajamar residential development, Ensenada, 1996-1998
  Oceano Diamante residential development, Ensenada, 2000
  Costa Bajamar condominiums, Ensenada, 2004-2005

 

Mr. Valdes has been one of our officers and directors since October 2013.

 

Jason Sunstein

 

Mr. Sunstein brings finance, mergers and acquisitions and general management experience. Since 1989, he has participated in a broad variety of both domestic and international structured investments and financings, ranging from debt and preferred stock to equity and developmental capital across a wide variety of infrastructure and corporate financings. He has been involved in numerous start-ups, turnarounds and public companies. Mr. Sunstein serves as on the Board of Directors of several public and private companies, as well as the Advisory Board for the National Nutrition Reform, a non-profit company in San Diego, California. In December 2014 Mr. Sunstein filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy and it was discharged May 2015. He attended San Diego State University where he majored in Finance and has held NASD Series 7 (General Securities Representative) and Series 63 licenses.

 

Mr. Sunstein has been one of our officers and directors since October 2013. Between February 2012 and July 2014 Mr. Sunstein was Vice President of Earth Dragon Resources, Inc., a company involved in plasma and wound therapy. Between January 2009 and January 2012 Mr. Sunstein was Vice President of Santeon Group, Inc., a firm involved in software development.

 

  21  

 

Lisa Landau

 

Ms. Landau joined the Company in January 2014. Previously, she founded Enduralite Lighting Technologies, LLC in 2012. She then created Intelligent Lighting Corp in 2013 to bring together complimentary lighting products and services. Prior to this, she spent 10 years with the Oasis of Hope Cancer Treatment Centers in Tijuana, Mexico, and Irvine, California as Director of Operations. Prior to joining Oasis of Hope, Ms. Landau was also an integral part of the sales and marketing of the original PowerDisc prototype and the early international marketing campaign that showcased Muhammad Ali as a director and spokesperson. Ms. Landau also attended Thomas Jefferson School of Law in San Diego, California with an emphasis in international trade. Ms. Landau has an accounting and finance background with extensive experience in the mortgage industry. She has also been a licensed California real estate agent since 2005 specializing in the residential and commercial markets in San Diego County.

 

All of our officers, with the exception of Mr. Valdez, devote all of their time to our business. Mr. Valdes devotes approximately 140 hours each month to our business.

 

Term of Office

 

All officers and directors listed above will remain in office until the next annual meeting of our stockholders, and until their successors have been duly elected and qualified or until removed from office in accordance with our bylaws. There are no agreements with respect to the election of Directors. We have not compensated our Directors for service on our Board of Directors, any committee thereof, or reimbursed for expenses incurred for attendance at meetings of our Board of Directors and/or any committee of our Board of Directors. Officers are appointed annually by our Board of Directors and each Executive Officer serves at the discretion of our Board of Directors. We do not have any standing committees. Our Board of Directors may in the future determine to pay Directors’ fees and reimburse Directors for expenses related to their activities.

 

None of our officers and/or Directors have filed any bankruptcy petition, been convicted of or been the subject of any criminal proceedings or the subject of any order, judgment or decree involving the violation of any state or federal securities laws within the past five (5) years.

 

Board Committees

 

Audit Committee

 

We do not have a standing audit committee of the Board of Directors. Management has determined not to establish an audit committee at present because of our limited resources and limited operating activities do not warrant the formation of an audit committee or the expense of doing so. We do not have a financial expert serving on the Board of Directors or employed as an officer based on management’s belief that the cost of obtaining the services of a person who meets the criteria for a financial expert under Item 401(e) of Regulation S-B is beyond its limited financial resources.

 

Code of Ethics

 

To date, we have not adopted a Code of Ethics applicable to our principal executive officer and principal financial officer. The Company does not believe that a formal written code of ethics is necessary at this time. We expect that the Company will adopt a code of ethics if and when the Board of Directors deems it is necessary.

 

Our directors will serve until the next annual meeting of shareholders or until their successors are duly elected and have qualified. Officers hold their positions at the pleasure of the board of directors, absent any employment agreement, of which none currently exists or is contemplated. There is no arrangement or understanding between any person pursuant to which any director or officer was or is to be selected as a director or officer, and there is no arrangement, plan or understanding as to whether non-management shareholders will exercise their voting rights to continue to elect directors to our board. There are also no arrangements, agreements or understandings between non-management shareholders that may directly or indirectly participate in or influence the management of our affairs. Our Board of Directors does not have any committees at this time.

 

Potential Conflicts of Interest

 

Since we do not have an audit or compensation committee comprised of independent directors or any independent directors on our board, the functions that would have been performed by such committees are performed by our directors. Thus, there is a potential conflict of interest in that our directors and officers have the authority to determine issues concerning management compensation and audit issues that may affect management decisions. We are not aware of any other conflicts of interest with any of our executives or directors.

 

Director Independence

 

Our board of directors has undertaken a review of the independence of each director and considered whether any director has a material relationship with us that could compromise his ability to exercise independent judgment in carrying out his responsibilities. As a result of this review, our board of directors determined that our directors do not meet the independence requirements, according to the applicable rules and regulations of the SEC.

 

  22  

 

Corporate Governance

 

There have been no changes in any state law or other procedures by which security holders may recommend nominees to our board of directors. In addition to having no nominating committee for that purpose, we currently have no specific audit committee and no audit committee financial expert. Based on the fact that our current business affairs are simple, any such committees are excessive and beyond the scope of our business and needs.

 

Family Relationships

 

Mr. Sunstein and Ms. Landau are brother and sister.

 

Indemnification of Executive Officers and Directors

 

Section 17-16-856 of the Wyoming Business Corporation Act provides that any director or officer of a Wyoming corporation may be indemnified against judgments, penalties, fines, settlements and reasonable expenses actually incurred by him in connection with or in defending any action, suit or proceeding in which he is a party by reason of his position, so long as it shall be determined that he conducted himself in good faith and that he reasonably believed that his conduct was in the corporation’s best interest and, with respect to any criminal action or proceeding, had no reasonable cause to believe that his conduct was unlawful. If a director or officer is wholly successful, on the merits or otherwise, in connection with such proceeding, such indemnification is mandatory.

 

Currently we do not maintain any directors’ and officers’ liability insurance covering our directors and officers against expenses and liabilities arising from certain actions to which they may become subject by reason of having served in such role.

 

At present, there is no pending litigation or proceeding involving any of our directors, officers, employees or agents where indemnification will be required under California law. We are not aware of any threatened litigation or preceding that might result in a claim for such indemnification.

 

Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act of 1933 may be permitted to our directors, officers and controlling persons pursuant to the provisions described above, or otherwise, we have been advised that in the opinion of the SEC such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act of 1933 and is, therefore, unenforceable. In the event that a claim for indemnification against such liabilities (other than our payment of expenses incurred or paid by our director, officer or controlling person in the successful defense of any action, suit or proceeding) is asserted by such director, officer or controlling person in connection with the securities being registered, we will, unless in the opinion of our counsel the matter has been settled by controlling precedent, submit to a court of appropriate jurisdiction the question whether such indemnification by it is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and will be governed by the final adjudication of such issue.

 

Item 11. Executive Compensation.

 

We have not entered into employment agreements with our executive officers and their compensation is determined at the discretion of our Board of Directors.

 

We do not offer retirement benefit plans to our executive officers, nor have we entered into any contract, agreement, plan or arrangement, whether written or unwritten, that provides for payments to a named executive officer at, or in connection with, the resignation, retirement or other termination of a named executive officer, or a change in control of the company or a change in the named executive officer’s responsibilities following a change in control. We do not have any standard arrangement for compensation of our directors for any services provided as director, including services for committee participation or for special assignments.

 

The Company does not have a compensation committee. Given the nature of the Company’s business, its limited stockholder base and the current composition of management, the board of directors does not believe that the Company requires a compensation committee at this time.

 

The following table summarizes all compensation recorded by us in 2019, 2018 and 2017 for our principal executive officer, each other executive officer serving as such whose annual compensation exceeded $100,000, and up to two additional individuals for whom disclosure would have been made in this table but for the fact that the individual was not serving as an executive officer of our company at December 31, 2019. The value attributable to any option awards is computed in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718. The assumptions made in the valuations of the option awards are included in Note 2 of the Notes to our Financial Statements appearing later in this report.

 

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

 

The following table presents information concerning the compensation awarded to, earned by, or paid to the named executive officers for services rendered for the three years ended December 31, 2019.

 

Name and
Principal
  Year Ended     Salary     Bonus     Stock Awards     Option Awards    

Non-Equity Incentive Plan

Compensation

   

Nonqualified Deferred

Compensation

    All Other Compensation     Total  
Position   Dec. 31     ($)     ($)     ($)(1)     ($)     ($)     ($)     ($)     ($)  
                                                       
Roberto Jesus   2019       21,000       0       0       0       0       0       0       21,000  
Valdez,   2018       40,805       0               0       0       0       0       40,805  
CEO, President,
Director
  2017       102,000       0       125,000       0       0       0       0       227,000  
                                                                       
Jason Sunstein,   2019       89,681       0       0       0       0       0       0       89,681  
VP Finance, CFO   2018       138,079       0       0       0       0       0       0       138,079  
Director   2017       139,987       0       125,000       0       0       0       0       264,987  
                                                                       
Lisa Landau,   2019       11,500       0       0       0       0       0       0       11,500  
Chief Operations   2018       33,706       0       0       0       0       0       0       33,706  
Officer   2017       30,505       0       125,000       0       0       0       0       155,505  

 

  23  

 

Employment Agreement

 

The Company has no Employment Agreement with any of its officers or directors.

 

Stock Option Plan –

2019 Equity Incentive Plan

 

On February 11, 2019, the Company’s Board of Directors approved a 2019 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2019 Plan”). In order for the 2019 Plan to grant “qualified stock options” to employees, it required approval by the Corporation’s shareholders within 12 months from the date of the 2019 Plan. The 2019 Plan was never approved by the shareholders. Therefore, any options granted under the 2019 Plan prior to shareholder approval will be “non-qualified”. Pursuant to the 2019 Plan, the Company has reserved a total of 3,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to be available under the plan. As of December 31, 2019, ILA has not granted any options, as such, there is no share-based compensation for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Employee Pension, Profit Sharing or other Retirement Plans

 

We do not have a defined benefit, pension plan, profit sharing or other retirement plan, although we may adopt one or more of such plans in the future.

 

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.

 

The following tables set forth the ownership, as of the date of this filing, of our common stock by each person known by us to be the beneficial owner of more than 5% of our outstanding common stock, our directors, and our executive officers and directors as a group. To the best of our knowledge, the persons named have sole voting and investment power with respect to such shares, except as otherwise noted. There are not any pending or anticipated arrangements that may cause a change in control.

 

The information presented below regarding beneficial ownership of our voting securities has been presented in accordance with the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission and is not necessarily indicative of ownership for any other purpose. Under these rules, a person is deemed to be a “beneficial owner” of a security if that person has or shares the power to vote or direct the voting of the security or the power to dispose or direct the disposition of the security. A person is deemed to own beneficially any security as to which such person has the right to acquire sole or shared voting or investment power within 60 days through the conversion or exercise of any convertible security, warrant, option or other right. More than one person may be deemed to be a beneficial owner of the same securities. The percentage of beneficial ownership by any person as of a particular date is calculated by dividing the number of shares beneficially owned by such person, which includes the number of shares as to which such person has the right to acquire voting or investment power within 60 days, by the sum of the number of shares outstanding as of such date plus the number of shares as to which such person has the right to acquire voting or investment power within 60 days. Consequently, the denominator used for calculating such percentage may be different for each beneficial owner. Except as otherwise indicated below and under applicable community property laws, we believe that the beneficial owners of our common stock listed below have sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares shown. The percentage of shares is based on 21,434,289 shares issued and outstanding on April 2, 2020.

 

Name  

# of Shares of

Common Stock

    Percentage  
Roberto Jesus Valdes     4,000,000       19 %
Jason Sunstein *     3,750,000       18 %
Lisa Landau     300,000       0.014 %
Elizabeth Roemer     1,000,000       0.5 %
All Exec. Officers and Directors as a group (3 persons)     8,050,000       38 %

 

  * Jason A. Sunstein Family Investments, LLC is the record holder of these shares. Jason Sunstein controls Jason A. Sunstein Family Investments, LLC.

 

We are not aware of any person who owns of record, or is known to own beneficially, five percent or more of the outstanding securities of any class of the issuer, other than as set forth above. There are no classes of stock other than common stock issued or outstanding.

 

There are no current arrangements which will result in a change in control.

 

  24  

 

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence.

 

Related Party Transactions

 

Please see Note 5 to the financial statements for a listing of our related party transactions

 

Director Independence

 

Our Common Stock is not quoted or listed on any national exchange or interdealer quotation system with a requirement that a majority of our board of directors be independent and therefore, the Company is not subject to any director independence requirements. Under NASDAQ Rule 5605(a)(2)(A), a director is not considered to be independent if he or she is also an executive officer or employee of the corporation. Under such definition our three officers and directors would not be considered an independent director.

 

Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services.

 

During 2019, Haskell & White, LLP and 2018, M&K CPAS, PLLC, the Company’s independent auditors, have billed for their services as set forth below. In addition, fees and services related to the audit of the financial statements of the Company for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, as contained in this Report, are estimated and included.

 

    Year ended December 31,  
    2019     2018  
             
Audit Fees   $ 56,300     $ 37,500  
                 
Audit-Related Fees   $ -0-     $ -0-  
                 
Tax Fees   $ -0-     $ -0-  
                 
All Other Fees   $ -0-     $ -0-  

 

Pre-Approval Policy

 

Our Board of Directors as a whole pre-approves all services provided by Haskell & White LLP. For any non-audit or non-audit related services, the Board of Directors must conclude that such services are compatible with the independence as our auditors.

 

  25  

 

PART IV

 

Item 15. Exhibits; Financial Statement Schedules.

 

Exhibit    
Number   Description of Exhibit
3.1   Articles of Incorporation of the Registrant (1)
3.2   Bylaws of the Registrant (1)
10.1   Share Exchange Agreement with ILA Mexico (1) 
10.2   Letter Agreement with Grupo Valcas/Baja Residents Club, S.A. de C.V. (1)
23.1*   Consent of HASKELL & WHITE LLP
23.2   Consent of M&K CPAS, PLLC
31.1*   Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302(a) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
31.2*   Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302(a) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

32.1*

101

 

Certification of CEO and CFO pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

The following materials from the Company’s Annual report for the period ended December 31, 2019 formatted in Extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL).

 

(1) Filed with S-1 registration statement on February 11, 2016.
* Filed herein.

 

  26  

 

SIGNATURES

 

In accordance with the Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized on the 14th day of April, 2020.

 

  INTERNATIONAL LAND ALLIANCE, INC.
     
  By: /s/ Roberto Jesus Valdes
  Name: Roberto Jesus Valdes
  Title: Principal Executive Officer

 

In accordance with the requirements of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities indicated and on the dates stated.

 

Signature    
     
/s/ Roberto Jesus Valdes   Dated: April 14, 2020
Roberto Jesus Valdes    
President, Principal Executive Officer and a Director    
     
/s/ Jason Sunstein   Dated: April 14, 2020
Jason Sunstein    
Principal Financial and Accounting Officer and a Director    

 

  27  

 

EXHIBIT INDEX

 

Exhibit    
Number   Description of Exhibit
3.1   Articles of Incorporation of the Registrant (1)
3.2   Bylaws of the Registrant (1)
10.1   Share Exchange Agreement with ILA Mexico (1)
10.2   Letter Agreement with Grupo Valcas/Baja Residents Club, S.A. de C.V. (1)
23.1*   Consent of HASKELL & WHITE LLP
23.2  

Consent of M&K CPAS, PLLC

31.1*   Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302(a) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
31.2*   Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302(a) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

32.1*

101

 

Certification of CEO and CFO pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

The following materials from the Company’s Annual report for the period ended December 31, 2019 formatted in Extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL)

 

(1) Filed with S-1 registration statement on February 11, 2016.
* Filed herein.

 

  28  

International Land Allia... (QB) (USOTC:ILAL)
Historical Stock Chart
From Aug 2020 to Sep 2020 Click Here for more International Land Allia... (QB) Charts.
International Land Allia... (QB) (USOTC:ILAL)
Historical Stock Chart
From Sep 2019 to Sep 2020 Click Here for more International Land Allia... (QB) Charts.