Filed Pursuant to Rule 424(b)(3)

Registration No. 333-261471

 

17,098,689 SHARES OF COMMON STOCK

 

 

CLUBHOUSE MEDIA GROUP, INC.

 

This Prospectus (this “Prospectus”) relates to the offer and sale from time to time of up to 17,098,689 shares of common stock, par value $0.001 (“Common Stock”), of Clubhouse Media Group, Inc., a Nevada corporation, by Peak One Opportunity Fund, L.P. (“Peak One”) and Peak One Investments, LLC (the “Selling Securityholders”). We are registering the resale of up to 17,098,689 shares of Common Stock consisting of (i) 17,028,689 shares of Common Stock issuable to Peak One under an equity line in the amount of $15,000,000 (the “Equity Line”) established by the Equity Purchase Agreement, dated as of October 29, 2021 (“Equity Line”), between us and Peak One Opportunity Fund, L.P., as more fully described in this Prospectus, and (ii) 70,000 shares of Common Stock issuable as commitment fee shares (of which 35,000 shares of Common Stock are issuable to Peak One and 35,000 shares of Common Stock are issuable to Peak One Investments, LLC). Peak One Investments is the General Partner of Peak One Opportunity Fund, L.P., both of which are Delaware corporations. The resale of such shares by the Selling Securityholders pursuant to this Prospectus is referred to as the “Offering.”

 

We are not selling any securities under this Prospectus and will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of shares of Common Stock by the Selling Securityholders. We will, however, receive proceeds from our sale of our shares of Common Stock under the Equity Line to the Selling Securityholders.

 

The Equity Purchase Agreement with Peak One provides that Peak One is committed to purchase up to $15,000,000 (“Maximum Commitment Amount”) of our Common Stock over the course of the commitment period. Pursuant to the terms of the Equity Purchase Agreement, the commitment period will begin on the date of the Equity Purchase Agreement, and ending on the earlier of (i) the date on which Peak One shall have purchased Common Stock pursuant to the Equity Purchase Agreement equal to the Maximum Commitment Amount, (ii) twenty four (24) months after the date of the Equity Purchase Agreement, (iii) written notice of termination by the Company to Peak One. (which shall not occur during any Valuation Period or at any time that Peak One holds any of the Put Shares), (iv) the Registration Statement is no longer effective after the initial effective date of the Registration Statement, or (v) the date that the Company commences a voluntary case or any person commences a proceeding against the Company, a custodian is appointed for the Company or for all or substantially all of its property or the Company makes a general assignment for the benefit of its creditors (the “Commitment Period”).

 

During the Commitment Period, the purchase price to be paid by Peak One for the Common Stock under the Equity Purchase Agreement shall be 95% of the Market Price, which is defined as the lesser of the (i) closing bid price of the Common Stock on the trading day immediately preceding the respective Put Date (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement), or (ii) lowest closing bid price of the Common Stock during the Valuation Period (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement), in each case as reported by Bloomberg Finance L.P or other reputable source designated by Peak One Opportunity Fund, L.P.

 

We may draw on the Equity Line from time to time, as and when we determine appropriate in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Equity Purchase Agreement. The 17,098,689 shares of Common Stock included in this prospectus represent a portion of the Common Stock issuable to the Selling Securityholders under the Equity Purchase Agreement.

 

The Selling Securityholders are “underwriters” within the meaning of Section 2(a)(11) of the Securities Act. The Selling Securityholders may sell the shares of Common Stock described in this Prospectus in a number of different ways and at varying prices. See “Plan of Distribution” for more information about how the Selling Securityholders may sell the shares of Common Stock being registered pursuant to this Prospectus.

 

We will pay the expenses incurred in registering the shares of Common Stock, including legal and accounting fees. See “Plan of Distribution.”

 

Our Common Stock is currently quoted on the OTC Market Group, Inc.’s OTC Pink tier under the symbol “CMGR.” On November 30, 2021, the last reported sale price of our Common Stock was $0.2425.

 

Our principal executive offices are located at 3651 Lindell Road, D517, Las Vegas, Nevada 89103.

 

Investing in our Common Stock involves a high degree of risk. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 12 of this Prospectus.

 

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this Prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

The date of this Prospectus is December 13, 2021

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  Page
CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS ii
INDUSTRY AND MARKET DATA ii
TRADEMARKS AND COPYRIGHTS ii
PROSPECTUS SUMMARY 1
SELECTED HISTORICAL CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA 11
RISK FACTORS 12
USE OF PROCEEDS 32
DIVIDEND POLICY 32
CAPITALIZATION 32
MARKET PRICE FOR COMMON EQUITY AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS 33
DETERMINATION OF OFFERING PRICE 32
DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS 34
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 64
MANAGEMENT 79
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION 83
SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT 87
CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS 89
DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES 92
SELLING SECURITYHOLDERS 96
PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION 97
SHARES ELIGIBLE FOR FUTURE SALE 99
LEGAL MATTERS 99
EXPERTS 99
DISCLOSURE OF COMMISSION’S POSITION ON INDEMNIFICATION FOR SECURITIES ACT LIABILITIES 100
WHERE YOU CAN FIND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 100
INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS F-1

 

No dealer, salesperson or other individual has been authorized to give any information or to make any representation other than those contained in this prospectus in connection with the offer made by this prospectus and, if given or made, such information or representations must not be relied upon as having been authorized by us. This prospectus does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any securities in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or in which the person making such offer or solicitation is not qualified to do so, or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such offer or solicitation. Neither the delivery of this prospectus nor any sale made hereunder shall, under any circumstances, create any implication that there has been no change in our affairs or that information contained herein is correct as of any time subsequent to the date hereof.

 

For investors outside the United States: We have not done anything that would permit this offering or possession or distribution of this prospectus in any jurisdiction where action for that purpose is required, other than in the United States. Persons outside the United States who come into possession of this prospectus must inform themselves, and observe any restrictions relating to, the offering of the shares of our common stock and the distribution of this prospectus outside the United States.

 

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Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements. Specifically, forward-looking statements may include statements relating to:

 

  our future financial performance;
     
  changes in the market for our products and services;
     
  our expansion plans and opportunities; and
     
  other statements preceded by, followed by or that include the words “estimate,” “plan,” “project,” “forecast,” “intend,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “seek,” “target” or similar expressions.

 

These forward-looking statements are based on information available as of the date of this prospectus and current expectations, forecasts and assumptions, and involve a number of judgments, risks and uncertainties. Accordingly, forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as representing our views as of any subsequent date, and we do not undertake any obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date they were made, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as may be required under applicable securities laws.

 

As a result of a number of known and unknown risks and uncertainties, our actual results or performance may be materially different from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Some factors that could cause actual results to differ include:

 

  the level of demand for our products and services;
     
  competition in our markets;
     
  our ability to grow and manage growth profitably;
     
  our ability to access additional capital;
     
  changes in applicable laws or regulations;
     
  our ability to attract and retain qualified personnel;
     
  the possibility that we may be adversely affected by other economic, business, and/or competitive factors; and
     
  other risks and uncertainties indicated in this prospectus, including those under “Risk Factors.”

 

INDUSTRY AND MARKET DATA

 

We are responsible for the disclosure in this prospectus. However, this prospectus includes industry data that we obtained from internal surveys, market research, publicly available information and industry publications. The market research, publicly available information and industry publications that we use generally state that the information contained therein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. The information therein represents the most recently available data from the relevant sources and publications and we believe remains reliable. We did not fund and are not otherwise affiliated with any of the sources cited in this prospectus. Forward-looking information obtained from these sources is subject to the same qualifications and additional uncertainties regarding the other forward-looking statements in this prospectus.

 

TRADEMARKS AND COPYRIGHTS

 

We own or have rights to trademarks or trade names that we use in connection with the operation of our business, including our corporate names, logos and website names. In addition, we own or have the rights to copyrights, trade secrets and other proprietary rights that protect the content of our products and the formulations for such products. This prospectus may also contain trademarks, service marks and trade names of other companies, which are the property of their respective owners. Our use or display of third parties’ trademarks, service marks, trade names or products in this prospectus is not intended to, and should not be read to, imply a relationship with or endorsement or sponsorship of us. Solely for convenience, some of the copyrights, trade names and trademarks referred to in this prospectus are listed without their ©, ® and ™ symbols, but we will assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights to our copyrights, trade names and trademarks. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

 

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

 

This summary of the prospectus highlights material information concerning our business and this offering. This summary does not contain all of the information that you should consider before making your investment decision. You should carefully read the entire prospectus, including the information presented under the section entitled “Risk Factors” and the financial data and related notes, before making an investment decision. This summary contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results may differ significantly from future results contemplated in the forward-looking statements as a result of factors such as those set forth in “Risk Factors” and “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements.”

 

In this prospectus, unless the context indicates otherwise, “Clubhouse Media,” the “Company,” “we,” “our,” “ours” or “us” refer to Clubhouse Media Group, Inc., a Nevada corporation, and its subsidiaries, including West of Hudson Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation, and its subsidiaries. Peak One Opportunity Fund, LP is referred to herein as “Peak One” or “Investor” and Peak One Investments is referred to herein a “Peak One Investments.”

 

This summary contains basic information about us and the offering. Because it is a summary, it does not contain all the information that you should consider before investing. You should read the entire prospectus carefully, including the risk factors and our financial statements and the related notes to those statements included in this prospectus.

 

We have not authorized anyone to provide you with different information and you must not rely on any unauthorized information or representation. We are not making an offer to sell these securities in any jurisdiction where an offer or sale is not permitted. This document may only be used where it is legal to sell these securities. You should assume that the information appearing in this prospectus is accurate only as of the date on the front of this prospectus, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus, or any sale of our common stock. Our business, financial condition and results of operations may have changed since the date on the front of this prospectus. We urge you to carefully read this prospectus before deciding whether to invest in any of the common stock being offered.

 

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

 

We operate a global network of professionally run content houses, each of which has its own brand, influencer cohort and production capabilities. Our Company offers management, production and deal-making services to our handpicked influencers, a management division for individual influencer clients, and an investment arm for joint ventures and acquisitions for companies in the social media influencer space. Our management team consists of successful entrepreneurs with financial, legal, marketing, and digital content creation expertise.

 

Through our subsidiary, West of Hudson Group, Inc., or WOHG, we currently generate revenues primarily (i) through Doiyen, LLC, a 100% wholly owned subsidiary of WOHG, providing talent management of social media influencers residing in our Clubhouses; (ii) through WHO Brands, a 100% wholly owned subsidiary of WOHG, providing content-creation, social media marketing, technology development and brand incubation; (iii) through Digital Influence Inc. (doing business as Magiclytics), a 100% wholly owned subsidiary of WOHG, providing predictive analytics for content creation brand deals; and (iv) for paid promotion by companies looking to utilize such social media influencers to promote their products or services. We solicit companies for potential marketing collaborations and cultivated content creation, work with the influencers and the marketing entity to negotiate and formalize a brand deal and then execute the deal and receive a certain percentage from the deal. In addition to the in-house brand deals, we generate income by providing talent management and brand partnership deals to external influencers not residing in our Clubhouses.

 

WOHG is the 100% owner and sole member and manager of each of these entities pursuant to each of the limited liability company agreements, operating agreements, bylaws, and/or articles of association, where applicable, that govern these entities, and has complete and exclusive discretion in the management and control of the affairs and business of WOH Brands, Doiyen, and Digital Influence Inc. (doing business as Magiclytics). WOHG possesses all powers necessary to carry out the purposes and business of these entities and is entitled to the receipt of all income (and/or losses) that these entities generate.

 

In addition to the above, WOHG is the 100% owner of two other limited liability companies – Clubhouse Studios, LLC, which holds most of our intellectual property, and DAK Brands, LLC, each incorporated in the State of Delaware on May 13, 2020. However, each of these entities has minimal or no operations, and is not intended to have any material operations in the near future.

 

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For the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020, Clubhouse Media generated revenues of $1,010,405 and reported a net loss of $2,577,721 and negative cash flow from operating activities of $1,967,551. For the nine months ended September 30, 2021, Clubhouse Media generated net revenues of $3,222,015, reported a gross profit of $572,895, and had negative cash flow from operating activities of $7,153,911. As noted in the consolidated financial statements of Clubhouse Media, as of September 30, 2021, Clubhouse Media had an accumulated deficit of $21,169,300. There is substantial doubt regarding the ability of Clubhouse Media to continue as a going concern as a result of its historical recurring losses and negative cash flows from operations as well as its dependence on private equity and financings. See “Risk Factors— Clubhouse Media has a history of operating losses and its management has concluded that factors raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern and the auditor of Clubhouse Media has included explanatory paragraphs relating to its ability to continue as a going concern in its audit report for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020.”

 

Principal Products and Services

 

Our current principal products and services are comprised of (1) our Clubhouses, (2) our talent management services and (3) our brand development and content creation.

 

The Clubhouses

 

Through WOHG, we are the sole owner of “The Clubhouse,” which is an integrated social media influencer incubator with physical and digital footprints in both Southern California and Europe. The Clubhouse is a collection of content creation houses located in scenic mansions in Southern California (currently including three locations), and Europe (one location), housing some of the most prominent and widely followed social media influencers, together carrying an estimated aggregate follower base of approximately 460 million social media followers as of December 2, 2021 across all platforms. The influencers who live in our Clubhouses, as well as the number of their social media followers, can fluctuate significantly at any given time, and we cannot predict the increase or decline of the number of influencers who live in our Clubhouses or the number of followers for our Clubhouse influencers at any given time in the future.

 

Content Houses at a Glance

 

Content houses originated from gaming houses in the gaming industry, where professional video game players and gaming teams lived in the same residence with each other in order to practice gaming and create content to build their own following. Eventually this concept was adopted by lifestyle influencers and was found to be a way for individual influencers to create new content with other influencers and grow followers together.

 

Our Clubhouses

 

The Clubhouse is an established network of social media content creation houses (Clubhouse BH and Clubhouse Europe) that each provide a picturesque living environment for our band of social media influencers, complete with in-house video, audio, and photo media production teams. We believe this enables our influencers to maximize the depth, breadth, scale, and engagement level and of their follower bases.

 

  Dance Dome LA” is housed under the Clubhouse BH location and targets a subgenre of influencers in the dance community. Dance Dome aims to target the young male and female demographic of 12-30 years old, specifically those interested in the subgenre of dancing-related content.
     
  “Clubhouse Europe” is located in the Republic of Malta, where we’ve expanded our international footprint by bringing together some of Europe’s most popular influencers under a single roof. Clubhouse Europe is targeting European demographic of men and women aged 17 to 30.

 

“The Clubhouse” Online Presence and Plans for Expansion of the Physical Clubhouses

 

While “The Clubhouse” network consists of physical locations (as described above), there are numerous “Clubhouse” accounts owned by The Clubhouse, with a combined following of over 460 million followers as of December 2, 2021 across Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, and TikTok. These accounts are directly held by us (as opposed to the Clubhouse team of influencers) and therefore we have direct access to the followers of these accounts, which we consider to be our followers.

 

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We are constantly surveying opportunities to establish new Clubhouses, and we intend to expand our Clubhouse locations as our business continues to grow. We specifically plan on expanding the Clubhouse footprint further into Europe and the U.S. as well as into Asia, and into other sectors of content creation like e-gaming, beauty and music. We currently plan to add from two to four additional Clubhouses each year, depending on available funding for such expansion and market conditions, though we cannot provide any assurance that we will be able to expand at this rate. We also intend to engage in a cross-house collaborative strategy that we believe to be unique in the influencer/content creator industry, and we believe we have access to talented individuals who can be deployed to a broad range of brand partnership and other opportunities, leading to diversified revenue streams and significant growth opportunities for the Company.

 

Influencers Benefit From Our Content Houses

 

Influencers need to constantly create original content to grow their following, and collaborations with other influencers can help facilitate creative content while allowing for sharing of followers among influencers. Our Clubhouses provide a unique living situation where influencers can collaborate and work together to grow each other’s following. For example, one of the influencers who was living in our Clubhouses experienced in four months, growth from 3.22 million followers on Instagram to 5.2 million followers on Instagram. Another one of the influencers who lived in our Clubhouses experienced in four months, growth from 1.5 million followers on Instagram to 2.3 million followers on Instagram.

 

Clubhouse and Influencer Fit

 

At Clubhouse Media, we strive to cultivate a large and committed following for our team of influencers, which we plan to leverage to popularize our in-house brands, driving sales and brand-awareness to our target customers. Our approach is to create a balance between social media creativity and the business of social media marketing. We believe that this symbiotic balance creates a higher output for both our Clubhouses and influencers and creates an attractive one-stop shop for brands to advertise and for influencers to grow and collaborate. The Clubhouse’s goal is to develop and successfully monetize on its network of influencers through a portfolio of valuable brands by becoming the world’s leading hub for new media content. The Clubhouse has already received media coverage in publications such as Forbes, the New York Times, Business Insider and Seventeen, among others.

 

Talent Management Services

 

Doiyen LLC, our indirectly wholly owned subsidiary, is a talent management company for social media influencers and generates revenues based on the earnings of its influencer-clients (or “Creators”) by receiving a percentage of the earnings of its Creators. Certain influencers who live in our various Clubhouses enter into an Exclusive Management Agreement (the “Management Agreement(s)”). Through Doiyen, we seek to represent some of the world’s top talent in the world of social media. We plan to hire experienced talent and management agents as well as build our support and administrative resources seeking to expand operations. Our influencers include entertainers, content creators, and style icons.

 

Through Doiyen, we currently represent more than 24 social media influencers, with a combined number of followers on Instagram, TikTok, and YouTube of over 64,000,000. We are dedicated to helping Doiyen’s influencer-clients build their brands, maintain creative control of their destinies, and diversify and grow their businesses through “The Clubhouse,” providing them opportunities to increase their monetization potential and amplify their reach.

 

We also may enter into non-exclusive management agreements with certain Creators, however this is extremely rare, as we prefer to only enter into exclusive management agreements.

 

Brand Development and Content Creation

 

Through WOH Brands, LLC, a 100% wholly owned subsidiary of WOHG, we engage and also plan to engage in a number of activities with respect to brand development and incubation, content creation, and technology development, as follows:

 

  Content Creation: original long and short form content creation for streaming services or other platforms involved in content distribution;

 

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  Brand Development and Product Sales: acquiring or creating in-house brands and selling products in various categories, including apparel, beauty, and other lifestyle brands; and
     
  Technology: development and/or acquisition of software geared towards social media, which may be licensed, sold outright, or otherwise monetized by us.

 

Through Digital Influence Inc. (doing business as Magiclytics), a 100% wholly owned subsidiary of WOHG, we provide predictive analytics for content creation brand deals.

 

Subscription Services

 

In September 2021, the Company launched its subscription-based site HoneyDrip.com, which provides a digital space for creators to share unique content with their subscribers.

 

INDUSTRY OVERVIEW

 

Social Media and Influencer Marketing and Promotion

 

According to a Business Insider Intelligence report titled “Influencer Marketing: State of the social media influencer market in 2021” originally published in December 2019 and updated as of February 2021, influencer marketing spending has grown significantly since 2015 and is expected to reach $13.8 billion annually by 2021. According to the same source, currently 78% of companies spend over 10% of their marketing budget on influencer marketing and 11% of companies allocate more than 40% of their marketing budget on influencer marketing and the percentage is expected to grow as more companies become comfortable with the channel. Also according to the same source, companies surveyed about influencer marketing noted that content quality, aligned target audience demographic and engagement rate were the three most important determinants in choosing influencer partners and that the two most important goals for influencer marketing based on survey responses were increasing brand awareness and reaching new audiences in order to expand their existing customer base.

 

WOHG intends to capitalize on this growing social media and influencer based advertising spending, utilizing its Clubhouse influencers to attract advertisers directly, as well as generating business for Creators, for which it will receive compensation pursuant to its Management Agreements.

 

Apparel

 

The United States apparel market was valued at approximately 368 billion U.S. dollars as of 2019. Store-based retailing was valued at over $268 billion, while e-commerce brought in over $100 billion. As the internet increasingly influences social and economic activities, the e-commerce market for retail goods is expected to grow steadily. Our core customer demographic is 12 to 30-year old women and men.

 

Competition

 

We seek to compete with our competitors by out-scaling our competition, focusing on in-house business infrastructure and providing superior support and management services for our Clubhouse influencers. We strive to have more physical locations than other influencer-house networks. We are currently unaware of any other company combining the various business aspects in which we engage into one unified business. We also believe our experienced management team provides us with a significant advantage in the social media influencer business, as participants in the space have traditionally lacked the extensive business experience our executive management team possesses, which we intend to use to our advantage. Notwithstanding, we may not be able to effectively compete with such competitors.

 

Customers

 

The customers we service through Doiyen include our influencer-clients (also called “Creators” or “Content Creators”) and companies that contract directly with us for paid promotion. The customers who purchase our products come to us through WHO Brands.

 

Doiyen and its Creators are currently or have recently worked with a number of notable brands, including Fashion Nova, Spotify, McDonalds, Amazon, and Boohoo.

 

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Sales and Marketing

 

We generally attract clients through our social media presence across various platforms, including YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok.

 

As a respected name in the social media influencer industry, we are often approached by influencers who want us to represent them through Doiyen, or want to live in one of our well-known Clubhouses. We also scout for up-and-coming talented influencers on various social media platforms, who we then attempt to engage as clients.

 

For paid promotion, we generally receive inbound inquiries for promotional opportunities from companies looking to promote their brands or products. Doiyen also has a sales team to reach out to specific brands that we believe fits a specific influencer’s style, which is another way we generate business.

 

All products that we sell are marketed through our Clubhouse team of influencers, who provide promotion and marketing social media posts on our behalf as part of the terms of their living arrangements in the Clubhouses.

 

Government Regulation

 

We are subject to various federal, state and local laws, both domestically and internationally, governing matters such as:

 

  licensing laws for talent management companies, such as California’s Talent Agencies Act;
  licensing, permitting and zoning;
  health, safety and sanitation requirements;
  harassment and discrimination, and other similar laws and regulations;
  compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) and similar regulations in other countries;
  data privacy and information security;
  marketing activities;
  environmental protection regulations;
  imposition by the U.S and/or foreign countries of trade restrictions, restrictions on the manner in which content is currently licensed and distributed and ownership restrictions; and
  government regulation of the entertainment industry.

 

We monitor changes in these laws and believe that we are in material compliance with applicable laws and regulations. See “Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business—We are subject to extensive U.S. and foreign governmental regulations, and our failure to comply with these regulations could adversely affect our business.”

 

Recent Developments

 

For a detailed description of recent developments of the Company, see “Description of Business—Recent Developments” on page 44 of this prospectus.

 

Overview of the Business of West of Hudson Group, Inc.

 

West of Hudson Group, Inc., or WOHG, our directly wholly owned subsidiary, is primarily a holding company, and operates various aspects of its business through its operating subsidiaries of which WOHG is the 100% owner and sole member, in the case of limited liability companies, and which are as follows:

 

    Doiyen, LLC – a talent management company that provides representation to Clubhouse influencers.
     
    WOH Brands, LLC – a content-creation studio, social media marketing company, technology developer.
     
    Digital Influence Inc. d/b/a Magiclytics – providing predictive analytics for content creation brands’ valuation, M&A, and other transactions.

 

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Organizational Structure

 

The following reflects our organization structure:

 

 

 

Effects of Coronavirus on the Company

 

If the current outbreak of the coronavirus continues to grow, the effects of such a widespread infectious disease and epidemic may inhibit our ability to conduct our business and operations and could materially harm our company. The coronavirus may cause us to have to reduce operations as a result of various lock-down procedures enacted by the local, state or federal government, which could restrict the movement of our influencers outside of or within a specific Clubhouse or even effect the influencer’s ability to create content. The coronavirus may also cause a decrease in advertising spending by companies as a result of the economic turmoil resulting from the spread of the coronavirus and thereby having a negative effect on our ability to generate revenue from advertising. Further, if there is a spread of the coronavirus within any of our Clubhouses, it may cause an inability for our content creators to create and post content and could potentially cause a specific Clubhouse location to be entirely quarantined. Additionally, we may encounter negative publicity or a negative public reaction when creating and posting certain content while a coronavirus related lockdown is enacted. The continued coronavirus outbreak may also restrict our ability to raise funding when needed, and may cause an overall decline in the economy as a whole. The specific and actual effects of the spread of coronavirus are difficult to assess at this time as the actual effects will depend on many factors beyond our control and knowledge. However, the spread of the coronavirus, if it continues, may cause an overall decline in the economy as a whole and also may materially harm our company.

 

Notwithstanding the foregoing possible negative impacts on our business and results of operations, up until now, we do not believe our prior and current business operations, financial condition, and results of operations have been negatively impacted by the coronavirus pandemic and related shutdowns. As the social media sector appears to have been thriving during the pandemic and shutdowns, we believe that our social media-based business and our results of operations have been thriving as well. More specifically, we have been successful at opening several houses, actively recruiting influencers/creators, creating content, and generating revenue during the pandemic and shutdowns. Notwithstanding, the ultimate impact of the coronavirus pandemic on our operations remains unknown and will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, including the duration of the coronavirus outbreak, new information which may emerge concerning the severity of the coronavirus pandemic, and any additional preventative and protective actions that governments, or our company, may direct, which may result in an extended period of business disruption and reduced operations. The long-term financial impact cannot be reasonably estimated at this time and may ultimately have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

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Summary Risk Factors

 

Our business is subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, including those described in “Risk Factors” immediately following this Prospectus summary and elsewhere in this Prospectus. These risks represent challenges to the successful implementation of our strategy and to the growth and future profitability of our business. These risks include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

  Clubhouse Media has a history of operating losses;
     
  There are no assurances we will realize the anticipated benefits from the acquisition of WOHG;
     
  The current outbreak of the coronavirus may have a negative effect on our ability to conduct our business and operations and may also cause an overall decline in the economy as a whole and could materially harm our Company;
     
  We may be adversely affected by political tensions between the United States and China;
     
  We may not be able to effectively manage our growth and the increased complexity of our business, which could negatively impact our brand and financial performance;
  We may suffer from lack of availability of additional funds;
     
  The ability of our Chief Executive Officer, Amir Ben-Yohanan, to control our business may limit or eliminate minority stockholders’ ability to influence corporate affairs;
     
  We are not a party to certain of the leases for its Clubhouse properties, and therefore is subject to the risk of those leases being terminated or altered without its consent;
     
  Our business is subject to fluctuations that are not predictable, which subjects our business to increase risks;
     
  Our business depends on our ability to provide customers and followers with interesting and useful content, which in turn depends on the content contributed by the content creators;
     
  Changes in public and consumer tastes and preferences and industry trends could reduce demand for our services and content offerings and adversely affect our business;
     
  Our ability to generate revenue from discretionary and corporate spending, such as corporate sponsorships and advertising, is subject to many factors, including many that are beyond our control;
     
  We may not be able to adapt to or manage new content distribution platforms or changes in consumer behavior resulting from new technologies;
     
  Because our success depends substantially on our ability to maintain a professional reputation, adverse publicity concerning us, one of our businesses, our Creators or our key personnel could adversely affect our business;
     
  We depend on the relationships of our talent managers and other key personnel with clients across many categories, including fashion, music, digital, and sponsorship;
     
  Our success depends, in part, on our continuing ability to identify, recruit and retain qualified and experienced talent managers. If we fail to recruit and retain suitable talent managers or if our relationships with our talent managers change or deteriorate, it could adversely affect our business;
     
  Our failure to identify, sign and retain influencer-clients could adversely affect our business;

 

7
 

 

  The markets in which we operate are highly competitive, both within the United States and internationally;
     
  We operate in a fast-evolving industry, and we are in the early stage of our business. We cannot guarantee that our monetization strategies will be successfully implemented or generate sustainable revenues and profit;
     
  We rely on technology, such as our information systems, to conduct our business. Failure to protect our technology against breakdowns and security breaches could adversely affect our business;
     
  Increases in the costs of content may have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations;
     
  In our paid promotion business, if we are unable to prove that our advertising and sponsorship solutions provide an attractive return on investment for our customers, our financial results could be harmed;
     
  We will be attempting to launch brands in new markets and with new products. Our inability to effectively execute our business plan in relation to these new brands could negatively impact our business;
     
  Our intellectual property rights are valuable, and if we are unable to protect them or are subject to intellectual property rights claims, our business may be harmed;
     
  As a creator and a distributor of content over the internet, we face potential liability for legal claims based on the nature and content of the materials that we create or distribute;
     
  We are subject to extensive U.S. and foreign governmental regulations, and our failure to comply with these regulations could adversely affect our business;
     
  We could become involved in claims or litigations that may result in adverse outcomes; and
     
  A limited market for our common stock.

 

In addition, the management of Clubhouse Media has concluded that its historical recurring losses from operations and negative cash flows from operations as well as its dependence on securing private equity and other financings raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern and the auditor of Clubhouse Media has included an explanatory paragraph relating to its ability to continue as a going concern in its audit report for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020.

 

Company Information

 

Our principal office is located at 3651 Lindell Road, D517, Las Vegas, Nevada 89103 and our phone number is (702) 479-3016. Our corporate website address is www.clubhousemediagroup.com. Information contained on, or accessible through, our website is not a part of, and is not incorporated by reference into, this Prospectus.

 

Summary of the Peak One Equity Purchase Agreement and Registration Rights Agreement

 

On November 2, 2021, the Company entered into an Equity Purchase Agreement and Registration Rights Agreement (the “Registration Rights Agreement”) with Peak One Opportunity Fund, L.P., a Delaware limited Partnership (“Investor”), dated as of October 29, 2021, pursuant to which the Company shall have the right, but not the obligation, to direct Investor, to purchase up to $15,000,000.00 (the “Maximum Commitment Amount”) in shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (“Common Stock”), in multiple tranches (the “Put Shares”). Further, under the Equity Purchase Agreement and subject to the Maximum Commitment Amount, the Company has the right, but not the obligation, to submit a Put Notice (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement) from time to time to Investor (i) in a minimum amount not less than $20,000.00 and (ii) in a maximum amount up to the lesser of (a) $400,000.00 or (b) 250% of the Average Daily Trading Value (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement).

 

In exchange for Investor entering into the Equity Purchase Agreement, the Company agreed, among other things, to (A) issue Investor and Peak One Investments, LLC, an aggregate of 70,000 shares of Common Stock (the “Commitment Shares”), and (B) file a registration statement registering the Common Stock issued as Commitment Shares and issuable to Investor under the Equity Purchase Agreement for resale (the “Registration Statement”) with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 60 calendar days of the Equity Purchase Agreement, as more specifically set forth in the Registration Rights Agreement.

 

8
 

 

The obligation of Investor to purchase the Company’s Common Stock shall begin on the date of the Equity Purchase Agreement, and ending on the earlier of (i) the date on which Investor shall have purchased Common Stock pursuant to the Equity Purchase Agreement equal to the Maximum Commitment Amount, (ii) twenty four (24) months after the date of the Equity Purchase Agreement, (iii) written notice of termination by the Company to Investor (which shall not occur during any Valuation Period or at any time that Investor holds any of the Put Shares), (iv) the Registration Statement is no longer effective after the initial effective date of the Registration Statement, or (v) the date that the Company commences a voluntary case or any person commences a proceeding against the Company, a custodian is appointed for the Company or for all or substantially all of its property or the Company makes a general assignment for the benefit of its creditors (the “Commitment Period”).

 

During the Commitment Period, the purchase price to be paid by Investor for the Common Stock under the Equity Purchase Agreement shall be 95% of the Market Price, which is defined as the lesser of the (i) closing bid price of the Common Stock on the trading day immediately preceding the respective Put Date (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement), or (ii) lowest closing bid price of the Common Stock during the Valuation Period (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement), in each case as reported by Bloomberg Finance L.P or other reputable source designated by Investor.

 

The number of Put Shares to be purchased by the Investor shall not exceed the number of such shares that, when aggregated with all other shares of Common Stock then owned by the Investor beneficially or deemed beneficially owned by the Investor, would result in the Investor owning more than the Beneficial Ownership Limitation as determined in accordance with Section 16 of the Exchange Act and the regulations promulgated thereunder. The “Beneficial Ownership Limitation” shall be 4.99% of the number of shares of the Common Stock outstanding immediately after giving effect to the issuance of shares of Common Stock issuable pursuant to a Put Notice.

 

The Equity Purchase Agreement and the Registration Rights Agreement contain customary representations, warranties, agreements and conditions to completing future sale transactions, indemnification rights and obligations of the parties. Among other things, Investor represented to the Company, that it is an “accredited investor” (as such term is defined in Rule 501(a) of Regulation D under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”)), and the Company sold the securities in reliance upon an exemption from registration contained in Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act and Regulation D promulgated thereunder.

 

The foregoing descriptions of the Equity Purchase Agreement and the Registration Rights Agreement are qualified in their entirety by reference to the full text of such agreements, copies of which are attached as Exhibit 10.21 and 10.22 to the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part. The representations, warranties and covenants contained in such agreements were made only for purposes of such agreements and as of specific dates, were solely for the benefit of the parties to such agreements and may be subject to limitations agreed upon by the contracting parties.

 

The Offering

 

Issuer:   Clubhouse Media Group, Inc.
     
Shares to be Issued Pursuant to Put Notices:   17,028,689 shares of Common Stock that we may issue to Peak One pursuant to put notices under the Equity Purchase Agreement.
     
Commitment Shares Issued to Selling Securityholders:   70,000 shares of Common Stock issued to the Selling Securityholders, 35,000 to each of Peak One and Peak One Investments, LLC respectively, on November 2, 2021.
     
Common Stock Outstanding before Offering:   96,712,499 shares of Common Stock (1)
     
Common Stock Outstanding after Offering:   113,741,188 shares of Common Stock, assuming all 17,028,689 shares are sold to the Selling Stockholder under the Equity Line. If we sell less shares of Common Stock to the Selling Stockholder under the Equity Line, we have substantially less Common Stock outstanding after the Offering.

 

9
 

 

Use of proceeds:   We will not receive any of the proceeds from the Selling Securityholders sales of our stock. We will receive proceeds from the sale of our stock to Peak One pursuant to the Equity Purchase Agreement, which we intend to use to fund our product development programs, acquisition of new products, working capital and to general operational needs. The amounts that we actually spend for any specific purpose may vary significantly, and will depend on a number of factors including, but not limited to, market conditions. In addition, we may use a portion of any net proceeds to acquire complementary businesses; however, we do not have plans for any acquisitions at this time. See “Use of Proceeds.”
     
Risk factors:   See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 12 of this prospectus for a discussion of some of the factors you should carefully consider before deciding to invest in our common stock.
     
Trading Market:   Our common stock is currently quoted on the OTC Pink tier of the OTC Market Group, Inc. under the symbol “CMGR.”
     
Transfer Agent and Registrar:   Empire Stock Transfer is our transfer agent and registrar in connection with the offering.
     
Ownership Limits (Blockers):   The number of Put Shares to be purchased by the Investor shall not exceed the number of such shares that, when aggregated with all other shares of Common Stock then deemed beneficially owned by the Investor, would result in the Investor owning more than 4.99% of the number of shares of the Common Stock outstanding immediately after giving effect to the issuance of the Put Shares.
     
Dividend policy:   We do not anticipate declaring or paying any cash dividends on our common stock following our public offering.

 

(1) Unless we indicate otherwise, all information in this prospectus is based on 96,712,499 shares of common stock issued and outstanding as of December 2, 2021.

 

10
 

 

SELECTED HISTORICAL CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

 

The following table presents the Company’s selected historical consolidated financial data for the periods indicated. The selected historical consolidated financial data for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 and the balance sheet data as of December 31, 2020 are derived from the Company’s audited financial statements. The summary historical financial data for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 and the balance sheet data as of September 30, 2021 and 2020 are derived from our unaudited financial statements.

 

Historical results are included for illustrative and informational purposes only and are not necessarily indicative of results we expect in future periods, and results of interim periods are not necessarily indicative of results for the entire year. The data presented below should be read in conjunction with, and are qualified in their entirety by reference to, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

   

For the Period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to

December 31, 2020

   

For the Nine Months Ended

September 30, 2021

   

For the Period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to

September 30, 2020

 
          (unaudited)  
Statement of Operations Data                        
Total revenues   $ 1,010,405     $ 3,222,015     $ 312,906  
Total operating expenses   $ 2,725,105     $ 12,780,575     $ 1,746,298  
Loss before income taxes   $ (2,577,721 )   $ (18,510,882 )   $ (1,624,571 )
Income tax expense   $ -     $ -     $ -  
Net income (loss)   $ (2,577,721 )   $ (18,510,882 )   $ (1,668,971 )
Basic and diluted net loss per share   $ (0.05 )   $ (0.20 )   $ (0.02 )
                         
Balance Sheet Data (at period end)                        
Cash and cash equivalents   $ 37,774     $ 791,160     $ 161,195  
Working capital (deficit) (1)   $ (234,316 )   $ (5,269,815 )   $ (1,901,627 )
Total assets   $ 534,988     $ 1,700,992     $ 576,969  
Total liabilities   $ 2,867,074     $ 7,948,870     $ 2,200,040  
Stockholders’ equity (deficit)   $ (2,332,086 )   $ (6,247,878 )   $ (1,623,071 )

 

(1) Working capital represents total current assets less total current liabilities.

 

11
 

 

RISK FACTORS

 

An investment in our securities carries a significant degree of risk. You should carefully consider the following risks, as well as the other information contained in this prospectus, including our historical financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus, before you decide to purchase our securities. Any one of these risks and uncertainties has the potential to cause material adverse effects on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results which could cause actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements expressed by us and a significant decrease in the value of our common shares and warrants. Refer to “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements.”

 

We may not be successful in preventing the material adverse effects that any of the following risks and uncertainties may cause. These potential risks and uncertainties may not be a complete list of the risks and uncertainties facing us. There may be additional risks and uncertainties that we are presently unaware of, or presently consider immaterial, that may become material in the future and have a material adverse effect on us. You could lose all or a significant portion of your investment due to any of these risks and uncertainties.

 

Below is a summary of material risks, uncertainties and other factors that could have a material effect on the Company and its operations:

 

  Clubhouse Media has a history of operating losses, and its management has concluded that factors raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern and the auditor of Clubhouse Media has included an explanatory paragraph relating to its ability to continue as a going concern in its audit report for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020.
  We are a holding company, and our principal asset is our 100% equity interest in WOHG, through which we own 100% of each of WOHG’s subsidiaries, and accordingly we are dependent upon distributions from such operating subsidiaries to pay taxes and other expenses.
  WOHG is an early-stage company with a limited operating history. Such limited operating history of WOHG may not provide an adequate basis to judge our future prospects and results of operations.
  Since inception of WOHG, WOHG has experienced losses, and we may have to further reduce our costs by curtailing future operations to continue as a business.
  There are no assurances we will realize the anticipated benefits from the acquisition of WOHG.
  The current outbreak of the coronavirus may have a negative effect on our ability to conduct our business and operations and may also cause an overall decline in the economy as a whole and could materially harm our Company.
  We may be adversely affected by political tensions between the United States and China.
  We may fail to successfully execute our business plan.
  Our acquisition strategy creates risks for our business.
  We may not be able to effectively manage our growth and the increased complexity of our business, which could negatively impact our brand and financial performance.
  We may suffer from lack of availability of additional funds.
  Our substantial amount of indebtedness may adversely affect our cash flow and our ability to operate our business, remain in compliance with debt covenants and make payments on our indebtedness.
  The ability of our Chief Executive Officer, Amir Ben-Yohanan, to control our business may limit or eliminate minority stockholders’ ability to influence corporate affairs.
  We are not a party to certain of the leases for its Clubhouse properties, and therefore is subject to the risk of those leases being terminated or altered without its consent.
  Our business is subject to fluctuations that are not predictable, which subjects our business to increase risks.
  Our business depends on our ability to provide customers and followers with interesting and useful content, which in turn depends on the content contributed by the content creators.
  Changes in public and consumer tastes and preferences and industry trends could reduce demand for our services and content offerings and adversely affect our business.
  Our ability to generate revenue from discretionary and corporate spending, such as corporate sponsorships and advertising, is subject to many factors, including many that are beyond our control.
  We may not be able to adapt to or manage new content distribution platforms or changes in consumer behavior resulting from new technologies.
  Because our success depends substantially on our ability to maintain a professional reputation, adverse publicity concerning us, one of our businesses, our Creators or our key personnel could adversely affect our business.

 

12
 

 

  We depend on the relationships of our talent managers and other key personnel with clients across many categories, including fashion, music, digital, and sponsorship.
  Our success depends, in part, on our continuing ability to identify, recruit and retain qualified and experienced talent managers. If we fail to recruit and retain suitable talent managers or if our relationships with our talent managers change or deteriorate, it could adversely affect our business.
  Our failure to identify, sign and retain influencer-clients could adversely affect our business.
  The markets in which we operate are highly competitive, both within the United States and internationally.
  We operate in a fast-evolving industry, and we are in the early stage of our business. We cannot guarantee that our monetization strategies will be successfully implemented or generate sustainable revenues and profit.
  We rely on technology, such as our information systems, to conduct our business. Failure to protect our technology against breakdowns and security breaches could adversely affect our business.
  The commercial success of our products is dependent, in part, on factors outside our control.
  Increases in the costs of content may have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
  In our paid promotion business, if we are unable to prove that our advertising and sponsorship solutions provide an attractive return on investment for our customers, our financial results could be harmed.
  We will be attempting to launch brands in new markets and with new products. Our inability to effectively execute our business plan in relation to these new brands could negatively impact our business.
  Our management team’s attention may be diverted by acquisitions and searches for new acquisition targets, and our business and operations may suffer adverse consequences as a result.
  We may be unable to scale our operations successfully.
  Economic conditions or changing consumer preferences could adversely impact our business.
  Our intellectual property rights are valuable, and if we are unable to protect them or are subject to intellectual property rights claims, our business may be harmed.
  We may be found to have infringed the intellectual property rights of others, which could expose us to substantial damages or restrict our operations.
  As a creator and a distributor of content over the internet, we face potential liability for legal claims based on the nature and content of the materials that we create or distribute.
  We are subject to extensive U.S. and foreign governmental regulations, and our failure to comply with these regulations could adversely affect our business.
  Our results of operations, which are reported in U.S. dollars, could be adversely affected if currency exchange rates fluctuate substantially in the future.
  Our amended and restated bylaws provide that state or federal court located within the state of Nevada will be the sole and exclusive forum for substantially all disputes between us and our shareholders, which could limit its stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us or our directors, officers or other employees.
  By purchasing common stock in this offering, you are bound by the fee-shifting provision contained in our amended and restated bylaws, which may discourage you to pursue actions against us.
  As a result of being a public company, we are subject to additional reporting and corporate governance requirements that will require additional management time, resources and expense.
  We may not have sufficient insurance coverage and an interruption of our business or loss of a significant amount of property could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and operations.
  We could become involved in claims or litigations that may result in adverse outcomes.
  Trading on the OTC Markets is volatile and sporadic, which could depress the market price of our common stock and make it difficult for our security holders to resell their common stock.
  Our stock price is likely to be highly volatile because of several factors, including a limited public float.
  If investors successfully seek rescission, we will face severe financial demands that we may not be able to meet.
  Our common stock has been in the past, and may be in the future, a “penny stock” under SEC rules. It may be more difficult to resell securities classified as “penny stock.”
  FINRA sales practice requirements may also limit a shareholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock.
  If we fail to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, the price of our securities may be adversely affected.
  We are required to comply with certain provisions of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and if we fail to continue to comply, our business could be harmed, and the price of our securities could decline.
  The sale and issuance of additional shares of our common stock could cause dilution as well as the value of our common stock to decline.

 

13
 

 

  The issuance of a large number of shares of our Common Stock could significantly dilute existing stockholders and negatively impact the market price of our Common Stock.
  The Selling Securityholders may sell a large number of shares, resulting in substantial diminution to the value of shares held by existing stockholders.
  Shares eligible for future sale may adversely affect the market.
  Substantial future sales of shares of our common stock could cause the market price of our Common Stock to decline.
  Purchasers in this offering will experience immediate and substantial dilution in the book value of their investment.
  Fiduciaries investing the assets of a trust or pension, or profit-sharing plan must carefully assess an investment in our Company to ensure compliance with ERISA.
  We may invest or spend the proceeds of this offering in ways with which you may not agree or in ways which may not yield a return.
  Risks of investing using a credit card.
  Provisions of our articles of incorporation and bylaws may delay or prevent a takeover which may not be in the best interests of our stockholders.
  We do not expect to pay dividends in the foreseeable future.
     
    We encourage you, however, to read the full risk factors presented below.

 

RISKS RELATED TO OUR BUSINESS

 

Clubhouse Media has a history of operating losses, and its management has concluded that factors raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern and the auditor of Clubhouse Media has included an explanatory paragraph relating to its ability to continue as a going concern in their audit report for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020.

 

Clubhouse Media has a history of operating losses and have incurred cash flow deficits. For the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020, Clubhouse Media reported a net loss of $2,577,721 and negative cash flow from operating activities of $1,967,551. For the nine months ended September 30, 2021, Clubhouse Media generated revenues in the amount of $3,222,015, reported a gross profit of $572,895, and had negative cash flow from operating activities of $7,153,911. As of September 30, 2021, Clubhouse Media had an aggregate accumulated deficit of $21,169,300. There is substantial doubt regarding the ability of Clubhouse Media to continue as going concerns as a result of their historical recurring losses and negative cash flows from operations as well as their dependence on private equity and financings. Clubhouse Media anticipates that it will continue to report losses and negative cash flow for the foreseeable future. The management of Clubhouse Media has concluded that their historical recurring losses from operations and negative cash flows from operations as well as their dependence on private equity and other financings raise substantial doubt about their ability to continue as a going concern the auditor of Clubhouse Media has included an explanatory paragraph relating to their ability to continue as a going concern in its audit report for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020.

 

The consolidated financial statements of Clubhouse Media do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty. These adjustments would likely include substantial impairment of the carrying amount of our assets and potential contingent liabilities that may arise if we are unable to fulfill various operational commitments. In addition, the value of our securities, including common stock issued in this offering, would be greatly impaired. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon generating sufficient cash flow from operations and obtaining additional capital and financing, including funds to be raised in this offering. If our ability to generate cash flow from operations is delayed or reduced and we are unable to raise additional funding from other sources, we may be unable to continue in business even if this offering is successful. For further discussion about our ability to continue as a going concern and our plan for future liquidity, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations —Ability to Continue as a Going Concern.”

 

We are a holding company, and our principal asset is our 100% equity interest in WOHG, through which we own 100% of each of WOHG’s subsidiaries, and accordingly we are dependent upon distributions from such operating subsidiaries to pay taxes and other expenses.

 

We are a holding company, and our principal asset is our 100% equity interests in WOHG. WOHG operates through its subsidiary wholly owned companies, of which it owns 100% of each. Accordingly, we are dependent upon distributions from our operating subsidiaries to pay taxes and other expenses. If our operating subsidiaries do not generate sufficient revenues such that they can provide distributions to us, we may be unable to pay our taxes and other expenses which would have a materially adverse effect on our business operations and our Company as a whole.

 

14
 

 

WOHG is an early-stage company with a limited operating history. Such limited operating history of WOHG may not provide an adequate basis to judge our future prospects and results of operations.

 

On November 12, 2020, pursuant to the closing of the Share Exchange Agreement, we acquired WOHG, and WOHG thereafter became our wholly owned subsidiary, and the business of WOHG became the business of the Company going forward. WOHG has limited experience and a limited operating history in which to assess its future prospects as a company. In addition, the market for the products and services offered through WOHG is highly competitive. If we fail to successfully develop and offer the products and services offered through WOHG in an increasingly competitive market, we may not be able to capture the growth opportunities associated with them or recover our development and marketing costs, and our future results of operations and growth strategies could be adversely affected. The limited history of WOHG may not provide a meaningful basis for investors to evaluate our business, financial performance, and prospects.

 

Since inception of WOHG, WOHG has experienced losses, and we may have to further reduce our costs by curtailing future operations to continue as a business.

 

Since inception of WOHG, WOHG has had operating losses and its cash flow has been inadequate to support its ongoing operations. Its ability to fund its capital requirements out of its available cash and cash generated from its operations depends on a number of factors, including its ability to gain interest in its products and services and continue growing its existing operations and its ability to raise funds as needed. If we cannot continue to generate positive cash flow from operations, we will have to reduce our costs and try to raise working capital from other sources. These measures could materially and adversely affect our ability to execute our operations and expand our business.

 

There are no assurances we will realize the anticipated benefits from the acquisition of WOHG.

 

Our future success will depend, in part, on our ability to realize the anticipated growth opportunities and synergies from combining Clubhouse Media and WOHG. The combined company may encounter the following difficulties, costs and delays involved in integrating these operations:

 

  failure to integrate both companies’ businesses and operations;
  failure to successfully manage relationships with customers and other important relationships;
  failure of customers to continue using the services of the combined company;
  challenges encountered in managing larger operations;
  the loss of key employees;
  failure to manage the growth and growth strategies of both companies;
  diversion of the attention of management from other ongoing business concerns;
  potential incompatibility of technologies and systems; and
  potential impairment charges incurred to write down the carrying amount of intangible assets generated as a result of the mergers.

 

If the combined company’s operations do not meet the expectations of the pre-existing customers of our companies before, then these customers may cease doing business with the combined company altogether, which would harm our results of operations and financial condition. If the management team is not able to develop strategies and implement a business plan that successfully addresses these difficulties, we may not realize the anticipated benefits of combining the companies. In particular, we are likely to realize lower earnings per share, which may have an adverse impact on our Company and the market price of our common stock.

 

The current outbreak of the coronavirus may have a negative effect on our ability to conduct our business and operations and may also cause an overall decline in the economy as a whole and could materially harm our Company.

 

If the current outbreak of the coronavirus continues to grow, the effects of such a widespread infectious disease and epidemic may inhibit our ability to conduct our business and operations and could materially harm our Company. The coronavirus may cause us to have to reduce operations as a result of various lock-down procedures enacted by the local, state or federal government, which could restrict the movement of our influencers outside of or within a specific Clubhouse or even effect the influencer’s ability to create content. The coronavirus may also cause a decrease in advertising spending by companies as a result of the economic turmoil resulting from the spread of the coronavirus and thereby having a negative effect on our ability to generate revenue from advertising. Further, if there is a spread of the coronavirus within any of our Clubhouses, it may cause an inability for our content creators to create and post content and could potentially cause a specific Clubhouse location to be entirely quarantined. Additionally, we may encounter negative publicity or a negative public reaction when creating and posting certain content while a coronavirus related lockdown is enacted. The continued coronavirus outbreak may also restrict our ability to raise funding when needed and may also cause an overall decline in the economy as a whole. The specific and actual effects of the spread of coronavirus are difficult to assess at this time as the actual effects will depend on many factors beyond our control and knowledge. However, the spread of the coronavirus, if it continues, may cause an overall decline in the economy as a whole and also may materially harm our Company.

 

15
 

 

Notwithstanding the foregoing possible negative impacts on our business and results of operations, up until now, we do not believe our prior and current business operations, financial condition, and results of operations have been negatively impacted by the coronavirus pandemic and related shutdowns. As the social media sector appears to have been thriving during the pandemic and shutdowns, we believe that our social media-based business and our results of operations have been thriving as well. More specifically, we have been successful at opening several houses, actively recruiting influencers/creators, creating content, and generating revenue during the pandemic and shutdowns. Notwithstanding, the ultimate impact of the coronavirus pandemic on our operations remains unknown and will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, including the duration of the coronavirus outbreak, new information which may emerge concerning the severity of the coronavirus pandemic, and any additional preventative and protective actions that governments, or our company, may direct, which may result in an extended period of business disruption and reduced operations. The long-term financial impact cannot be reasonably estimated at this time and may ultimately have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

We may be adversely affected by political tensions between the United States and China.

 

Political tensions between the United States and China have escalated due to, among other things, trade disputes, the COVID-19 outbreak and sanctions imposed by the U.S. Department of Treasury on certain officials of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and the central government of the PRC. On August 6, 2020 then-President Donald Trump issued an executive order requiring ByteDance to sell TikTok to an American company, or risk being banned in the United States entirely. While ByteDance ultimately complied with this executive order and TikTok was not banned in the United States, and it is unclear what the Biden administration’s position with respect to TikTok will be, a ban of a social media platform on which our influencers have acquired significant followers, such as TikTok, would have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations. Furthermore, there have been recent media reports on deliberations within the U.S. government regarding potentially limiting or restricting China-based companies from accessing U.S. capital markets. If any legislation were to be enacted or any regulations were to be adopted along these lines that ultimately had the effect of harming or outright banning a social media platform utilized by our Company and/or its influencers, it could have a material adverse effect on our business and operations.

 

We may fail to successfully execute our business plan.

 

Our shareholders may lose their entire investment if we fail to execute our business plan. Our prospects must be considered in light of the following risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to, competition, the erosion of ongoing revenue streams, the ability to retain experienced personnel and general economic conditions. We cannot guarantee that we will be successful in executing our business plan. If we fail to successfully execute our business plan, we may be forced to cease operations, in which case our shareholders may lose their entire investment.

 

Our acquisition strategy creates risks for our business.

 

We expect that we will pursue acquisitions of other businesses, assets or technologies to grow our business. We may fail to identify attractive acquisition candidates or we may be unable to reach acceptable terms for future acquisitions. We might not be able to raise enough cash to compete for attractive acquisition targets. If we are unable to complete acquisitions in the future, our ability to grow our business at our anticipated rate will be impaired.

 

We may pay for acquisitions by issuing additional shares of our common stock, which would dilute our shareholders, or by issuing debt, which could include terms that restrict our ability to operate our business or pursue other opportunities and subject us to meaningful debt service obligations. We may also use significant amounts of cash to complete acquisitions. To the extent that we complete acquisitions in the future, we likely will incur future depreciation and amortization expenses associated with the acquired assets. We may also record significant amounts of intangible assets, including goodwill, which could become impaired in the future. Acquisitions involve numerous other risks, including:

 

  difficulties integrating the operations, technologies, services and personnel of the acquired companies;

 

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  challenges maintaining our internal standards, controls, procedures and policies;
     
  diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns;
     
  over-valuation by us of acquired companies;
     
  litigation resulting from activities of the acquired company, including claims from terminated employees, customers, former shareholders and other third parties;
     
  insufficient revenues to offset increased expenses associated with the acquisitions and unanticipated liabilities of the acquired companies;
     
  insufficient indemnification or security from the selling parties for legal liabilities that we may assume in connection with our acquisitions;
     
  entering markets in which we have no prior experience and may not succeed;
     
  risks associated with foreign acquisitions, such as communication and integration problems resulting from geographic dispersion and language and cultural differences, compliance with foreign laws and regulations and general economic or political conditions in other countries or regions;
     
  potential loss of key employees of the acquired companies; and
     
  impairment of relationships with clients and employees of the acquired companies or our clients and employees as a result of the integration of acquired operations and new management personnel.

 

We may not be able to effectively manage our growth and the increased complexity of our business, which could negatively impact our brand and financial performance.

 

As we grow our business we may incur increasing costs, such as operating costs and marketing costs. If such expansion is not properly managed, it may adversely affect our financial and operating resources without achieving the desired effects.

 

As we only have a limited history of operating our business at its current scale, it is difficult to evaluate our current business and future prospects, including our ability to grow in the future. In addition, our costs and expenses may increase rapidly as we expand our business and continue to invest in our Clubhouses to enhance our competitiveness. Continued growth could also strain our ability to maintain reliable service levels for our clients and customers, develop and improve our operational, financial, legal and management controls, and enhance our reporting systems and procedures. Our costs and expenses may grow faster than our revenues and may be greater than what we anticipate. If we are unable to generate adequate revenues and to manage our costs and expenses, we may continue to incur losses in the future and may not be able to achieve or subsequently maintain profitability. Managing our growth will require significant expenditures and the allocation of valuable management resources. If we fail to achieve the necessary level of efficiency in our organization as it grows, our business, operating results and financial condition could be harmed.

 

We may suffer from lack of availability of additional funds.

 

We expect to have ongoing needs for working capital in order to fund operations and to continue to expand our operations. To that end, we will be required to raise additional funds through equity or debt financing. However, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in securing additional capital on favorable terms, if at all. If we are successful, whether the terms are favorable or unfavorable, there is a potential that we will fail to comply with the terms of such financing, which could result in severe liability for our Company. If we are unsuccessful, we may need to (a) initiate cost reductions; (b) forego business development opportunities; (c) seek extensions of time to fund liabilities, or (d) seek protection from creditors. In addition, any future sale of our equity securities would dilute the ownership and control of your shares and could be at prices substantially below prices at which our shares currently trade. Our inability to raise capital could require us to significantly curtail or terminate our operations altogether. We may seek to increase our cash reserves through the sale of additional equity or debt securities. The sale of convertible debt securities or additional equity securities could result in additional and potentially substantial dilution to our shareholders. The incurrence of indebtedness would result in increased debt service obligations and could result in operating and financing covenants that would restrict our operations and liquidity. In addition, our ability to obtain additional capital on acceptable terms is subject to a variety of uncertainties.

 

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In addition, if we are unable to generate adequate cash from operations, and if we are unable to find sources of funding, it may be necessary for us to sell all or a portion of our assets, enter into a business combination, or reduce or eliminate operations. These possibilities, to the extent available, may be on terms that result in significant dilution to our shareholders or that result in our shareholders losing all of their investment in our Company.

 

Our substantial amount of indebtedness may adversely affect our cash flow and our ability to operate our business, remain in compliance with debt covenants and make payments on our indebtedness.

 

Our substantial level of indebtedness increases the possibility that we may be unable to generate cash sufficient to pay, when due, the principal of, interest on or other amounts due with respect to our indebtedness. Our indebtedness could have other important consequences to you as a stockholder. For example, it could:

 

  make it more difficult for us to satisfy our obligations with respect to our indebtedness and any failure to comply with the obligations of any of our debt instruments, including financial and other restrictive covenants, could result in an event of default under the senior secured credit facility and the senior subordinated note;
     
  make us more vulnerable to adverse changes in general economic, industry and competitive conditions and adverse changes in government regulation;
     
  require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to payments on our indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of our cash flows to fund working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and other general corporate purposes;
     
  limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industry in which we operate;
     
  place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have less debt; and
     
  limit our ability to borrow additional amounts for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, debt service requirements, execution of our business strategy or other purposes.

 

Any of the above listed factors could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The ability of our Chief Executive Officer, Amir Ben-Yohanan, to control our business may limit or eliminate minority stockholders’ ability to influence corporate affairs.

 

Voting control of the Company is held by our Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Ben-Yohanan, through the share of Series X Preferred Stock he holds. This share of Series X Preferred Stock has a number of votes at any time equal to (i) the number of votes then held or entitled to be made by all other equity or debt securities of the Company, or pursuant to any other agreement, contract or understanding of the Company, plus (ii) one. In addition, as of the date of this prospectus, Mr. Ben-Yohanan beneficially owned 56,958,396 shares of our common stock, which represents 58.90% of the voting power of our outstanding common stock. Following this offering, Mr. Ben-Yohanan will control approximately 50.01% of the voting power of our outstanding common stock if all the common stock being offered are sold. Because of this voting control through the shares of Series X Preferred Stock and the common stock he beneficially owns, he is able to significantly influence membership of our Board of Directors, as well as all other matters requiring stockholder approval. The interests of our Chief Executive Officer may differ from the interests of other stockholders with respect to the issuance of shares, business transactions with or sales to other companies, selection of other officers and directors and other business decisions. The minority stockholders will have no way of overriding decisions made by our Chief Executive Officer.

 

We are not a party to certain of the leases for its Clubhouse properties, and therefore is subject to the risk of those leases being terminated or altered without its consent.

 

We are not listed as the tenant on the lease agreements of Clubhouse BH. Instead, our Chief Executive Officer, Amir Ben-Yohanan, is listed as the tenant of this properties pursuant the lease agreement for this house. While Mr. Ben-Yohanan intends to assign this lease to the Company in the future, there is a possibility that Mr. Ben-Yohanan may not assign this lease in the near term, or at all. If Mr. Ben Yohanan were to depart the Company, pursuant to a disagreement or otherwise, before assigning this lease agreement to the Company, Mr. Ben-Yohanan could terminate this lease, or our right to inhabit these properties, without consent or notice to us. Such an event could materially harm our operating results, as well as our reputation within the influencer community, which is important to our ability to attract and retain talent.

 

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Our business is subject to fluctuations that are not predictable, which subjects our business to increase risks.

 

Our business is subject to fluctuations with respect to both our influencers and the number of followers on social media we are able to access through our influencers and our own social media channels. The influencers who live in our Clubhouses, in general, do not stay for long periods of time. Influencers are not required by contract to live in our Clubhouses, and therefore may leave at any point. While we will still generate income from our influencers with which we have entered into Management Agreements regardless of whether such influencers live in our Clubhouses or not, either party may terminate the Management Agreement upon 30 days’ notice without cause. As such, our roster of Clubhouse influencers can change rapidly and significantly, which also affects the number of social media followers we can access, which we believe is a material factor in our ability to generate revenues. For example, at least one of our Clubhouse influencers has over 11 million followers as of the date of this Prospectus. If this influencer were to leave our Clubhouse, we would immediately lose access to those followers through our Creator Occupancy Agreement. While we always seek to fill openings in our Clubhouses quickly, there is no guarantee we will be able to do so, or to fill such openings with influencers with an equal number of followers that the previous occupant-influencer had. Further, followers on social media in general often fluctuate significantly due to external factors that are not predictable. The unexpected loss of one or more of our influencers and/or a reduction in the number of ours or our influencers’ followers could have a negative impact on our business.

 

Our business depends on our ability to provide customers and followers with interesting and useful content, which in turn depends on the content contributed by the content creators.

 

The quality of the content offered by our influencers and their followers’ level of engagement are critical to our success. In order to attract and retain users and compete effectively, we must offer interesting and useful content and enhance followers’ viewing experience. It is vital to our operations that we remain sensitive to and responsive to evolving public and consumer preferences and offer content that appeals to our followers and customers. We have also been providing our content creators with support and guidance in various forms, including technical support for content distribution, editing and uploading. However, we cannot assure you that our content creators can contribute to create popular contents. If our content creators cease to contribute content, or their uploaded content fails to attract or retain our followers and customers, we may experience a decline in our business and suffer a reduction in revenue.

 

Changes in public and consumer tastes and preferences and industry trends could reduce demand for our services and content offerings and adversely affect our business.

 

Our ability to generate revenues is highly sensitive to rapidly changing consumer preferences and industry trends, as well as the popularity of the talent, brands and owners of IP we represent, and the assets we own. Our success depends on our influencers’ ability to create quality content through popular social media channels that meet the changing preferences of the broad consumer market and respond to competition from an expanding array of choices facilitated by technological developments in the delivery of content. Our operations and revenues are affected by consumer tastes and entertainment trends, which are unpredictable and subject to change and may be affected by changes in the social and political climate. Changes in consumers’ tastes or a change in the perceptions of our business partners, whether as a result of the social and political climate or otherwise, could adversely affect our operating results. Our failure to avoid a negative perception among consumers or anticipate and respond to changes in consumer preferences, including in the form of content creation or distribution, could result in reduced demand for our product and/or content offerings, or a reduced social media followings and business opportunities for our Creators, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our ability to create popular, social media-based entertainment content is increasingly important to the success of our business and our ability to generate revenues. The production of entertainment content is inherently risky because the revenues we derive from various sources primarily depend on our ability to reach large audiences and satisfy consumer tastes and expectations in a consistent manner. The popularity of our content and owned assets is affected by our ability to maintain or develop strong brand awareness and target key audiences, the sources and nature of competing content offerings, the time and manner in which consumers acquire and view some of our entertainment products and the options available to advertisers for reaching their desired audiences. Consumer tastes change frequently and it is a challenge to anticipate what offerings will be successful at any point in time. We invest substantial capital in our content and owned assets, including in the creation of original content, before learning the extent to which it will achieve popularity with consumers. A lack of popularity of these, our other content offerings or our owned assets, as well as labor disputes, unavailability of a star performer, equipment shortages, cost overruns, disputes with production teams or adverse weather conditions, could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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Our ability to generate revenue from discretionary and corporate spending, such as corporate sponsorships and advertising, is subject to many factors, including many that are beyond our control.

 

Our business depends on discretionary consumer and corporate spending. Many factors related to corporate spending and discretionary consumer spending, including economic conditions affecting disposable consumer income such as unemployment levels, fuel prices, interest rates, changes in tax rates and tax laws that impact companies or individuals and inflation can significantly impact our operating results. While consumer and corporate spending may decline at any time for reasons beyond our control, the risks associated with our businesses become more acute in periods of a slowing economy or recession, which may be accompanied by reductions in corporate sponsorship and advertising. During periods of reduced economic activity, many consumers have historically reduced their discretionary spending and advertisers have reduced their sponsorship and advertising expenditures, which can result in a reduction in sponsorship opportunities. There can be no assurance that consumer and corporate spending will not be adversely impacted by current economic conditions, or by any future deterioration in economic conditions, thereby possibly impacting our operating results and growth. A prolonged period of reduced consumer or corporate spending could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may not be able to adapt to or manage new content distribution platforms or changes in consumer behavior resulting from new technologies.

 

We must successfully adapt to and manage technological advances in our industry, including the emergence of alternative social media platforms. If we are unable to adopt or are late in adopting technological changes and innovations, it may lead to a loss of consumers viewing our content, and a corresponding reduction in revenues from advertisers. It may also lead to a reduction in ours or our Creators’ ability to monetize new platforms. Our ability to effectively generate revenue from new content distribution platforms and viewing technologies will affect our ability to maintain and grow our business. Emerging forms of content distribution may provide different economic models and compete with current distribution methods (such as Instagram and TikTok) in ways that are not entirely predictable, which could reduce demand for promotional posts by our team of influencers. We must also adapt to changing consumer behavior driven by advances in technology. If we fail to adapt our distribution methods and content to emerging technologies and new distribution platforms, our ability to generate revenue from our targeted audiences may decline and could result in an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Because our success depends substantially on our ability to maintain a professional reputation, adverse publicity concerning us, one of our businesses, our Creators or our key personnel could adversely affect our business.

 

Our professional reputation is essential to our continued success and any decrease in the quality of our reputation could impair our ability to, among other things, recruit and retain qualified and experienced talent managers and other key personnel, retain or attract Creators, and retain or attract advertisers, purchasers of our products, (i.e. our customers). Our overall reputation may be negatively impacted by a number of factors, including negative publicity concerning us, members of our management, our Creators, our customers, and other key personnel. Any adverse publicity relating to such individuals or entities that we employ or represent, or to our Company, including from reported or actual incidents or allegations of illegal or improper conduct, such as harassment, discrimination or other misconduct, could result in significant media attention, even if not directly relating to or involving WOHG, and could have a negative impact on our professional reputation, potentially resulting in termination of contracts, our inability to attract new customer or client relationships, or the loss or termination of such employees’ services, all of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our professional reputation could also be impacted by adverse publicity relating to one or more of our owned or majority owned brands or businesses.

 

We depend on the relationships of our talent managers and other key personnel with clients across many categories, including fashion, music, digital, and sponsorship.

 

We depend heavily upon relationships that our talent managers and other key personnel have developed with our influencer-clients, as well as our corporate customers that utilize our team of influencers for advertising and paid promotion. The personal relationships that our talent managers, influencers, and other key personnel have developed with brands and other key business contacts help us to secure access to sponsorships, endorsements, professional contracts, events and other opportunities for our Creators, which is critical to our success. Due to the importance of those contacts to us, a substantial deterioration in these relationships, or substantial loss of talent managers or other key personnel who maintain these relationships, could adversely affect our business. In particular, our talent management business is dependent upon the highly personalized relationships between our team at Doiyen LLC and their Creators – i.e., the influencers with whom we contract with and represent. A substantial deterioration in the team managing a client may result in a deterioration in our relationship with, or the loss of, the clients represented by that manager. The substantial loss of multiple talent managers could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our talent managers and other key personnel are not party to long-term contracts and, in any event, can leave our Company with little or no notice. We can give no assurance that all or any of these individuals will remain with us or will retain their associations with key business contacts.

 

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Our success depends, in part, on our continuing ability to identify, recruit and retain qualified and experienced talent managers. If we fail to recruit and retain suitable talent managers or if our relationships with our talent managers change or deteriorate, it could adversely affect our business.

 

Our success depends, in part, upon our continuing ability to identify, recruit and retain qualified and experienced talent managers. There is great competition for qualified and experienced talent managers in the social media industry, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to hire or retain a sufficient number of qualified persons to meet our requirements, or that we will be able to do so under terms that are economically attractive to us. Any failure to retain certain talent managers could lead to the loss of sponsorship and other engagements and have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our failure to identify, sign and retain influencer-clients could adversely affect our business.

 

We derive substantial revenue from the engagements, sponsorships, and branding deals entered into by our influencer-clients. We depend on identifying, signing and retaining as clients those influencers with significant social media followings, that are deemed to be favorable candidates for companies to utilize for advertising, promotion, and branding. Our competitive position is dependent on our continuing ability to attract, develop and retain such clients whose work is likely to achieve a high degree of value and recognition as well as our ability to provide such clients with sponsorships, endorsements, professional contracts, productions, events and other opportunities. Our failure to attract and retain these clients, an increase in the costs required to attract and retain such clients, or an untimely loss or retirement of these clients could adversely affect our financial results and growth prospects. We have not entered into written agreements with many of the clients we represent. These clients may decide to discontinue their relationship with us at any time and without notice. In addition, the clients with whom we have entered into written contracts may choose not to renew their contracts with us on reasonable terms or at all or they may breach or seek to terminate these contracts. If any of our clients decide to discontinue their relationships with us, whether they are under a contract or not, we may be unable to recoup costs expended to develop and promote them and our financial results may be adversely affected. Further, the loss of such clients could lead other of our clients to terminate their relationships with us.

 

The markets in which we operate are highly competitive, both within the United States and internationally.

 

We face competition from a variety of other domestic and foreign companies. We face competition from alternative providers of the content, services, and products we and our Creators offer and from other forms of entertainment in a rapidly changing and increasingly fragmented marketplace. There are other companies and individuals currently providing similar products and services as us in the social media influencer industry. Our competitors include, but are not limited to, Hype House, Glam House and any other social media influencer collectives and/or talent management companies specializing in representing influencers, each of which may have greater financial and other resources than us. We may be unable to successfully compete with these competitors and may expend significant resources without success. Further, any increased competition, which may not be foreseeable, or our failure to adequately address any competitive factors, could result in reduced demand for our content, clients or key brands, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We operate in a fast-evolving industry, and we are in the early stage of our business. We cannot guarantee that our monetization strategies will be successfully implemented or generate sustainable revenues and profit.

 

We are in the early stage of our business, and our monetization model is evolving. We generate revenues primarily by providing our users with valuable content. We also generate revenues from advertising and other services. We cannot assure you that we can successfully implement the existing monetization strategies to generate sustainable revenues, or that we will be able to develop new monetization strategies to grow our revenues. If our strategic initiatives do not enhance our ability to monetize or enable us to develop new monetization approaches, we may not be able to maintain or increase our revenues or recover any associated costs. In addition, we may introduce new products and services to expand our revenue streams, including products and services with which we have little or no prior development or operating experience. If these new or enhanced products or services fail to engage users, content creators or business partners, we may fail to diversify our revenue streams or generate sufficient revenues to justify our investments and costs, and our business and operating results may suffer as a result.

 

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We rely on technology, such as our information systems, to conduct our business. Failure to protect our technology against breakdowns and security breaches could adversely affect our business.

 

We rely on technology, such as our information systems and social media platforms, to conduct our business. This technology is vulnerable to service interruptions and security breaches from inadvertent or intentional actions by our employees, partners and vendors, or from attacks by malicious third parties. Such attacks are of ever-increasing levels of sophistication and are made by groups and individuals with a wide range of motives and expertise, including organized criminal groups, “hacktivists,” nation states and others. The techniques used to breach security safeguards evolve rapidly, and they may be difficult to detect for an extended period of time, and the measures we take to safeguard our technology may not adequately prevent such incidents.

 

While we have taken steps to protect our confidential and personal information and invested in information technology, there can be no assurance that our efforts will prevent service interruptions or security breaches in our systems or the unauthorized or inadvertent wrongful use or disclosure of confidential information. Such incidents could adversely affect our business operations, reputation and client relationships. Any such breach would require us to expend significant resources to mitigate the breach of security and to address matters related to any such breach, including the payment of fines. Although we maintain an insurance policy that covers data security, privacy liability and cyber-attacks, our insurance may not be adequate to cover losses arising from breaches or attacks on our systems. We also may be required to notify regulators about any actual or perceived personal data breach as well as the individuals who are affected by the incident within strict time periods.

 

In addition, our use of social media presents the potential for further vulnerabilities. For instance, we may be subject to boycotts, spam, spyware, ransomware, phishing and social engineering, viruses, worms, malware, DDOS attacks, password attacks, man-in-the-middle attacks, cybersquatting, impersonation of employees or officers, abuse of comments and message boards, fake reviews, doxing and swatting. While we have internal policies in place to protect against these vulnerabilities, we can make no assurances that we will not be adversely affected should one of these events occur.

 

The commercial success of our products is dependent, in part, on factors outside our control.

 

The commercial success of our products is dependent upon unpredictable and volatile factors beyond our control, such as the success of our competitors’ products. Our failure to attract market acceptance and a sustainable competitive advantage over our competitors would materially harm our business.

 

Increases in the costs of content may have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We need to produce or acquire popular content. The production and acquisition of such content depends on our ability to retain our content creators. As our business develops, we may incur increasing revenue-sharing costs to compensate our content creators of producing original content. Increases in market prices for licensed content may also have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. If we are not able to procure licensed content at commercially acceptable costs, our business and results of operations will be adversely impacted. In addition, if we are unable to generate sufficient revenues to outpace the increase in market prices for licensed content, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected. We rely on our team to generate creative ideas for original content and to supervise the original content origination and production process, and we intend to continue to invest resources in content production. If we are not able to compete effectively for talents or attract and retain top influencers at reasonable costs, our original content production capabilities would be negatively impacted.

 

In our paid promotion business, if we are unable to prove that our advertising and sponsorship solutions provide an attractive return on investment for our customers, our financial results could be harmed.

 

Our ability to grow revenue from our paid promotion business will be dependent on our ability to demonstrate to marketers that their marketing campaigns with us provide a meaningful return on investment relative to offline and other online opportunities. Our ability, however, to demonstrate the value of advertising and sponsorship on paid promotion business properties will depend, in part, on the quality of our products and contents, the actions taken by our competitors to enhance their offerings, whether we meet the expectations of our customers and a number of other factors. If we are unable to maintain sophisticated and high-quality contents that provide value to our customers or demonstrate our ability to provide value to our customers, our financial results will be harmed.

 

We will be attempting to launch brands in new markets and with new products. Our inability to effectively execute our business plan in relation to these new brands could negatively impact our business.

 

We are attempting launch new product brands into markets in which we have no experience offering products. Launching new products into new markets is risky and requires extensive marketing and business expertise. There can be no assurances we will have the capital, personnel resources, or expertise to be successful in launching these new business efforts.

 

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Our management team’s attention may be diverted by acquisitions and searches for new acquisition targets, and our business and operations may suffer adverse consequences as a result.

 

Mergers and acquisitions are time intensive, requiring significant commitment of our management team’s focus and resources. If our management team spends too much time focused on acquisitions or on potential acquisition targets, our management team may not have sufficient time to focus on our existing business and operations. This diversion of attention could have material and adverse consequences on our operations and our ability to be profitable.

 

We may be unable to scale our operations successfully.

 

Our growth strategy will place significant demands on our management and financial, administrative and other resources. Operating results will depend substantially on the ability of our officers and key employees to manage changing business conditions and to implement and improve our financial, administrative and other resources. If we are unable to respond to and manage changing business conditions, or the scale of its operations, then the quality of its services, its ability to retain key personnel, and its business could be harmed.

 

Economic conditions or changing consumer preferences could adversely impact our business.

 

A downturn in economic conditions in one or more of the Company’s markets could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition, business and prospects. Although we attempt to stay informed of government and customer trends, any sustained failure to identify and respond to trends could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition, business and prospects.

 

Our intellectual property rights are valuable, and if we are unable to protect them or are subject to intellectual property rights claims, our business may be harmed.

 

The content created by Clubhouse influencers, including the rights related to that content, are important assets for us, as is the “Clubhouse Media Group and Clubhouse BH” name. We do not hold any patents protecting our intellectual property, and we have only filed a trademark application for “The Clubhouse” recently, which has not yet been granted as of the date of this Prospectus. The Company subsequently fell out of the trademark response period and was deemed abandoned. The Company has since filed a petition to revive the abandoned application to continue the pursuant of the trademark. Various events outside of our control pose a threat to our intellectual property rights as well as to our business. Regardless of the merits of the claims, any intellectual property claims could be time-consuming and expensive to litigate or settle. In addition, if any claims against us are successful, we may have to pay substantial monetary damages or discontinue any of our practices that are found to be in violation of another party’s rights. We also may have to seek a license to continue such practices, which may significantly increase our operating expenses or may not be available to us at all. Also, the efforts we have taken to protect our proprietary rights may not be sufficient or effective. Any significant impairment of our intellectual property rights could harm our business or our ability to compete.

 

We may be found to have infringed the intellectual property rights of others, which could expose us to substantial damages or restrict our operations.

 

We expect to be subject to legal claims that we have infringed the intellectual property rights of others. The ready availability of damages and royalties and the potential for injunctive relief have increased the costs associated with litigating and settling patent infringement claims. Any claims, whether or not meritorious, could require us to spend significant time, money, and other resources in litigation, pay damages and royalties, develop new intellectual property, modify, design around, or discontinue existing products, services, or features, or acquire licenses to the intellectual property that is the subject of the infringement claims. These licenses, if required, may not be available at all or have acceptable terms. As a result, intellectual property claims against us could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition, operating results and cash flows.

 

As a creator and a distributor of content over the internet, we face potential liability for legal claims based on the nature and content of the materials that we create or distribute.

 

Failure to identify and prevent illegal or inappropriate content from being created or distributed by our influencer may subject us to liability. To the extent that U.S. and foreign authorities find any content being created or distributed by our influencer objectionable, they may require us to limit or eliminate the dissemination of such content in the form of take-down orders, or otherwise. We may have to conduct a self-inspection by taking a comprehensive review of the content created by us. However, there can be no assurance that we can identify all the videos or other content that may violate relevant laws and regulations.

 

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We are subject to extensive U.S. and foreign governmental regulations, and our failure to comply with these regulations could adversely affect our business.

 

Our operations are subject to federal, state and local laws, statutes, rules, regulations, policies and procedures in the United States and around the world, which are subject to change at any time, governing matters such as:

 

  licensing laws for talent agencies, such as California’s Talent Agencies Act;
     
  licensing, permitting and zoning requirements for operation of our Clubhouses;
     
  health, safety and sanitation requirements;
     
  harassment and discrimination, and other labor and employment laws and regulations;
     
  compliance with the U.S. Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990;
     
  compliance with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977, as amended (the “FCPA”) and similar regulations in other countries, which prohibit U.S. companies and their intermediaries from engaging in bribery or other prohibited payments to foreign officials and require companies to keep books and records that accurately and fairly reflect the transactions of the Company and to maintain an adequate system of internal accounting controls;
     
  compliance with applicable antitrust and fair competition laws;
     
  compliance with international trade controls, including applicable import/export regulations, and sanctions and international embargoes that may limit or restrict our ability to do business with specific individuals or entities or in specific countries or territories;
     
  compliance with anti-money laundering and countering terrorist financing rules, currency control regulations, and statutes prohibiting tax evasion and the aiding or abetting of tax evasion;
     
  marketing activities;
     
  compliance with current and future privacy and data protection laws imposing requirements for the processing and protection of personal or sensitive information, including the GDPR and the E.U. e-Privacy Regulation;
     
  compliance with cybersecurity laws imposing country-specific requirements relating to information systems and network design, security, operations, and use;

 

  compliance with laws or regulations that regulate the content contained within videos, games and other content formats created by our influencers;
     
  tax laws; and
     
  imposition by foreign countries of trade restrictions, restrictions on the manner in which content is currently licensed and distributed or ownership restrictions.

 

Noncompliance with these laws could subject us to whistleblower complaints, investigations, sanctions, settlements, prosecution, other enforcement actions, disgorgement of profits, significant fines, damages, other civil and criminal penalties or injunctions, reputational harm, adverse media coverage, and other collateral consequences. Multiple or repeated failures by us to comply with these laws and regulations could result in increased fines or proceedings against us. If any subpoenas or investigations are launched, or governmental or other sanctions are imposed, or if we do not prevail in any possible civil or criminal litigation, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially harmed. In addition, responding to any action will likely result in a materially significant diversion of management’s attention and resources and significant defense costs and other professional fees. Enforcement actions and sanctions could further harm our business, results of operations and financial condition. While we attempt to conduct our business and operations in a manner that we believe to be in compliance with such laws and regulations, there can be no assurance that a law or regulation will not be interpreted or enforced in a manner contrary to our current understanding. In addition, the promulgation of new laws, rules and regulations could restrict or unfavorably impact our business, which could decrease demand for our services, reduce revenue, increase costs or subject us to additional liabilities.

 

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In some United States and foreign jurisdictions, we may have direct and indirect interactions with government agencies and state-affiliated entities in the ordinary course of our business. In the event that we fail to comply with the regulations of a particular jurisdiction, whether through our acts or omissions or those of third parties, we may be prohibited from operating in those jurisdictions, which could lead to a decline in various revenue streams in such jurisdictions, and could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We are also required to comply with economic sanctions laws imposed by the United States or by other jurisdictions where we do business, which may restrict our transactions in certain markets, and with certain customers, business partners and other persons and entities. As a result, we are not permitted to, directly or indirectly (including through a third-party intermediary), procure goods, services, or technology from, or engage in transactions with, individuals and entities subject to sanctions. While we believe we have been in compliance with sanctions requirements, there can be no guarantee that we will remain in compliance. Any violation of corruption or sanctions laws could result in fines, civil and criminal sanctions against us or our employees, prohibitions on the conduct of our business (e.g., debarment from doing business with International Development Banks and similar organizations) and damage to our reputation, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our results of operations, which are reported in U.S. dollars, could be adversely affected if currency exchange rates fluctuate substantially in the future.

 

As we expect to expand our international operations, we become more exposed to the effects of fluctuations in currency exchange rates. We generally collect revenue from our international markets in the local currency. Rapid appreciation of the U.S. dollar against these foreign currencies can harm our reported results and cause the revenue derived from our foreign users to decrease. Such appreciation could increase the costs of purchasing our products to our customers outside of the U.S., adversely affecting our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

We will also incur expenses for employee compensation and other operating expenses at our non-U.S. locations in the local currency. Fluctuations in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and other currencies could result in the dollar equivalent of our expenses being higher which may not be offset by additional revenue earned in the local currency. This could have a negative impact on our reported results of operations.

 

Our amended and restated bylaws provide that state or federal court located within the state of Nevada will be the sole and exclusive forum for substantially all disputes between us and our shareholders, which could limit its stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us or our directors, officers or other employees.

 

Section 7.4 of our amended and restated bylaws provides that “[u]nless the Corporation consents in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the sole and exclusive forum for (i) any derivative action or proceeding brought on behalf of the Corporation, (ii) any action asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any director, officer or other employee of the Corporation to the Corporation or the Corporation’s stockholders, (iii) an action asserting a claim arising pursuant to any provision of the NRS, or (iv) any action asserting a claim governed by the internal affairs doctrine shall be a state or federal court located within the state of Nevada, in all cases subject to the court’s having personal jurisdiction over the indispensable parties named as defendants.” This exclusive forum provision is intended to apply to claims arising under Nevada state law and would not apply to claims brought pursuant to the Exchange Act or Securities Act, or any other claim for which the federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction. The exclusive forum provision in our amended and restated bylaws will not relieve us of our duty to comply with the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations thereunder, and shareholders will not be deemed to have waived our compliance with these laws, rules and regulations.

 

This exclusive forum provision may limit a shareholder’s ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum of its choosing for disputes with us or our directors, officers or other employees, which may discourage lawsuits against us or our directors, officers or other employees. In addition, shareholders who do bring a claim in the state or federal court in the State of Nevada could face additional litigation costs in pursuing any such claim, particularly if they do not reside in or near Nevada. The state or federal court of the State of Nevada may also reach different judgments or results than would other courts, including courts where a shareholder would otherwise choose to bring the action, and such judgments or results may be more favorable to us than to our shareholders. However, the enforceability of similar exclusive forum provisions in other companies’ bylaws has been challenged in legal proceedings, and it is possible that a court could find this type of provision to be inapplicable to, or unenforceable in respect of, one or more of the specified types of actions or proceedings. If a court were to find the exclusive forum provision contained in our amended and restated bylaws to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we might incur additional costs associated with resolving such action in other jurisdictions.

 

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By purchasing common stock in this offering, you are bound by the fee-shifting provision contained in our amended and restated bylaws, which may discourage you to pursue actions against us and could discourage shareholder lawsuits that might otherwise benefit the Company and its shareholders.

 

Section 7.4 of our amended and restated bylaws provides that “[i]f any action is brought by any party against another party, relating to or arising out of these Bylaws, or the enforcement hereof, the prevailing party shall be entitled to recover from the other party reasonable attorneys’ fees, costs and expenses incurred in connection with the prosecution or defense of such action, provided that the provisions of this sentence shall not apply with respect to “internal corporate claims” as defined in Section 109(b) of the DGCL.”

 

Our amended and restated bylaws provide that for this section, the term “attorneys’ fees” or “attorneys’ fees and costs” means the fees and expenses of counsel to the Company and any other parties asserting a claim subject to Section 7.4 of the amended and restated bylaws, which may include printing, photocopying, duplicating and other expenses, air freight charges, and fees billed for law clerks, paralegals and other persons not admitted to the bar but performing services under the supervision of an attorney, and the costs and fees incurred in connection with the enforcement or collection of any judgment obtained in any such proceeding.

 

We adopted the fee-shifting provision to eliminate or decrease nuisance and frivolous litigation. We intend to apply the fee-shifting provision broadly to all actions except for claims brought under the Exchange Act and Securities Act.

 

There is no set level of recovery required to be met by a plaintiff to avoid payment under this provision. Instead, whoever is the prevailing party is entitled to recover the reasonable attorneys’ fees, costs and expenses incurred in connection with the prosecution or defense of such action. Any party who brings an action, and the party against whom such action is brought under Section 7.4 of our amended and restated bylaws, which could include, but is not limited to former and current shareholders, Company directors, officers, affiliates, legal counsel, expert witnesses and other parties, are subject to this provision. Additionally, any party who brings an action, and the party against whom such action is brought under Section 7.4 of our amended and restated bylaws, which could include, but is not limited to former and current shareholders, Company directors, officers, affiliates, legal counsel, expert witnesses and other parties, would be able to recover fees under this provision.

 

In the event you initiate or assert a claim against us, in accordance with the dispute resolution provisions contained in our Bylaws, and you do not, in a judgment prevail, you will be obligated to reimburse us for all reasonable costs and expenses incurred in connection with such claim, including, but not limited to, reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses and costs of appeal, if any. Additionally, this provision in Section 7.4 of our amended and restated bylaws could discourage shareholder lawsuits that might otherwise benefit the Company and its shareholders.

 

THE FEE SHIFTING PROVISION CONTAINED IN THE AMENDED AND RESTATED BYLAWS IS NOT INTENDED TO BE DEEMED A WAIVER BY ANY HOLDER OF COMMON STOCK OF THE COMPANY’S COMPLIANCE WITH THE U.S. FEDERAL SECURITIES LAWS AND THE RULES AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED THEREUNDER. THE FEE SHIFTING PROVISION CONTAINED IN THE AMENDED AND RESTATED BYLAWS DO NOT APPLY TO CLAIMS BROUGHT UNDER THE EXCHANGE ACT AND SECURITIES ACT.

 

As a result of being a public company, we are subject to additional reporting and corporate governance requirements that will require additional management time, resources and expense.

 

As a public company we are obligated to file with the SEC annual and quarterly information and other reports that are specified in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). We are also subject to other reporting and corporate governance requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended, and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, all of which impose significant compliance and reporting obligations upon us and require us to incur additional expense in order to fulfill such obligations.

 

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We may not have sufficient insurance coverage and an interruption of our business or loss of a significant amount of property could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and operations.

 

We currently do not maintain any insurance policies against loss of key personnel and business interruption as well as product liability claims. If such events were to occur, our business, financial performance and financial position may be materially and adversely affected.

 

We could become involved in claims or litigations that may result in adverse outcomes.

 

From time-to-time we may be involved in a variety of claims or litigations. Such proceeding may initially be viewed as immaterial but could prove to be material. Litigations are inherently unpredictable and excessive verdicts do occur. Given the inherent uncertainties in litigation, even when we can reasonably estimate the amount of possible loss or range of loss and reasonably estimable loss contingencies, the actual outcome may change in the future due to new developments or changes in approach. In addition, such claims or litigations could involve significant expense and diversion of management’s attention and resources from other matters.

 

RISKS RELATED TO OUR COMMON STOCK AND THE OFFERING

 

Trading on the OTC Markets is volatile and sporadic, which could depress the market price of our common stock and make it difficult for our security holders to resell their common stock.

 

Our common stock currently trades on the OTC Pink tier of OTC Market Group LLC’s Marketplace under the symbol “CMGR”. The OTC Market is a network of security dealers who buy and sell stock. The dealers are connected by a computer network that provides information on current “bids” and “asks,” as well as volume information. Trading in securities quoted on the OTC Markets is often thin and characterized by wide fluctuations in trading prices, due to many factors, some of which may have little to do with our operations or business prospects. This volatility could depress the market price of our common stock for reasons unrelated to operating performance. Moreover, the OTC Markets is not a stock exchange, and trading of securities on the OTC Markets is often more sporadic than the trading of securities listed on a quotation system like Nasdaq Capital Market or a stock exchange like the NYSE American. These factors may result in investors having difficulty reselling any shares of our common stock.

 

Our stock price is likely to be highly volatile because of several factors, including a limited public float.

 

The market price of our common stock has been volatile in the past and the market price of our common stock is likely to be highly volatile in the future. You may not be able to resell shares of our common stock following periods of volatility because of the market’s adverse reaction to volatility.

 

Other factors that could cause such volatility may include, among other things:

 

  actual or anticipated fluctuations in our operating results;
     
  the absence of securities analysts covering us and distributing research and recommendations about us;
     
  we may have a low trading volume for a number of reasons, including that a large portion of our stock is closely held;
     
  overall stock market fluctuations;
     
  announcements concerning our business or those of our competitors;
     
  actual or perceived limitations on our ability to raise capital when we require it, and to raise such capital on favorable terms;

 

  conditions or trends in the industry;
     
  litigation;
     
  changes in market valuations of other similar companies;
     
  future sales of common stock;
     
  departure of key personnel or failure to hire key personnel; and
     
  general market conditions.

 

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Any of these factors could have a significant and adverse impact on the market price of our common stock. In addition, the stock market in general has at times experienced extreme volatility and rapid decline that has often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of particular companies. These broad market fluctuations may adversely affect the trading price of our common stock, regardless of our actual operating performance.

 

Once our common stock is listed on Nasdaq Capital Market or NYSE American, there can be no assurance that we will be able to comply with the national stock exchange’s continued listing standards.

 

We intend to list our common stock on the Nasdaq Capital Market or the NYSE American under the symbol “CMGR.” There is no assurance that our listing application will be approved by the Nasdaq Capital Market or the NYSE American. Assuming that our common stock is listed, there can be no assurance any broker will be interested in trading our stock. Therefore, it may be difficult to sell your shares of common stock if you desire or need to sell them. We cannot provide any assurance that an active and liquid trading market in our securities will develop or, if developed, that such market will continue.

 

If our common stock is approved for listing on the Nasdaq Capital Market or NYSE American, there is no guarantee that we will be able to maintain such listing for any period of time by perpetually satisfying continued listing requirements. Our failure to continue to meet these requirements may result in our securities being delisted from Nasdaq Capital Market or NYSE American, as the case may be.

 

Our common stock has been in the past, and may be in the future, a “penny stock” under SEC rules. It may be more difficult to resell securities classified as “penny stock.”

 

Our common stock has been in the past, and may be in the future, a “penny stock” under applicable SEC rules (generally defined as non-exchange traded stock with a per-share price below $5.00). Unless we successfully list our common stock on a national securities exchange, or maintain a per-share price above $5.00, these “penny stock” rules impose additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers that recommend the purchase or sale of penny stocks to persons other than those who qualify as “established customers” or “accredited investors.” For example, broker-dealers must determine the appropriateness for non-qualifying persons of investments in penny stocks. Broker-dealers must also provide, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, a standardized risk disclosure document that provides information about penny stocks and the risks in the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, disclose the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction, furnish monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account, provide a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser, and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction.

 

Legal remedies available to an investor in “penny stocks” may include the following:

 

  If a “penny stock” is sold to the investor in violation of the requirements listed above, or other federal or states securities laws, the investor may be able to cancel the purchase and receive a refund of the investment.
     
  If a “penny stock” is sold to the investor in a fraudulent manner, the investor may be able to sue the persons and firms that committed the fraud for damages.

 

These requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity, if any, in the secondary market for a security that becomes subject to the penny stock rules. The additional burdens imposed upon broker-dealers by such requirements may discourage broker-dealers from effecting transactions in our securities, which could severely limit the market price and liquidity of our securities. If our common stock is a “penny stock,” these requirements may restrict the ability of broker-dealers to sell our common stock and may affect your ability to resell our common stock.

 

Many brokerage firms will discourage or refrain from recommending investments in penny stocks. Most institutional investors will not invest in penny stocks. In addition, many individual investors will not invest in penny stocks due, among other reasons, to the increased financial risk generally associated with these investments.

 

For these reasons, penny stocks may have a limited market and, consequently, limited liquidity. We can give no assurance at what time, if ever, our common stock will not be classified as a “penny stock” in the future.

 

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FINRA sales practice requirements may also limit a shareholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock.

 

In addition to the “penny stock” rules described above, FINRA has adopted Rule 2111 that requires a broker-dealer to have reasonable grounds for believing that an investment is suitable for a customer before recommending the investment. Prior to recommending speculative low-priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status, investment objectives and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, FINRA believes that there is a high probability that speculative low-priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. The FINRA requirements make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our common stock, which may limit your ability to buy and sell our stock and have an adverse effect on the market for our shares.

 

If we fail to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, the price of our securities may be adversely affected.

 

Our internal control over financial reporting has weaknesses and conditions that require correction or remediation. For the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020, we identified a material weakness in our assessment of the effectiveness of disclosure controls and procedures. We do not have accounting staff with sufficient technical accounting knowledge relating to accounting for U.S. income taxes and complex U.S. GAAP matters. Currently, we contract with an outside certified public accountant to assist us in maintaining our disclosure controls and procedures and the preparation of our financial statements for the foreseeable future. We plan to increase the size of our accounting staff at the appropriate time for our business and its size to ameliorate our concern that we do not have accounting staff with sufficient technical accounting knowledge relating to accounting for U.S. income taxes and complex U.S. GAAP matters, which we believe would resolve the material weakness in disclosure controls and procedures, but there can be no assurances as to the timing of any such action or that we will be able to do so.

 

We are required to comply with certain provisions of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and if we fail to continue to comply, our business could be harmed and the price of our securities could decline.

 

Rules adopted by the SEC pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act require an annual assessment of internal control over financial reporting, and for certain issuers an attestation of this assessment by the issuer’s independent registered public accounting firm. The standards that must be met for management to assess the internal control over financial reporting as effective are evolving and complex, and require significant documentation, testing, and possible remediation to meet the detailed standards. We expect to incur significant expenses and to devote resources to Section 404 compliance on an ongoing basis. It is difficult for us to predict how long it will take or costly it will be to complete the assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting for each year and to remediate any deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting. As a result, we may not be able to complete the assessment and remediation process on a timely basis. In the event that our Chief Executive Officer or Chief Financial Officer determines that our internal control over financial reporting is not effective as defined under Section 404, we cannot predict how regulators will react or how the market prices of our securities will be affected; however, we believe that there is a risk that investor confidence and the market value of our securities may be negatively affected.

 

The sale and issuance of additional shares of our common stock could cause dilution as well as the value of our common stock to decline.

 

Investors’ interests in the Company will be diluted and investors may suffer dilution in their net book value per share when we issue additional shares. We are authorized to issue 500,000,000 shares of common stock. We anticipate that all or at least some of our future funding, if any, will be in the form of equity financing from the sale of our common stock. If we do sell or issue more common stock, any investors’ investment in the Company will be diluted. Dilution is the difference between what you pay for your stock and the net tangible book value per share immediately after the additional shares are sold by us. If dilution occurs, any investment in the Company’s common stock could seriously decline in value.

 

The issuance of a large number of shares of our Common Stock could significantly dilute existing stockholders and negatively impact the market price of our Common Stock.

 

On October 29, 2021, the Company entered into an Equity Purchase Agreement, dated as of October 29, 2021, with Peak One providing that, upon the terms and subject to the conditions thereof, Peak One is committed to purchase, on an unconditional basis, shares of Common Stock (“Put Shares”) at an aggregate price of up to $15,000,000 over the course of the commitment period. Pursuant to the terms of the equity purchase agreement, the purchase price for each of the Put Shares equals 50% of the lowest trading closing price of the Common Stock during the ten (10) trading days immediately prior to the date of the applicable put notice (“Put Notice”). As a result, if we sell shares of Common Stock under the equity purchase agreement, we will be issuing Common Stock at below market prices, which could cause the market price of our Common Stock to decline, and if such issuances are significant in number, the amount of the decline in our market price could also be significant. In general, we are unlikely to sell shares of Common Stock under the equity purchase agreement at a time when the additional dilution to stockholders would be substantial unless we are unable to obtain capital to meet our financial obligations from other sources on better terms at such time. However, if we do, the dilution that could result from such issuances could have a material adverse impact on existing stockholders and could cause the price of our common stock to fall rapidly based on the amount of such dilution.

 

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The Selling Securityholders may sell a large number of shares, resulting in substantial diminution to the value of shares held by existing stockholders.

 

Pursuant to the Equity Purchase Agreement, we are prohibited from delivering a Put Notice to Peak One to the extent that the issuance of shares would cause the Selling Securityholders to beneficially own more than 4.99% of our then-outstanding shares of common stock; provided, however, the Selling Securityholders in their sole discretion can waive this ownership limitation up to 9.99% of our then-outstanding shares of Common Stock. These restrictions however, do not prevent the Selling Stockholder from selling shares of Common Stock received in connection with the Equity Line and then receiving additional shares of Common Stock in connection with a subsequent issuance. In this way, the Selling Securityholders could sell more than 4.99% (or 9.99% if 4.99% ownership limitation is waived) of the outstanding shares of Common Stock in a relatively short time frame while never holding more than 4.99% (or 9.99% if 4.99% ownership limitation is waived) at any one time. As a result, existing stockholders and new investors could experience substantial diminution in the value of their shares of Common Stock. Additionally, we do not have the right to control the timing and amount of any sales by the Selling Securityholders of the shares issued under the Equity Line.

 

Shares eligible for future sale may adversely affect the market.

 

From time to time, certain of our stockholders may be eligible to sell all or some of their shares of common stock by means of ordinary brokerage transactions in the open market pursuant to Rule 144 promulgated under the Securities Act, subject to certain limitations. In general, pursuant to Rule 144, non-affiliate stockholders may sell freely after six months, subject only to the current public information requirement. Affiliates may sell after six months, subject to the Rule 144 volume, manner of sale (for equity securities), current public information, and notice requirements. Of the approximately 96,712,499 shares of our common stock outstanding as of December 2, 2021, approximately 11,531,385 shares are tradable without restriction. Given the limited trading of our common stock, resale of even a small number of shares of our common stock pursuant to Rule 144 or an effective registration statement may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

 

Substantial future sales of shares of our common stock could cause the market price of our Common Stock to decline.

 

The market price of shares of our Common Stock could decline as a result of substantial sales of our Common Stock, particularly sales by our directors, executive officers and significant stockholders, a large number of shares of our Common Stock becoming available for sale or the perception in the market that holders of a large number of shares intend to sell their shares.

 

Fiduciaries investing the assets of a trust or pension, or profit-sharing plan must carefully assess an investment in our Company to ensure compliance with ERISA.

 

In considering an investment in the Company of a portion of the assets of a trust or a pension or profit-sharing plan qualified under Section 401(a) of the Code and exempt from tax under Section 501(a), a fiduciary should consider (i) whether the investment satisfies the diversification requirements of Section 404 of ERISA; (ii) whether the investment is prudent, since the Offered Shares are not freely transferable and there may not be a market created in which the Offered Shares may be sold or otherwise disposed; and (iii) whether interests in the Company or the underlying assets owned by the Company constitute “Plan Assets” under ERISA. See “ERISA Consideration.”

 

We may invest or spend the proceeds of this offering in ways with which you may not agree or in ways which may not yield a return.

 

The principal purposes of this offering is to raise additional capital. We currently intend to use the proceeds we receive from this offering after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and fees and expenses associated with qualification of offering under Regulation A, including legal, auditing, accounting, transfer agent, and other professional fees, primarily for the (i) funding of possible strategic acquisition opportunities, (ii) funding of marketing expenses, and (iii) working capital and general corporate purposes. Our management will have considerable discretion in the application of the net proceeds, and you will not have the opportunity, as part of your investment decision, to assess whether the proceeds are being used appropriately. Investors in this offering will need to rely upon the judgment of our management with respect to the use of proceeds. If we do not use the net proceeds that we receive in this offering effectively, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be harmed, and the market price of our common stock could decline.

 

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Provisions of our articles of incorporation and bylaws may delay or prevent a takeover which may not be in the best interests of our stockholders.

 

Provisions of our amended and restated articles of incorporation and our bylaws, as amended, may be deemed to have anti-takeover effects, which include when and by whom special meetings of our stockholders may be called, and may delay, defer or prevent a takeover attempt. Further, our articles of incorporation, as amended, authorize the issuance of up to approximately 50,000,000 shares of preferred stock with such rights and preferences as may be determined from time to time by our Board of Directors in their sole discretion. Our Board of Directors may, without stockholder approval, issue series of preferred stock with dividends, liquidation, conversion, voting or other rights that could adversely affect the voting power or other rights of the holders of our common stock.

 

We do not expect to pay dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

We do not intend to declare dividends for the foreseeable future, as we anticipate that we will reinvest any future earnings in the development and growth of our business. Therefore, investors will not receive any funds unless they sell their common stock, and stockholders may be unable to sell their shares on favorable terms. We cannot assure you of a positive return on investment or that you will not lose the entire amount of your investment in our common stock.

 

Affiliates of the Company, including officers, directors and existing members of the Company, may invest in this offering and their funds will be counted toward the Company achieving the Minimum Offering Amount.

 

There is no restriction on affiliates of the Company, including its officers, directors and existing members, investing in the offering. As a result, it is possible that if the Company has raised some funds, but not reached the Minimum Offering Amount, affiliates can contribute the balance so that there will be an Initial Closing. The Minimum Offering Amount is typically intended to be a protection for investors and gives investors confidence that other investors, along with them, are sufficiently interested in the offering and the Company, and its prospects to receive investments of at least the Minimum Offering Amount. By permitting affiliates to invest in the offering and make up any shortfall between what non-affiliate investors have invested and the Minimum Offering Amount, this protection is largely eliminated. Investors should be aware that no funds other than their own and those of affiliates investing along with them may be invested in this offering.

 

Changes in accounting principles and guidance, or their interpretation, could result in unfavorable accounting charges or effects, including changes to our previously filed financial statements, which could cause our stock price to decline.

 

We prepare our consolidated financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”). These principles are subject to interpretation by the SEC and various bodies formed to interpret and create appropriate accounting principles and guidance. A change in these principles or guidance, or in their interpretations, may have a significant effect on our reported results and retroactively affect previously reported results.

 

Being a public company results in additional expenses, diverts management’s attention and could also adversely affect our ability to attract and retain qualified directors.

 

As a public reporting company, we are subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act. These requirements generate significant accounting, legal and financial compliance costs and make some activities more difficult, time consuming or costly and may place significant strain on our personnel and resources. The Exchange Act requires, among other things, that we maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. In order to establish the requisite disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting, significant resources and management oversight are required.

 

As a result, management’s attention may be diverted from other business concerns, which could have an adverse and even material effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. These rules and regulations may also make it more difficult and expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance. If we are unable to obtain appropriate director and officer insurance, our ability to recruit and retain qualified officers and directors, especially those directors who may be deemed independent, could be adversely impacted.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

 

We will not receive any proceeds from the disposition and/or resale of the shares of common stock by the Selling Stockholders or their transferees. We will, however, receive cash proceeds from the sale of the Put Shares to the Selling Securityholder. While we retain broad discretion on the use of proceeds, we intend to use such proceeds to fund our product development programs, acquisition of new products, working capital and to general operational needs. The amounts that we actually spend for any specific purpose may vary significantly, and will depend on a number of factors including, but not limited to, market conditions. In addition, we may use a portion of any net proceeds to acquire complementary businesses; however, we do not have plans for any acquisitions at this time.

 

The intended use of proceeds in this section takes into account the potential impacts of COVID-19.

 

DETERMINATION OF OFFERING PRICE

 

The Selling Security Holders, Peak One and Peak One Investments, may, from time to time, sell any or all of its shares of our common stock on otcmarkets.com or any other stock exchange, market or trading facility on which the shares of our common stock are traded, or in private transactions. These sales may be at fixed prices, prevailing market prices at the time of sale, at varying prices, or at negotiated prices.

 

The Equity Purchase Agreement permits Peak One to initially purchase the Put Shares at the price that is 95% of the closing bid price of the Company’s Common Stock on the Principal Market on the Trading Day immediately preceding the respective Put Date. This price was negotiated between the Company and Peak One and considered several factors including the prevailing market conditions, including the history and prospects for the industry in which we compete, our future prospects; and our capital structures.

 

We offer no assurances that the offering price of our shares by the Selling Securityholders will correspond to the price at which our common stock will trade in the public market subsequent to this offering or that an active trading market for our common stock and warrants will develop and continue after this offering.

 

DIVIDEND POLICY

 

We have not paid any cash dividends on our common stock and do not currently anticipate paying cash dividends in the foreseeable future. The agreements into which we may enter in the future, including indebtedness, may impose limitations on our ability to pay dividends or make other distributions on our capital stock. Payment of future dividends on our common stock, if any, will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on, among other things, our results of operations, cash requirements and surplus, financial condition, contractual restrictions and other factors that our board of directors may deem relevant. We intend to retain future earnings, if any, for reinvestment in the development and expansion of our business.

 

CAPITALIZATION

 

The following table sets forth the Company’s cash and cash equivalents and capitalization as of September 30, 2021 on an actual basis.

 

This table should be read in conjunction with the information contained in this Prospectus, including “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and the financial statements of Clubhouse Media and the related notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this Prospectus.

 

   

As of

September 30, 2021

 
    Actual  
    (Unaudited)  
Cash and cash equivalents   $ 791,160  
         
Convertible notes payable, net   $ 3,671,433  
Convertible notes payable, net – related party   $ 1,401,032  
         
Stockholders’ equity:        
Common stock, $0.001 par value; 500,000,000 shares authorized and 96,122,532 shares issued and outstanding on an actual basis   $ 96,123  
Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 50,000,000 shares authorized and 1 share issued and outstanding on an actual basis   $ -  
Additional paid-in capital   $ 14,825,299  
Accumulated deficit   $ (21,169,300 )
Accumulated other comprehensive income   $ -  
Total stockholders’ deficit   $ (6,247,878 )
Total capitalization   $ (1,175,413 )

 

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MARKET PRICE FOR COMMON EQUITY AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

Our common stock currently trades on the OTC Pink tier of OTC Market Group LLC’s Marketplace under the symbol “CMGR”. Prior to January 20, 2021, our common stock publicly traded on the OTC Marketplace of OTC Market Group LLC under the symbol “TONJ.” On January 20, 2021, we changed the symbol of our common stock from “TONJ” to “CMGR,” in conjunction with our name change from “Tongji Healthcare Group, Inc.” to “Clubhouse Media Group, Inc.”

 

The OTC Market is a network of security dealers who buy and sell stock. The dealers are connected by a computer network that provides information on current “bids” and “asks,” as well as volume information. The trading of securities on the OTC Pink is often sporadic and investors may have difficulty buying and selling our shares or obtaining market quotations for them, which may have a negative effect on the market price of our common stock. The closing price of our common stock on the OTC Pink on November 30, 2021 was $0.2425.

 

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated the high and low bid quotations for our common stock. These quotations represent inter-dealer quotations, without adjustment for retail markup, markdown, or commission and may not represent actual transactions.

 

Period

Fiscal Year 2021

  High     Low  
First Quarter (January 1, 2021 – March 31, 2021)   $ 28.43     $ 1.35  
Second Quarter (April 1, 2021 – June 30, 2021)   $ 12.55     $ 4.21  
Third Quarter (July 1, 2021 – September 30, 2021)   $ 6.47     $ 1.30  
Fourth Quarter (October 1, 2021 – December 31, 2021*)   $ 2.18     $ 0.21  

 

Period

Fiscal Year 2020

  High     Low  
First Quarter (January 1, 2020 – March 31, 2020)   $ 0.12     $ 0.055  
Second Quarter (April 1, 2020 – June 30, 2020)   $ 0.85     $ 0.055  
Third Quarter (July 1, 2020 – September 30, 2020)   $ 3.90     $ 0.29  
Fourth Quarter (October 1, 2020 – December 31, 2020)   $ 6.96     $ 0.85  

 

*Through November 30, 2021.

 

Holders

 

As of December 2, 2021 we had 96,712,499 shares of our common stock par value, $0.001 issued and outstanding. There were approximately 344 holders of record of our common stock.

 

Transfer Agent and Registrar

 

The Company’s transfer agent Empire Stock Transfer, located at 1859 Whitney Mesa Drive, Henderson, NV 89014.

 

Equity Compensation Plans

 

None.

 

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DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

 

In this prospectus, unless the context indicates otherwise, “Clubhouse Media,” the “Company,” “we,” “our,” “ours” or “us” refer to Clubhouse Media Group, Inc., a Nevada corporation, and its subsidiaries, including West of Hudson Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation, and its subsidiaries.

 

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

 

We operate a global network of professionally run content houses, each of which has its own brand, influencer cohort and production capabilities. Our Company offers management, production and deal-making services to our handpicked influencers, a management division for individual influencer clients, and an investment arm for joint ventures and acquisitions for companies in the social media influencer space. Our management team consists of successful entrepreneurs with financial, legal, marketing, and digital content creation expertise.

 

Through our subsidiary, West of Hudson Group, Inc., or WOHG, we currently generate revenues primarily from (i) through Doiyen, LLC, a 100% wholly owned subsidiary of WOHG, talent management of social media influencers residing in our Clubhouses; (ii) through WHO Brands, a 100% wholly owned subsidiary of WOHG, content-creation, social media marketing, technology development and brand incubation; (iii) through Digital Influence Inc. (doing business as Magiclytics), a 100% wholly owned subsidiary of WOHG, providing predictive analytics for content creation brand deals; and (iv) for paid promotion by companies looking to utilize such social media influencers to promote their products or services. We solicit companies for potential marketing collaborations and cultivated content creation, work with the influencers and the marketing entity to negotiate and formalize a brand deal and then execute the deal and receive a certain percentage from the deal. In addition to the in-house brand deals, we generate income by providing talent management and brand partnership deals to external influencers not residing in our Clubhouses.

 

WOHG is the 100% owner and sole member and manager of each of these entities pursuant to each of the limited liability company agreements and bylaws, where applicable, that govern these entities, and has complete and exclusive discretion in the management and control of the affairs and business of WOH Brands, Doiyen, and Digital Influence Inc. (doing business as Magiclytics) possesses all powers necessary to carry out the purposes and business of these entities. WOHG is entitled to the receipt of all income (and/or losses) that these entities generate.

 

In addition to the above, WOHG is the 100% owner of two other limited liability companies – Clubhouse Studios, LLC, which holds most of our intellectual property, and DAK Brands, LLC, each incorporated in the State of Delaware on May 13, 2020. However, each of these entities has minimal or no operations, and is not intended to have any material operations in the near future.

 

For the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020, Clubhouse Media generated revenues of $1,010,405 and reported a net loss of $2,577,721 and negative cash flow from operating activities of $1,967,551. For the nine months ended September 30, 2021, Clubhouse Media generated net revenues of $3,222,015, reported a gross profit of $572,895, and had negative cash flow from operating activities of $7,153,911. As noted in the consolidated financial statements of Clubhouse Media, as of September 30, 2021, Clubhouse Media had an accumulated deficit of $21,169,300. There is substantial doubt regarding the ability of Clubhouse Media to continue as a going concern as a result of its historical recurring losses and negative cash flows from operations as well as its dependence on private equity and financings. See “Risk Factors— Clubhouse Media has a history of operating losses and its management has concluded that factors raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern and the auditor of Clubhouse Media has included explanatory paragraphs relating to its ability to continue as a going concern in its audit report for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020.”

 

Principal Products and Services

 

Our current principal products and services are comprised of (1) our Clubhouses, (2) our talent management services and (3) our brand development and content creation.

 

The Clubhouses

 

Through WOHG, we are the sole owner of “The Clubhouse,” which is an integrated social media influencer incubator with a physical and digital footprint in Southern California and Europe. The Clubhouse is a collection of content creation houses located in scenic mansions in Southern California (3 locations), and Europe (1 location) that houses who we believe to be some of the most prominent and widely followed social media influencers, together carrying a currently estimated follower base of approximately 460 million social media followers as of December 2, 2021 across all Clubhouse influencers. The influencers who live in our Clubhouses, as well as the number of their social media followers, can fluctuate significantly at any given time, and we cannot predict the increase or decline of the number of influencers who live in our Clubhouses or the number of followers for our Clubhouse influencers at any given time in the future.

 

Content Houses at a Glance

 

Content houses originated from gaming houses in the gaming industry, where professional video game players and gaming teams lived in the same residence with each other in order to practice gaming and create content to build their own following. Eventually this concept was adopted by lifestyle influencers and was found to be a way for individual influencers to create new content with other influencers and grow followers together.

 

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Our Clubhouses

 

The Clubhouse is an established network of social media content creation houses (Clubhouse BH and Clubhouse Europe) that each provide a picturesque living environment for our band of social media influencers, complete with in-house media production teams, including photographers and videographers. We believe that this enables the influencers living at these houses to maximize the depth, breadth and scale of followers that those influencers can build across popular social media platforms.

 

  “Clubhouse BH” is located in the heart of Beverly Hills in Los Angeles, California and is occupied by a group of content creators who live and work together 24 hours per day and seven days per week, and are equipped with a full media team. We believe that this structure enables successful collaboration and content creation by the content-creators. Clubhouse BH is 12,000 square feet, has 11 bedrooms and sits on one acre of land. Clubhouse BH is targeting men and women aged 17 to 30.

 

 

  Dance Dome LA” is housed under the Clubhouse BH location that targets a subgenre of influencers in the dance community. Dance Dome aims to target the young male and female demographic of 12-30 years old specifically those interested in the subgenre of dancing related content.
     
  “Clubhouse Europe” is located in the Republic of Malta, where we’ve expanded our international footprint by bringing together under one roof who we believe to be some of Europe’s most popular influencers. Clubhouse Europe is targeting European demographic of men and women aged 17 to 30.

 

 

 

“The Clubhouse” Online Presence and Plans for Expansion of the Physical Clubhouses

 

While “The Clubhouse” network consists of physical locations (as described above), there are numerous “Clubhouse” accounts owned by The Clubhouse, with a combined following of over 460 million followers as of December 2, 2021 across Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, and TikTok. These accounts are directly held by us (as opposed to the Clubhouse team of influencers) and therefore we have direct access to the followers of these accounts, which we consider to be our followers.

 

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We are constantly surveying opportunities to establish new Clubhouses, and intend to expand our Clubhouse locations as our business continues to grow. We specifically plan on expanding the Clubhouse footprint further into Europe and the U.S. as well as into Asia, into other content niche types such as e-gaming, beauty and music. We currently intend to expand with two to four additional Clubhouses each year, depending on available funding for such expansion and we cannot provide any assurance that we’ll be able to expand at this intended rate. We also intend to engage in a cross-house collaborative strategy that we believe has not yet been established in the industry and we have talent that can be deployed to a broad range of brand partnership and other opportunities that we believe can lead to significant growth opportunities through diversified revenue streams.

 

Why We Believe that Influencers Benefit from Content Houses

 

Influencers need to constantly create original content to grow their following, and collaborations with other influencers can help facilitate creative content while allowing for sharing of followers among influencers. Our Clubhouses provide a unique living situation where influencers can collaborate and work together to grow each other’s following. For example, one of the influencers who was living in our Clubhouses experienced in four months, growth from 3.22 million followers on Instagram to 5.2 million followers on Instagram. Another one of the influencers who lived in our Clubhouses experienced in four months, growth from 1.5 million followers on Instagram to 2.3 million followers on Instagram.

 

Clubhouse and Influencer Fit

 

At Clubhouse Media, we strive to cultivate a large and committed following for our team of influencers, which we plan to leverage to popularize our in-house brands, driving sales and brand-awareness to our target customers. Our approach is to create a balance between social media creativity and the business of social media marketing. We believe that this symbiotic balance creates a higher output for both our Clubhouses and influencers and creates an attractive one-stop shop for brands to advertise and for influencers to grow and collaborate. The Clubhouse’s goal is to develop and successfully monetize on its network of influencers through a portfolio of valuable brands by becoming the world’s leading hub for new media content. The Clubhouse has already received media coverage in publications such as Forbes, the New York Times, Business Insider and Seventeen, among others.

 

Talent Management Services

 

Doiyen LLC, our indirectly wholly owned subsidiary, is a talent management company for social media influencers and generates revenues based on the earnings of its influencer-clients (or “Creators”) by receiving a percentage of the earnings of its Creators. Certain influencers who live in our various Clubhouses enter into an Exclusive Management Agreement (the “Management Agreement(s)”). Through Doiyen, we seek to represent some of the world’s top talent in the world of social media. We plan to hire experienced talent and management agents as well as build our support and administrative resources seeking to expand operations. Our influencers include entertainers, content creators, and style icons.

 

Through Doiyen, we currently represent more than 24 social media influencers, with a combined number of followers on Instagram, TikTok, and YouTube of over 64,000,000. We are dedicated to helping Doiyen’s influencer-clients build their brands, maintain creative control of their destinies, and diversify and grow their businesses through “The Clubhouse,” providing them opportunities to increase their monetization potential and amplify their reach.

 

We also may enter into non-exclusive management agreements with certain Creators, however this is extremely rare, as we prefer to only enter into exclusive management agreements.

 

Paid Promotion

  

Doiyen and its contracted Creators primarily generate revenue from companies paying for promotion for their brands, products, and/or services.

 

There are three primary types of arrangements through which we will receive revenues from these activities through Doiyen:

 

(1) As a talent management company, Doiyen generates revenues based on the earnings of its influencer-clients Creators by receiving a percentage of the earnings of its Creators. Creators are often sought after directly by companies for specific branding and/or promotional opportunities. In these situations, the client-company would contract with the Creator directly, and such services provided by the Creator would fall under the Management Agreement, and Doiyen would receive a percentage of the earnings of the Creator for such services as described above.

 

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(2) Pursuant to the Creator Occupancy Agreements, the influencers agree to make certain posts on their own social media accounts at our direction, and we use these “deliverables” to create deals with brands and instruct the influencers to make posts on their social media accounts as required of them under the Creator Occupancy Agreements for the brands we choose to do deals with. We believe this creates what we refer to as “Free Earned Media Value.”

 

(3) Instead of a dealing directly with individual influencers as part of the talent management services provided through Doiyen, brands can also work directly with Clubhouse’s branded social media accounts, of which WOHG owns 100%. These house accounts grow as each influencer is required to promote the house accounts under the Creator Occupancy Agreements, which require Creators to make social media posts at the direction of Doiyen on such accounts on a regular basis without additional compensation, in exchange for being provided with living arrangements. When Doiyen exercises this right to provide promotional services to a paying client through the Clubhouse’s social media accounts, Doiyen receives 100% of the compensation.

 

Companies that contract with Doiyen to provide such promotional activities for their advertising campaigns or custom content requests generally either prepay for services or request credit terms. Such agreements typically provide for either a non-refundable deposit, or a cancellation fee if the agreement is canceled by Doiyen prior to completion our promotional services.

 

Brand Development and Content Creation

 

Through WOH Brands, LLC, a 100% wholly owned subsidiary of WOHG, we engage and also plan to engage in a number of activities with respect to brand development and incubation, content creation, and technology development, as follows:

 

  Content Creation: original long and short form content creation for streaming services or other platforms involved in content distribution;
     
  Brand Development and Product Sales: acquiring or creating in-house brands and selling products in various categories, including apparel, beauty, and other lifestyle brands; and
     
  Technology: development and/or acquisition of software geared towards social media, which may be licensed, sold outright, or otherwise monetized by us.

 

Through Digital Influence Inc. (doing business as Magiclytics), a 100% wholly owned subsidiary of WOHG, we provide predictive analytics for content creation brand deals.

 

Brand Development

 

On May 19, 2020, WOH Brands began to engage in brand development, with a focus on creating apparel, beauty, and other lifestyle brands with quality product offerings. Through WOH Brands, our indirectly wholly-owned subsidiary, we intend to acquire, enter into joint ventures or launch best-in-class brands with an objective of innovation and product uniqueness, derived from demographic data, market research, and omni-channel experiences.

 

WOH Brands is primarily focused on creating brands on our behalf and may consider joint-ventures with other established companies in the consumer-packaged goods space for purposes of brand and production creation. WOH Brands will not provide its branding or product services to third parties outside of the Clubhouse Media-family of companies other than companies with which it may enter into a joint venture or other companies it contracts with to do so.

 

As of the date of this Prospectus, WOH Brands has only sold a minimal amount of products, and has only generated minimal revenues.

 

Content Creation

 

WOH Brands acts as an internal studio for us, with the ability to develop ideas for, produce, and film content. Each of the Clubhouse locations are equipped with studios - some with separate studios within the houses and some with the entire house as a studio - and open-areas that enable content creation. As a Clubhouse Media entity, WOH Brands has access to these resources, including the Clubhouse-influencers residing at each Clubhouse location, which it can utilize for quality content creation.

 

Digital Influence Inc. (doing business as Magiclytics) provides predictive analytics for content creation brand deals.

 

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As of the date of this Prospectus, WOH Brands’ activities in this area have been limited to assisting in the production of paid-promotional content for companies that have engaged Doiyen or Doiyen’s Creators for brand and product promotion, as well as content-creation for Clubhouse, for which WOH Brands does not receive compensation. WOH Brands’ activities in this capacity include filming, photography, and graphic design.

 

Planned Operations

 

  Brand Development. As stated above, WOH Brands intends to acquire, enter into joint ventures with, or create new brands in apparel, beauty, and other lifestyle categories in the future. We believe that we are in a unique position to gather data intelligence from our dealings with paid brand deals. While companies pay Doiyen and our influencers to promote their products or services, we gain firsthand insight into what type of brands (and their corresponding products and services) resonate with our demographic. We believe that this information better positions WOH Brands in deciding what type of product or service to acquire or build. WOH Brands will not provide its brand development services to third parties outside of the Clubhouse Media-family of companies, but may engage in joint ventures with third parties.
     
  Content Creation. In the future, WOH Brands intends to create entertainment content for streaming services and other platforms in the entertainment and/or social media space. WOH Brands expects it could receive ad revenues, revenues for licensing, and/or revenues for sales of content to purchasers in this space.
     
  Technology Development / Software. WOH Brands also intends to engage in technology and software related to social media, either through development of such technologies itself, or through acquiring such technologies from other companies. WOH Brands believes there are a number of areas in which there is opportunity for software to add value to companies in the social media space. For example, WOH Brands believes that there is a need for software that provides analytic capabilities and generates predictive outcomes for returns on social media promotional spends on specific influencers. WOH Brands also believes there are opportunities for competition with certain existing social media platforms. WHO Brands intends to either develop internally or acquire such software and/or technologies, which it plans to subsequently license, sell, or otherwise monetize to generate revenues.
     
  Subscription Services. In September 2021, the Company launched its subscription-based site HoneyDrip.com, which provides a digital space for creators to share unique content with their subscribers.

 

INDUSTRY OVERVIEW

 

Social Media and Influencer Marketing and Promotion

 

Around the world, marketing is a key strategy for brands to obtain exposure, achieve better recall, communicate themes and drive increased consumer engagement. Globally, in 2018, there was an estimated spend of $66 billion on sponsorships, up from $43 billion in 2008, according to Statista 2019-Worldwide; IEG; 2007 to 2017. As for the overall advertising landscape, Zenith estimated that global advertising spending reached $579 billion in 2018, and will grow at a CAGR of 4% through 2020.

 

Advertising has shifted significantly towards social media over the last few years, and social media influencers who are the primary form of advertisement distribution is highly disorganized. We believe that one of the most important aspects of building a company or launching a product is social media marketing. According to an article titled “Global social media research summary July 2020” by Smart Insights dated August 3, 2020, during the COVID-19 Pandemic, social media experienced a 43% increase in usage. According to an article titled “55 critical social media statistics to fuel your 2020 strategy” published by SproutSocial dated January 7, 2020, the amount spent on advertising over social media will likely reach $102 billion by 2020.

 

According to a Business Insider Intelligence report titled “Influencer Marketing: State of the social media influencer market in 2021” originally published in December 2019 and updated February 2021, influencer marketing spending has grown significantly since 2015 and is expected to reach $13.8 billion annually by 2021. According to the same source, currently 78% of companies spend over 10% of their marketing budget on influencer marketing and 11% of companies allocate more than 40% of their marketing budget on influencer marketing and the percentage is expected to grow as more companies become comfortable with the channel. Also according to the same source, companies surveyed about influencer marketing noted that content quality, aligned target audience demographic and engagement rate were the three most important determinants in choosing influencer partners and that the two most important goals for influencer marketing based on survey responses were increasing brand awareness and reaching new audiences in order to expand their existing customer base.

 

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WOHG intends to capitalize on this growing social media and influencer based advertising spending, utilizing its Clubhouse influencers to attract advertisers directly, as well as generating business for Creators, for which it will receive compensation pursuant to its Management Agreements.

 

Apparel

 

The United States apparel market was valued at approximately 368 billion U.S. dollars as of 2019. Store-based retailing was valued at over 268 billion U.S., while e-commerce brought in over 100 million U.S. dollars of revenue. As the internet increasingly influences social and economic activities, the e-commerce market for retail goods is expected to grow steadily. Our core customer demographic is anywhere from 12 to 30-year old women and men.

 

Competition

 

We face competition from a variety of companies in the different areas in which we operate. We face competition from influencer houses similar to the Clubhouse, such as Hype House and Glam House. While we do not generate revenue directly from the Clubhouse, the Clubhouse enables us to attract quality, popular, talented influencers in the social media industry, which we consider to be our primary asset that enables our various business operations.

 

As a talent management company through Doiyen, we compete against other talent management companies that are specific to the social media influencer space, such as IZEA and Viral Nation. We compete with these other companies on the basis of our brand name, reputation for access to industry participants and desirable projects, as well as pricing.

 

For our brands and products, we currently compete primarily with other specialty retailers, higher-end department stores and Internet businesses that engage in the retail sale of women’s and men’s apparel, accessories and similar merchandise targeting customers aged 12 to 30. We believe the principal basis upon which we compete are design, quality, and price. We believe that our primary competitive advantage is high visibility, which we can achieve through our network of Clubhouse influencers.

 

In the future, we expect to compete with other content-creators for placement on streaming services and other content platforms, with technology and software companies in the social media space, and with companies making lifestyle and/or beauty products marketed to social media audiences.

 

We seek to effectively compete with such competitors by out-scaling our competition, focusing on in-house business infrastructure and providing superior support and management services for our Clubhouse influencers. We strive to have more physical locations than other influencer-house networks. Currently, we are unaware of any other company that is combining into one business the various business aspects in which we engage. In addition, we believe the experience of our management team provides us with a significant advantage in the social media influencer business, as participants in this space have traditionally lacked the business experience that our executive management team possesses, which we intend to use to our advantage. Notwithstanding, we may not be able to effectively compete with such competitors.

 

Customers

 

Our customers include our influencer-clients, or Creators, (through Doiyen), companies that contract directly with us (through Doiyen) for paid promotion, and the consumers that purchase our products (through WOH Brands).

 

Doiyen and its Creators have already worked with a number of notable brands, including, but not limited to, Fashion Nova, Spotify, McDonalds, Amazon, and Boohoo.

 

Sales and Marketing

 

We generally attract clients through our social media presence across various platforms, including YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok.

 

As a respected name in the social media influencer industry, we are often approached by influencers who want us to represent them (through Doiyen), or want to live in one of our Clubhouses. We also scout for up-and-coming talented influencers on various social media platforms, who we then attempt to engage as clients.

 

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For paid promotion, we generally receive inbound inquiries for promotional opportunities from companies looking to promote their brands or products. Doiyen also has a sales team to reach out to specific brands that we believe fits a specific influencer’s style, which is another way we generate business.

 

All products that we sell are marketed through our Clubhouse team of influencers, who provide promotion and marketing social media posts on our behalf as part of the terms of their living arrangements in the Clubhouses.

 

Government Regulation

 

We are subject to various federal, state and local laws, both domestically and internationally, governing matters such as:

 

  licensing laws for talent management companies, such as California’s Talent Agencies Act;
  licensing, permitting and zoning;
  health, safety and sanitation requirements;
  harassment and discrimination, and other similar laws and regulations;
  compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) and similar regulations in other countries;
  data privacy and information security;
  marketing activities;
  environmental protection regulations;
  imposition by the U.S and/or foreign countries of trade restrictions, restrictions on the manner in which content is currently licensed and distributed and ownership restrictions; and
  government regulation of the entertainment industry.

 

We monitor changes in these laws and believe that we are in material compliance with applicable laws and regulations. See “Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business—We are subject to extensive U.S. and foreign governmental regulations, and our failure to comply with these regulations could adversely affect our business.”

 

Our Clubhouses are subject to building and health codes and fire regulations imposed by the state and local governments in the jurisdictions in which they are located. In addition, our U.S. Clubhouses are subject to the U.S. Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 which require us to maintain certain accessibility features at each of the facilities.

 

Our entertainment and content businesses are also subject to certain regulations applicable to our use of Internet web sites and mobile applications such as Tik Tok, Instagram and YouTube. We maintain various web sites and mobile applications that provide information and content regarding our businesses and offer merchandise for sale. The operation of these web sites and applications may be subject to a range of federal, state and local laws.

 

Due to our involvement in products, we are subject to laws governing advertising and promotions, privacy laws, safety regulations, consumer protection regulations and other laws that regulate retailers and govern the promotion and sale of merchandise. We monitor changes in these laws and believe that we are in material compliance with applicable laws.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We currently do not own any patents, trademarks or any other intellectual property at this time.

 

The Company filed a trademark application on April 15, 2020, with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) under Application Serial No. 90649015 for the mark “Clubhouse Media Group.” The application can be found at https://tmsearch.uspto.gov/bin/showfield?f=doc&state=4807:hxdnrn.3.1 and is identified with this image:

 

 

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Overview of the Business of West of Hudson Group, Inc.

 

WOHG, our directly wholly owned subsidiary, was incorporated on May 19, 2020 under the laws of the State of Delaware. WOHG is primarily a holding company, and operates various aspects of its business through its operating subsidiaries of which WOHG is the 100% owner and sole member, and which are as follows:

 

  1. Doiyen, LLC – a talent management company that provides representation to Clubhouse influencers, as further described below.
     
  2. WOH Brands, LLC – a content-creation studio, social media marketing company, technology developer, and brand incubator, as further described below.
     
  3. Digital Influence Inc. (doing business as Magiclytics) – a company that provides predictive analytics for content creation brand deals.

 

Doiyen, LLC (“Doiyen”), formerly named WHP Management, LLC, and before that named WHP Entertainment LLC, is a California limited liability company formed on January 2, 2020. Doiyen was acquired by WOHG on July 9, 2020 pursuant to an exchange agreement between WOHG and Doiyen, pursuant to which WOHG acquired 100% of the membership interests of Doiyen in exchange for 100 shares of common stock of WOHG. A copy of this agreement is filed as Exhibit 6.7 to the Offering Statement of which this Prospectus forms a part. As described above, Doiyen is a talent management company for social media influencers, and seeks to represent some of the world’s top talent in the world of social media. Doiyen is the entity with which our influencers contract when living in one of our Clubhouses.

 

WOH Brands, LLC (“WOH Brands”) is a Delaware limited liability company formed on May 19, 2020 by WOHG. As described above, WOH Brands engages and also plans to engage in a number of activities, with respect to brand development and incubation, content creation, and technology development.

 

Digital Influence Inc. (doing business as Magiclytics) is a Wyoming corporation formed on July 2, 2018. The Company acquired a 100% interest in Magiclytics on February 3, 2021. As described above, Magiclytics provides predictive analytics for content creation brand deals.

 

WOHG is the 100% owner and sole member and manager of each of these entities pursuant to each of the limited liability company agreements and bylaws, where applicable, that govern these entities, and has complete and exclusive discretion in the management and control of the affairs and business of WOH Brands, Doiyen, and Digital Influence Inc. (doing business as Magiclytics) possesses all powers necessary to carry out the purposes and business of these entities. WOHG is entitled to the receipt of all income (and/or losses) that these entities generate.

 

In addition to the above, WOHG is the 100% owner of two other limited liability companies – Clubhouse Studios, LLC, which holds most of our intellectual property, and DAK Brands, LLC, each incorporated in the State of Delaware on May 13, 2020. However, each of these entities has minimal or no operations as of the date of this Prospectus and are not intended to have any material operations in the near future.

 

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Organizational Structure

 

The following diagram reflects our organization structure:

 

 

 

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Effects of Coronavirus on the Company

 

If the current outbreak of the coronavirus continues to grow, the effects of such a widespread infectious disease and epidemic may inhibit our ability to conduct our business and operations and could materially harm our company. The coronavirus may cause us to have to reduce operations as a result of various lock-down procedures enacted by the local, state or federal government, which could restrict the movement of our influencers outside of or within a specific Clubhouse or even effect the influencer’s ability to create content. The coronavirus may also cause a decrease in advertising spending by companies as a result of the economic turmoil resulting from the spread of the coronavirus and thereby having a negative effect on our ability to generate revenue from advertising. Further, if there is a spread of the coronavirus within any of our Clubhouses, it may cause an inability for our content creators to create and post content and could potentially cause a specific Clubhouse location to be entirely quarantined. Additionally, we may encounter negative publicity or a negative public reaction when creating and posting certain content while a coronavirus related lockdown is enacted. The continued coronavirus outbreak may also restrict our ability to raise funding when needed, and may cause an overall decline in the economy as a whole. The specific and actual effects of the spread of coronavirus are difficult to assess at this time as the actual effects will depend on many factors beyond our control and knowledge. However, the spread of the coronavirus, if it continues, may cause an overall decline in the economy as a whole and also may materially harm our company.

 

Notwithstanding the foregoing possible negative impacts on our business and results of operations, up until now, we do not believe our prior and current business operations, financial condition, and results of operations have been negatively impacted by the coronavirus pandemic and related shutdowns. As the social media sector appears to have been thriving during the pandemic and shutdowns, we believe that our social media-based business and our results of operations have been thriving as well. More specifically, we have been successful at opening several houses, actively recruiting influencers/creators, creating content, and generating revenue during the pandemic and shutdowns. Notwithstanding, the ultimate impact of the coronavirus pandemic on our operations remains unknown and will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, including the duration of the coronavirus outbreak, new information which may emerge concerning the severity of the coronavirus pandemic, and any additional preventative and protective actions that governments, or our company, may direct, which may result in an extended period of business disruption and reduced operations. The long-term financial impact cannot be reasonably estimated at this time and may ultimately have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Organizational History

 

Clubhouse Media Group, Inc. was incorporated under the laws of the State of Nevada on December 19, 2006 with the name Tongji Healthcare Group, Inc. by Nanning Tongji Hospital, Inc. (“NTH”). On the same day, Tongji, Inc., our wholly owned subsidiary, was incorporated in the State of Colorado. Tongji, Inc. was later dissolved on March 25, 2011.

 

NTH was established in Nanning in the province of Guangxi of the People’s Republic of China (“PRC” or “China”) by the Nanning Tongji Medical Co. Ltd. and an individual on October 30, 2003.

 

NTH was a designated hospital for medical insurance in the city of Nanning and Guangxi province with 105 licensed beds. NTH specializes in the areas of internal medicine, surgery, gynecology, pediatrics, emergency medicine, ophthalmology, medical cosmetology, rehabilitation, dermatology, otolaryngology, traditional Chinese medicine, medical imaging, anesthesia, acupuncture, physical therapy, health examination, and prevention.

 

On December 27, 2006, Tongji, Inc. acquired 100% of the equity of NTH pursuant to an Agreement and Plan of Merger, pursuant to which NTH became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Tongji Inc. Pursuant to the Agreement and Plan of Merger, we issued 15,652,557 shares of common stock to the shareholders of NTH in exchange for 100% of the issued and outstanding shares of common stock of NTH. The acquisition of NTH was accounted for as a reverse acquisition under the purchase method of accounting since the shareholders of NTH obtained control of the entity. Accordingly, the reorganization of the two companies was recorded as a recapitalization of NTH, with NTH being treated as the continuing operating entity. The Company, through NTH, thereafter operated the hospital, until the Company eventually sold NTH, as described below.

 

Effective December 31, 2017, under the terms of a Bill of Sale, we agreed to sell, transfer convey and assign forever all of its rights, title and interest in its equity ownership interest in its subsidiary, NTH, to Placer Petroleum Co., LLC, an Arizona limited liability company. Pursuant to the Bill of Sale, consideration for this sale, transfer conveyance and assignment is Placer Petroleum Co, LLC assuming all assets and liabilities of NTH as of December 31, 2017. As a result of the Bill of Sale, the related assets and liabilities of Nanning Tongji Hospital, Inc. was reported as discontinued operations effective December 31, 2017. Thereafter, the Company had minimal operations.

 

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On May 20, 2019, pursuant to Case Number A-19-793075-P, Nevada’s 8th Judicial District, Business Court entered and Order Granting Application of Joseph Arcaro as Custodian of Tongji Healthcare Group, Inc. pursuant to NRS 78.347(1)(b), pursuant to which Joseph Arcaro was appointed custodian of the Company and given authority to reinstate the Company with the State of Nevada under NRS 78.347. On May 23, 2019, Joseph Arcaro filed a Certificate of Reinstatement of the Company with the Secretary of State of the State of Nevada. In addition, on May 23, 2019, Joseph Arcaro filed an Annual List of the Company with the Secretary of State of the State of Nevada, designating himself as President, Secretary, Treasurer and Director of the Company for the filing period of 2017 to 2019. On November 13, 2019, Mr. Arcaro filed a Motion to Terminate Custodianship of Tongji Healthcare Group, Inc. pursuant to NRS 78.650(4) with the District Court in Clark County Nevada. On December 6, 2019, the court granted Mr. Arcaro’s motion, and the custodianship was terminated.

 

Effective May 29, 2020, Joseph Arcaro, our Chief Executive Officer, President, Secretary, Treasurer and sole director and the beneficial owner, through his ownership of Algonquin Partners Inc. (“Algonquin”), of 65% of the Company’s common stock, entered into a Stock Purchase Agreement (the “Stock Purchase Agreement”) by and among West of Hudson Group, Inc., the Company, Algonquin, and Mr. Arcaro. Pursuant to the terms of the SPA, WOHG agreed to purchase, and Algonquin agreed to sell, 30,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock in exchange for payment by WOHG to Algonquin of $240,000 (the “Stock Purchase”). Thereafter, WOHG distributed the 30,000,000 shares of the Company among the shareholders of WOHG. The Stock Purchase closed on June 18, 2020, resulting in a change of control of the Company.

 

On July 7, 2020, we amended our articles of incorporation whereby we increased our authorized capital stock to 550,000,000 shares, comprised of 500,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.001 and 50,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.001.

 

Share Exchange Agreement – West of Hudson Group, Inc.

 

On August 11, 2020, we entered into the Share Exchange Agreement with (i) WOHG; (ii) each of the WOHG Shareholders; and (iii) Mr. Ben-Yohanan as the Shareholders’ Representative.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the Share Exchange Agreement, the parties agreed that the Company would acquire 100% of WOHG’s issued and outstanding capital stock, in exchange for the issuance to the WOHG Shareholders of a number of shares of the Company’s common stock to be determined at the closing of the Share Exchange Agreement.

 

On November 12, 2020, the Company filed a Certificate of Designations with the Secretary of State of Nevada to designate one share of the preferred stock of the Company as the Series X Preferred Stock of the Company.

 

The closing of the Share Exchange Agreement occurred on November 12, 2020. Pursuant to the terms of the Share Exchange Agreement, the Company acquired 200 shares WOHG’s common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, representing 100% of the issued and outstanding capital stock of WOHG, in exchange for the issuance to the WOHG Shareholders of 46,811,195 shares of the Company’s common stock (the “Share Exchange”). As a result of the Share Exchange, WOHG became a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company.

 

In addition, on November 20, 2020, pursuant to the Share Exchange Agreement and subsequent Waiver, the Company issued and sold to Amir Ben-Yohanan one share of Series X Preferred Stock, at a purchase price of $1.00. This one share of Series X Preferred Stock has a number of votes equal to all of the other votes entitled to be cast on any matter by any other shares or securities of the Company plus one, but will not have any economic or other interest in the Company.

 

The Share Exchange is intended to be a reorganization within the meaning of Section 368(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), and the Share Exchange Agreement is intended to be a “plan of reorganization” within the meaning of the regulations promulgated under Section 368(a) of the Code and for the purpose of qualifying as a tax-free transaction for federal income tax purposes.

 

On November 12, 2020, pursuant to the closing of the Share Exchange Agreement, we acquired WOHG, and WOHG thereafter became our wholly owned subsidiary, and the business of WOHG became the business of the Company going forward.

 

Recent Developments of West of Hudson Group, Inc.

 

On August 3, 2020, on behalf of WOHG, Amir Ben-Yohanan, our Chief Executive Officer, entered into a lease agreement for a term ending July 31, 2021 for $50,000 a month (for the property currently being used for the Dobre Brothers House – Beverly Hills location.) The Company terminated its lease agreement for the Dobre Brothers House effective September 1, 2021. At the time of the termination of this lease, the Company had a month-to-month tenancy at this location, as contemplated under the lease after the expiration of the initial term of the lease on July 31, 2021.

 

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On September 4, 2020, on behalf of WOHG, Mr. Ben-Yohanan, our Chief Executive Officer, entered into a one year lease agreement for $40,000 a month for the “Weheartfans House – Bel-Air” Clubhouse. Neither Amir Ben-Yohanan nor WOHG renewed the lease upon its expiration.

 

On September 6, 2020, WOHG entered into an agreement to rent the property for Clubhouse Europe until November 5, 2020, for 4,000 euros per month and to be extended month to month thereafter.

 

On August 18, 2020, on behalf of the Company, Amir Ben-Yohanan, our Chief Executive Officer, entered into a one-year lease agreement for a term commencing on February 1, 2021 and ending January 31, 2022 for $12,500 a month (for the property currently being used for the Society Las Vegas – Las Vegas location). As of July 31, 2021, the Company and the landlord mutually agreed to terminate the lease without penalty.

 

On March 4, 2021, the Company entered into a three-month lease agreement for a term ending June 15, 2021 for $34,000.00 per month (for the property currently being used for the Just a House – Los Angeles location.) This lease was not renewed.

 

As of September 30, 2021, Mr. Ben-Yohanan, our Chief Executive Officer has advanced $2,291,151 to WOHG to pay WOHG’s operating expenses.

 

Name Change

 

On November 2, 2020, the Company filed a Certificate of Amendment with the Secretary of State of Nevada in order to amend its Articles of Incorporation to change the Company’s name from “Tongji Healthcare Group, Inc.” to “Clubhouse Media Group, Inc.”

 

On January 20, 2021, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) approved our name change from “Tongji Healthcare Group, Inc.” to “Clubhouse Media Group, Inc.” and approved the change the symbol of our common stock from “TONJ” to “CMGR.”

 

Share Exchange Agreement - Magiclytics

 

On February 3, 2021, the Company entered into an Amended and Restated Share Exchange Agreement (the “A&R Share Exchange Agreement”) by and between the Company, Digital Influence Inc., a Wyoming corporation doing business as Magiclytics (“Magiclytics”), each of the shareholders of Magiclytics (the “Magiclytics Shareholders”) and Christian Young, as the representative of the Magiclytics Shareholders (the “Shareholders’ Representative”). Christian Young is the President, Secretary, and a Director of the Company, and is also an officer, director, and significant shareholder of Magiclytics.

 

The A&R Share Exchange Agreement amended and restated in its entirety the previous Share Exchange Agreement between the same parties, which was executed on December 3, 2020. The A&R Share Exchange Agreement replaces the Share Exchange Agreement in its entirety.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the A&R Share Exchange Agreement, the Company agreed to acquire from the Magiclytics Shareholders, who hold an aggregate of 5,000 shares of Magiclytics’ common stock, par value $0.01 per share (the “Magiclytics Shares”), all 5,000 Magiclytics Shares, representing 100% of Magiclytics’ issued and outstanding capital stock, in exchange for the issuance by the Company to the Magiclytics Shareholders of the 734,689 shares of the Company’s common stock based on a $3,500,000 valuation of Magiclytics, to be apportioned between the Magiclytics Shareholders pro rata based on their respective ownership of Magiclytics Shares.

 

On February 3, 2021 (the “Magiclytics Closing Date”), the parties closed on the transactions contemplated in the A&R Share Exchange Agreement, and the Company agreed to issue 734,689 shares of Company common stock to the Magiclytics Shareholders in exchange for all 5,000 Magiclytics Shares (the “Magiclytics Closing”). On February 3, 2021, pursuant to the closing of the Share Exchange Agreement, we acquired Magiclytics, and Magiclytics thereafter became our wholly owned subsidiary.

 

At the Magiclytics Closing, we agreed to issue to Christian Young and Wilfred Man each 330,610 shares of Company Common Stock, representing 45% each, or 90% in total of the Company common stock which we agreed to issue to the Magiclytics Shareholders at the Magiclytics Closing. As of February 7, 2021, we have not issued the 734,689 shares to the Magiclytics shareholders.

 

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The number of shares of the Company common stock issued at the Magiclytics Closing was based on the fair market value of the Company common stock as initially agreed to by the parties, which is $4.76 per share (the “Base Value”). The fair market value was determined based on the volume weighted average closing price of the Company common stock for the twenty (20) trading day period immediately prior to the Magiclytics,. In the event that the initial public offering price per share of the Company common stock in this offering pursuant to Regulation A is less than the Base Value, then within three (3) business days of the qualification by the SEC of the Offering Statement forming part of this Prospectus, the Company will issue to the Magiclytics Shareholders a number of additional shares of Company common stock equal to:

 

  (1) $3,500,000 divided by the initial public offering price per share of the Company common stock in this offering pursuant to Regulation A, minus;
  (2) 734,689

 

The resulting number of shares of the Company common stock pursuant to the above calculation will be referred to as the “Additional Shares”, and such Additional Shares will also be issued to the Magiclytics Shareholders pro rata based on their respective ownership of Magiclytics Shares.

 

In addition to the exchange of shares between the Magiclytics Shareholders and the Company described above, on the Magiclytics Closing Date the parties took a number of other actions in connection with the Magiclytics Closing pursuant to the terms of the A&R Share Exchange Agreement:

 

  (i) The Board of Directors of Magiclytics (the “Magiclytics Board”) expanded the size of the Magiclytics Board to 3 persons and named Simon Yu, a current officer and director of the Company as a director of the Magiclytics Board.
  (ii) The Magiclytics Board named Wilfred Man as the Chief Executive Officer of Magiclytics, Christian Young as the President and Secretary of the Magiclytics and Simon Yu as the Chief Operating Officer of Magiclytics.

 

Further, immediately following the Magiclytics Closing, the Company assumed responsibility for all outstanding accounts payables and operating costs to continue operations of Magiclytics including but not limited to payment to any of its vendors, lenders, or other parties in which Magiclytics engages with in the regular course of its business.

 

“The Clubhouse” Online Presence and Plans for Expansion of the Physical Clubhouses

 

While “The Clubhouse” network consists of physical locations (as described above), there are numerous “Clubhouse” accounts owned by The Clubhouse, with a combined following of over 5.7 million followers as of June 22, 2021 across Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, and TikTok. These accounts are directly held by us (as opposed to the Clubhouse team of influencers) and therefore we have direct access to the followers of these accounts, which we consider to be our followers.

 

Management Agreement—TheTinderBlog

 

Effective June 10, 2021, the Company entered into an exclusive management agreement pursuant to which it will manage, invest in and help grown “TheTinderBlog” (Instagram.com/thetinderblog), a large and highly successful Instagram meme account. TheTinderBlog is an official partner of Facebook. TheTinderBlog boasts over 4.2 million followers acquired over its six-year existence, as well as a seven-figure annual net income built on nearly one billion web impressions per month. TheTinderBlog has also attracted major advertisers, including McDonald’s, Amazon Prime, Dunkin Donuts, Samsung, among others.

 

Clubhouse Creator Affiliate Program

 

In June 2021, we launched the Clubhouse Creator Affiliate Program. Through this program, we invite young social media creators from all over the world to join the Clubhouse network, promote the Clubhouse brand and grow their social media network with us. To date, over 18 creators with a total reach of well over 100 million followers have signed up and partnered with us and we expect many more to do the same. These creators will serve as Clubhouse ambassadors worldwide and we plan to invite them to visit our content houses and collaborate with our creators.

 

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CONVERTIBLE PROMISSORY NOTES

 

Convertible Promissory Note – Scott Hoey

 

On September 10, 2020, the Company entered into a note purchase agreement with Scott Hoey, pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Mr. Hoey the aggregate principal amount of $7,500 for a purchase price of $7,500 (“Hoey Note”).

 

The Hoey Note had a maturity date of September 10, 2022 and bore interest at 8% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the Hoey Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty. Mr. Hoey had the right, until the Indebtedness is paid in full, to convert all, but only all, of the then-outstanding Indebtedness into shares of Company common stock at a conversion price of 50% of the volume weighted average of the closing price (“VWAP”) during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, subject to customary adjustments for stock splits, etc. occurring after the issuance date.

 

On December 8, 2020, the Company issued to Mr. Hoey 10,833 shares of Company common stock upon the conversion of the $7,500 convertible promissory note issued to Mr. Hoey at a conversion price of $0.69 per share.

 

Since the conversion price is based on 50% of the VWAP during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, the Company has determined that the conversion feature is considered a derivative liability for the Company, which is detailed in Note 10.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $0 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – Cary Niu

 

On September 18, 2020, the Company entered into a note purchase agreement with Cary Niu, pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Ms. Niu the aggregate principal amount of $50,000 for a purchase price of $50,000 (“Niu Note”).

 

The Niu Note has a maturity date of September 18, 2022 and bears interest at 8% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the Niu Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty. Ms. Niu will have the right, until the Indebtedness is paid in full, to convert all, but only all, of the then-outstanding Indebtedness into shares of Company common stock at a conversion price of 30% of the volume weighted average of the closing price during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, subject to customary adjustments for stock splits, etc. occurring after the issuance date.

 

Since the conversion price is based on 30% of the VWAP during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, the Company has determined that the conversion feature is considered a derivative liability for the Company, which is detailed in Note 10.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $50,000 and $50,000, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – Jesus Galen

 

On October 6, 2020, the Company entered into a note purchase agreement with Jesus Galen, pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Mr. Galen the aggregate principal amount of $30,000 for a purchase price of $30,000 (“Galen Note”).

 

The Galen Note has a maturity date of October 6, 2022 and bears interest at 8% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the Galen Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty. Mr. Galen will have the right, until the Indebtedness is paid in full, to convert all, but only all, of the then-outstanding Indebtedness into shares of Company common stock at a conversion price of 50% of the volume weighted average of the closing price during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, subject to customary adjustments for stock splits, etc. occurring after the issuance date.

 

Since the conversion price is based on 50% of the VWAP during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, the Company has determined that the conversion feature is considered a derivative liability for the Company, which is detailed in Note 10.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $30,000 and $30,000, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – Darren Huynh

 

On October 6, 2020, the Company entered into a note purchase agreement with Darren Huynh, pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Mr. Huynh the aggregate principal amount of $50,000 for a purchase price of $50,000 (“Huynh Note”).

 

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The Huynh Note has a maturity date of October 6, 2022, and bears interest at 8% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the Huynh Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty. Mr. Huynh will have the right, until the Indebtedness is paid in full, to convert all, but only all, of the then-outstanding Indebtedness into shares of Company common stock at a conversion price of 50% of the volume weighted average of the closing price during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, subject to customary adjustments for stock splits, etc. occurring after the issuance date.

 

Since the conversion price is based on 50% of the VWAP during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, the Company has determined that the conversion feature is considered a derivative liability for the Company, which is detailed in Note 10.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $50,000 and $50,000, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – Wayne Wong

 

On October 6, 2020, the Company entered into a note purchase agreement with Wayne Wong, pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Mr. Wong the aggregate principal amount of $25,000 for a purchase price of $25,000 (“Wong Note”).

 

The Wong Note has a maturity date of October 6, 2022, and bears interest at 8% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the Wong Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty. Mr. Wong will have the right, until the Indebtedness is paid in full, to convert all, but only all, of the then-outstanding Indebtedness into shares of Company common stock at a conversion price of 50% of the volume weighted average of the closing price during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, subject to customary adjustments for stock splits, etc. occurring after the issuance date.

 

Since the conversion price is based on 50% of the VWAP during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, the Company has determined that the conversion feature is considered a derivative liability for the Company, which is detailed in Note 10.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $25,000 and $25,000, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – Matthew Singer

 

On January 3, 2021, the Company entered into a note purchase agreement with Matthew Singer, pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Mr. Singer the aggregate principal amount of $13,000 for a purchase price of $13,000 (“Singer Note”).

 

The Singer Note had a maturity date of January 3, 2023, and bore interest at 8% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the Singer Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty. Mr. Singer had the right, until the Indebtedness is paid in full, to convert all, but only all, of the then-outstanding Indebtedness into shares of Company common stock at a conversion price of 70% of the volume weighted average of the closing price during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, subject to customary adjustments for stock splits, etc. occurring after the issuance date.

 

On January 26, 2021, the Company issued to Matthew Singer 8,197 shares of Company common stock upon the conversion of the convertible promissory note issued to Mr. Singer in the principal amount of $13,000 on January 3, 2021 at a conversion price of $1.59 per share.

 

Since the conversion price is based on 70% of the VWAP during the 20-trading day period immediately prior to the option conversion date, the Company has determined that the conversion feature is considered a derivative liability for the Company, which is detailed in Note 10.

 

The balance as of September e 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $0 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – ProActive Capital SPV I, LLC

 

On January 20, 2021, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement (the “ProActive Capital SPA”) with ProActive Capital SPV I, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“ProActive Capital”), pursuant to which, on same date, the Company (i) issued a convertible promissory note to ProActive Capital the aggregate principal amount of $250,000 for a purchase price of $225,000, reflecting a $25,000 original issue discount (the “ProActive Capital Note”), and in connection therewith, sold to ProActive Capital 50,000 shares of Company Common Stock at a purchase price of $0.001 per share. In addition, at the closing of this sale, the Company reimbursed ProActive Capital the sum of $10,000 for ProActive Capital’s costs in completing the transaction, which amount ProActive Capital withheld from the total purchase price paid to the Company.

 

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The ProActive Capital Note has a maturity date of January 20, 2022 and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the ProActive Capital Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The ProActive Capital Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of Company Common Stock at ProActive Capital’s election at any time following the time that the SEC qualifies the Company’s offering statement related to the Regulation A Offering, at a conversion price equal to 70% of the Regulation A Offering Price of the Company Common Stock in the Regulation A Offering, and is subject to a customary beneficial ownership limitation of 9.99%, which may be waived by ProActive Capital on 61 days’ notice to the Company. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the determination of the conversion price.

 

The $25,000 original issue discounts, the fair value of 50,000 shares issued, and the beneficial conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discounts at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were $217,024.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $250,000 and $0, respectively.

 

First Convertible Promissory Note – GS Capital Partners

 

On January 25, 2021, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement (the “GS Capital #1”) with GS Capital Partners, LLC (“GS Capital”), pursuant to which, on same date, the Company (i) issued a convertible promissory note to GS Capital the aggregate principal amount of $288,889 for a purchase price of $260,000, reflecting a $28,889 original issue discount (the “GS Capital Note”), and in connection therewith, sold to GS Capital 50,000 shares of Company Common Stock at a purchase price of $0.001 per share. In addition, at the closing of this sale, the Company reimbursed GS Capital the sum of $10,000 for GS Capital’s costs in completing the transaction, which amount GS Capital withheld from the total purchase price paid to the Company.

 

The GS Capital Note has a maturity date of January 25, 2022, and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the GS Capital Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The GS Capital Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of Company Common Stock at GS Capital’s election at any time following the time that the SEC qualifies the Company’s offering statement related to the Regulation A Offering, at a conversion price equal to 70% of the Regulation A Offering Price of the Company Common Stock in the Regulation A Offering, and is subject to a customary beneficial ownership limitation of 9.99%, which may be waived by GS Capital on 61 days’ notice to the Company. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the determination of the conversion price.

 

The $28,889 original issue discounts, the fair value of 50,000 shares issued, and the beneficial conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discounts at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were $288,889.

 

The entire principal balance and interest were converted in the quarter ended June 30, 2021. The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $0 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – GS Capital Partners #2

 

On February 19, 2021, the Company entered into another securities purchase agreement with GS Capital (the “GS Capital #2”), pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to GS Capital the aggregate principal amount of $577,778 for a purchase price of $520,000, reflecting a $57,778 original issue discount, and in connection therewith, sold to GS Capital 100,000 shares of Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share at a purchase price of $100, representing a per share price of $0.001 per share. In addition, at the closing of this sale, the Company reimbursed GS Capital the sum of $10,000 for GS Capital’s costs in completing the transaction, which amount GS Capital withheld from the total purchase price paid to the Company.

 

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The GS Capital Note has a maturity date of February 19, 2022 and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the GS Capital Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The GS Capital Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of the Company Common Stock at GS Capital’s election at any time following the time that the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) qualifies the Company’s offering statement related to the Company’s planned offering of Company Common Stock pursuant to Regulation A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Regulation A Offering”). At such time, the GS Capital Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) will be convertible at a conversion price equal to 70% of the initial offering price of the Company Common Stock in the Regulation A Offering, subject to a customary beneficial ownership limitation of 9.99%, which may be waived by GS Capital on 61 days’ notice to the Company. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the determination of the conversion price.

 

The $57,778 original issue discounts, the fair value of 100,000 shares issued, and the beneficial conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discounts at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were $577,778.

 

GS Capital converted $96,484 and $3,515 accrued interest in the quarter ended June 30, 2021. The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $481,294 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – GS Capital Partners #3

 

On March 16, 2021, the Company entered into another securities purchase agreement with GS Capital (the “GS Capital #3”), pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to GS Capital the aggregate principal amount of $577,778 for a purchase price of $520,000, reflecting a $57,778 original issue discount, and in connection therewith, sold to GS Capital 100,000 shares of Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share at a purchase price of $100, representing a per share price of $0.001 per share. In addition, at the closing of this sale, the Company reimbursed GS Capital the sum of $10,000 for GS Capital’s costs in completing the transaction, which amount GS Capital withheld from the total purchase price paid to the Company.

 

The GS Capital Note has a maturity date of March 22, 2022 and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the GS Capital Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The GS Capital Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of the Company Common Stock at GS Capital’s election at any time following the time that the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) qualifies the Company’s offering statement related to the Company’s planned offering of Company Common Stock pursuant to Regulation A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Regulation A Offering”). At such time, the GS Capital Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) will be convertible at a conversion price equal to 70% of the initial offering price of the Company Common Stock in the Regulation A Offering, subject to a customary beneficial ownership limitation of 9.99%, which may be waived by GS Capital on 61 days’ notice to the Company. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the determination of the conversion price.

 

The $57,778 original issue discounts, the fair value of 100,000 shares issued, and the beneficial conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discounts at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were $577,778.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $577,778 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – GS Capital Partners #4

 

On April 1, 2021, the Company entered into another securities purchase agreement with GS Capital (the “GS Capital #4”), pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to GS Capital the aggregate principal amount of $550,000 for a purchase price of $500,000, reflecting a $50,000 original issue discount, and in connection therewith, sold to GS Capital 45,000 shares of Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share at a purchase price of $45, representing a per share price of $0.001 per share. In addition, at the closing of this sale, the Company reimbursed GS Capital the sum of $10,000 for GS Capital’s costs in completing the transaction, which amount GS Capital withheld from the total purchase price paid to the Company.

 

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The GS Capital Note #4 has a maturity date of April 1, 2022 and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the GS Capital Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The GS Capital Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of the Company Common Stock at GS Capital’s election at any time following the time that the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) qualifies the Company’s offering statement related to the Company’s planned offering of Company Common Stock pursuant to Regulation A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Regulation A Offering”). At such time, the GS Capital Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) will be convertible at a conversion price equal to 70% of the initial offering price of the Company Common Stock in the Regulation A Offering, subject to a customary beneficial ownership limitation of 9.99%, which may be waived by GS Capital on 61 days’ notice to the Company. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the determination of the conversion price.

 

The $50,000 original issue discounts, the fair value of 45,000 shares issued, and the beneficial conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discount at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were recorded at $550,000.

 

The balance of the GS Capital Note #4 as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $550,000 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – GS Capital Partners #5

 

On April 29, 2021, Clubhouse Media Group, Inc. (the “Company”) entered into a securities purchase agreement (the “Securities Purchase Agreement”) with GS Capital Partners, LLC (“GS Capital”), pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to GS Capital in the aggregate principal amount of $550,000 for a purchase price of $500,000, reflecting a $50,000 original issue discount (the “GS Capital Note #5”) and, in connection therewith, sold to GS Capital 125,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Company Common Stock”) at a purchase price of $125, representing a per share price of $0.001 per share. In addition, at the closing of this sale, the Company reimbursed GS Capital the sum of $5,000 for GS Capital’s costs in completing the transaction, which amount GS Capital withheld from the total purchase price paid to the Company.

 

The April 2021 GS Capital Note #5 has a maturity date of April 29, 2022 and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the GS Capital Note #5, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The GS Capital Note #5 (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Company Common Stock”) at GS Capital’s election at any time following the time that the SEC qualifies the Company’s offering statement related to the Company’s planned offering of Company Common Stock pursuant to Regulation A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Regulation A Offering”). At such time, the GS Capital Note #5 (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) will be convertible at a conversion price equal to 70% of the initial offering price of the Company Common Stock in the Regulation A Offering, subject to a customary beneficial ownership limitation of 9.99%, which may be waived by GS Capital on 61 days’ notice to the Company. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the determination of the conversion price.

 

The $50,000 original issue discounts, the fair value of 125,000 shares issued, and the beneficial conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discount at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were recorded at $550,000.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $550,000 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – GS Capital Partners #6

 

On June 3, 2021, Clubhouse Media Group, Inc. (the “Company”) entered into a securities purchase agreement (the “Securities Purchase Agreement”) with GS Capital Partners, LLC (“GS Capital”), pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to GS Capital in the aggregate principal amount of $550,000 for a purchase price of $500,000, reflecting a $50,000 original issue discount (the “GS Capital Note #6”) and, in connection therewith, sold to GS Capital 85,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Company Common Stock”) at a purchase price of $85, representing a per share price of $0.001 per share. In addition, at the closing of this sale, the Company reimbursed GS Capital the sum of $5,000 for GS Capital’s costs in completing the transaction, which amount GS Capital withheld from the total purchase price paid to the Company.

 

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The GS Capital Note #6 has a maturity date of June 3, 2022 and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the GS Capital Note #6, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The GS Capital Note #6 (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Company Common Stock”) at GS Capital’s election at any time following the time that the SEC qualifies the Company’s offering statement related to the Company’s planned offering of Company Common Stock pursuant to Regulation A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Regulation A Offering”). At such time, the GS Capital Note #6 (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) will be convertible at a conversion price equal to 70% of the initial offering price of the Company Common Stock in the Regulation A Offering, subject to a customary beneficial ownership limitation of 9.99%, which may be waived by GS Capital on 61 days’ notice to the Company. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the determination of the conversion price.

 

The $50,000 original issue discounts, the fair value of 85,000 shares issued, and the beneficial conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discount at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were recorded at $550,000.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $550,000 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – Tiger Trout Capital Puerto Rico

 

On January 29, 2021, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement (the “Tiger Trout SPA”) with Tiger Trout Capital Puerto Rico, LLC, a Puerto Rico limited liability company (“Tiger Trout”), pursuant to which, on same, date, the Company (i) issued a convertible promissory note in the aggregate principal amount of $1,540,000 for a purchase price of $1,100,000, reflecting a $440,000 original issue discount (the “Tiger Trout Note”), and (ii) sold to Tiger Trout 220,000 shares Company common stock for a purchase price of $220.00.

 

The Tiger Trout Note has a maturity date of January 29, 2022, and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the Tiger Trout Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty, provided however, that if the Company does not pay the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest by July 2, 2021, an additional $50,000 is required to be paid to Tiger Trout at the time the Tiger Trout Note is repaid, if the Company repays the Tiger Trout Note prior to its maturity date.

 

If the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest under the Tiger Trout Note has not been repaid on or before the maturity date, that will be an event of default under the Tiger Trout Note. If an event of default has occurred and is continuing, Tiger Trout may declare all or any portion of the then-outstanding principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest under the Tiger Trout Note (the “Indebtedness”) due and payable, and the Indebtedness will become immediately due and payable in cash by the Company. Further, Tiger Trout will have the right, until the Indebtedness is paid in full, to convert all, but only all, of the then-outstanding Indebtedness into shares of Company common stock at a conversion price of $0.50 per share, subject to customary adjustments for stock splits, etc. occurring after the issuance date. The Tiger Trout Note contains a customary beneficial ownership limitation of 9.99%, which may be waived by Tiger Trout on 61 days’ notice to the Company.

 

The $440,000 original issue discounts, the fair value of 220,000 shares issued, and the beneficial conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discounts at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were $1,540,000.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $1,540,000 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – Eagle Equities LLC

 

On April 13, 2021, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement (the “Eagle SPA”) with Eagle Equities LLC (“Eagle Equities”), pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Eagle Equities in the aggregate principal amount of $1,100,000 for a purchase price of $1,000,000.00, reflecting a $100,000 original issue discount (the “Eagle Equities Note”), and, in connection therewith, sold to Eagle Equities 165,000 shares of Company’s common stock, par value of $0.001 per share (the “Company Common Stock”) at a purchase price of $165.00, representing a per share price of $0.001 per share. In addition, at the closing of this sale, the Company reimbursed Eagle Equities the sum of $10,000 for Eagle Equities’ costs in completing the transaction, which amount Eagle Equities withheld from the total purchase price paid to the Company.

 

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The Eagle Equities Note has a maturity date of April 13, 2022 and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than upon the circumstances set forth in the Eagle Equities Note – specifically, if (i) the SEC qualifies the Company’s offering statement related to the Company’s planned offering of Company Common Stock pursuant to Regulation A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended; and (ii) the Company receives $3,500,000 in net proceeds from such Regulation A Offering, then Company must repay the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest on the Eagle Equities Note within three (3) business days from the date of such occurrence. The Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The Eagle Equities Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of the Company Common Stock at Eagle Equities’ election at any time following the time that the SEC qualifies the Company’s offering statement related to the Company’s planned offering of Company Common Stock pursuant to Regulation A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. At such time, the Eagle Equities Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) will be convertible in restricted shares of Company Common Stock at a conversion price equal to 70% of the initial offering price of the Company Common Stock in the Regulation A Offering, subject to a customary beneficial ownership limitation of 9.99%, which may be waived by Eagle Equities on 61 days’ notice to the Company. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the determination of the conversion price. Alternatively, if the SEC has not qualified the Company’s offering statement related to the Company’s planned offering of Company Common Stock pursuant to Regulation A under the Securities Act of 1933 by October 10, 2021, and Eagle Equities Note has not yet been fully repaid, then Eagle Equities will have the right to convert the Eagle Equities Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) into restricted shares of Company Common Stock at a conversion price of $6.50 per share (subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the April 13, 2021).

 

The $100,000 original issue discounts, the fair value of 165,000 shares issued, and the beneficial conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discount at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were recorded at $1,100,000.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $1,100,000 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – Labrys Fund, LP

 

On March 11, 2021, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement (the “Labrys SPA”) with Labrys Fund, LP (“Labrys”), pursuant to which the Company issued a 10% promissory note (the “Labrys Note”) with a maturity date of March 11, 2022 (the “Labrys Maturity Date”), in the principal sum of $1,000,000. In addition, the Company issued 125,000 shares of its common stock to Labrys as a commitment fee pursuant to the Labrys SPA. Pursuant to the terms of the Labrys Note, the Company agreed to pay to $1,000,000 (the “Principal Sum”) to Labrys and to pay interest on the principal balance at the rate of 10% per annum. The Labrys Note carries an original issue discount (“OID”) of $100,000. Accordingly, on the Closing Date (as defined in the Labrys SPA), Labrys paid the purchase price of $900,000 in exchange for the Labrys Note. Labrys may convert the Labrys Note into the Company’s common stock (subject to the beneficial ownership limitations of 4.99% in the Labrys Note) at any time at a conversion price equal to $10.00 per share.

 

The Company may prepay the Labrys Note at any time prior to the date that an Event of Default (as defined in the Labrys Note) occurs at an amount equal to 100% of the Principal Sum then outstanding plus accrued and unpaid interest (no prepayment premium) plus $750.00 for administrative fees. The Labrys Note contains customary events of default relating to, among other things, payment defaults, breach of representations and warranties, and breach of provisions of the Labrys Note or Labrys SPA.

 

Upon the occurrence of any Event of Default, the Labrys Note shall become immediately due and payable and the Company shall pay to Labrys, in full satisfaction of its obligations hereunder, an amount equal to the Principal Sum then outstanding plus accrued interest multiplied by 125% (the “Default Amount”). Upon the occurrence of an Event of Default, additional interest will accrue from the date of the Event of Default at the rate equal to the lower of 16% per annum or the highest rate permitted by law.

 

The $100,000 original issue discounts, the fair value of 125,000 shares issued, and the beneficial conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discounts at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were $1,000,000.

 

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For the quarter ended June 30, 2021, the Company paid $300,000 cash to reduce the balance of the convertible promissory note from Labrys Fund, LP. The balance as of June 30, 2021, was $700,000.

 

The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $545,000 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – Amir Ben-Yohanan

 

On February 2, 2021, the Company and Amir Ben-Yohanan, its Chief Executive Officer, entered into a promissory note in the total principal amount of $2,400,000 (the “Amir 2021 Note”) to replace the Amir 2020 note. The Note memorializes a $2,400,000 loan that Mr. Ben-Yohanan previously advanced to the Company and its subsidiaries to fund their operations. The Note bears simple interest at a rate of eight percent (8%) per annum, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest of the Note at any time without penalty.

 

At the time of the qualification by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission of the Company’s Prospectus, pursuant to Regulation A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, $1,000,000 of the Indebtedness shall, automatically and without any further action of the Company or the Holder, be converted into a number of restricted fully paid and non-assessable shares of shares of common stock, par value $0.001 per share, of the Company equal to (i) $1,000,000 divided by (ii) the price per share of the Common Stock as offered in the Prospectus.

 

As of June 11, 2021, the Company received notice of qualification by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission on its Prospectus. Accordingly, the principal balance of $1,000,000 has been converted to common stock and recorded under shares to be issued until it is issued.


The balance as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $1,269,864 and $0, respectively. The final maturity date of the Note is February 2, 2024.

 

Rui Wu – Note Purchase Agreement, Convertible Promissory Note, Warrant, and Security Agreement

 

On August 27, 2021 Clubhouse Media Group, Inc. (the “Company”) entered into a note purchase agreement (the “Rui Wu Note Purchase Agreement”) with Rui Wu, an individual (“Rui Wu”), with an effective date of August 26, 2021, pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Rui Wu in the aggregate principal amount of $550,000 for a purchase price of $500,000, reflecting a $50,000 original issue discount (the “Rui Wu Note”) and, in connection therewith, issued to Rui Wu a Warrant to purchase 37,500 shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Company Common Stock”) at an exercise price of $2.00 per share, subject to adjustment (the “Rui Wu Warrant”). In addition, in connection with the Rui Wu Note Purchase Agreement, the Company entered into a Security Agreement on same date with Rui Wu, pursuant to which the Company’s obligations under the Rui Wu Note were secured by a first priority lien and security interest on all of the assets of the Company (the “Rui Wu Security Agreement”). While each of the Rui Wu Warrant, Security Agreement, Note, and Note Purchase Agreement have an effective date and/or effective issue date of August 26, 2021, each was entered into and/or issued on August 27, 2021.

 

The Rui Wu Note has a maturity date of August 26, 2022 and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the Rui Wu Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The Rui Wu Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of Company Common Stock at any time following August 26, 2021 until the note is repaid. The conversion price per share of Common Stock shall initially mean the lesser of (i) $1.00 or (ii) 75% of the lowest daily volume weighted average price of the Common Stock during the twenty (20) Trading Days (as defined in the Rui Wu Note) immediately preceding the date of the respective conversion. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the determination of the conversion price.

 

The Rui Wu Note contains customary events of default, including, but not limited to:

 

  if the Company fails to pay the then-outstanding principal amount and accrued interest on the Rui Wu Note on any date any such amounts become due and payable, and any such failure is not cured within three business days of written notice thereof by Rui Wu; or
  the Company fails to remain compliant with the Depository Trust Company (“DTC”), thus incurring a “chilled” status with DTC; or

 

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  any trading suspension is imposed by the SEC under Section 12(j) of the Exchange Act or Section 12(k) of the Exchange Act; or
  the occurrence of any delisting of the Company Common Stock from any securities exchange on which the Company Common Stock is listed or suspension of trading of the Company Common Stock on the OTC Markets.

 

If an event of default has occurred and is continuing, Rui Wu may declare all or any portion of the then-outstanding principal amount of the Rui Wu Note, together with all accrued and unpaid interest thereon, due and payable, and the Rui Wu Note shall thereupon become immediately due and payable in cash and Rui Wu will also have the right to pursue any other remedies that Rui Wu may have under applicable law. In the event that any amount due under the Rui Wu Note is not paid as and when due, such amounts shall accrue interest at the rate of 18% per year, simple interest, non-compounding, until paid.

 

The foregoing description of the Rui Wu Note Purchase Agreement, Rui Wu Note, Rui Wu Warrant, and Rui Wu Security Agreement does not purport to be complete and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full texts of these documents, copies of which are filed as Exhibit 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, and 10.4 respectively, to the company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on August 27, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference.

 

The $50,000 original issue discounts, the fair value of 125,000 warrants issued, and the conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discount at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were recorded at $550,000. For the excess amount of derivative liability, the Company recorded accretion expense of $514,850 at the inception date of this note.

 

The balance of the Riu Wu Note as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 was $550,000 and $0, respectively.

 

Chris Etherington – Note Purchase Agreement, Convertible Promissory Note, Warrant, and Security Agreement

 

On August 27, 2021, the Company entered into a note purchase agreement (the “Chris Etherington Note Purchase Agreement”) with Chris Etherington, an individual (“Chris Etherington”), with an effective date of August 26, 2021, pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Chris Etherington in the aggregate principal amount of $165,000 for a purchase price of $150,000, reflecting a $15,000 original issue discount (the “Chris Etherington Note”) and, in connection therewith, issued to Chris Etherington a Warrant to purchase 37,500 shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Company Common Stock”) at an exercise price of $2.00 per share, subject to adjustment (the “Chris Etherington Warrant”). In addition, in connection with the Chris Etherington Note Purchase Agreement, the Company entered into a Security Agreement on same date with Chris Etherington, pursuant to which the Company’s obligations under the Chris Etherington Note were secured by a first priority lien and security interest on all of the assets of the Company (the “Chris Etherington Security Agreement”). While each of the Chris Etherington Warrant, Security Agreement, Note, and Note Purchase Agreement have an effective date and/or effective issue date of August 26, 2021, each was entered into and/or issued on August 27, 2021.

 

The Chris Etherington Note has a maturity date of August 26, 2022 and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the Chris Etherington Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The Chris Etherington Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of Company Common Stock at any time following August 26, 2021 until the note is repaid. The conversion price per share of Common Stock shall initially mean the lesser of (i) $1.00 or (ii) 75% of the lowest daily volume weighted average price of the Common Stock during the twenty (20) Trading Days (as defined in the Chris Etherington Note) immediately preceding the date of the respective conversion. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the determination of the conversion price.

 

The Chris Etherington Note contains customary events of default, including, but not limited to:

 

  if the Company fails to pay the then-outstanding principal amount and accrued interest on the Chris Etherington Note on any date any such amounts become due and payable, and any such failure is not cured within three business days of written notice thereof by Chris Etherington; or
  the Company fails to remain compliant with the Depository Trust Company (“DTC”), thus incurring a “chilled” status with DTC; or
  any trading suspension is imposed by the SEC under Section 12(j) of the Exchange Act or Section 12(k) of the Exchange Act; or
  the occurrence of any delisting of the Company Common Stock from any securities exchange on which the Company Common Stock is listed or suspension of trading of the Company Common Stock on the OTC Markets.

  

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If an event of default has occurred and is continuing, Chris Etherington may declare all or any portion of the then-outstanding principal amount of the Chris Etherington Note, together with all accrued and unpaid interest thereon, due and payable, and the Chris Etherington Note shall thereupon become immediately due and payable in cash and Chris Etherington will also have the right to pursue any other remedies that Chris Etherington may have under applicable law. In the event that any amount due under the Chris Etherington Note is not paid as and when due, such amounts shall accrue interest at the rate of 18% per year, simple interest, non-compounding, until paid.

 

The $15,000 original issue discounts, the fair value of 37,500 warrants issued, and the conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discount at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were recorded at $165,000. For the excess amount of derivative liability, the Company recorded accretion expense of $160,538 at the inception date of this note.

 

The balance of the Chris Etherington Note as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 was $165,000 and $0, respectively.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – Sixth Street Lending LLC

 

On November 18, 2021, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement (the “Securities Purchase Agreement”) with Sixth Street Lending LLC (“Sixth Street”), pursuant to which, on the same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Sixth Street in the aggregate principal amount of $224,000.00 for a purchase price of $203,750.00, reflecting a $20,250.00 original issue discount (the “Note”). At closing, the Company reimbursed Sixth Street the sum of $3,750.00 for Sixth Street’s costs in completing the transaction.

 

The Note has a maturity date of November 18, 2022 (the “Maturity Date”) and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the Maturity Date, other than as specifically set forth in the Note. The Company may not prepay the Note prior to the Maturity Date, other than by way of a conversion initiated by Sixth Street.

 

The Note provides Sixth Street with conversion rights to convert all or any part of the outstanding and unpaid principal amount of the Note from time to time into fully paid and non-assessable shares of the Company’s Common Stock, par value $0.001 (“Common Stock”). Conversion rights are exercisable at any time during the period beginning on May 17, 2022 (180 days from when the Note was issued) and ending on the later of (i) the Maturity Date and (ii) the date of payment of the amounts due upon an uncured event of default. Any principal that Sixth Street elects to convert will convert at the Conversion Price, which is a Common Stock per share price equal to the lesser of a Variable Conversion Price and $1.00. The Variable Conversion Price is 75% of the Market Price, which is the lowest dollar volume-weighted average sale price (“VWAP”) during the 20-trading day period ending on the trading day immediately preceding the conversion date. VWAP is based on trading prices on the principal market for Company Common Stock or, if none, OTC. Currently, the Common Stock trades OTC. In no event is Sixth Street entitle to convert any portion of the Note upon which conversion Sixth Street and its affiliates would beneficially own more than 4.99% of the outstanding shares of Company Common Stock.

 

The Note contains customary events of default, including, but not limited to: (1) failure to pay principal or interest on the Note when due; (2) failure to issue and transfer Common Stock upon exercise of Sixth Street of its conversion rights; (3) an uncured breach of any of the Company’s other material obligations contained in the Note; and (4) the Company’s breach of any representation or warranty in the Securities Purchase Agreement or other related agreements.

 

If an event of default occurs and continues uncured, the Note becomes immediately due and payable. If an event of default occurs because the Company fails to issue shares of Common Stock to Sixth Street within three business days of receiving a notice of conversion from Sixth Street, the Company shall pay an amount equal to 200% of the Default Amount (defined below) in full satisfaction of the Company’s obligations under the Note. If an event of default occurs for any other reason that continues uncured (except in the case of appointment of a receiver, bankruptcy, liquidation, or a similar default), the Company shall pay an amount equal to 150% of the Default Amount (defined below) in full satisfaction of the Company’s obligations under the Note.

 

The “Default Amount” is equal to the sum of (a) accrued and unpaid interest on the principal amount of the Note to the date of payment plus (b) default interest, which is calculated based on a rate of 22% per year (inclusive of the 10% interest per year that would be due absent an event of default), plus (c) certain other amounts that may be owed under the Note.

 

TinTekk AP and Rick Ware Racing Agreements

 

On July 12, 2021, Clubhouse Media Group, Inc. (the “Company”) entered into a Joint Services Agreement (the “Agreement”) with FinTekk AP, LLC, a Texas limited liability company (“FinTekk”), and Rick Ware Racing, LLC, a North Carolina limited liability company (“RWR”). FinTekk and RWR are professional motorsports racing and marketing companies providing services focused specifically in the NASCAR Cup Series, NASCAR Xfinity Series, the IndyCar Racing Series, and the IMSA Sports Car Championship Series. Pursuant to the Agreement, FinTekk and RWR agreed to provide certain services to the Company, and the Company agreed to provide certain services to RWR.

 

In general, FinTekk will provide the Company with marketing and branding consulting services utilizing the RWR racing platform, and will promote the Company as the primary brand for the NASCAR race events in which RWR participates in conjunction with the RWR platform.

 

RWR will provide racing car drivers as well as NASCAR and development team drivers and athletes currently competing in motor racing; and RWR will engage and integrate its social media team with the Company team members to collaborate, promote and market the Company to the racing fan bases of NASCAR and IndyCar through the use of each other’s social and digital media platforms.

 

The Company will engage and integrate its social media/influencer member network and production teams with RWR team members to collaborate, promote and market RWR racing efforts and racing and driver story lines through various media platforms operated or familiar to the Company.

 

The respective services of the parties under the Agreement will apply with respect to 11 races occurring from July 18, 2021 to September 26, 2021 (the “Events”); and the compensation under the Agreement for the respective services is payable with respect to each of the Events, as follows:

 

  In return for the provision by FinTekk of its services, for each Event the Company will issue FinTekk 51,146 shares of the Company’s common stock, which will be issued on the first business day following the completion of the applicable Event.
  In return for the provision by RWR of its services, for each Event the Company will pay RWR $113,636, which shall be due and payable to RWR on the first business day following the completion of the applicable Event.
  In return for the provision by the Company of its services, for each Event RWR will pay the Company $90,909, which will be due and payable to the Company on the second business day following the completion of the applicable Event.

 

Any party may terminate the Agreement for convenience after 50% of the events have concluded and with two weeks’ prior written notice to the other parties. In addition, the Agreement may be terminated at any time by a party, with notice to the other parties, in the event that another other party materially breaches the terms or conditions of the Agreement, and such breach is either not capable of cure or, if capable of cure, is not cured within three days of written notice to the breaching party. Upon the termination or expiration of the Agreement, the parties will have no further obligations hereunder other than those which arose prior to such termination or which are explicitly set forth in the Agreement as surviving any such termination or expiration.

 

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The Agreement contains customary representations and warranties of the parties, and customary provisions relating to confidentiality obligations, indemnification, and miscellaneous provisions.

 

Alden Reiman Agreement

 

On August 20, 2021 Clubhouse Media Group, Inc. (the “Company”) entered into a consulting agreement with Alden Reiman. In general, the consultant will make best efforts to obtain brand deals, sponsorships deals, and other revenue generating activities for Clubhouse and its roster of talent. Consultant may utilize the Clubhouse’s name when providing such Services.

 

In exchange for above services, the Company will pay Alden Reiman a signing bonus of $30,000 and a consulting fee of $32,000 per month in equal weekly installments as an independent contractor during the Term. The term shall be (2) months (the “Initial Term”) and shall automatically renew for additional two (2) month increments.

 

Yomtubian Consulting Agreement

 

On June 10, 2021, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with Joseph Yomtubian. Pursuant to the terms of the consulting agreement, Mr. Yomtubian agreed to provide to the Company certain management consulting and business advisory services. In exchange for such services, the Company agreed to pay Mr. Yomtubian $20,000 monthly. The consulting agreement has a term of one year.

 

Young Consulting Agreement

 

On February 3, 2021, in connection with (but not pursuant to) the closing of the A&R Share Exchange Agreement relating to Magiclytics, the Company entered in a consulting agreement with Chris Young, the President, Secretary, and a Director of the Company. Mr. Young is greater than 5% stockholder of the company.

 

As compensation for Mr. Young’s services pursuant to the Consulting Agreement, the Company agreed to issue to Mr. Young shares of Company Common Stock upon the completion of certain milestones, as follows:

 

  (i) Upon the first to occur of (i) Magiclytics actually receiving $500,000 in gross revenue following the Effective Date; and (ii) Magiclytics having conducted 1,250 Campaigns (subject to certain conditions) following the Effective Date, the Company will issue to Mr. Young a number of shares of Company Common Stock equal to (i) $393,750, divided by (ii) the VWAP (as defined in the Consulting Agreement) as of the date that the earlier of this clause (i) and clause (ii) below have occurred (the “Tranche 1 Satisfaction Date”).
     
  (ii) Upon the first to occur of (i) Magiclytics actually receiving an additional $500,000 in gross revenue following the Tranche 1 Satisfaction Date; and (ii) Magiclytics having conducted an additional 1,250 Campaigns (subject to certain conditions) following the Tranche 1 Satisfaction Date, the Company will issue to Mr. Young a number of shares of Company Common Stock equal to (i) $393,750, divided by (ii) the VWAP as of the date that the earlier of clause (i) above and this clause (ii) of have occurred (the “Tranche 2 Satisfaction Date”).
     
  (iii) Upon the first to occur of (i) Magiclytics actually receiving an additional $500,000 in gross revenue following the Tranche 2 Satisfaction Date; and (ii) Magiclytics having conducted an additional 1,250 Campaigns (subject to certain conditions) following the Tranche 2 Satisfaction Date, the Company will issue to Mr. Young a number of shares of Company Common Stock equal to (i) $393,750, divided by (ii) the VWAP as of the date that the earlier of clause (i) and clause (ii) above have occurred (the “Tranche 3 Satisfaction Date”).

 

Call Agreements

 

On March 12, 2021, Harris Tulchin, a Director of the Company, entered into separate “Call Agreements” with each of Amir Ben-Yohanan, a Director and the Chief Executive Officer of the Company, and Christian Young, a former Director and the former President and Secretary of the Company.

 

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Employment Agreements

 

Simon Yu Employment Agreement

 

On April 9, 2021, the Company entered into an employment agreement with Simon Yu, its Chief Operating Officer. Pursuant to this employment agreement, Mr. Yu agreed to continue to serve as Chief Operating Officer of the Company, reporting to the Chief Executive Officer of the Company (or other person determined by the Chief Executive Officer or the Company’s Board of Directors (the “Board”). As compensation for Mr. Yu’s services, the Company agreed to pay Mr. Yu an annual base salary of $380,000 (the “Base Salary”) comprised of two parts a “Cash Portion”, and an “Optional Portion”. The Cash Portion is a monthly cash payment of $15,000 – or $180,000 on an annual basis. The remaining $200,000 per year – the Optional Portion – is payable as follows:

 

  (i) If the Company’s Board determines that the Company has sufficient cash on hand to pay all or a portion of the Optional Portion in cash, such amount shall be paid in cash.
       
    If the Board determines that the Company does not have sufficient cash on hand to pay all of the Optional Portion in cash, then the portion of the
       
  (i) Optional Portion which the Board determines that the Company has sufficient cash on hand to pay in cash will be paid in cash, and the remainder (the “Deferred Portion”) will either:
         
      a. be paid at a later date, when the Board determines that the Company has sufficient cash on hand to enable the Company to pay the Deferred Portion; or
         
        will not be paid in cash – and instead, the Company will issue shares of Company Common Stock equal to (A) the Deferred Portion,
         
      b. divided by (B) the VWAP (as defined in the employment agreement) as of the date of issuance of such shares of Company Common Stock.

 

In addition, pursuant to the employment agreement, Mr. Yu is entitled to be paid discretionary annual bonuses as determined by the Board (currently intended to be a maximum of $250,000 per year), and is also entitled to receive fringe benefits, such as, but not limited to, reimbursement for reimbursement for all reasonable and necessary out-of-pocket business, entertainment and travel, vacation days, and certain insurances.

 

The initial term of the employment agreement is one (1) year from the effective date of the agreement (i.e. April 9, 2022), unless earlier terminated. Thereafter, the term is automatically extended on an annual basis for terms of one (1) year each, unless either the Company or Mr. Yu provides notice to the other party of their desire to not so renew the term of the agreement (as applicable) at least thirty (30) days prior to the expiration of the then-current term.

 

Mr. Yu’s employment with the Company shall be “at will,” meaning that either Mr. Yu or the Company may terminate Mr. Yu’s employment at any time and for any reason, subject to certain terms and conditions.

 

The Company may terminate the employment agreement at any time, with or without “cause”, as defined in the employment agreement and Mr. Yu may terminate the employment agreement at any time, with or without “good reason”, as defined in the employment agreement. If the Company terminates the employment agreement for cause or Mr. Yu terminates the employment agreement without good reason, Mr. Yu will be entitled to be paid any unpaid salary owed or accrued, including the issuance of any shares of Company Common Stock owed or accrued (as compensation) as of the termination date. In the event that there was any Deferred Portion which had been agreed to be paid in cash, such Deferred Portion instead will be paid in shares of Company Common Stock as though such amount had been agreed to be paid via the issuance of shares of Company Common Stock. Mr. Yu will also be entitled to payment for any unreimbursed expenses as of the termination date. However, any unvested portion of any equity granted to Mr. Yu will be immediately forfeited as of the termination date.

 

On October 8, 2021, Simon Yu resigned from all officer and director positions with the Company.

 

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Harris Tulchin Employment Agreement

 

On April 9, 2021 the Company entered into employment agreement with Harris Tulchin. Pursuant to this employment agreement, Mr. Tulchin agreed to serve as Chief Operating Officer of the Company, reporting to the Chief Executive Officer of the Company (or other person determined by the Chief Executive Officer or the Company’s Board of Directors (the “Board”). As compensation for Mr. Tulchin’s services, the Company agreed to pay Mr. Tulchin an annual base salary of $380,000 (the “Base Salary”) comprised of two parts a “Cash Portion”, and an “Optional Portion”. The Cash Portion is a monthly cash payment of $15,000 – or $180,000 on an annual basis. The remaining $200,000 per year – the Optional Portion – is payable as follows:

 

(ii) If the Company’s Board determines that the Company has sufficient cash on hand to pay all or a portion of the Optional Portion in cash, such amount shall be paid in cash. If the Board determines that the Company does not have sufficient cash on hand to pay all of the Optional Portion in cash, then the portion of the Optional Portion which the Board determines that the Company has sufficient cash on hand to pay in cash will be paid in cash, and the remainder (the “Deferred Portion”) will either be paid at a later date, when the Board determines that the Company has sufficient cash on hand to enable the Company to pay the Deferred Portion; or will not be paid in cash – and instead, the Company will issue shares of Company Common Stock equal to (A) the Deferred Portion, divided by (B) the VWAP (as defined in the employment agreement) as of the date of issuance of such shares of Company Common Stock.

 

In addition, pursuant to the employment agreement, Mr. Tulchin is entitled to be paid discretionary annual bonuses as determined by the Board (currently intended to be a maximum of $250,000 per year), and is also entitled to receive fringe benefits, such as, but not limited to, reimbursement for reimbursement for all reasonable and necessary out-of-pocket business, entertainment and travel, vacation days, and certain insurances.

 

The initial term of the employment agreement is one (1) year from the effective date of the agreement (i.e. April 9, 2022), unless earlier terminated. Thereafter, the term is automatically extended on an annual basis for terms of one (1) year each, unless either the Company or Mr. Tulchin provides notice to the other party of their desire to not so renew the term of the agreement (as applicable) at least thirty (30) days prior to the expiration of the then-current term.

 

Mr. Tulchin’s employment with the Company shall be “at will,” meaning that either Mr. Tulchin or the Company may terminate Mr. Tulchin’s employment at any time and for any reason, subject to certain terms and conditions.

 

The Company may terminate the employment agreement at any time, with or without “cause”, as defined in the employment agreement and Mr. Tulchin may terminate the employment agreement at any time, with or without “good reason”, as defined in the employment agreement. If the Company terminates the employment agreement for cause or Mr. Tulchin terminates the employment agreement without good reason, Mr. Tulchin will be entitled to be paid any unpaid salary owed or accrued, including the issuance of any shares of Company Common Stock owed or accrued (as compensation) as of the termination date. In the event that there was any Deferred Portion which had been agreed to be paid in cash, such Deferred Portion instead will be paid in shares of Company Common Stock as though such amount had been agreed to be paid via the issuance of shares of Company Common Stock. Mr. Tulchin will also be entitled to payment for any unreimbursed expenses as of the termination date. However, any unvested portion of any equity granted to Mr. Tulchin will be immediately forfeited as of the termination date.

 

Amir Ben-Yohanan Employment Agreement

 

On April 11, 2021, the Company entered into an employment agreement with Amir Ben-Yohanan for Mr. Ben-Yohanan to serve as Chief Executive Officer of the Company. As compensation for Mr. Ben-Yohanan’s services, the Company agreed to pay Mr. Ben-Yohanan an annual base salary of $380,000 (the “Base Salary”) comprised of two parts a “Cash Portion”, and an “Optional Portion”. The Cash Portion is a monthly cash payment of $15,000 – or $180,000 on an annual basis. The remaining $200,000 per year – the Optional Portion – is payable as follows:

 

If the Company’s Board determines that the Company has sufficient cash on hand to pay all or a portion of the Optional Portion in cash, such amount shall be paid in cash.

 

If the Board determines that the Company does not have sufficient cash on hand to pay all of the Optional Portion in cash, then the portion of the Optional Portion which the Board determines that the Company has sufficient cash on hand to pay in cash will be paid in cash, and the remainder (the “Deferred Portion”) will either be paid at a later date, when the Board determines that the Company has sufficient cash on hand to enable the Company to pay the Deferred Portion; or will not be paid in cash – and instead, the Company will issue shares of Company Common Stock equal to (A) the Deferred Portion, divided by (B) the VWAP (as defined in the employment agreement) as of the date of issuance of such shares of Company Common Stock.

 

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In addition, pursuant to the employment agreement, Mr. Ben-Yohanan is entitled to be paid discretionary annual bonuses as determined by the Board (currently intended to be a maximum of $250,000 per year), and is also entitled to receive fringe benefits, such as, but not limited to, reimbursement for reimbursement for all reasonable and necessary out-of-pocket business, entertainment and travel, vacation days, and certain insurances.

 

The initial term of the employment agreement is one (1) year from the effective date of the agreement (i.e. April 9, 2022), unless earlier terminated. Thereafter, the term is automatically extended on an annual basis for terms of one (1) year each, unless either the Company or Mr. Ben-Yohanan provides notice to the other party of their desire to not so renew the term of the agreement (as applicable) at least thirty (30) days prior to the expiration of the then-current term.

 

Mr. Ben-Yohanan’s employment with the Company shall be “at will,” meaning that either Mr. Ben-Yohanan or the Company may terminate Mr. Ben-Yohanan’s employment at any time and for any reason, subject to certain terms and conditions.

 

The Company may terminate the employment agreement at any time, with or without “cause”, as defined in the employment agreement and Mr. Ben-Yohanan may terminate the employment agreement at any time, with or without “good reason”, as defined in the employment agreement. If the Company terminates the employment agreement for cause or Mr. Ben-Yohanan terminates the employment agreement without good reason, Mr. Ben-Yohanan will be entitled to be paid any unpaid salary owed or accrued, including the issuance of any shares of Company Common Stock owed or accrued (as compensation) as of the termination date. In the event that there was any Deferred Portion which had been agreed to be paid in cash, such Deferred Portion instead will be paid in shares of Company Common Stock as though such amount had been agreed to be paid via the issuance of shares of Company Common Stock. Mr. Ben-Yohanan will also be entitled to payment for any unreimbursed expenses as of the termination date. However, any unvested portion of any equity granted to Mr. Ben-Yohanan will be immediately forfeited as of the termination date.

 

The terms of Mr. Ben-Yohanan’s employment agreement are identical to the terms of the employment agreements of Simon Yu and Harris Tulchin described above, except for the following terms:

 

  Mr. Ben-Yohanan’s Base Salary is $400,000 per year
  Mr. Ben-Yohanan reports only to the Board of Directors of the Company.

 

Christian Young Employment Agreement

 

On April 11, 2021, the Company entered into an employment agreement with Christian Young for Mr. Young to serve as President of the Company. As compensation for Mr. Youngs’s services, the Company agreed to pay Mr. Young an annual base salary of $380,000 (the “Base Salary”).

 

Mr. Young’s employment agreement was the same as Mr. Tulchin and Mr. Yu’s except for the following:

 

The Company and Mr. Young acknowledged that each of them are also the parties to that certain Consulting Agreement, dated as of February 3, 2021 and filed as Exhibit 10.8 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed February 8, 2021 with the SEC (the “Consulting Agreement”), and that the Consulting Agreement and Mr. Young’s employment agreement will operate independently of each other – except that in the event of a conflict between this employment agreement and the Consulting Agreement, the terms and conditions of this employment agreement will control.

 

On October 8, 2021, Christian Young resigned from all officer and director positions with the Company.

 

Kaplun Appointment as Chief Financial Officer, Kaplun Executive Employment Agreement & Kaplun Restricted Stock Award

 

On October 7, 2021, the Company’s Board of Directors appointed Dmitry Kaplun as the Company’s Chief Financial Officer. In connection with Mr. Kaplun’s appointment, the Company and Mr. Kaplun entered into an executive employment agreement dated as of October 7, 2021 (the “Employment Agreement”). Pursuant to the terms of the Employment Agreement, the Company agreed to pay Mr. Kaplun an annual base salary of $280,000. In addition, the Company agreed to grant to Mr. Kaplun on the effective date of the Employment Agreement and on each anniversary thereof a number of restricted shares of common stock equal to (i) $100,000, divided by (ii) the lesser of (A) $1.70 (as the same may be adjusted) and (B) 80% of the VWAP as of the grant date. Each restricted stock grant will vest ratably over the calendar year following the grant date, vesting as to 25% of the number of shares of common stock in the restricted stock grant at the end of each calendar quarter of such year, as provided in the Employment Agreement. Mr. Kaplun will also be paid discretionary annual bonuses if and when declared by the Board.

 

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The Employment Agreement has an initial term ending on the earlier of (i) the first anniversary of the effective date of the Employment Agreement, and (ii) the time of the termination of Mr. Kaplun’s employment. in accordance with the provisions herein. The initial term and any renewal term will automatically be extended for one or more additional terms of one year each, unless either the Company or Mr. Kaplun provides notice to the other party at least 30 days prior to the expiration of the then-current term.

 

The Company may terminate Mr. Kaplun’s employment at any time, with or without Cause (as defined in the Employment Agreement), subject to the terms and conditions of the Employment Agreement. In the event that the Company terminates Mr. Kaplun’s employment with Cause, subject to the terms of the Employment Agreement, (i) the Company will pay to Mr. Kaplun unpaid base salary and benefits then owed or accrued, and any unreimbursed expenses; and (ii) any unvested portion of the restricted stock grants and any other equity granted to Mr. Kaplun will immediately be forfeited as of the termination date.

 

In the event that the Company terminates Mr. Kaplun’s employment without Cause, subject to the terms and conditions of the Employment Agreement, (i) the Company will pay to Mr. Kaplun any base salary, bonuses, and benefits then owed or accrued, and any unreimbursed expenses; (ii) the Company will pay to Mr. Kaplun, in one lump sum, an amount equal to the base salary that would have been paid to Mr. Kaplun for a three-month period; and (iii) any equity grant already made to Mr. Kaplun will, to the extent not already vested, be deemed automatically vested.

 

Mr. Kaplun may resign at any time, with or without Good Reason (as defined in the Employment Agreement). In the event that Mr. Kaplun resigns with Good Reason, the Company will pay to Mr. Kaplun the amounts, and Mr. Kaplun will, subject to the terms of the Employment Agreement, be entitled to such benefits (including without limitation any vesting of unvested shares under any equity grant), that would have been payable to Mr. Kaplun or which Mr. Kaplun would have received had Mr. Kaplun’s employment been terminated by the Company without Cause.

 

In the event that Mr. Kaplun resigns without Good Reason, the Company will pay to Mr. Kaplun the amounts, and Mr. Kaplun will be entitled, subject to the terms of the Employment Agreement, to such benefits (including without limitation any vesting of unvested shares under any equity grant), that would have been payable to Mr. Kaplun or which Mr. Kaplun would have received had Mr. Kaplun’s employment been terminated by the Company with Cause.

 

The Employment Agreement contains customary representations and warranties of the parties, and customary provisions relating to confidentiality obligations, indemnification, and miscellaneous provisions.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the Employment Agreement, the Board granted Mr. Kaplun 58,824 shares of restricted common stock on October 7, 2021. 25% of the shares vest on each of the three-month, six-month, nine-month and 12-month anniversaries of the grant date.

 

Additional Compensation for Directors

 

For the three months ended September 30, 2021, the Board of Directors approved and paid no cash bonuses to its directors.

 

Resignations of Simon Yu and Christian Young

 

On October 8, 2021, each of Christian Young, President, Secretary and Director of the Company, and Simon Yu, Chief Operating Officer and Director of the Company, resigned from all officer and director positions with the Company, effective immediately. Each of Messrs. Young and Yu will continue to provide consulting services to the Company.

 

Musina Board Appointment

 

On October 12, 2021, the Board appointed Massimiliano Musina to serve as a member of the Company’s Board of Directors. In connection with Mr. Musina’s appointment, the Company and Mr. Musina entered into an Independent Director Agreement dated October 12, 2021 (the “Director Agreement”). Pursuant to the Director Agreement, Mr. Musina agreed to serve as an independent director of the Company during the term of the Director Agreement. The term of the Director Agreement is from October 12, 2021 until Mr. Musina either resigns or is removed from his position as a director or until his death.

 

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Pursuant to the terms of the Director Agreement, the Company agreed to issue to Mr. Musina each quarter a number of shares of common stock having a fair market value of $25,000, in exchange for Mr. Musina’s service as a member of the Company’s Board of Directors. The number of shares of common stock to be issued will be calculated by dividing $25,000 by the VWAP, as further described in the Director Agreement. Pursuant to the Director Agreement, the Company agreed to reimburse Mr. Musina for all reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred by him in attending any in-person meetings, provided that he complies with the generally applicable policies, practices and procedures of the Company for submission of expense reports, receipts or similar documentation of such expenses. Any reimbursements for allocated expenses (as compared to out-of-pocket expenses of Mr. Musina in excess of $500.00) must be approved in advance by the Company.

 

The Director Agreement contains customary representations and warranties of the parties, and customary provisions relating to confidentiality obligations, and miscellaneous provisions.

 

Advisory Board

 

On April 2, 2021, the Company established an advisory board (“Advisory Board”) to provide guidance and advice to the directors and officers of the Company regarding technical and business matters. The advisory board has no voting powers. The Advisory Board currently consists of two members: Andrew Omori and Perry Simon.

 

Andrew Omori. On April 2, 2021, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with Andrew Omori and appointed Mr. Omori to the Advisory Board of the Company. Mr. Omori is a partner at Andreessen Horowitz, one of Silicon Valley’s most prominent and successful venture capital firms, with $17.6 billion in assets under management. Andreessen Horowitz is well known for leading investments in hit social audio app, Clubhouse (which is not owned, and is not otherwise affiliated with, the Company), as well as Airbnb and Coinbase. Prior to joining Andreessen Horowitz, Mr. Omori served as a VP at JMP Group and as a successful technology investment banker. Mr. Omori has dedicated his career to helping technology companies scale and has worked with a variety of social companies including Snap, Pinterest, Roblox, and the Clubhouse app. Mr. Omori will advise the Board of Directors and the Company regarding optimal pathways for monetizing the Company’s operations as well as providing the Company with access to relationships, branding opportunities, and partnerships that hold the potential for further gains in shareholder value.

 

Perry Simon. On April 21, 2021, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with Perry Simon and appointed Mr. Simon to the Advisory Board of the Company. Mr. Simon is the former executive vice president of Primetime at NBC Entertainment, where he helped develop and supervise some of television’s most iconic series, including “Cheers,” “The Golden Girls,” “Law and Order,” “L.A. Law,” “Miami Vice,” “Frasier,” Seinfeld, and “The Cosby Show.” He is also a former General Manager at PBS former Managing Director at BBC Worldwide America, former President of Viacom Productions and former executive officer at Paul Allen’s Vulcan Productions. Over the past 20 years, Mr. Simon has helped to facilitate the rapid growth of mission-driven programming, driving large gains in audience size and fan engagement, and winning multiple awards along the way (Golden Globes, Emmys, and Peabodys). Mr. Simon will advise the Company on non-profit and social impact activities, as well as other business, financial, and organizational matters, and access his extensive entertainment industry relationships and knowledge for content development, acquisition, and deal structures.

 

Employees

 

We currently have 7 full time employees, including Amir Ben-Yohanan, our Chief Executive Officer, Dmitry Kaplun, our Chief Financial Officer, and Harris Tulchin, our Chief Business Affairs Officer and Chief Legal Officer. We also contract with a number of consultants that assist in various aspects of our operations. Contractors exist both at WOHG as well as at our operating subsidiaries, which is currently Doiyen and WOH Brands.

 

We believe that a diverse workforce is important to our success. As we grow our business, we will focus on the hiring, retention and advancement of women and underrepresented populations, and to cultivate an inclusive and diverse corporate culture. The company has hired a Human Resources consultant to evaluate and implement our ongoing human capital needs. We will continue to evaluate our use of human capital measures or objectives in managing our business such as the factors we employ or seek to employ in the development, attraction and retention of personnel and maintenance of diversity in our workforce.

 

In the future, we also intend to provide our employees and their families with access to a variety of innovative, flexible and convenient health and wellness programs, including benefits that provide protection and security so they can have peace of mind concerning events that may require time away from work or that impact their financial well-being; that support their physical and mental health by providing tools and resources to help them improve or maintain their health status and encourage engagement in healthy behaviors; and that offer choice where possible so they can customize their benefits to meet their needs and the needs of their families.

 

We also expect to provide robust compensation and benefits programs to help meet the needs of our employees.

 

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Legal Proceedings

 

From time to time, we are involved in various claims and legal actions arising in the ordinary course of business. To the knowledge of our management, there are no legal proceedings currently pending against us which we believe would have a material effect on our business, financial position or results of operations and, to the best of our knowledge, there are no such legal proceedings contemplated or threatened.

 

Custodianship

 

On May 20, 2019, pursuant to Case Number A-19-793075-P, Nevada’s 8th Judicial District, Business Court entered and Order Granting Application of Joseph Arcaro as Custodian of Tongji Healthcare Group, Inc. pursuant to NRS 78.347(1)(b), pursuant to which Joseph Arcaro was appointed custodian of the Company and given authority to reinstate the Company with the State of Nevada under NRS 78.347. On May 23, 2019, Joseph Arcaro filed a Certificate of Reinstatement of the Company with the Secretary of State of the State of Nevada. In addition, on May 23, 2019, Joseph Arcaro filed an Annual List of the Company with the Secretary of State of the State of Nevada, designating himself as President, Secretary, Treasurer and Director of the Company for the filing period of 2017 to 2019.

 

On November 13, 2019, Mr. Arcaro filed a Motion to Terminate Custodianship of Tongji Healthcare Group, Inc. pursuant to NRS 78.650(4) with the District Court in Clark County Nevada. On December 6, 2019, the court granted Mr. Arcaro’s motion, and the custodianship was terminated. A copy of this order is filed as Exhibit 6.2 to the Offering Statement of which this Prospectus forms a part.

 

Properties

 

Our headquarters is located at 3651 Lindell Road, D517, Las Vegas, Nevada. There is no physical office space here, and this address is mainly used as a mailing address and call center for WOHG. We pay a fee of $79.00 per month for the use of this headquarters.

 

Our management generally works out of 201 Santa Monica Blvd., Suite 30, Santa Monica, California 90401, which is WOHG’s headquarters. We believe that these facilities are adequate to support the Company’s existing operations and that we will be able to obtain appropriate additional facilities or alternative facilities on commercially reasonable terms if and when necessary. We do not have a formal lease pursuant to which it uses these offices, and does not have a monthly rent obligation for use of these premises.

 

We have one social media content creation house located in Los Angeles, California (Clubhouse BH), and one social media content creation house located in the Republic of Malta (Clubhouse Europe). Clubhouse Europe is approximately 7,000 square feet and Clubhouse BH, is approximately 12,000 square feet and are used by the Company to provide living arrangements for our team of social media influencers, as well as provide an environment for content creation. In an effort to provide desirable living arrangements for our team of influencers, as well as provide an ideal location our influencers to create content, we strive to choose properties that are large, picturesque, and conducive for filming.

 

Details of the lease arrangements for each of these Clubhouse properties are summarized below.

 

  Clubhouse BH: The tenant at this property is Amir Ben-Yohanan and Amie Ben-Yohanan. The lease term expired on March 31, 2021. (See Exhibit 6.26). We decided to rent this property on a month-to-month basis rather than extend the lease following the expiration of the lease. While we are not named as the tenant on the lease for this property, it is planned that this lease will be assigned to the Company in the future. In order to use this property as the Clubhouse in the meantime, we have agreed to reimburse Amir Ben-Yohanan, its Chief Executive Officer, for any rent expenses incurred by Mr. Ben-Yohanan on our behalf with respect to this property. The monthly rent paid for Clubhouse BH is $42,000 per month.
     
  Clubhouse Europe: The tenant at this property is West of Hudson Group, Inc. The lease term expired on November 5, 2020 and. Pursuant to the mutually agreement of the Company and the landlord, the lease for this property is now on a month to month basis. (See Exhibit 6.6). The monthly rent paid and related expenses for the Clubhouse Europe location is $7,000 Euros per month.

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF
FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with (i) Clubhouse Media Group, Inc. financial statements and related notes thereto, and (ii) the section entitled “Description of Business,” included in this prospectus. The discussion contains forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Our actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in those forward-looking statements as a result of many factors, including, but not limited to, those set forth under “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this prospectus. As used in this section “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” unless otherwise indicated or the context requires, the terms “Clubhouse Media,” the “Company,” “we,” “our,” “ours” or “us” and other similar terms mean Clubhouse Media Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries.

 

Overview

 

We operate a global network of professionally run content houses, each of which has its own brand, influencer cohort and production capabilities. Our Company offers management, production and deal-making services to our handpicked influencers, a management division for individual influencer clients, and an investment arm for joint ventures and acquisitions for companies in the social media influencer space. Our management team consists of successful entrepreneurs with financial, legal, marketing, and digital content creation expertise.

 

Through our subsidiary, West of Hudson Group, Inc., or WOHG, we currently generate revenues primarily from talent management of social media influencers residing in our Clubhouses and for paid promotion by companies looking to utilize such social media influencers to promote their products or services. We solicit companies for potential marketing collaborations and cultivated content creation, work with the influencers and the marketing entity to negotiate and formalize a brand deal and then execute the deal and receive a certain percentage from the deal. In addition to the in-house brand deals, we generate income by providing talent management and brand partnership deals to external influencers not residing in our Clubhouses.

 

History

 

For a detailed description of our history see “Description of Business – Organizational History” on page 42 of this prospectus.

 

Recent Developments

 

FinTekk/Rick Ware Racing Joint Services Agreement

 

On July 12, 2021, we entered into a Joint Services Agreement (the “Joint Services Agreement”) with FinTekk AP, LLC (“FinTekk”), and Rick Ware Racing, LLC (“RWR”). FinTekk and RWR are professional motorsports racing and marketing companies providing services focused specifically in the NASCAR Cup Series, NASCAR Xfinity Series, the IndyCar Racing Series, and the IMSA Sports Car Championship Series. Pursuant to the Joint Services Agreement, FinTekk and RWR agreed to provide certain services to the Company, and the Company agreed to provide certain services to RWR.

 

In general, FinTekk agreed to provide the Company with marketing and branding consulting services utilizing the RWR racing platform, and to promote the Company as the primary brand for the NASCAR race events in which RWR participates in conjunction with the RWR platform.

 

RWR agreed to provide racing car drivers as well as NASCAR and development team drivers and athletes currently competing in motor racing; and RWR agreed to engage and integrate its social media team with the Company team members to collaborate, promote and market the Company to the racing fan bases of NASCAR and IndyCar through the use of each other’s social and digital media platforms.

 

The Company agreed to engage and integrate its social media/influencer member network and production teams with RWR team members to collaborate, promote and market RWR racing efforts and racing and driver story lines through various media platforms operated or familiar to the Company.

 

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The respective services of the parties under the Joint Services Agreement applied with respect to 11 races that occurred from July 18, 2021 to September 26, 2021 (the “Events”); and the compensation under the Agreement for the respective services was payable with respect to each of the Events, as follows:

 

  (ii) In return for the provision by FinTekk of its services, for each Event the Company agreed to issue FinTekk 51,146 shares of the Company’s common stock.
     
  (iii) In return for the provision by RWR of its services, for each Event the Company agreed to pay RWR $113,636.
     
  (iv) In return for the provision by the Company of its services, for each Event RWR agreed to pay the Company $90,909.

 

Conversion of Ben-Yohanan Note

 

On February 2, 2021, the Company and Amir Ben-Yohanan, its Chief Executive Officer, entered into a promissory note in the total principal amount of $2,400,000 (the “Note”). The Note bears simple interest at a rate of 8% per annum, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest of the Note at any time without penalty.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the Note, $1,000,000 of the principal amount and accrued interest of the Note would automatically be converted into a number of restricted (non-Regulation A) shares of the Company common stock equal to (i) $1,000,000 divided by (ii) the initial public offering price per share of Company common stock in the Company’s Regulation A offering (the “Conversion”).

 

On July 9, 2021, the Conversion occurred, and Mr. Ben-Yohanan was issued 250,000 shares of common stock as a result of $1,000,000 in principal and interest due on the Note converting into shares of common stock at $4.00 per share, which is the initial public offering price per share of the common stock in the Company’s offering pursuant to Regulation A.

 

As of September 30, 2021, there is $1,269,864 in principal and $25,884 accrued interest outstanding on the Note, which will become payable by the Company commencing on February 2, 2022 as required to amortize the Note and the outstanding indebtedness over the following 24 months. The final maturity date of the Note is February 2, 2024.

 

Rui Wu – Note Purchase Agreement, Convertible Promissory Note, Warrant, and Security Agreement

 

On August 27, 2021, the Company entered into a note purchase agreement (the “Rui Wu Note Purchase Agreement”) with Rui Wu, an individual, with an effective date of August 26, 2021, pursuant to which the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Mr. Wu in the aggregate principal amount of $550,000 for a purchase price of $500,000, reflecting a $50,000 original issue discount (the “Rui Wu Note”) and, in connection therewith, issued to Mr. Wu a warrant to purchase 37,500 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $2.00 per share, subject to adjustment (the “Rui Wu Warrant”). In addition, in connection with the Rui Wu Note Purchase Agreement, the Company entered into a Security Agreement with Rui Wu, pursuant to which the Company’s obligations under the Rui Wu Note were secured by a first priority lien and security interest on all of the assets of the Company (the “Rui Wu Security Agreement”). While each of the Rui Wu Warrant, Security Agreement, Note, and Note Purchase Agreement have an effective date and/or effective issue date of August 26, 2021, each was entered into and/or issued on August 27, 2021.

 

The Rui Wu Note has a maturity date of August 26, 2022 and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the Rui Wu Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The Rui Wu Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of Company common stock at any time following August 26, 2021 until the note is repaid. The conversion price per share of common stock shall initially mean the lesser of (i) $1.00 or (ii) 75% of the lowest daily volume weighted average price of the common stock during the 20 Trading Days (as defined in the Rui Wu Note) immediately preceding the date of the respective conversion. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc., which occur following the determination of the conversion price.

 

The Rui Wu Note contains customary events of default, including, but not limited to:

 

  if the Company fails to pay the then-outstanding principal amount and accrued interest on the Rui Wu Note on any date any such amounts become due and payable, and any such failure is not cured within three business days of written notice thereof by Mr. Wu; or
  the Company fails to remain compliant with the Depository Trust Company (“DTC”), thus incurring a “chilled” status with DTC; or
  any trading suspension is imposed by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) under Section 12(j) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) or Section 12(k) of the Exchange Act; or
  the occurrence of any delisting of the Company common stock from any securities exchange on which the Company common stock is listed or suspension of trading of the Company common stock on the OTC Markets.

 

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If an event of default has occurred and is continuing, Mr. Wu may declare all or any portion of the then-outstanding principal amount of the Rui Wu Note, together with all accrued and unpaid interest thereon, due and payable, and the Rui Wu Note shall thereupon become immediately due and payable in cash and Mr. Wu will also have the right to pursue any other remedies that Mr. Wu may have under applicable law. In the event that any amount due under the Rui Wu Note is not paid as and when due, such amounts shall accrue interest at the rate of 18% per year, simple interest, non-compounding, until paid.

 

The $50,000 original issue discounts, the fair value of 125,000 warrants issued, and the conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discount at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were recorded at $550,000. For the excess amount of derivative liability, the Company recorded accretion expense of $514,850 at the inception date of this note.

 

The balance of the Riu Wu Note as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 was $550,000 and $0, respectively.

 

Chris Etherington – Note Purchase Agreement, Convertible Promissory Note, Warrant, and Security Agreement

 

On August 27, 2021, the Company entered into a note purchase agreement (the “Chris Etherington Note Purchase Agreement”) with Chris Etherington with an effective date of August 26, 2021, pursuant to which, on same date, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Mr. Etherington in the aggregate principal amount of $165,000 for a purchase price of $150,000, reflecting a $15,000 original issue discount (the “Chris Etherington Note”) and, in connection therewith, issued to Mr. Etherington a warrant to purchase 37,500 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $2.00 per share, subject to adjustment (the “Chris Etherington Warrant”). In addition, in connection with the Chris Etherington Note Purchase Agreement, the Company entered into a Security Agreement e with Mr. Etherington, pursuant to which the Company’s obligations under the Chris Etherington Note were secured by a first priority lien and security interest on all of the assets of the Company (the “Chris Etherington Security Agreement”). While each of the Chris Etherington Warrant, Security Agreement, Note, and Note Purchase Agreement have an effective date and/or effective issue date of August 26, 2021, each was entered into and/or issued on August 27, 2021.

 

The Chris Etherington Note has a maturity date of August 26, 2022 and bears interest at 10% per year. No payments of the principal amount or interest are due prior to the maturity date other than as specifically set forth in the Chris Etherington Note, and the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest at any time without penalty.

 

The Chris Etherington Note (and the principal amount and any accrued and unpaid interest) is convertible into shares of Company common stock at any time following August 26, 2021 until the note is repaid. The conversion price per share of common stock shall initially mean the lesser of (i) $1.00 or (ii) 75% of the lowest daily volume weighted average price of the common stock during the 20 Trading Days (as defined in the Chris Etherington Note) immediately preceding the date of the respective conversion. The conversion price is subject to customary adjustments for any stock splits, etc. which occur following the determination of the conversion price.

 

The Chris Etherington Note contains customary events of default, including, but not limited to:

 

  if the Company fails to pay the then-outstanding principal amount and accrued interest on the Chris Etherington Note on any date any such amounts become due and payable, and any such failure is not cured within three business days of written notice thereof by Mr. Etherington; or
  the Company fails to remain compliant with the DTC, thus incurring a “chilled” status with DTC; or
     
  any trading suspension is imposed by the SEC under Section 12(j) of the Exchange Act or Section 12(k) of the Exchange Act; or
     
  the occurrence of any delisting of the Company common stock from any securities exchange on which the Company common stock is listed or suspension of trading of the Company common stock on the OTC Markets.

 

If an event of default has occurred and is continuing, Mr. Etherington may declare all or any portion of the then-outstanding principal amount of the Chris Etherington Note, together with all accrued and unpaid interest thereon, due and payable, and the Chris Etherington Note shall thereupon become immediately due and payable in cash and Mr. Etherington will also have the right to pursue any other remedies that Mr. Etherington may have under applicable law. In the event that any amount due under the Chris Etherington Note is not paid as and when due, such amounts shall accrue interest at the rate of 18% per year, simple interest, non-compounding, until paid.

 

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The $15,000 original issue discounts, the fair value of 37,500 warrants issued, and the conversion features were recorded as debt discounts and amortized over the term of the note. Therefore, the total debt discount at the inception date of this convertible promissory note were recorded at $165,000. For the excess amount of derivative liability, the Company recorded accretion expense of $160,538 at the inception date of this note.

 

The balance of the Chris Etherington Note as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 was $165,000 and $0, respectively.

 

Termination of Offering

 

On August 31, 2021, the Company decided to terminate its Regulation A+ offering. Prior to terminating the Regulation A+ offering, the Company sold 257,625 shares in the offering at $4.00 per share, yielding proceeds of approximately $1,030,500.

 

Closing of Dobre Brothers House

 

On September 1, 2021, the Company officially closed one of its Clubhouse locations - Dobre Brothers House – located in Beverly Hills, CA. The Company terminated its lease agreement for the Dobre Brothers House effective September 1, 2021. At the time of the termination of this lease, the Company had a month-to-month tenancy at this location, as contemplated under the lease after the expiration of the initial term of the lease on July 31, 2021. The Company did not incur any termination penalties as a result of terminating the lease.

 

The Dobre Brothers House hosted Darius, Cyrus, Marcus and Lucas Dobre (collectively, the “Dobre Brothers”). The Dobre Brothers were prominent influencers in the Company’s roster, with a total follower reach of approximately 115 million. As a result of the closing of the Dobre Brothers House, the Dobre Brothers will no longer be required to provide promotion and marketing social media posts on our behalf as part of the terms of their living arrangements in the Dobre Brothers House. As such, the Company will exclude Dobre Brothers followers from the Company’s calculations of its own follower reach going forward. Nonetheless, the Company has continued to have a working relationship with the Dobre Brothers since the closing of the Dobre Brothers House, and intends to maintain a working relationship with the Dobre Brothers going forward.

 

Closing of LA Content House

 

On November 12, 2021, following approval and ratification of a resolution by the board of directors and a determination that the action is in the Company’s best interests, the Company closed its content creation house located at 1024 Summit Drive, Beverly Hills, California 90210. The Company will operate the business previously conducted at the House on a solely remote/virtual basis.

 

Kaplun Appointment as Chief Financial Officer, Kaplun Executive Employment Agreement & Kaplun Restricted Stock Award

 

On October 7, 2021, the Company’s Board of Directors appointed Dmitry Kaplun as the Company’s Chief Financial Officer. In connection with Mr. Kaplun’s appointment, the Company and Mr. Kaplun entered into an executive employment agreement dated as of October 7, 2021 (the “Employment Agreement”). Pursuant to the terms of the Employment Agreement, the Company agreed to pay Mr. Kaplun an annual base salary of $280,000. In addition, the Company agreed to grant to Mr. Kaplun on the effective date of the Employment Agreement and on each anniversary thereof a number of restricted shares of common stock equal to (i) $100,000, divided by (ii) the lesser of (A) $1.70 (as the same may be adjusted) and (B) 80% of the VWAP as of the grant date. Each restricted stock grant will vest ratably over the calendar year following the grant date, vesting as to 25% of the number of shares of common stock in the restricted stock grant at the end of each calendar quarter of such year, as provided in the Employment Agreement. Mr. Kaplun will also be paid discretionary annual bonuses if and when declared by the Board.

 

The Employment Agreement has an initial term ending on the earlier of (i) the first anniversary of the effective date of the Employment Agreement, and (ii) the time of the termination of Mr. Kaplun’s employment. in accordance with the provisions herein. The initial term and any renewal term will automatically be extended for one or more additional terms of one year each, unless either the Company or Mr. Kaplun provides notice to the other party at least 30 days prior to the expiration of the then-current term.

 

The Company may terminate Mr. Kaplun’s employment at any time, with or without Cause (as defined in the Employment Agreement), subject to the terms and conditions of the Employment Agreement. In the event that the Company terminates Mr. Kaplun’s employment with Cause, subject to the terms of the Employment Agreement, (i) the Company will pay to Mr. Kaplun unpaid base salary and benefits then owed or accrued, and any unreimbursed expenses; and (ii) any unvested portion of the restricted stock grants and any other equity granted to Mr. Kaplun will immediately be forfeited as of the termination date.

 

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In the event that the Company terminates Mr. Kaplun’s employment without Cause, subject to the terms and conditions of the Employment Agreement, (i) the Company will pay to Mr. Kaplun any base salary, bonuses, and benefits then owed or accrued, and any unreimbursed expenses; (ii) the Company will pay to Mr. Kaplun, in one lump sum, an amount equal to the base salary that would have been paid to Mr. Kaplun for a three-month period; and (iii) any equity grant already made to Mr. Kaplun will, to the extent not already vested, be deemed automatically vested.

 

Mr. Kaplun may resign at any time, with or without Good Reason (as defined in the Employment Agreement). In the event that Mr. Kaplun resigns with Good Reason, the Company will pay to Mr. Kaplun the amounts, and Mr. Kaplun will, subject to the terms of the Employment Agreement, be entitled to such benefits (including without limitation any vesting of unvested shares under any equity grant), that would have been payable to Mr. Kaplun or which Mr. Kaplun would have received had Mr. Kaplun’s employment been terminated by the Company without Cause.

 

In the event that Mr. Kaplun resigns without Good Reason, the Company will pay to Mr. Kaplun the amounts, and Mr. Kaplun will be entitled, subject to the terms of the Employment Agreement, to such benefits (including without limitation any vesting of unvested shares under any equity grant), that would have been payable to Mr. Kaplun or which Mr. Kaplun would have received had Mr. Kaplun’s employment been terminated by the Company with Cause.

 

The Employment Agreement contains customary representations and warranties of the parties, and customary provisions relating to confidentiality obligations, indemnification, and miscellaneous provisions.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the Employment Agreement, the Board granted Mr. Kaplun 58,824 shares of restricted common stock on October 7, 2021.

 

25% of the shares vest on each of the three-month, six-month, nine-month and 12-month anniversaries of the grant date.

 

Young and Yu Resignations

 

On October 8, 2021, each of Christian Young, President, Secretary and Director of the Company, and Simon Yu, Chief Operating Officer and Director of the Company, resigned from all officer and director positions with the Company, effective immediately. Each of Messrs. Young and Yu continue to provide consulting services to the Company.

 

Musina Board Appointment

 

On October 12, 2021, the Board appointed Massimiliano Musina to serve as a member of the Company’s Board of Directors. In connection with Mr. Musina’s appointment, the Company and Mr. Musina entered into an Independent Director Agreement dated October 12, 2021 (the “Director Agreement”). Pursuant to the terms of the Director Agreement, the Company agreed to issue to Mr. Musina each quarter a number of shares of common stock having a fair market value of $25,000, in exchange for Mr. Musina’s service as a member of the Company’s Board of Directors.

 

Equity Purchase Agreement and Registration Rights Agreement

 

On November 2, 2021, the Company entered into an Equity Purchase Agreement and Registration Rights Agreement (the “Registration Rights Agreement”) with Peak One Opportunity Fund, L.P., a Delaware limited Partnership (“Investor”), dated as of October 29, 2021, pursuant to which the Company shall have the right, but not the obligation, to direct Investor, to purchase up to $15,000,000.00 (the “Maximum Commitment Amount”) in shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (“Common Stock”), in multiple tranches (the “Put Shares”). Further, under the Equity Purchase Agreement and subject to the Maximum Commitment Amount, the Company has the right, but not the obligation, to submit a Put Notice (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement) from time to time to Investor (i) in a minimum amount not less than $20,000.00 and (ii) in a maximum amount up to the lesser of (a) $400,000.00 or (b) 250% of the Average Daily Trading Value (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement).

 

In exchange for Investor entering into the Equity Purchase Agreement, the Company agreed, among other things, to (A) issue Investor and Peak One Investments, LLC, an aggregate of 70,000 shares of Common Stock (the “Commitment Shares”), and (B) file a registration statement registering the Common Stock issued as Commitment Shares and issuable to Investor under the Equity Purchase Agreement for resale (the “Registration Statement”) with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 60 calendar days of the Equity Purchase Agreement, as more specifically set forth in the Registration Rights Agreement.

 

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The obligation of Investor to purchase the Company’s Common Stock shall begin on the date of the Equity Purchase Agreement, and ending on the earlier of (i) the date on which Investor shall have purchased Common Stock pursuant to the Equity Purchase Agreement equal to the Maximum Commitment Amount, (ii) twenty four (24) months after the date of the Equity Purchase Agreement, (iii) written notice of termination by the Company to Investor (which shall not occur during any Valuation Period or at any time that Investor holds any of the Put Shares), (iv) the Registration Statement is no longer effective after the initial effective date of the Registration Statement, or (v) the date that the Company commences a voluntary case or any person commences a proceeding against the Company, a custodian is appointed for the Company or for all or substantially all of its property or the Company makes a general assignment for the benefit of its creditors (the “Commitment Period”).

 

During the Commitment Period, the purchase price to be paid by Investor for the Common Stock under the Equity Purchase Agreement shall be 95% of the Market Price, which is defined as the lesser of the (i) closing bid price of the Common Stock on the trading day immediately preceding the respective Put Date (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement), or (ii) lowest closing bid price of the Common Stock during the Valuation Period (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement), in each case as reported by Bloomberg Finance L.P or other reputable source designated by Investor.

 

The number of Put Shares to be purchased by the Investor shall not exceed the number of such shares that, when aggregated with all other shares of Common Stock then owned by the Investor beneficially or deemed beneficially owned by the Investor, would result in the Investor owning more than the Beneficial Ownership Limitation as determined in accordance with Section 16 of the Exchange Act and the regulations promulgated thereunder. The “Beneficial Ownership Limitation” shall be 4.99% of the number of shares of the Common Stock outstanding immediately after giving effect to the issuance of shares of Common Stock issuable pursuant to a Put Notice.

 

The Equity Purchase Agreement and the Registration Rights Agreement contain customary representations, warranties, agreements and conditions to completing future sale transactions, indemnification rights and obligations of the parties. Among other things, Investor represented to the Company, that it is an “accredited investor” (as such term is defined in Rule 501(a) of Regulation D under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”)), and the Company sold the securities in reliance upon an exemption from registration contained in Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act and Regulation D promulgated thereunder.

 

The foregoing descriptions of the Equity Purchase Agreement and the Registration Rights Agreement are qualified in their entirety by reference to the full text of such agreements, copies of which are attached as Exhibit 10.21 and 10.22 to the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part. The representations, warranties and covenants contained in such agreements were made only for purposes of such agreements and as of specific dates, were solely for the benefit of the parties to such agreements and may be subject to limitations agreed upon by the contracting parties.

 

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Organizational Structure

 

The following diagram represents our organization structure:

 

 

 

Results of Operations

 

For the Three and Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021 Compared to the Three Months Ended September 30, 2020 and the Period from January 2, 2020 (Inception) to September 30, 2020

 

Net Revenue

 

Net revenue was $1,768,677 for the three months ended September 30, 2021, compared to net revenue of $217,372 for the three months ended September 30, 2020. The increase was due to the generation of revenue since the second quarter in 2020 and the increase of brand deals and agency deals and revenue from Tinder Blog. Alden Reiman has joined Clubhouse Media as a consultant via his company The Reinman Agency and contributed to the increase of the revenue for the Company for the three months ended September 30, 2021.

 

Net revenue was $3,222,015 for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, compared to net revenue of $312,906 for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to September 30, 2020. The increase was due to the generation of revenue since the second quarter in 2020 and the increase of brand deals and agency deals and revenue from Tinder Blog. Alden Reiman has joined Clubhouse Media as a consultant via his company The Reinman Agency and contributed to the increase of the revenue for the Company for the nine months ended September 30, 2021.

 

Cost of Goods Sold

 

Cost of sales was $1,467,333 for the three months ended September 30, 2021, compared to cost of sales of $100,973 for the three months ended September 30, 2020. The increase was due the generation of revenue since the second quarter in 2020 and the increase of brand deals and agency deals and revenue from Tinder Blog. Alden Reiman has joined Clubhouse Media as a consultant via his company The Reinman Agency and has contributed to the increase in the cost of goods sold via higher revenue for the Company for the three months ended September 30, 2021.

 

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Cost of sales was $2,649,120 for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, compared to $191,179 for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to September 30, 2020. The increase was due to the generation of revenue since the second quarter in 2020 and the increase of brand deals and agency deals and revenue from Tinder Blog. Alden Reiman has joined Clubhouse Media as a consultant via his company The Reinman Agency and contributed to the increases in the cost of goods sold via higher revenue for the Company for the nine months ended September 30, 2021.

 

Gross Profit

 

Gross profit was $301,344 for the three months ended September 30, 2021, compared to gross profit of $116,398 for the three months ended September 30, 2020. The gross profit percentage was 17.04% for the three months ended September 30, 2021, compared to 53.55% for the three months ended September 30, 2020.

 

Gross profit was $572,895 for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, compared to gross profit of $121,726 for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to September 30, 2020. The gross profit percentage was 17.78% for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, compared to 38.9% for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to September 30, 2020.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses for the three months ended September 30, 2021 were $3,382,248, compared to $772,186 for the three months ended September 30, 2020.

 

The variances were as follows: (i) an increase in rent and utilities expense of $81,407; (ii) an increase in consultant fees of $412,773; (iii) an increase in sales and marketing expenses of $167,139; (iv) an increase in legal fees of $166,405; (v) an decrease in office expense of $(22,161); (vi) a decrease of production expense of $(21,002), (vii) an increase of meals and travel expense of $49,894; (viii) an increase in accounting and audit fees of $5,000, and (ix) an increase in payroll of $478,348. The overall increase in general and administrative expenses resulted from the commencement of our operations since 2020 and incurred more expenses from the expansion of operations, payroll expenses, and professional fees incurred as a public company.

 

Non-cash operating expenses for the three months ended September 30, 2021 were $1,275,505, including (i) depreciation of $8,514 and (ii) stock-based compensation of $1,266,991. Non-cash operating expenses for the three months ended September 30, 2020 were $44,340 from stock compensation expense.

 

Total Operating expenses for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 were $12,780,575 as compared to $1,746,298 for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to September 30, 2020.

 

The variances were as follows: (i) an increase in rent and utilities expense of $948,030; (ii) an increase in consultant fees of $1,158,739; (iii) an increase in sales and marketing expenses of $819,085; (iv) an increase in legal fees of $704,146; (v) an increase in office expense of $98,726; (vi) an decrease of production expense of $(20,898), (vii) an increase of meals and travel expense of $229,867; (viii) an increase of director and executive expenses of $709,996; (ix)an increase in accounting and audit fees of $104,787, and (x) an increase in payroll of $879,453. The overall increase in general and administrative expenses resulted from the commencement of our operations since 2020 and incurred more expenses from the expansion of operations, payroll expenses, and professional fees incurred as a public company.

 

Non-cash operating expenses for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 were $22,528 from depreciation expenses, and (ii) stock-based compensation of $5,514,675. Non-cash operating expenses for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to September 30, 2020 were $284,341 from impairment of $240,000 and stock compensation expense of $44,340.

 

Other (Income) Expenses

 

Other (income) expenses for the three months ended September 30, 2021 were $2,321,057, as compared to $29,974 for the three months ended September 30, 2020. Other expenses for the three months ended September 30, 2021 included (i) change in fair value derivative liability of $(361,904), (ii) interest expense of $2,655,253; and (iii) other (income) expenses for $27,708. The change in derivative liability is the non-cash change in the fair value and relates to our derivative instruments. Interest expense of $2,655,253 was mostly comprised of non-cash interest of $1,788,379 from amortization of debt discounts, $463,756 from accretion expense – excess derivative liability, and $191,486 from interest accrued to the convertible promissory note holders.

 

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Other (income) expenses for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 were $6,303,202, as compared to $44,399 for the period from January 2, 2020(inception) to September 30, 2020. Other expenses for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 included (i) change in fair value derivative liability of $(336,139), (ii) interest expense of $6,193,692; and (iii) extinguishment of debt with related party for $297,138, and extinguishment of debt for $148,511. The change in derivative liability is the non-cash change in the fair value and relates to our derivative instruments. Interest expense of $6,193,692 was mostly comprised of non-cash interest of $15,920 from imputed interest, $4,293,366 from amortization of debt discounts and $629,795 from the fair value of shares issued to one of the convertible promissory note holders, $463,756 from accretion expense – excess derivative liability, and $451,391 interest accrued to convertible promissory note holders.

 

Net Loss

 

Net loss for the three months ended September 30, 2021 was $5,401,961, compared to $685,762 for the three months ended September 30, 2020 for the reasons discussed above.

 

Net loss for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 was $18,510,882, compared to $1,668,971 for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to September 30, 2020 for the reasons discussed above.

 

For the Period from January 2, 2020 (Inception) to December 31, 2020

 

Net Revenues

 

Net revenue for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 was $1,010,405. We began to generate revenue mainly from our brand deals since inception on January 2, 2020.

 

Cost of Sales

 

Cost of sales for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 was $579,855. The cost of sales were mainly commissions paid to social influencers for their performance according to the management agreement.

 

Gross Profit 

 

Gross profit was $430,550 for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020. The gross profit percentage was 42.6% for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 were $2,725,105. The major expenses were as follows: (i) rent and utilities expense of $1,069,934 ;(iii) consultant fees of $269,436; (iv) sales and marketing expenses of $27,810; (v) legal fees of $318,928; (vi) office expense of $112,310; and (vii) a production expense of $237,791. As part of the general and administrative expenses for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020, we recorded public relations, investor relations or business development expenses of $108,081.

 

Non-cash operating expenses for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 were $442,549 including (i) depreciation of $14,945; (ii) amortization of debt discounts of $26,993; (iii) stock-based compensation of $160,611; and (iv) impairment of goodwill of $240,000.

 

Other (Income) Expenses

 

Other expenses for the for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 was $283,166. The other expense for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 included (i) change in fair value derivative liability of $61,029 and (ii) interest expense of $222,207. The change in derivative liability is the non-cash change in the fair value and relates to our derivative instruments. Interest expense of $222,207 was mostly comprised of non-cash interest of $87,213 from imputed interest and $108,000 from interest expense in excess of derivative liability.

 

Net Loss

 

Net loss for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 was $2,577,721 for the reasons discussed above.

 

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

 

For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021 Compared to the Period from January 2, 2020 (Inception) to September 30, 2020

 

Operating Activities

 

Net cash used in operating activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 was $7,153,911. This amount was primarily related to a net loss of $18,510,882 and offset by (i) net working capital increase of $725,586; (ii) non-cash expenses of $10,631,385 including (a) depreciation and amortization of $22,527; (b) imputed interest of $15,920; (c) stock-based compensation of $5,514,675; (vi) loss in extinguishment of debt from related party of $297,138; (vii) loss in extinguishment of debt $148,509, (viii) change in fair value of derivative liability of $(336,140), (ix) interest expense from amortization of debt discounts of $4,293,367, and (x) accretion expense from excess derivative liability of $675,388.

 

Net cash used in operating activities for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to September 30, 2020 was $1,510,578. This amount was primarily related to a net loss of $1,668,971 and net working capital decrease of $134,568 and offset by stock compensation expense of $44,341, impairment expense of $240,000 and depreciation expense of $8,621.

 

Investment Activities

 

Net cash used in investing activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 was $302,740. The Company purchased $33,900 in property, plant, and equipment and $268,916 in internal used software for the nine months ended September 30, 2021.

 

Net cash used in investing activities for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to September 30, 2020 was $308,177. The Company purchased $68,177 in property, plant, and equipment and $240,000 in the Tongji public shell company for the nine months ended September 30, 2021.

 

Financing Activities

 

Net cash provided by financing activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 was $8,210,038. The amount was related to proceeds from our chief executive officer and chairman of the Board of $244,803 and repayment to our chief executive officer and chairman of the Board of $137,500 and proceeds from borrowing from convertible notes payable of $7,712,445 and repayments of $455,000 to convertible notes payable holders.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to September 30, 2020 was $1,979,949. The amount was related to proceeds from our chief executive officer and chairman of the Board of $1,922,449 and proceeds from borrowing from convertible notes payable of $57,500.

 

For the Period from January 2, 2020 (Inception) to December 31, 2020

 

Operating Activities

 

Net cash used in operating activities for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 was $1,967,551. This amount was primarily related to a net loss of $2,577,721 and (i) net working capital increase of $88,621; and offset by (ii) non-cash expenses of $698,791 including (iii) depreciation and amortization of $41,938; (iv) imputed interest of $87,213; (v) stock-based compensation of $160,611; (vi) impairment of goodwill of $240,000; (vii) non-cash interest expense in excess of derivative liability of $108,000; and (viii) change in fair value of derivative liability of $61,029.

 

Investment Activities

 

Net cash used in investing activities for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 was $319,737. The 2020 amount related to the cash paid in the public shell company of $240,00 and acquisition of $79,737 of fixed assets.

 

Financing Activities

 

Net cash provided by financing activities for the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 was $2,325,062. The 2020 amount related to proceeds from our chief executive officer and chairman of the Board of $2,162,562 and convertible notes payable of $162,500.

 

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Equity Purchase Agreement and Registration Rights Agreement

 

On November 2, 2021, the Company entered into an Equity Purchase Agreement and Registration Rights Agreement (the “Registration Rights Agreement”) with Peak One Opportunity Fund, L.P., a Delaware limited Partnership (“Investor”), dated as of October 29, 2021, pursuant to which the Company shall have the right, but not the obligation, to direct Investor, to purchase up to $15,000,000.00 (the “Maximum Commitment Amount”) in shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (“Common Stock”), in multiple tranches (the “Put Shares”). Further, under the Equity Purchase Agreement and subject to the Maximum Commitment Amount, the Company has the right, but not the obligation, to submit a Put Notice (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement) from time to time to Investor (i) in a minimum amount not less than $20,000.00 and (ii) in a maximum amount up to the lesser of (a) $400,000.00 or (b) 250% of the Average Daily Trading Value (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement).

 

In exchange for Investor entering into the Equity Purchase Agreement, the Company agreed, among other things, to (A) issue Investor and Peak One Investments, LLC, an aggregate of 70,000 shares of Common Stock (the “Commitment Shares”), and (B) file a registration statement registering the Common Stock issued as Commitment Shares and issuable to Investor under the Equity Purchase Agreement for resale (the “Registration Statement”) with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 60 calendar days of the Equity Purchase Agreement, as more specifically set forth in the Registration Rights Agreement.

 

The obligation of Investor to purchase the Company’s Common Stock shall begin on the date of the Equity Purchase Agreement, and ending on the earlier of (i) the date on which Investor shall have purchased Common Stock pursuant to the Equity Purchase Agreement equal to the Maximum Commitment Amount, (ii) twenty four (24) months after the date of the Equity Purchase Agreement, (iii) written notice of termination by the Company to Investor (which shall not occur during any Valuation Period or at any time that Investor holds any of the Put Shares), (iv) the Registration Statement is no longer effective after the initial effective date of the Registration Statement, or (v) the date that the Company commences a voluntary case or any person commences a proceeding against the Company, a custodian is appointed for the Company or for all or substantially all of its property or the Company makes a general assignment for the benefit of its creditors (the “Commitment Period”).

 

During the Commitment Period, the purchase price to be paid by Investor for the Common Stock under the Equity Purchase Agreement shall be 95% of the Market Price, which is defined as the lesser of the (i) closing bid price of the Common Stock on the trading day immediately preceding the respective Put Date (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement), or (ii) lowest closing bid price of the Common Stock during the Valuation Period (as defined in the Equity Purchase Agreement), in each case as reported by Bloomberg Finance L.P or other reputable source designated by Investor.

 

The number of Put Shares to be purchased by the Investor shall not exceed the number of such shares that, when aggregated with all other shares of Common Stock then owned by the Investor beneficially or deemed beneficially owned by the Investor, would result in the Investor owning more than the Beneficial Ownership Limitation as determined in accordance with Section 16 of the Exchange Act and the regulations promulgated thereunder. The “Beneficial Ownership Limitation” shall be 4.99% of the number of shares of the Common Stock outstanding immediately after giving effect to the issuance of shares of Common Stock issuable pursuant to a Put Notice.

 

In accordance with that certain Registration Rights Agreement, the Selling Securityholders are entitled to certain rights with respect to the registration of the Put Shares and Commitment Shares issued in connection with the Equity Purchase Agreement (the “Registrable Securities”). Pursuant to the Registration Rights Agreement, the Company must (i) file the Registration Statement within sixty calendar days from the date of the Registration Rights Agreement, (ii) use reasonable efforts to cause the Registration Statement to be declared effective under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), as promptly as possible after the filing thereof, but in any event no later than the 90th calendar day following the date of the Registration Rights Agreement, and (iii) use its reasonable efforts to keep such Registration Statement continuously effective under the Securities Act until all of the Commitment Shares and Purchase Shares have been sold thereunder or pursuant to Rule 144. The Company must also take such action as is necessary to register and/or qualify the Registrable Securities under such other securities or blue sky laws of all applicable jurisdictions in the United States.

 

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Effects of Coronavirus on the Company

 

If the current outbreak of the coronavirus continues to grow, the effects of such a widespread infectious disease and epidemic may inhibit our ability to conduct our business and operations and could materially harm our Company. The coronavirus may cause us to have to reduce operations as a result of various lock-down procedures enacted by the local, state or federal government, which could restrict the movement of our influencers outside of or within a specific Clubhouse or even effect the influencer’s ability to create content. The coronavirus may also cause a decrease in advertising spending by companies as a result of the economic turmoil resulting from the spread of the coronavirus and thereby having a negative effect on our ability to generate revenue from advertising. Further, if there is a spread of the coronavirus within any of our Clubhouses, it may cause an inability for our content creators to create and post content and could potentially cause a specific Clubhouse location to be entirely quarantined. Additionally, we may encounter negative publicity or a negative public reaction when creating and posting certain content while a coronavirus related lockdown is enacted. The continued coronavirus outbreak may also restrict our ability to raise funding when needed, and may cause an overall decline in the economy as a whole. The specific and actual effects of the spread of coronavirus are difficult to assess at this time as the actual effects will depend on many factors beyond our control and knowledge. However, the spread of the coronavirus, if it continues, may cause an overall decline in the economy as a whole and also may materially harm our Company.

 

Notwithstanding the foregoing possible negative impacts on our business and results of operations, up until now, we do not believe our prior and current business operations, financial condition, and results of operations have been negatively impacted by the coronavirus pandemic and related shutdowns. As the social media sector appears to have been thriving during the pandemic and shutdowns, we believe that our social media-based business and our results of operations have been thriving as well. More specifically, we have been successful at opening several houses, actively recruiting influencers/creators, creating content, and generating revenue during the pandemic and shutdowns. Notwithstanding, the ultimate impact of the coronavirus pandemic on our operations remains unknown and will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, including the duration of the coronavirus outbreak, new information which may emerge concerning the severity of the coronavirus pandemic, and any additional preventative and protective actions that governments, or our company, may direct, which may result in an extended period of business disruption and reduced operations. The long-term financial impact cannot be reasonably estimated at this time and may ultimately have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Going Concern

 

We adopted the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (“FASB”) Accounting Standard Codification (“ASC”) Topic 205-40, Presentation of Financial Statements – Going Concern, which requires that management evaluate whether there are relevant conditions and events that, in the aggregate, raise substantial doubt about the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern and to meet its obligations as they become due within one year after the date that the financial statements are issued.

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that we will continue as a going concern. While the Company is attempting to generate additional revenues, the Company’s cash position may not be significant enough to support the Company’s daily operations. Management intends to raise additional funds by way of a public or private offering. Management believes that the actions presently being taken to further implement its business plan and generate revenues provide the opportunity for the Company to continue as a going concern. While the Company believes in the viability of its strategy to generate revenues and in its ability to raise additional funds, there can be no assurances to that effect. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent upon the Company’s ability to further implement its business plan and generate revenues. We will require additional cash funding to fund operations. Therefore, we concluded there was substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

 

To fund further operations, we will need to raise additional capital. We may obtain additional financing in the future through the issuance of its common stock, or through other equity or debt financings. Our ability to continue as a going concern or meet the minimum liquidity requirements in the future is dependent on its ability to raise significant additional capital, of which there can be no assurance. If the necessary financing is not obtained or achieved, we will likely be required to reduce its planned expenditures, which could have an adverse impact on the results of operations, financial condition and our ability to achieve its strategic objective. There can be no assurance that financing will be available on acceptable terms, or at all. The financial statements contain no adjustments for the outcome of these uncertainties. These factors raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern and have a material adverse effect on our future financial results, financial position and cash flows.

 

Convertible Promissory Notes

 

For a detailed description of convertible promissory notes of the Company, see “Description of Business— Convertible Promissory Notes” on page 47 of this prospectus.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

As of September 30, 2021, we did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined in Item 303(a)(4)(ii) of Regulation S-K promulgated under the Securities Act of 1934 reasonably likely to have a material effect on our financial condition.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Use of Estimates

 

In preparing the consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”), management makes estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities as of the dates of the consolidated financial statements, as well as the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Significant estimates and assumptions made by management include, but are not limited to, revenue recognition, the allowance for bad debt, useful life of fixed assets, income taxes and unrecognized tax benefits, valuation allowance for deferred tax assets, and assumptions used in assessing impairment of long-lived assets. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Reverse Merger Accounting

 

The Merger was accounted for as a reverse-merger and recapitalization in accordance with GAAP. WOHG was the acquirer for financial reporting purposes and Clubhouse Media Group, Inc. was the acquired company. Consequently, the assets and liabilities and the operations that are reflected in the historical financial statements prior to the Merger will be those of WOHG and will be recorded at the historical cost basis of WOHG since its inception on January 2, 2020. The consolidated financial statements after completion of the Merger include the assets and liabilities of the Company and WOHG, historical operations of WOHG since its inception on January 2, 2020 to the closing date of the merger, and operations of the Company from the closing date of the Merger. Common stock and the corresponding capital amounts of the Company pre-merger have been retroactively restated as capital stock shares reflecting the exchange ratio in the Merger. In conjunction with the Merger, WOHG received no cash and assumed no liabilities from Clubhouse Media Group, Inc. All members of the Company’s executive management are from WOHG.

 

Lease

 

On January 2, 2020, the Company adopted FASB ASC Topic 842, Leases, or ASC 842, using the modified retrospective transition method with a cumulative effect adjustment to accumulated deficit as of January 1, 2019, and accordingly, modified its policy on accounting for leases as stated below.

 

As described under “Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements,” below, the primary impact of adopting ASC 842 for the Company was the recognition in the consolidated balance sheet of certain lease-related assets and liabilities for operating leases with terms longer than 12 months. The Company elected to use the short-term exception and does not records assets/liabilities for short term leases as of September 30, 2021.

 

The Company’s leases primarily consist of facility leases which are classified as operating leases. The Company assesses whether an arrangement contains a lease at inception. The Company recognizes a lease liability to make contractual payments under all leases with terms greater than twelve months and a corresponding right-of-use asset, representing its right to use the underlying asset for the lease term. The lease liability is initially measured at the present value of the lease payments over the lease term using the collateralized incremental borrowing rate since the implicit rate is unknown. Options to extend or terminate a lease are included in the lease term when it is reasonably certain that the Company will exercise such an option. The right-of-use asset is initially measured as the contractual lease liability plus any initial direct costs and prepaid lease payments made, less any lease incentives. Lease expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

 

Leased right-of-use assets are subject to impairment testing as a long-lived asset at the asset-group level. The Company monitors its long-lived assets for indicators of impairment. As the Company’s leased right-of-use assets primarily relate to facility leases, early abandonment of all or part of facility as part of a restructuring plan is typically an indicator of impairment. If impairment indicators are present, the Company tests whether the carrying amount of the leased right-of-use asset is recoverable including consideration of sublease income, and if not recoverable, measures impairment loss for the right-of-use asset or asset group.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

In May 2014 the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which supersedes all existing revenue recognition requirements, including most industry specific guidance. This new standard requires a company to recognize revenues when it transfers goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration that the Company expects to receive for those goods or services. The FASB subsequently issued the following amendments to ASU No. 2014-09 that have the same effective date and transition date: ASU No. 2016-08, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Principal versus Agent Considerations; ASU No. 2016-10, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing; ASU No. 2016-12, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Narrow-Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients; and ASU No. 2016-20, Technical Corrections and Improvements to Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. The Company adopted these amendments with ASU 2014-09 (collectively, the new revenue standards).

 

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Under the new revenue standards, the Company recognizes revenues when its customer obtains control of promised goods or services, in an amount that reflects the consideration which it expects to receive in exchange for those goods. The Company recognizes revenues following the five-step model prescribed under ASU No. 2014-09: (i) identify contract(s) with a customer; (ii) identify the performance obligations in the contract; (iii) determine the transaction price; (iv) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and (v) recognize revenues when (or as) we satisfy the performance obligation. The Company recognized revenue from providing temporary and permanent staffing solutions and sale of consumer products.

 

The Company generates revenue from its managed services when a marketer (typically a brand, agency or partner) pays the Company to provide custom content, influencer marketing, amplification or other campaign management services (“Managed Services”).

 

The Company maintains separate arrangements with each marketer and content creator either in the form of a master agreement or terms of service, which specify the terms of the relationship and access to its platforms, or by statement of work, which specifies the price and the services to be performed, along with other terms. The transaction price is determined based on the fixed fee stated in the statement of work and does not contain variable consideration. Marketers who contract with the Company to manage their advertising campaigns or custom content requests may prepay for services or request credit terms. The agreement typically provides for either a non-refundable deposit, or a cancellation fee if the agreement is canceled by the customer prior to completion of services. Billings in advance of completed services are recorded as a contract liability until earned. The Company assesses collectability based on a number of factors, including the creditworthiness of the customer and payment and transaction history.

 

For Managed Services Revenue, the Company enters into an agreement to provide services that may include multiple distinct performance obligations in the form of: (i) an integrated marketing campaign to provide influencer marketing services, which may include the provision of blogs, tweets, photos or videos shared through social network offerings and content promotion, such as click-through advertisements appearing in websites and social media channels; and (ii) custom content items, such as a research or news article, informational material or videos. Marketers typically purchase influencer marketing services for the purpose of providing public awareness or advertising buzz regarding the marketer’s brand and they purchase custom content for internal and external use. The Company may provide one type or a combination of all types of these performance obligations on a statement of work for a lump sum fee. The Company allocates revenue to each performance obligation in the contract at inception based on its relative standalone selling price. These performance obligations are to be provided over a stated period that generally ranges from one day to one year. Revenue is accounted for when the performance obligation has been satisfied depending on the type of service provided. The Company views its obligation to deliver influencer marketing services, including management services, as a single performance obligation that is satisfied at the time the customer receives the benefits from the services.

 

Based on the Company’s evaluations, revenue from Managed Services is reported on a gross basis because the Company has the primary obligation to fulfill the performance obligations and it creates, reviews and controls the services. The Company takes on the risk of payment to any third-party creators and it establishes the contract price directly with its customers based on the services requested in the statement of work. The contract liabilities as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $27,500 and $73,648, respectively.

 

Subscription-Based Revenue

 

The Company recognize subscription-based revenue through its social media website at Honeydrip.com, which allow customers to visit the creators personal page over the contract period without taking possession of the products or deliverables, are provided on either a subscription or consumption basis. Revenue provided on a subscription basis is recognized ratably over the contract period and revenue provided on a consumption basis is recognized when the subscriber paid and received their access to the content.

 

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Software Development Costs

 

We apply ASC 350-40, Intangibles—Goodwill and Other—Internal Use Software, in review of certain system projects. These system projects generally relate to software we do not intend to sell or otherwise market. In addition, we apply this guidance to our review of development projects related to software used exclusively for our SaaS subscription offerings. In these reviews, all costs incurred during the preliminary project stages are expensed as incurred. Once the projects have been committed to and it is probable that the projects will meet functional requirements, costs are capitalized. These capitalized software costs are amortized on a project-by-project basis over the expected economic life of the underlying product on a straight-line basis, which is typically two to three years. Amortization commences when the software is available for its intended use. Amounts capitalized related to development of internal use software are included in property and equipment, net, on our Consolidated Balance sheets and related depreciation is recorded as a component of amortization of intangible assets and depreciation in our consolidated statements of operations. During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, we capitalized approximately $268,916, related to internal use software and recorded $0 in related amortization expense. Unamortized costs of capitalized internal use software totaled $ 346,804 and $0 as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.

 

Goodwill Impairment

 

We test goodwill at least annually for impairment at the reporting unit level. We recognize an impairment charge if the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value. When a portion of a reporting unit is disposed, goodwill is allocated to the gain or loss on disposition based on the relative fair values of the business or businesses disposed and the portion of the reporting unit that will be retained.

 

For other intangible assets that are not deemed indefinite-lived, cost is generally amortized on a straight-line basis over the asset’s estimated economic life, except for individually significant customer-related intangible assets that are amortized in relation to total related sales. Amortizable intangible assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the related carrying amounts may not be recoverable. In these circumstances, they are tested for impairment based on undiscounted cash flows and, if impaired, written down to estimated fair value based on either discounted cash flows or appraised values. The Company impaired $0 and $240,000 of goodwill for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and September 30, 2020, respectively.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

Long-lived assets, which include property, plant and equipment and intangible assets, are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable.

 

Recoverability of long-lived assets to be held and used is measured by comparing the carrying amount of an asset to the estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. If the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its estimated undiscounted future cash flows, an impairment charge is recognized by the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the assets. Fair value is generally determined using the asset’s expected future discounted cash flows or market value, if readily determinable. Based on its review, the Company believes that, as of December 31, 2020, there was no impairment loss of its long-lived assets.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability approach that requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in the Company’s financial statements or tax returns. In estimating future tax consequences, the Company generally considers all expected future events other than enactments of changes in the tax law. For deferred tax assets, management evaluates the probability of realizing the future benefits of such assets. The Company establishes valuation allowances for its deferred tax assets when evidence suggests it is unlikely that the assets will be fully realized.

 

The Company recognizes the tax effects of an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not to be sustained based solely on its technical merits as of the reporting date and then only in an amount more likely than not to be sustained upon review by the tax authorities. Income tax positions that previously failed to meet the more likely than not threshold are recognized in the first subsequent financial reporting period in which that threshold is met. Previously recognized tax positions that no longer meet the more likely than not threshold are derecognized in the first subsequent financial reporting period in which that threshold is no longer met. The Company classifies potential accrued interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits within the accompanying consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss) as income tax expense.

 

The Company has not completed a full fiscal year, post-recapitalization and has not filed an income tax return and incurred net operating losses from inception to December 31, 2020. The net operating losses that has future benefits will be recorded as $773,921 deferred tax assets, but net with 100% valuation allowance until the Company expected to realize this deferred tax assets in the future.

 

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Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The carrying value of cash, accounts receivable, other receivable, note receivable, other current assets, accounts payable, and accrued expenses, if applicable, approximate their fair values based on the short-term maturity of these instruments. The carrying amounts of debt were also estimated to approximate fair value.

 

The Company utilizes the methods of fair value (“FV”) measurement as described in ASC 820 to value its financial assets and liabilities. As defined in ASC 820, FV is based on the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. In order to increase consistency and comparability in FV measurements, ASC 820 establishes a FV hierarchy that prioritizes observable and unobservable inputs used to measure FV into three broad levels, which are described below:

 

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for assets or liabilities. The FV hierarchy gives the highest priority to Level 1 inputs.

Level 2: Observable prices that are based on inputs not quoted on active markets, but corroborated by market data.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs are used when little or no market data is available. The FV hierarchy gives the lowest priority to Level 3 inputs.

 

The Company used Level 3 inputs for its valuation methodology for the derivative liabilities for conversion feature of the convertible notes in determining the fair value the weighted-average Binomial option pricing model following assumption inputs. The fair value of derivative liability as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 was $1,082,106 and $304,490, respectively.

 

Stock based Compensation

 

Stock based compensation cost to employees is measured at the date of grant, based on the calculated fair value of the stock-based award, and will be recognized as expense over the employee’s requisite service period (generally the vesting period of the award). Share-based compensation awards issued to non-employees for services rendered are recorded at either the fair value of the services rendered or the fair value of the share-based payment, whichever is more readily determinable.

 

Derivative instruments

 

The fair value of derivative instruments is recorded and shown separately under liabilities. Changes in the fair value of derivatives liability are recorded in the consolidated statement of operations under other (income) expense.

 

Our Company evaluates all of its financial instruments to determine if such instruments are derivatives or contain features that qualify as embedded derivatives. For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported in the consolidated statements of operations. For stock-based derivative financial instruments, the Company uses binomial option-pricing model to value the derivative instruments at inception and on subsequent valuation dates. The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is evaluated at the end of each reporting period. Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument could be required within 12 months of the balance sheet date.

 

Related Parties

 

The Company follows subtopic 850-10 of the FASB ASC for the identification of related parties and disclosure of related party transactions. Pursuant to Section 850-10-20 related parties include:

 

a. affiliates of the Company;

b. entities for which investments in their equity securities would be required, absent the election of the FV option under the FV Option Subsection of Section 825–10–15, to be accounted for by the equity method by the investing entity;

c. trusts for the benefit of employees, such as pension and profit-sharing trusts that are managed by or under the trusteeship of management;

d. principal owners of the Company;

e. management of the Company;

f. other parties with which the Company may deal if one party controls or can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the other to an extent that one of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests; and

 

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g. other parties that can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the transacting parties or that have an ownership interest in one of the transacting parties and can significantly influence the other to an extent that one or more of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests.

 

The financial statements shall include disclosures of material related party transactions, other than compensation arrangements, expense allowances, and other similar items in the ordinary course of business. However, disclosure of transactions that are eliminated in the preparation of financial statements is not required in those statements.

 

The disclosures shall include: a. the nature of the relationship(s) involved; b. a description of the transactions, including transactions to which no amounts or nominal amounts were ascribed, for each of the periods for which income statements are presented, and such other information deemed necessary to an understanding of the effects of the transactions on the financial statements; c. the dollar amounts of transactions for each of the periods for which income statements are presented and the effects of any change in the method of establishing the terms from that used in the preceding period; and d. amounts due from or to related parties as of the date of each balance sheet presented and, if not otherwise apparent, the terms and manner of settlement.

 

New Accounting Pronouncements

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments (“ASU 2016-13”). ASU 2016-13 requires companies to measure credit losses utilizing a methodology that reflects expected credit losses and requires a consideration of a broader range of reasonable and supportable information to inform credit loss estimates. ASU 2016-13 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022, including those interim periods within those fiscal years. We did not expect the adoption of this guidance have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

 

MANAGEMENT

 

The following table sets forth the names and ages of the members of our Board of Directors and our executive officers and the positions held by each. Our Board of Directors elects our executive officers annually by majority vote. Each director’s term continues until his or her successor is elected or qualified at the next annual meeting, unless such director earlier resigns or is remove. Set forth below is certain information concerning the directors and executive officers of the Company. The following table also sets forth the names and ages of the members of our Advisory Board.

 

Name   Age   Position
Amir Ben-Yohanan (1)   49   Chief Executive Officer and Director, Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial and Accounting Officer
Harris Tulchin (2)   68   Chief Business Affairs, Chief Legal Officer and Director
Dmitry Kaplun(4)   44   Chief Financial Officer
Gary Marenzi (3)   65   Director
Massimiliano Musina(5)   39   Director
Andrew Omari(6)   39   Consultant- Advisory Board
Perry Simon(6)   40   Consultant- Advisory Board

 

  (1) Mr. Ben-Yohanan was appointed to his position with the Company pursuant to the terms of the Stock Purchase Agreement dated May 29, 2020 by and among West of Hudson Group, Inc., Tongji Healthcare Group Inc, Algonquin Partners Inc., and Joseph Arcaro. Pursuant to the terms of the Stock Purchase Agreement, and in connection with the closing of the Stock Purchase Agreement on June 18, 2020, Mr. Arcaro, the then-sole member of the Board of Directors of the Company, appointed Amir Ben-Yohanan, to his position, and thereafter, immediately resigned from all positions with the Company. On April 11, 2021, the Company entered into an Employment Agreement with Amir Ben-Yohanan to serve as Chief Executive Officer of the Company.
  (2) Mr. Marenzi was appointed on July 28, 2020, immediately after, and in connection with, his appointment a director of the Company, Mr. Marenzi and the Company entered into an independent director agreement (the “Marenzi Independent Director Agreement”). The Marenzi Independent Director Agreement, also dated July 28, 2020, sets out the terms and conditions of Mr. Marenzi’s role as a director of the Company.
  (3) On August 5, 2020, immediately after, and in connection with, his appointment a director of the Company, Mr. Tulchin and the Company entered into a director agreement (the “Tulchin Director Agreement”). The Tulchin Director Agreement, also dated August 5, 2020, sets out the terms and conditions of Mr. Tulchin’s role as a director of the Company. On March 12, 2021, the Company and Mr. Tulchin entered into an amendment to Mr. Tulchin’s Director Agreement. On April 11, 2021, Mr. Tulchin was appointed as Chief Legal Officer of the Company by the Board of Directors. On April 9, 2021, the Company entered into an Employment Agreement with Mr. Tulchin to serve as Chief Legal Officer of the Company.

 

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  (4) Mr. Kaplun was appointed on October 7, 2021. In connection with Mr. Kaplun’s appointment, the Company and Mr. Kaplun entered into an executive employment agreement dated as of October 7, 2021 (the “Employment Agreement”). Pursuant to the terms of the Employment Agreement, the Company agreed to pay Mr. Kaplun an annual base salary of $280,000. In addition, the Company agreed to grant to Mr. Kaplun on the effective date of the Employment Agreement and on each anniversary thereof a number of restricted shares of common stock equal to (i) $100,000, divided by (ii) the lesser of (A) $1.70 (as the same may be adjusted) and (B) 80% of the VWAP as of the grant date. Each restricted stock grant will vest ratably over the calendar year following the grant date, vesting as to 25% of the number of shares of common stock in the restricted stock grant at the end of each calendar quarter of such year, as provided in the Employment Agreement. Mr. Kaplun will also be paid discretionary annual bonuses if and when declared by the Board.
 

(5)

 

Mr. Musina was appointed on October 12, 2021. Mr. Musina entered into an Independent Director Agreement dated October 12, 2021 (the “Director Agreement”). Pursuant to the terms of the Director Agreement, the Company agreed to issue to Mr. Musina each quarter a number of shares of common stock having a fair market value of $25,000, in exchange for Mr. Musina’s service as a member of the Company’s Board of Directors.
  (6) On April 2, 2021, the Company established an advisory board (“Advisory Board”) to provide guidance and advice to the directors and officers of the Company regarding technical and business matters. The advisory board has no voting powers. The advisory board is made up of two members including Andrew Omori and Perry Simon

 

Amir Ben-Yohanan, Chief Executive Officer and Director

 

Amir Ben-Yohanan was appointed as the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and as a member of the Company’s Board of Directors on June 18, 2020. Mr. Ben-Yohanan worked for over 15 years for large multinational corporations, such as AT&T and the Associated Press, as a Senior Director of Finance where he oversaw internal audit, compliance and financial reporting departments. In 2012, he left a successful career in the corporate world to become an entrepreneur. In August 2015, Mr. Ben-Yohanan founded West of Hudson Properties, a real estate investment and property management firm headquartered in Hackensack, NJ. West of Hudson Properties currently owns and manages over $300 million in real estate assets across 95+ multi-family residential properties. More recently, he has expanded the operation and successfully completes several multi-family ground up construction projects each year in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

 

Mr. Ben-Yohanan earned his Master’s Degree in Finance from the University of Sydney Australia in 1999 and holds an undergraduate degree in Accounting.

 

Harris Tulchin, Chief Business Affairs, Chief Legal Officer and Director

 

Mr. Tulchin was appointed Chief Business Affairs and Chief Legal Officer and as a member of the Company’s Board of Directors on April 11, 2021 and August 5, 2020, respectively. Mr. Tulchin is an entertainment lawyer, producer, author, and producer’s representative and has been practicing entertainment, transactional, and labor law since 1978. He is the Chairman, founder and owner of Harris Tulchin & Associates LTD, an international entertainment and multimedia law firm that provides legal services to its clients in the motion picture, television, music, and multimedia industries. Mr. Tulchin has served as the Chairman of Harris Tulchin & Associates LTD since his firm’s incorporation in 2000 where he has represented clients in every facet of the entertainment industry, including major film studios, producers, writers, directors, actors, digital developers, animators, and musicians. Mr. Tulchin has also held numerous senior roles at various other companies in his career, serving as, among others, Senior Vice President of Business Affairs and General Counsel for Cinema Group, General Counsel and Head of Business Affairs for KCET Television, Senior Counsel for United Artists, Director of Business Affairs at MGM Television, and Counsel for Filmways Pictures. He has produced or executive produced over a dozen films, including “To Sleep With Anger” starring Danny Glover and directed by Charles Burnett, which was admitted into Sundance and Cannes Film Festivals in 1990, and was a winner of four Independent Spirit Awards. Mr. Tulchin is also the co-author of a book considered a staple of the motion picture industry, entitled: “The Independent Film Producer’s Survival Guide: A Legal and Business Sourcebook”, published by Schirmer Press, New York (2002, 2005, 2010).

 

In addition to serving as Chairman of his law firm, Mr. Tulchin also serves as Chief Legal Adviser and a member of the advisory board of Cinezen Blockchained Entertainment AB, a Swedish start-up blockchain/cryptocurrency video-on-demand distribution platform with the goal to revolutionize the existing model of film distribution. He has served in these capacities since the Company’s inception in September 2017, and provides guidance on business and legal issues in connection with the Company’s operations.

 

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In his role as director of the Company, Mr. Tulchin brings a wealth of expertise in both the legal and business aspects of the development, production, financing and distribution of entertainment product, and the international licensing of content in all media and will provide valuable guidance to the Company as it endeavors to implement its plan of operations.

 

He is a graduate of Cornell University and UC Hastings College of Law, and was admitted to The State Bar of California in 1979 and the Hawaii State Bar in 1978. He is presently inactive in Hawaii.

 

Dmitry Kaplun, Chief Financial Officer

 

Mr. Kaplun, age 44, has over 20 years of financial and general management experience in media, technology and telecom sectors both domestically and internationally. Most recently from March 2020 to August 2021, Mr. Kaplun held the position of Vice President of Finance for NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises and between 2010 and 2017 he held various positions of Finance Director, Vice President Finance and Operations and Senior Vice President Business Operations & GM for Latin America for Fox International Productions, a foreign language film production division of 20th Century Fox. Throughout his career, Mr. Kaplun has also consulted for various media and technology companies and was a producer/investor in film projects. He holds an undergraduate degree in Finance from the University of Florida, a joint MBA from Maastricht Business School in the Netherlands/Audencia Nantes School of Management in France and a Masters in Finance from IE Business School in Spain.

 

Gary Marenzi, Director

 

Gary Marenzi was appointed as an independent member of the Company’s Board of Directors on July 28, 2020. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Marenzi previously held the role of President of Paramount International Television, MGM Worldwide Television and ITV. He has been instrumental in raising capital for MGM during its growth years in 2008, and helped ITV’s OTT channel acquire the rights to distribute James Bond. He has launched global content franchises including STARGATE, NCIS, TEEN WOLF, and History Channel’s VIKINGS. He is an active Board Member of the Hollywood Radio & TV Society (HRTS), and has served on the Executive Committees of the National Association of Television Program Executives (NATPE) and the International Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (IATAS). Gary is the founder and President of Marenzi & Associates, which provides creative collaboration, strategic management advice and implementation for the media and entertainment industry with clients such as Lebron James’s Media Company “Uninterrupted”. He served as President of Marenzi & Associates from 2011 to 2016 and since 2019 on. From 2016 to 2019, Mr. Marenzi served as Head of Entertainment Sales & Partnerships for Endeavor Content.

 

Mr. Marenzi received both his BA and MBA from Stanford University.

 

Massimiliano Musina, Director

 

Mr. Musina is a managing partner of Spout, a podcast media company, where he has been since 2020 to the present. He is also Founder and CEO of The Map Group, a Film and TV production and Financing company, where he has been from 2016 to the present. Mr. Mussina is also a co-founder of the Podcast and Media company called Gulfstream Studios, where he has been from 2021 to the present.

 

Advisory Board

 

On April 2, 2021, the Company established an advisory board (“Advisory Board”) to provide guidance and advice to the directors and officers of the Company regarding technical and business matters. The advisory board has no voting powers. The advisory board is made up of two members including Andrew Omori and Perry Simon.

 

Andrew Omori. On April 2, 2021, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with Andrew Omori and appointed Mr. Omori to the Advisory Board of the Company. Mr. Omori is a partner at Andreessen Horowitz, one of Silicon Valley’s most prominent and successful venture capital firms, with $17.6 billion in assets under management. Andreessen Horowitz is well known for leading investments in hit social audio app, Clubhouse (which is not owned, and is not otherwise affiliated with, the Company), as well as Airbnb and Coinbase. Prior to joining Andreessen Horowitz, Mr. Omori served as a VP at JMP Group and as a successful technology investment banker. Mr. Omori has dedicated his career to helping technology companies scale and has worked with a variety of social companies including Snap, Pinterest, Roblox, and the Clubhouse app. Mr. Omori will advise the Board of Directors and the Company regarding optimal pathways for monetizing the Company’s operations as well as providing the Company with access to relationships, branding opportunities, and partnerships that hold the potential for further gains in shareholder value.

 

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Perry Simon. On April 21, 2021, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with Perry Simon and appointed Mr. Simon to the Advisory Board of the Company. Mr. Simon is the former executive vice president of Primetime at NBC Entertainment, where he helped develop and supervise some of television’s most iconic series, including “Cheers,” “The Golden Girls,” “Law and Order,” “L.A. Law,” “Miami Vice,” “Frasier,” Seinfeld, and “The Cosby Show.” He is also a former General Manager at PBS former Managing Director at BBC Worldwide America, former President of Viacom Productions and former executive officer at Paul Allen’s Vulcan Productions. Over the past 20 years, Mr. Simon has helped to facilitate the rapid growth of mission-driven programming, driving large gains in audience size and fan engagement, and winning multiple awards along the way (Golden Globes, Emmys, and Peabodys). Mr. Simon will advise the Company on non-profit and social impact activities, as well as other business, financial, and organizational matters, and access his extensive entertainment industry relationships and knowledge for content development, acquisition, and deal structures.

 

Committees

 

We do not have a standing nominating, compensation or audit committee. Rather, our full Board of Directors performs the functions of these committees. We do not believe it is necessary for our Board of Directors to appoint such committees because the volume of matters that come before our Board of Directors for consideration permits the directors to give sufficient time and attention to such matters to be involved in all decision making. Additionally, because our common stock is not listed for trading or quotation on a national securities exchange, we are not required to have such committees.

 

Director Independence

 

We have one independent director (Gary Marenzi), as such term is defined in the listing standards of The NASDAQ Stock Market, at this time. The Company is not quoted on any exchange that requires director independence requirements.

 

Code of Ethics

 

We have not yet adopted a code of ethics that applies to all of our employees, officers and directors, including those officers responsible for financial reporting. We expect that we will adopt a code of ethics in the near future.

 

Family Relationships

 

None.

 

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

 

No executive officer, member of the Board of Directors or control person of our Company has been involved in any legal proceeding listed in Item 401(f) of Regulation S-K in the past 10 years.

 

Board Leadership Structure and Board’s Role in Risk Oversight

 

We have not separated the positions of Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer. Amir Ben-Yohanan has served as our Chairman of the Board of Directors since June 30, 2020 and Chief Executive Officer since June 30, 2020. We believe that combining the positions of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer allows for focused leadership of our organization which benefits us in our relationships with investors, customers, suppliers, employees and other constituencies. We believe that consolidating the leadership of the Company under Mr. Ben-Yohanon is the appropriate leadership structure for our Company and that any risks inherent in that structure are balanced by the oversight of our other independent directors on our Board. However, no single leadership model is right for all companies and at all times. The Board recognizes that depending on the circumstances, other leadership models, such as the appointment of a lead independent director, might be appropriate. Accordingly, the Board may periodically review its leadership structure. In addition, following the completion of the offering, the Board will hold executive sessions in which only independent directors are present.

 

Our Board is generally responsible for the oversight of corporate risk in its review and deliberations relating to our activities. Our principal source of risk falls into two categories, financial and product commercialization. Our Board regularly reviews information regarding our cash position, liquidity and operations, as well as the risks associated with each. The Board regularly reviews plans, results and potential risks related to our business. The Board is also expected to oversee risk management as it relates to our compensation plans, policies and practices for all employees including executives and directors, particularly whether our compensation programs may create incentives for our employees to take excessive or inappropriate risks which could have a material adverse effect on the Company.

 

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Limitation on Liability and Indemnification of Officers and Directors

 

Our Articles of Incorporation provides that our officers and directors will be indemnified by us to the fullest extent authorized by Nevada law, as it now exists or may in the future be amended. In addition, our articles of incorporation and section 138 of the Nevada Business Corporation Act provide that our directors will not be personally liable for monetary damages to us for breaches of their fiduciary duty as directors unless such breach involves intentional misconduct, fraud, or a knowing violation of the law.

 

Our articles of incorporation also permit us to maintain insurance on behalf of any officer, director or employee for any liability arising out of his or her actions, regardless of whether Delaware law would permit such indemnification. We have purchased a policy of directors’ and officers’ liability insurance that insures our officers and directors against the cost of defense, settlement or payment of a judgment in some circumstances and insures us against our obligations to indemnify our officers and directors.

 

These provisions may discourage stockholders from bringing a lawsuit against our directors for breach of their fiduciary duty. These provisions also may have the effect of reducing the likelihood of derivative litigation against officers and directors, even though such an action, if successful, might otherwise benefit us and our stockholders. Furthermore, a stockholder’s investment may be adversely affected to the extent we pay the costs of settlement and damage awards against officers and directors pursuant to these indemnification provisions.

 

We believe that these provisions and the insurance are necessary to attract and retain talented and experienced officers and directors.

 

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

No executive compensation was paid during the period from January 2, 2020 (inception) to December 31, 2020 to the officers and directors of the Company. However, the Company has entered into Employment Agreements, a Consulting Agreement, and Directors Agreements with its officers and directors, as applicable, as described below.

 

Employment Agreements

 

See Employment Agreements on page 90 of this Prospectus.

 

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

 

2021 Equity Incentive Plan

 

Overview

 

The Board of Directors and shareholders holding a majority of the Company’s voting capital approved and adopted the Tongji Healthcare Group, Inc. 2020 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2020 Plan”) on November 24, 2020. The 2020 Plan authorizes the issuance of up to an aggregate maximum of 13,890,000 shares of the common stock, subject to adjustment as described in the 2020 Plan. The 2020 Plan shall be administered by the Board or one or more committees appointed by the Board or another committee (“Administrator”). The Administrator, in its discretion, selects the individuals to whom awards may be granted, the time or times at which such awards are granted, and the terms of such awards. The 2020 Plan authorizes the Company to grant stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted shares, restricted share unit, cash awards, other awards, and performance-based awards. Awards may be granted to the Company’s officers, employees, directors and consultants.

 

The purpose of 2020 Plan is to promote the success of the Company and to increase stockholder value by providing an additional means through the grant of awards to attract, motivate, retain and reward selected employees and other eligible persons. The Board may, at any time, terminate or, from time to time, amend, modify or suspend this 2020 Plan, in whole or in part. To the extent then required by applicable law or any applicable stock exchange or required under the Internal Revenue Code to preserve the intended tax consequences of the 2020 Plan, or deemed necessary or advisable by the Board, the 2020 Plan and any amendment to the 2020 Plan shall be subject to stockholder approval. Unless earlier terminated by the Board, the 2020 Plan will terminate ten years from the date of adoption.

 

Authorized Shares

 

A total of shares of the Company’s common stock are authorized for issuance pursuant to the 2020 Plan. Subject to adjustment as provided in the 2020 Plan, the maximum aggregate number of shares that may be issued under the 2020 Plan will be cumulatively increased on each subsequent January 1 by a number of shares equal to the smaller of (i) 3% of the number of shares of common stock issued and outstanding on the immediately preceding December 31, or (ii) an amount determined by the Board.

 

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Additionally, if any award issued pursuant to the 2020 Plan expires or becomes unexercisable without having been exercised in full, is surrendered pursuant to an exchange program, as provided in the 2020 Plan, or, with respect to restricted stock, restricted stock units (“RSUs”), performance units or performance shares, is forfeited to or repurchased by the Company due to the failure to vest, the unpurchased shares (or for awards other than stock options or stock appreciation rights the forfeited or repurchased shares) which were subject thereto will become available for future grant or sale under the 2020 Plan (unless the 2020 Plan has terminated). With respect to stock appreciation rights, only shares actually issued pursuant to a stock appreciation right will cease to be available under the 2020 Plan; all remaining shares under stock appreciation rights will remain available for future grant or sale under the 2020 Plan (unless the 2020 Plan has terminated). Shares that have actually been issued under the 2020 Plan under any award will not be returned to the 2020 Plan and will not become available for future distribution under the 2020 Plan; provided, however, that if shares issued pursuant to awards of restricted stock, restricted stock units, performance shares or performance units are repurchased by the Company or are forfeited to the Company due to the failure to vest, such shares will become available for future grant under the 2020 Plan. Shares used to pay the exercise price of an award or to satisfy the tax withholdings related to an award will become available for future grant or sale under the 2020 Plan. To the extent an award under the 2020 Plan is paid out in cash rather than shares, such cash payment will not result in reducing the number of shares available for issuance under the 2020 Plan.

 

Notwithstanding the foregoing and, subject to adjustment as provided in the 2020 Plan, the maximum number of shares that may be issued upon the exercise of incentive stock options will equal the aggregate share number stated above, plus, to the extent allowable under Section 422 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, and regulations promulgated thereunder, any shares that become available for issuance under the 2020 Plan in accordance with the foregoing.

 

Plan Administration

 

The Board or one or more committees appointed by the Board will administer the 2020 Plan. In addition, if the Company determines it is desirable to qualify transactions under the 2020 Plan as exempt under Rule 16b-3 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, such transactions will be structured with the intent that they satisfy the requirements for exemption under Rule 16b-3. Subject to the provisions of the 2020 Plan, the administrator has the power to administer the 2020 Plan and make all determinations deemed necessary or advisable for administering the 2020 Plan, including the power to determine the fair market value of the Company’s common stock, select the service providers to whom awards may be granted, determine the number of shares covered by each award, approve forms of award agreements for use under the 2020 Plan, determine the terms and conditions of awards (including the exercise price, the time or times at which the awards may be exercised, any vesting acceleration or waiver or forfeiture restrictions and any restriction or limitation regarding any award or the shares relating thereto), construe and interpret the terms of the 2020 Plan and awards granted under it, prescribe, amend and rescind rules relating to the 2020 Plan, including creating sub-plans and modify or amend each award, including the discretionary authority to extend the post-termination exercisability period of awards (provided that no option or stock appreciation right will be extended past its original maximum term), and to allow a participant to defer the receipt of payment of cash or the delivery of shares that would otherwise be due to such participant under an award. The a