Quarterly Report (10-q)

Date : 05/15/2019 @ 11:03AM
Source : Edgar (US Regulatory)
Stock : Relmada Therapeutics, Inc. (QB) (RLMD)
Quote : 2.6  0.0 (0.00%) @ 1:00AM

Quarterly Report (10-q)

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

☒   QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended  March 31, 2019

 

or

 

  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _______________________ to ___________________________

 

Commission File Number:  000-55347

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada   45-5401931

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

     

880 Third Avenue, 12th Floor

New York, NY

  10022
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)

 

(212) 547-9591

(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

 

N/A

(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    ☒ Yes     No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    ☒ Yes   No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
  Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

  

Title of each class   Trading Symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered

N/A

       

   

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). ☐ Yes     ☒ No

 

As of May 14, 2019 there were 33,256,987 shares of common stock outstanding $0.001 par value per share outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

  

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Index

 

  Page
Number
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
   
Item 1. Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements 1
  Unaudited Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018 1
  Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three and Nine Months Ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 2
  Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Nine Months Ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 3
  Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity 5
  Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements 7
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation 17
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 25
Item 4. Controls and Procedures 25
     
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION  
     
Item 1. Legal Proceedings 26
Item 1A. Risk Factors 26
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 26
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities 26
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 26
Item 5. Other Information 26
Item 6. Exhibits 27
SIGNATURES 28

 

i

 

 

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

(Unaudited)

 

    March 31,
2019
    June 30,
2018
 
Assets            
Current assets:            
Cash and cash equivalents   $ 2,053,853     $ 2,238,943  
Other receivable     -       7,617  
Lease payments receivable – short-term     68,654       64,486  
Prepaid expenses     207,793       426,921  
Total current assets     2,330,300       2,737,967  
Fixed assets, net of accumulated depreciation     8,298       12,080  
Other assets     43,908       24,788  
Lease payments receivable – long-term     221,221       273,244  
                 
Total assets   $ 2,603,727     $ 3,048,079  
                 
Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)                
                 
Current liabilities:                
Accounts payable   $

1,080,110

    $ 765,439  
Accrued expenses     1,020,950       659,455  
Notes payable     28,769       285,170  
Derivative liabilities     -       4,194,634  
                 
Total current liabilities     2,129,829       5,904,698  
                 
Promissory notes payable, net of discount of $0 and $4,548,543     -       2,656,457  
                 
Total liabilities    

2,129,829

      8,561,155  
                 
Commitments and contingencies                
                 
Stockholders’ equity (deficit):                
Preferred stock, $0.001 par value, 200,000,000 shares authorized, no shares issued or outstanding     -       -  
Class A convertible preferred stock, $0.001 par value, 3,500,000 shares authorized, no shares issued and outstanding     -       -  
Common stock, $0.001 par value, 200,000,000 shares authorized, 30,980,658 and 12,549,870 shares issued and outstanding, respectively     30,981       12,550  
Additional paid-in capital     107,982,692       88,818,681  
Accumulated deficit     (107,539,775 )     (94,344,307 )
                 
Total stockholders’ equity (deficit)   $ 473,898     $ (5,513,076 )
                 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity (deficit)   $ 2,603,727     $ 3,048,079  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

1

 

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

(Unaudited)

 

    Three Months Ended
March 31,
    Nine months ended
March 31,
 
    2019     2018     2019     2018  
Operating expenses:                        
Research and development   $ 1,275,948     $ 1,666,902     $ 3,954,848     $ 1,983,372  
General and administrative     1,426,056       883,009       4,637,370       3,003,980  
Total Operating Expenses     2,702,004       2,549,911       8,592,218       4,987,352  
Loss from Operations     (2,702,004 )     (2,549,911 )     (8,592,218 )     (4,987,352 )
                                 
Other income (expenses):                                
Change in fair value of derivative liabilities     -       (254,862 )     (54,634 )     80,542  
Loss on extinguishment of debt     -       -       (3,774,468 )        
Interest income (expense), net     15,939       (397,111 )     (774,148 )     (706,460 )
Other income     -       -       -       2,350  
Total other income (expenses)     15,939       (651,973 )     (4,603,250 )     (623,568 )
Net loss   $ (2,686,065 )   $ (3,201,884 )   $ (13,195,468 )   $ (5,610,920 )
                                 
Loss per common share – basic and diluted   $ (0.09 )   $ (0.26 )   $ (0.58 )   $ (0.45 )
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding – basic and diluted     30,037,971       12,547,620       22,670,534       12,542,678  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

2

 

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

 

    Nine months ended
March 31,
 
    2019     2018  
             
Cash flows from operating activities            
Net loss   $ (13,195,468 )   $ (5,610,920 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:                
Depreciation expense     3,782       1,698  
Stock-based compensation     810,537       365,173  
Amortization of deferred financing costs     661,167       501,203  
Change in fair value of derivative liabilities     54,634       (80,542 )
Fair value of shares relinquished in litigation     (394,410 )     -  
Loss on promissory note extinguishment     3,774,468       -  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:                
Other receivable     7,617       232,597  
Other assets     (19,120 )     -  
Lease payment receivable     47,855       44,022  
Prepaid expenses     219,128       312,572  
Accounts payable    

314,671

      483,531  
Accrued expenses     884,365       14,761  
Net cash used in operating activities   $ (6,830,774 )     (3,735,905 )
                 
Cash flows from investing activities                
Purchase of fixed assets     -       (2,591 )
Net cash used in investing activities     -       (2,591 )
                 
Cash flows from financing activities                
Proceeds from promissory notes and warrants, net of fees             6,534,400  
Principal payments of notes payable     (256,401 )     (248,790 )
Net proceeds from sale of units     6,902,085          
Net cash provided by financing activities   $ 6,645,684       6,285,610  
Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents     (185,090 )     2,547,114  
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period     2,238,943       1,710,512  
                 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period   $ 2,053,853     $ 4,257,626  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

3

 

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

    Nine months ended
March 31,
 
    2019     2018  
             
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:            
             
Cash paid during the period for:            
Income taxes   $ -     $ -  
Interest   $ 5,876     $ 2,738  
                 
Non-cash investing and financing transactions:                
Issuances of common stock resulting from cashless exercise of warrants   $ -     $ 17  
Issuance of vested shares of restricted stock             38  
Warrants issued to placement agent   $ -     $ 200,658  
Warrants issued to promissory note holders   $ -     $ 1,268,813  
Derivative associated with issuance of promissory notes   $ -     $ 3,862,095  
Debt issuance cost from accrued financing fees   $ -     $ 127,757  
Write-off of derivative liability due to adoption of ASU 2017-11   $ 59,397          
Conversion of promissory notes and accrued interest to common stock   $

 8,030,365

       

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

4

 

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Statements of Stockholders’ Equity

(Unaudited)

 

    Nine months ended March 31, 2019  
                Additional           Total
Stockholders’
 
    Common Stock     Paid-in     Accumulated     Equity  
    Shares     Amount     Capital     Deficit     (Deficit)  
Balances at June 30, 2018     12,549,870     $ 12,550     $ 88,818,681     $ (94,344,307 )   $ (5,513,076 )
Cumulative effect of write-off of derivative liability for adoption of ASU 2017-11     -       -       59,397       -       59,397  
Adjusted Balances as at June 30, 2018     12,549,870     $ 12,550     $ 88,878,078     $ (94,344,307 )   $ (5,453,679 )
Stock-based compensation     -       -       152,801       -       152,801  
Net loss     -       -       -       (3,380,093 )     (3,380,093 )
                                         
Balances at September 30, 2018     12,549,870       12,550       89,030,879       (97,724,400 )     (8,680,971 )
                                         
Stock-based compensation     -       -       263,044       -       263,044  
Conversion of Notes and accrued interest     10,731,669       10,731       11,794,102       -       11,804,833  
Equity units issued for cash     6,482,671       6,483       5,170,602       -       5,177,085  
Net loss     -       -               (7,129,310 )     (7,129,310 )
                                         
Balances at December 31, 2018     29,764,210       29,764       106,258,627       (104,853,710 )     1,434,681  
                                         
Stock-based compensation                     394,692               394,692  
Equity units issued for cash     1,519,840       1,520       1,723,480               1,725,000  
Shares relinquished     (303,392 )     (303 )     (394,107 )             (394,410 )
Net loss                             (2,686,065 )     (2,686,065 )
                                         
Balances at March 31, 2019     30,980,658     $ 30,981     $ 107,982,692     $ (107,539,775 )   $ 473,898  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

5

 

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Statements of Stockholders’ Equity (Continued)

(Unaudited)

  

    Nine months ended March 31, 2018  
                Additional           Total  
    Common Stock     Paid-in     Accumulated     Stockholders’  
    Shares     Amount     Capital     Deficit     Deficit  
Balances at June 30, 2017     12,528,374     $ 12,528     $ 86,831,211     $ (85,383,455 )   $ 1,460,284  
                                         
Issuance of warrants to promissory notes payable placement agent     -       -       75,577       -       75,577  
Issuance of warrants to holders of promissory notes payable     -       -       841,617       -       841,617  
Issuance of common stock on exercise of Series A Preferred Stock Warrants     16,746       17       (17 )     -       16,746  
Stock-based compensation     -       -       68,870       -       68,870  
Net loss     -       -       -       (981,686 )     (981,686 )
                                         
Balances at September 30, 2017     12,545,120       12,545       87,817,258       (86,365,141 )     1,464,662  
                                         
Issuance of warrants to promissory notes payable placement agent     -       -       125,081       -       125,081  
Issuance of warrants to holders of promissory notes payable     -       -       424,727       -       424,727  
Stock-based compensation     -       -       134,038       -       134,038  
Net loss     -       -               (1,427,350 )     (1,427,350 )
                                         
Balances at December 31, 2017     12,545,120       12,545       88,501,104       (87,792,491 )     721,158  
                                         
Issuance of restricted stock     3,750       4       (4 )     -       -  
Issuance of warrants to holders of promissory notes payable     -       -       2,469       -       -  
Stock-based compensation     -       -       162,265       -       162,265  
Net loss                             (3,201,884 )     (3,201,884 )
                                         
Balances at March 31, 2018     12,548,870     $ 12,548     $ 88,665,834     $ (90,994,375 )   $ (2,315,993 )

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.  

  

6

 

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1 – BUSINESS

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc. (“Relmada” or the “Company”) (a Nevada corporation), is a clinical-stage, publicly traded biotechnology company focused on the development of d-methadone (dextromethadone, REL-1017), an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. d-Methadone is a new chemical entity that potentially addresses areas of high unmet medical need in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and other disorders. REL-1017 is in Phase 2 for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

 

The Company has a portfolio of three 505b2 product candidates at various stages of development. These products are: LevoCap ER (REL-1015), an abuse resistant, sustained release dosage form of the opioid analgesic levorphanol; BuTab (oral buprenorphine, REL-1028), an oral dosage form of the opioid analgesic buprenorphine; and MepiGel (topical mepivacaine, REL-1021), an orphan drug designated topical formulation of the local anesthetic mepivacaine. These products are not currently in active development.

 

In addition to the normal risks associated with a new business venture, there can be no assurance that the Company’s research and development will be successfully completed or that any product will be approved or commercially viable. The Company is subject to risks common to companies in the biotechnology industry including, but not limited to, dependence on collaborative arrangements, development by the Company or its competitors of new technological innovations, dependence on key personnel, protection of proprietary technology, and compliance with the FDA and other governmental regulations and approval requirements.

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements and related notes have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) for interim unaudited consolidated financial information. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by U.S. GAAP for complete consolidated financial statements. The unaudited consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments) which are, in the opinion of management, necessary for a fair statement of the results for the interim periods presented. Interim results are not necessarily indicative of the results for the full year. These unaudited consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements of the Company for the year ended June 30, 2018 and notes thereto contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business for the twelve month period following the issuance of these consolidated financial statements. As shown in the accompanying financial statements, the Company incurred negative operating cash flows of $6,830,774 for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and accumulated deficit of $107,539,775 from inception through March 31, 2019. These conditions raise doubt as to the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for one year after the date the financial statements are issued. These financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary if the Company is unable to continue as a going concern. We will need to raise additional funds in order to continue our clinical trials. Insufficient funds may cause us to delay, reduce the scope of or eliminate one or more of our development programs. Our future capital needs and the adequacy of our available funds will depend on many factors, including the cost of clinical studies and other actions needed to obtain regulatory approval of our products in development. Management plans to raise additional funds through public or private sales of equity or debt securities or from bank or other loans or through strategic collaboration and/or licensing agreements, to fund operations until the Company is able to generate enough revenues to cover operating costs. Financing may not be available on acceptable terms, or at all, and our failure to raise capital when needed could materially adversely impact our growth plans and our financial condition or results of operations. Additional equity financing, if available, may be dilutive to our shareholders. In addition, the Company may never be able to generate sufficient revenue if any from its potential products.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The unaudited consolidated financial statements include the Company’s accounts and those of the Company’s wholly-owned subsidiary. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses for the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. The significant estimates are the valuation of derivative liabilities, stock-based compensation expenses and recorded amounts related to income taxes.

  

7

 

    

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers cash deposits and all highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents. The Company’s cash deposits are held at two high-credit-quality financial institutions. The Company’s cash deposits at these institutions exceed federally insured limits.  

 

Patents

 

Costs related to filing and pursuing patent applications are recorded as general and administrative expense and expensed as incurred since recoverability of such expenditures is uncertain.

 

Fixed Assets

 

Fixed assets are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Fixed assets are comprised of computers and software, leasehold improvements, and furniture and fixtures. Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life of the assets. Computers and software have an estimated useful life of three years. Furniture and fixtures have an estimated useful life of approximately seven years.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company’s financial instruments primarily include cash, accounts payable and notes payable. Due to the short-term nature of cash, accounts payable and notes payable the carrying amounts of these assets and liabilities approximate their fair value.

 

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset, or paid to transfer a liability, in an orderly transaction between market participants. A fair value hierarchy has been established for valuation inputs that gives the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. The fair value hierarchy is as follows:

 

Level 1 Inputs - Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the reporting entity has the ability to access at the measurement date.

 

Level 2 Inputs - Inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. These might include quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active, inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability (such as interest rates, volatilities, prepayment speeds, credit risks, etc.) or inputs that are derived principally from or corroborated by market data by correlation or other means.

 

Level 3 Inputs - Prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable (supported by little or no market activity).

  

Fair Value on a Recurring Basis

 

As required by Accounting Standard Codification (“ASC”) Topic No. 820 - 10 Fair Value Measurement , financial assets and liabilities are classified based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The Company’s assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value measurement requires judgment and may affect the valuation of the fair value of assets and liabilities and their placement within the fair value hierarchy levels. The estimated fair value of the derivative instruments resulting from equity offerings in May 2014 and June 2014 have a down-round protection provision that, prior to the adoption of ASU 2017-11, was calculated with the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Sensitivity analysis for the Black-Scholes has many inputs and is subject to judgement which includes volatility. Volatility is based upon the Company’s historical volatility and the expected term is based upon the expiration date of the warrants. The estimated fair value of the derivative instruments from the convertible promissory notes issued during the year ended June 30, 2018, which have a redemption feature was estimated using the Monte Carlo pricing model, prior to the debt conversion. On the date of debt conversion, when the conversion price of the notes was established and there was no uncertainty as to the conversion of the debt, the estimated fair value of the derivative instrument from the convertible promissory notes was valued using the Black-Scholes model which closely approximates the value under the Monte Carlo pricing model.

  

8

 

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method. Accordingly, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in the tax rate is recognized in income or expense in the period that the change is effective. Tax benefits are recognized when it is probable that the deduction will be sustained. A valuation allowance is established when it is more likely than not that all or a portion of a deferred tax asset will either expire before the Company is able to realize the benefit, or that future deductibility is uncertain. As of March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018, the Company had recognized a valuation allowance to the full extent of the Company’s net deferred tax assets since the likelihood of realization of the benefit does not meet the more likely than not threshold.

 

The Company files a U.S. Federal income tax return and, various state returns. Uncertain tax positions taken on the Company’s tax returns will be accounted for as liabilities for unrecognized tax benefits. The Company will recognize interest and penalties, if any, related to unrecognized tax benefits in general and administrative expenses in the statements of operations. There were no liabilities recorded for uncertain tax positions at March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018. The open tax years, subject to potential examination by the applicable taxing authority, for the Company are from June 30, 2015 through June 30, 2018.

 

Research and Development

 

Research and development costs primarily consist of research contracts for the advancement of product development, salaries and benefits, stock-based compensation, and consultants. The Company expenses all research and development costs in the period incurred. The Company makes an estimate of costs in relation to clinical study contracts. The Company analyzes the progress of studies, including the progress of clinical studies and phases, invoices received and contracted costs when evaluating the adequacy of the amount expensed and the related prepaid asset and accrued liability. 

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company measures the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the grant-date fair value of the award. That cost is recognized over the period during which an employee is required to provide service in exchange for the award - the requisite service period. The grant-date fair value of employee share options is estimated using the Black-Scholes option pricing model adjusted for the unique characteristics of those instruments. Compensation expense for warrants granted to non-employees is determined by the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measured, and is recognized over the service period. The Company reviews its agreements and the future performance obligation with respect to the unvested warrants for its vendors or consultants. When appropriate, the Company will expense the unvested warrants at the time when management deems the service obligation for future services has ceased. 

 

Loss per Common Share

 

Basic loss per common share attributable to common stockholders is calculated by dividing the loss attributable to common stockholders by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period, without consideration for common stock equivalents. Diluted loss per common share attributable to common stockholders is computed by dividing the net loss attributable to common stockholders by the weighted-average number of common share equivalents outstanding for the period determined using the treasury-stock method. Dilutive common stock equivalents are comprised of restricted stock awards, options and warrants to purchase common stock. For all periods presented, there is no difference in the number of shares used to calculate basic and diluted shares outstanding due to the Company’s net loss position.

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, the following potentially dilutive securities were excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share, as the inclusion of such shares would be anti-dilutive: 

 

    Nine months ended  
    March 31,
2019
    March 31,
2018
 
Stock options     5,743,240       2,573,240  
Common stock warrants     16,047,775       9,816,025  
Total     21,791,015       12,389,265  

 

9

 

  

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements 

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, “Leases” (Topic 842), whereby lessees will be required to recognize for all leases at the commencement date a lease liability, which is a lessee’s obligation to make lease payments arising from a lease, measured on a discounted basis; and a right-of-use asset, which is an asset that represents the lessee’s right to use, or control the use of, a specified asset for the lease term. The new standard is effective for us on July 1, 2019. with early adoption permitted. We expect to adopt the new standard on its effective date. A modified retrospective transition approach is required, applying the new standard to all leases existing at the date of initial application. An entity may choose to use either (1) its effective date or (2) the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements as its date of initial application. If an entity chooses the second option, the transition requirements for existing leases also apply to leases entered into between the date of initial application and the effective date. The entity must also recast its comparative period financial statements and provide the disclosures required by the new standard for the comparative periods. We expect to adopt the new standard on July 1, 2019 and use the effective date as our date of initial application. Consequently, financial information will not be updated and the disclosures required under the new standard will not be provided for dates and periods before July 1, 2019. The Company is still evaluating the expected impact on its financials.

 

In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-11, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260); Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (Topic 480); Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): (Part I) Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Down Round Features. These amendments simplify the accounting for certain financial instruments with down round features. The amendments require companies to disregard the down round feature when assessing whether the instrument is indexed to its own stock, for purposes of determining liability or equity classification. The Company elected to early adopt ASU 2017-11 effective October 1, 2018. 

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07,  Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Non-employee Share-Based Payment Accounting , which simplifies the accounting for share-based payments made to non-employees so the accounting for such payments is substantially the same as those made to employees. Under this ASU, share based awards to non-employees will be measured at fair value on the grant date of the awards, entities will need to assess the probability of satisfying performance conditions if any are present, and awards will continue to be classified according to ASC 718 upon vesting which eliminates the need to reassess classification upon vesting, consistent with awards granted to employees. The Company elected to early adopt ASU 2018-07 effective October 1, 2018 and will apply the guidance to any future equity-classified share based awards to nonemployees. 

 

NOTE 3 – PREPAID EXPENSES

 

Prepaid expenses consisted of the following (rounded to nearest $00):

 

    March 31,
2019
    June 30,
2018
 
Rent   $ -     $ 9,200  
Research and development     -       20,800  
Insurance     115,200       345,700  
Legal     12,100       10,000  
Other     80,500       41,200  
Total   $ 207,800     $ 426,900  

 

NOTE 4 – FIXED ASSETS

 

Fixed assets, net of accumulated depreciation, consisted of the following (rounded to nearest $00):

 

    Useful lives   March 31,
2019
    June 30,
2018
 
Computer and software   3 years   $ 16,700     $ 16,700  
Less: accumulated depreciation         (8,400 )     (4,600 )
Fixed assets       $ 8,300     $ 12,100  

  

10

 

  

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 5 – ACCRUED EXPENSES

 

Accrued expenses consisted of the following (rounded to nearest $00):

 

    March 31,
2019
    June 30,
2018
 
Research and development   $ 9,700     $ 10,400  
Professional fees     132,900       173,600  
Interest on promissory notes     -       371,600  
Accrued vacation     77,800       48,000  
Litigation settlement, net     750,000       -  
Other     50,600       55,900  
Total   $ 1,021,000     $ 659,500  

 

NOTE 6 – NOTES PAYABLE

 

In June 2018, the Company entered into a note for approximately $285,200 in conjunction with a renewal of its director and officer insurance policy. The interest rate was 2.35% per annum. The note matured on April 9, 2019.

 

At March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018, the note payable outstanding balances were approximately $28,800 and $285,200, respectively. 

 

NOTE 7 – DERIVATIVE LIABILITIES

 

ASC Topic No. 815 – Derivatives and Hedging provides guidance on determining what types of instruments or embedded features in an instrument issued by a reporting entity can be considered indexed to its own stock for the purpose of evaluating the first criteria of the scope exception in the pronouncement on accounting for derivatives. These requirements can affect the accounting for warrants and convertible preferred instruments issued by the Company.

 

At March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018, the Company had warrants resulting from equity offerings in May 2014 and June 2014 that do not have fixed settlement provisions because their exercise prices may be lowered if the Company issues securities at lower prices in the future, the Company concluded that the instruments are not indexed to the Company’s stock.

 

Until September 30, 2018, the Company followed ASC Topic No 815 and treated the warrants as derivative liabilities. In determining the fair value of the derivative liabilities, the Company used the Black-Scholes option pricing model at September 30 and June 30, 2018.

 

As noted in Note 2, the Company elected to early adopt ASU 2017-11 and reversed the derivative liability into equity effective July 1, 2018. The warrants balance of $59,397 was reversed to equity effective July 1, 2018.

 

The following is a summary of the assumptions used in the valuation model at June 30, 2018:

 

    June 30,  
    2018  
Common stock issuable upon exercise of warrants     2,574,570  
Market value of common stock on measurement date   $ 1.01  
Exercise price     $7.50 and $11.25  
Risk free interest rate (1)     2.33 %
Expected life in years   $ 0.95  
Expected volatility (2)     102 %
Expected dividend yields (3)     None  

 

(1) The risk-free interest rate was determined by management using the applicable Treasury Bill as of the measurement date.
(2) The historical trading volatility was determined by calculating the volatility of the Company’s stock.
(3) The Company does not expect to pay a dividend in the foreseeable future.

  

11

 

    

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 7 – DERIVATIVE LIABILITIES (continued)

 

Until October 18, 2018, the Company had promissory notes with a redemption feature that was not clearly and closely related to the host instrument and therefore is considered an embedded derivative which was bifurcated and recorded as a derivative liability. In determining the fair value of the derivative liabilities, the Company used the Monte-Carlo pricing model. The assumptions used in the valuation model considers the probability of redemption, the length of time to maturity and value of the redemption feature.

 

On October 12 and 18, 2018, the Company conducted closings on its private placement of securities. As a result of these closings, the outstanding promissory notes converted into common stock. The redemption feature associated with the promissory notes was valued on October 18, 2018 using the Black-Scholes model. The change in value of the derivative between October 1, 2018 and the October 18, 2018 was recorded as income. The notes were converted to common stock on October 18, 2018.

 

The Company had no financial liabilities accounted for at fair value on a recurring basis as of March 31, 2019.

 

The following table sets forth, by level within the fair value hierarchy, the Company’s financial liabilities that were accounted for at fair value on a recurring basis as of June 30, 2018:

 

    Markets for
Identical
Assets
    Other
Observable
Inputs
    Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
    Carrying
Value as of
June 30,
 
Description   (Level 1)     (Level 2)     (Level 3)     2018  
Derivative liability – warrant instruments   $        -     $          -     $ 30,526     $ 30,526  
Derivative liabilities – embedded redemption feature of promissory notes     -       -       4,164,108       4,164,108  
    $ -     $ -     $ 4,194,634     $ 4,194,634  

 

The following table sets forth a reconciliation of changes in the fair value of financial liabilities classified as level 3 in the fair value hierarchy for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2017:

 

    Nine months ended  
    March 31,     March 31,  
    2019     2018  
Beginning balance   $ 4,194,634     $ 175,853  
Adoption of ASU 2017-11 – warrants     (59,397 )     -  
Fair value of derivative liabilities for redemption feature of promissory notes payable     -       3,862,095  
Change in fair value of derivative liabilities     54,634       (80,542 )
Extinguishment of derivative liabilities on conversion of promissory notes.     (4,189,871 )     -  
Ending balance   $ -     $ 3,957,406  

 

NOTE 8 – PROMISSORY NOTES PAYABLE

 

Between September 2017 and January 2018, the Company issued two-year Convertible Promissory Notes (the “Notes”) and warrants, for aggregate gross proceeds of $7,205,000, $6,534,400 net of direct debt issuance costs. The notes had an interest rate of 7% per annum.

 

As a result of financings in October 2018, the principal and accumulated interest on the Convertible Promissory Notes was automatically converted into 10,731,669 shares of its common stock in accordance with the terms of the Notes. This resulted in a loss on extinguishment of debt, a non cash item, of approximately $3,774,500 in the quarter ended December 31, 2018.

 

12

 

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 9 – STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

Common Stock

 

During the nine months ended March 31, 2019, the Company closed on private placements of securities pursuant to Unit Purchase Agreements and Subscription Agreements, each dated as shown below. The price per unit (comprising one common stock and a warrant to purchase 0.65 common stock) was $0.90. The Company issued an aggregate of 7,288,225 shares of common stock to investors in these closings, for net proceeds of $5,941,547.

 

Date of closing   Common Stock Issued     Warrants issued     Unit Price     Net proceeds  
October 12, 2018     2,004,106       1,302,669     $ 0.90     $ 1,630,991  
October 18, 2018     1,640,334       1,066,218     $ 0.90     $ 1,287,007  
November 2, 2018     1,499,456       974,645     $ 0.90     $ 1,215,242  
December 5, 2018     1,338,775       870,200     $ 0.90     $ 1,083,307  
February 12, 2019     805,554       523,610     $ 0.90     $ 725,000  
                                 
Total     7,288,225       4,737,342             $ 5,941,547  

 

The exercise price of each warrant issued to investors was $1.50 with a 5-year term. Approximately $40,000 of legal costs were incurred that were not allocated to the individual closings.

 

In addition to the above, on March 27, 2019, the Company closed on a private placement of securities pursuant to Unit Purchase Agreements and Subscription Agreements dated March 27, 2019. The price per unit of the March 27, 2019 Units (comprising one common stock and a warrant to purchase 0.50 common stock) was $1.40. The Company issued an aggregate of 714,285 shares of common stock and 357,142 warrants to investors in these closings, for net proceeds of $1,000,000. The exercise price of the March 27, 2019 warrants was $2.25.

 

The October 12, 2018 and October 18, 2018 financings represented an Equity Financing as defined in the Convertible Promissory Note agreement. As a result of the October 12, 2018 and October 18, 2018 financings , the Company’s outstanding 7% Convertible Promissory Notes and accumulated interest converted into 10,731,669 shares of common stock.

 

Placement Agent Warrants

 

During the nine months ended March 31, 2019, the Company additionally issued an aggregate of 854,334 warrants to the placement agent in connection with the closings. The agent warrants have an exercise price of $0.99, are non-cancellable, vest upon issuance and expire on the fifth anniversary of the warrant date of issuance.

 

Options

 

In December 2014, the Board of Directors adopted and the shareholders approved Relmada’s 2014 Stock Option and Equity Incentive Plan, as amended (the “Plan”), which allows for the granting of common stock awards, stock appreciation rights, and incentive and nonqualified stock options to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock to designated employees, non-employee directors, and consultants and advisors. The Plan allowed for the granting of 1,611,769 options or stock awards. In August 2015, the board approved an amendment to the Plan. Among other things, the Plan Amendment updates the definition of “change of control” and provides for accelerated vesting of all awards granted under the plan in the event of a change of control of the Company. In January 2017, the stockholders approved an increase of 2,500,000 shares authorized to be issued under the Plan, raising the total shares allowed under the Plan to 4,111,768. In December 2017 the board approved, and in February 2018 the shareholders approved, an amendment to the Plan that increased the number of shares of common stock authorized for issuance under the Plan by an additional 2,500,000 shares from 4,111,768 to 6,611,768. In December 2018 the Board of Directors approved an amendment to the Plan to increase the number of shares of common stock authorized for issuance under the Plan by an additional 4,000,000 shares from 6,611,768 to 10,611,768.

 

Stock options are exercisable generally for a period of 10 years from the date of grant and generally vest over four years. As of March 31, 2019, 4,868,528 shares were available for future grants under the Plan.

 

As of March 31, 2019, no stock appreciation rights have been issued.

 

The Company utilizes the Black-Scholes option pricing model to estimate the fair value of stock options and warrants. The price of common stock prior to the Company being public was determined from a third party valuation. The risk-free interest rate assumptions were based upon the observed interest rates appropriate for the expected term of the equity instruments. The expected dividend yield was assumed to be zero as the Company has not paid any dividends since its inception and does not anticipate paying dividends in the foreseeable future. The expected volatility was based on historical volatility. The Company routinely reviews its calculation of volatility changes in future volatility, the Company’s life cycle, its peer group, and other factors.

 

The Company uses the simplified method for share-based compensation to estimate the expected term for employee option awards for share-based compensation in its option-pricing model. Prior to the adoption of ASU 2018-07 on October 1, 2018, the Company used the contractual term for non-employee options to estimate the expected term, for share-based compensation in its option-pricing model.

 

13

 

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 9 – STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (continued)

 

On February 13, 2017, Mr. Michael Becker, the Company’s Chief Financial Officer, resigned and entered into a consulting agreement with the Company to provide financial, investor, digital media, and public relations services for the Company. As a result of Mr. Becker’s change from an employee to a consultant, his options and shares of restricted stock outstanding on such date continued to vest pursuant to the awards’ original terms and were reclassified as non-employee awards. On December 15, 2017 Mr. Becker’s consulting agreement expired and all unvested options were cancelled.

 

On December 20, 2018, the Company awarded a total of 2,700,000 options to its chief executive officer, chief medical officer and board members with exercise price of $1.15 and a 10-year term vesting over 4-year period. The options have an aggregate fair value of $2.5 million calculated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. Variables used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model include: (1) discount rate of 2.69% (2) expected life of 6.25 years, (3) expected volatility of 102.3%, and (4) zero expected dividends.

 

At March 31, 2019, the Company has unrecognized stock-based compensation expense of approximately $3,448,900 related to unvested stock options over the weighted average remaining service period of 3.35 years.

 

Options

 

A summary of the changes in options during the nine months ended March 31, 2019 is as follows:

 

    Number
of
Options
    Weighted Average Exercise Price For Share     Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Term (Years)     Aggregate Intrinsic
Value
 
Outstanding and expected to vest at June 30, 2018     3,068,865     $ 1.45       8.8     $ 511,000  
Forfeited     (25,625 )   $ 7.59       -     $ -  
Issued     2,700,000     $ 1.15       9.7     $ 1,674,000  
Outstanding and expected to vest at March 31, 2019     5,743,240     $ 1.28       8.9     $ 4,199,110  
Options exercisable at March 31, 2019     1,278,687     $ 2.22       7.6     $ 799,763  

 

Warrants

 

A summary of the changes in outstanding warrants during the nine months ended March 31, 2019 is as follows:

 

    Number of Shares     Weighted Average Exercise Price Per Share  
Outstanding and vested at June 30, 2018     9,815,025     $ 3.96  
Forfeited     (7,500 )     4.00  
Issued     6,240,247       1.46  
Outstanding and vested at March 31, 2019     16,047,772     $ 2.15  

  

Included in the warrants outstanding at June 30, 2018, and March 31, 2019 are 2,574,570 warrants with an exercise price that is subject to downward adjustment on the sale of equity at prices below their original exercise price. The issuance of common stock in the three months ended March 31, 2019 resulted in a reduction of the exercise price of these warrants. This reduction had a di minimis effect on the financial statements.

 

14

 

    

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 9 – STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (continued)

 

On December 20, 2018, the Company granted 100,000 warrants to a contractor with exercise price of $1.15, a 10-year term and immediate vesting. The warrants have an aggregated fair value of $93,762 that was calculated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. Variables used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model include: (1) discount rate of 2.69% (2) expected life of 6.25 years, (3) expected volatility of 102.3%, and (4) zero expected dividends.

 

On January 1, 2019, the Company granted 120,000 warrants to a contractor with exercise price of $1.15, a 10-year term and quarterly vesting over four years vesting. The warrants have an aggregated fair value of $112,183 that was calculated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. Variables used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model include: (1) discount rate of 2.49% (2) expected life of 6.25 years, (3) expected volatility of 102.0%, and (4) zero expected dividends.

 

On March 9, 2019, the Company granted 71,429 warrants to a consultant with exercise price of $1.75, a 5-year term and immediate vesting. The warrants have an aggregated fair value of $95,131 that was calculated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. Variables used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model include: (1) discount rate of 2.42% (2) expected life of 5 years, (3) expected volatility of 102.0%, and (4) zero expected dividends.

 

At March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018, the aggregate intrinsic value of warrants vested and outstanding was approximately $4,057,000 and $215,000, respectively.

 

The following summarizes the components of stock-based compensation expense which includes stock options in the consolidated statements of operations for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 (rounded to nearest $00):

 

    Nine months ended March 31,
2019
    Nine months ended March 31,
2018
 
Research and development   $ 65,700     $ 44,500  
General and administrative     744,800       320,700  
Total   $ 810,500     $ 365,200  

   

NOTE 10 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

Consulting Agreements

 

On August 4, 2015, the Company entered into an Advisory and Consulting Agreement with Sandesh Seth, the Company’s Chairman of the Board. The effective date of the consulting agreement is June 30, 2015. Mr. Seth has substantial experience in, among other matters, business development, corporate planning, corporate finance, strategic planning, investor relations and public relations, and an expansive network of connections spanning the biopharmaceutical industry, accounting, legal and corporate communications professions. Mr. Seth will provide advisory and consulting services to assist the Company with strategic advisory services, assist in prioritizing product development programs per strategic objectives, assist in recruiting of key personnel and directors, corporate planning, business development activities, corporate finance advice, and assist in investor and public relations services. In consideration for the services to be provided, the Company agreed to pay Mr. Seth $12,500 per month on an ongoing basis. On June 6, 2017, Mr. Seth resigned from the Company to focus his attention on matters external to Relmada. The Company agreed to continue its advisory and consulting arrangement with Mr. Seth until December 31, 2017. 

 

On June 12, 2017, the Company and Maged Shenouda, a director of the Company, entered into a Consulting Agreement. Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, Mr. Shenouda will assist the Company with matters that may be requested by the Company. Mr. Shenouda will be paid a consulting fee of $10,000 per month. The term of the agreement is for one year. On November 13, 2017, Mr. Shenouda and the Company agreed to terminate the Consulting Agreement effective December 31, 2017.

   

15

 

 

Relmada Therapeutics, Inc.

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 11 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Legal

 

On February 6, 2019 the Company entered into a settlement agreement with Najib Babul, Relmada’s former President. Dr Babul relinquished his 303,392 shares in Relmada and signed a consulting contract and Relmada committed to a $500,000 initial payment and four subsequent payments of $250,000 on March 31, 2019, June 30, 2019, September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2019. For accounting purposes no fair value was attributed to the consulting agreement.

 

From time to time, the Company may become involved in lawsuits and other legal proceedings that arise in the course of business. Litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and it is not possible to predict the outcome of litigation with total confidence. The Company is currently not aware of any legal proceedings or potential claims against it whose outcome would be likely, individually or in the aggregate, to have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, operating results, or cash flows.

 

Leases and Sublease

 

The Company leased its corporate headquarters at 750 Third Avenue, 9th Floor, New York, New York 10017. The monthly rental fee was $9,454 per month. The lease was terminated effective January 1, 2019. Effective January 1, 2019, the Company entered a one year lease for its headquarters at 880 Third Avenue, 12 th floor, New York, NY 10022. The annualized monthly rent for 2019 is approximately $7,500.

  

On June 8, 2017, the Company entered into an Amended and Restated License Agreement with Actinium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“Actinium”). Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, Actinium will continue to license the furniture, fixtures, equipment and tenant improvements located in the office (“FFE”) for a license fee of $7,529 per month until December 8, 2022. Actinium shall have at any time during the term of this agreement the right to purchase the FFE for $496,914, less any previously paid license fees. The license of FFE qualifies as a sales-type lease. At inception, the Company derecognized the underlying assets of $493,452, recognized discounted lease payments receivable of $397,049 using the discount rate of 8.38% and recognized loss on sales-type lease of fixed assets of $96,403. As of March 31, 2019, the balance of unearned interest income was approximately $48,900.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

The following tables sets forth our contractual obligations for the next five years and thereafter:

 

    Total     Less than
1 year
    1 - 2 years     3 - 5 years     More than
5 years
 
Office lease   $ 67,500     $ 67,500     $       -     $       -     $       -  
Note payable     28,800       28,800       -       -       -  
Total obligations   $ 96,300     $ 96,300     $ -     $ -     $ -  

  

NOTE 12 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

On April 1, 2019 the Company awarded 150,000 options to a new employee with exercise price of $1.76 and a 10-year term vesting over 4-year period. The options have an aggregate fair value of $213,803 calculated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. Variables used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model include: (1) discount rate of 2.31% (2) expected life of 6.25 years, (3) expected volatility of 101.5%, and (4) zero expected dividends.

 

On April 12, 2019, the Company filed a Certificate of Amendment to its Articles of Incorporation to increase the number of authorized shares of the Company’s common stock from 100,000,000 to 200,000,000 shares.

 

On April 15, 2019, the Company executed an amendment to the Company’s 2014 Stock Option and Equity Incentive Plan. The amendment increases the number of shares of common stock that the Company is authorized to issue under the plan to 10,111,718 shares.

 

On May 14, 2019, the Company closed on a private placement of securities pursuant to Unit Purchase Agreements and Subscription Agreements dated May 14, 2019. The price per unit of the May 14, 2019 Units (comprising one common stock and a warrant to purchase 0.50 common stock) was $1.50. The Company issued an aggregate of 2,276,329 shares of common stock and 1,138,161 warrants to investors in this closing, for net proceeds of approximately $3,106,000. The exercise price of the May 14, 2019 investor warrants was $2.25 and they have a term of five years. The Company additionally issued warrants to brokers who acted as co-placement agents with respect to the private placement.

 

One agent received warrants to purchase 48,433 shares at an exercise price of $1.65 and the other agent a warrant to purchase 99,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $2.25. Both warrants have a term of 5 years. The warrants have aggregate fair value of $66,800 and $122,942 respectively, calculated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. Variables used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model include: (1) discount rate of 2.26% (2) expected life of 5 years, (3) expected volatility of 101%, and (4) zero expected dividends.

  

16

 

       

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATION

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENT NOTICE

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (this “Report”) contains forward looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties, principally in the sections entitled “Description of Business,” “Risk Factors,” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” All statements other than statements of historical fact contained in this Quarterly Report, including statements regarding future events, our future financial performance, business strategy and plans and objectives of management for future operations, are forward-looking statements. We have attempted to identify forward-looking statements by terminology including “anticipates,” “believes,” “can,” “continue,” “could,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “plans,” “potential,” “predicts,” “should,” or “will” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. Although we do not make forward-looking statements unless we believe we have a reasonable basis for doing so, we cannot guarantee their accuracy. These statements are only predictions and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, including the risks outlined under “Risk Factors” or elsewhere in this Quarterly Report, which may cause our or our industry’s actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Moreover, we operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risks emerge from time to time and it is not possible for us to predict all risk factors, nor can we address the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause our actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements included in this document are based on information available to us on the date hereof, and we assume no obligation to update any such forward-looking statements.

 

You should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statement, each of which applies only as of the date of this Quarterly Report on Form-10-Q. Before you invest in our securities, you should be aware that the occurrence of the events described in the section entitled “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report could negatively affect our business, operating results, financial condition and stock price. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update or revise publicly any of the forward-looking statements after the date of this Quarterly Report on Form-10-Q to conform our statements to actual results or changed expectations.

 

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

 

Relmada is a clinical-stage, publicly traded biotechnology company focused on the development of d-methadone (dextromethadone, REL-1017), an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. d-Methadone is a new chemical entity that potentially addresses areas of high unmet medical need in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and other disorders.

 

Our lead product candidate, d-methadone, is a New Chemical Entity (NCE) being developed as a rapidly acting, oral agent for the treatment of depression and other potential indications. We have completed Phase 1 single and multiple ascending dose studies. A Phase 2 study in major depressive disorder is ongoing, with the first patient dosed in June 2018, and we expect to have top line results in the first half of 2019.

 

NMDA receptors are present in many parts of the central nervous system and play important roles in regulating neuronal activity. We believe that dextromethadone acting as a NMDA receptor antagonist can have potential applications in a number of disease indications which mitigates risk and offers significant upside.

 

The Company has a legacy portfolio of three 505b2 product candidates at various stages of development. These products are: LevoCap ER (REL-1015), an abuse resistant, sustained release dosage form of the opioid analgesic levorphanol; BuTab (oral buprenorphine, REL-1028), an oral dosage form of the opioid analgesic buprenorphine; and MepiGel (topical mepivacaine, REL-1021), an orphan drug designated topical formulation of the local anesthetic mepivacaine. These products are not currently in active development.

  

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Our four development projects are briefly described below:

 

d-Methadone (dextromethadone, REL-1017) and Treatment-Resistant Depression (TRD)

 

Background

 

In 2014, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) estimated that 15.7 million adults aged 18 or older in the United States had at least one major depressive episode in the past year. According to data from nationally representative surveys supported by NIMH, only about half of Americans diagnosed with major depression in a given year receive treatment. Of those receiving treatment with as many as four different standard antidepressants, 33% of drug-treated depression patients do not achieve adequate therapeutic benefits according to the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial published in the American Journal of Psychiatry. Accordingly, we believe that approximately 3 million patients with such treatment-resistant depression are in need of new treatment options.

 

In addition to the high failure rate, none of the marketed products for depression can demonstrate rapid antidepressant effects and most of the products take up to a month to show effectiveness. The urgent need for improved, faster acting antidepressant treatments is underscored by the fact that severe depression can be life-threatening, due to heightened risk of suicide.

 

Recent studies have shown that ketamine, a drug known previously as an anesthetic, can lift depression in many patients within hours. However, it is unlikely that ketamine itself will become a practical treatment for most cases of depression. It must be administered through intravenous infusion, requiring a hospital setting, and more importantly can potentially trigger adverse side effects including psychedelic symptoms (hallucinations, memory defects, panic attacks), nausea/vomiting, somnolence, cardiovascular stimulation and, in a minority of patients, hepatoxicity. Ketamine also hasn’t been thoroughly studied for long-term safety and effectiveness, and the FDA hasn’t approved it to treat depression.

 

d-Methadone Overview and Mechanism of Action

 

d-Methadone’s mechanism of action, as a non-competitive NMDA channel blocker or antagonist, is fundamentally differentiated from all currently FDA-approved antidepressants, as well as all atypical antipsychotics used adjunctively with standard, FDA-approved antidepressants. Working through the same brain mechanisms as ketamine but potentially lacking its adverse side effects, Relmada’s d-Methadone is being developed as a rapidly acting, oral agent for the treatment of depression, neuropathic pain, and/or other potential CNS pathological conditions.

 

In chemistry an enantiomer, also known as an optical isomer, is one of two stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other that are non-superposable (not identical), much as one’s left and right hands are the same except for being reversed along one axis. A racemic compound, or racemate, is one that has equal amounts of left- and right-handed enantiomers of a chiral molecule. For racemic drugs, often only one of a drug’s enantiomers is responsible for the desired physiologic effects, while the other enantiomer is less active or inactive.

 

Racemic methadone has been used since the 1950s as a treatment for opioid addiction and has remained the primary therapy for this condition for more than 40 years. Methadone is a highly lipophilic molecule that is suitable for a variety of administration routes, with oral bioavailability close to 80%.

 

As a single isomer of racemic methadone, d-Methadone has been shown to possess NMDA antagonist properties with virtually no traditional opioid or ketamine-like adverse events at the expected therapeutic doses. In contrast, racemic methadone is associated with common opioid side effects that include anxiety, nervousness, restlessness, sleep problems (insomnia), nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, drowsiness, and others. It has been shown that the left (levo) isomer, l-Methadone, is largely responsible for methadone’s opioid activity, while the right (dextro) isomer, d-Methadone, is much less active as an opioid while maintaining affinity for the NMDA receptor.

 

NMDA receptors are present in many parts of the central nervous system and play important roles in regulating neuronal activity and promoting synaptic plasticity in brain areas important for cognitive functions such as executive function, learning and memory. Based on these premises, d-methadone could show benefits in several different CNS indications.

  

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d-Methadone Phase 1 Clinical Safety Studies

 

The safety data from two Company-funded d-Methadone Phase 1 clinical safety studies and a third study conducted by researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center indicate that d-Methadone was safe and well tolerated in both healthy subjects and cancer patients at all projected therapeutic doses tested.

 

In November 2014, Health Canada approved a Clinical Trial Application (“CTA”) to conduct the first Phase 1 study with d-methadone. This was a Single Ascending Dose (“SAD”) study and was followed by a Multiple Ascending Dose (“MAD”) study, both in healthy volunteers. The two studies were designed to assess the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of d-methadone in healthy, opioid-naïve subjects. The SAD study included single escalating oral doses of d-methadone to determine the maximum tolerated dose, defined as the highest dose devoid of unacceptable adverse events. In the MAD study, healthy subjects received daily oral doses of d-methadone for several days to assess its safety, pharmacokinetics and tolerability. In March 2015, we reported that d-methadone demonstrated an acceptable safety profile with no dose limiting side effects after four cohorts were exposed to increasing higher doses. In April 2015, the Company received clearance from Health Canada to continue with dose escalation and explore even higher single doses of d-methadone. In June 2015, the Company successfully completed the SAD study identifying the maximum tolerated dose and subsequently received a No Objection Letter (NOL) from Health Canada to conduct the MAD clinical study in August 2015. The MAD study was completed in January 2016 and the results successfully demonstrated a potential therapeutic dosing regimen for d-methadone with a favorable side effect and tolerability profile. The data from these studies was used to design a Phase 2a study in patients with depression.

  

d-Methadone In Vivo Study for Depression

 

In May 2016, we announced the results of an in vivo study showing that administration of d-methadone results in antidepressant-like effects in a well-validated animal model of depression, known as the forced swim test (FST), providing preclinical support for its potential as a novel treatment of depression.

 

According to the Journal of Visualized Experiments, the FST is based on the assumption that when placing an animal in a container filled with water, it will first make efforts to escape by swimming or climbing, but eventually will exhibit “immobility” that may be considered to reflect a measure of behavioral despair. This test has been extensively used because it involves the exposure of the animals to stress, which was shown to have a role in the tendency for major depression. Additionally, the FST has been shown to be influenced by some of the factors that are altered by or worsen depression in humans, including changes in food consumption and sleep abnormalities. The main advantages of this procedure are that it is relatively easy to perform and that its results are easily and quickly analyzed. Importantly, the FST’s sensitivity to a broad range of antidepressant drugs makes it a suitable screening test and is one of the most important features leading to its high predictive validity.

 

In the Company’s FST study, male Sprague Dawley rats were administered single doses of placebo, ketamine, or d-methadone on day one (after habituation; 24 hours prior to forced swim testing). At all doses tested, d-methadone significantly decreased immobility of the rats compared to the placebo, suggesting antidepressant-like activity. In addition, the effect of d-methadone on immobility at the two highest doses tested was larger than the effect seen with ketamine. Moreover, the effects of d-methadone in the forced swim test were not caused by a stimulant effect on spontaneous locomotor activity of the rats. Locomotor activity of lab animals is often monitored to assess the behavioral effects of drugs.

 

In September 2017 we completed two additional in vivo studies to confirm and support the antidepressant-like effect of dextromethadone in validated animal models, the Novelty Suppressed Feeding Test (“NSFT”) and the Female Urine-Sniffing test (“FUST”) test. The studies were performed by Professor Ronald S. Duman, Ph.D. at Yale University School of Medicine.

 

For FUST, rats are first exposed to a cotton tip dipped in tap water and later exposed to another cotton tip infused with fresh female urine. Male behavior was video recorded and total time spent sniffing the cotton-tipped applicator is determined. For NSFT, rats were food deprived for 24 hr and then placed in an open field with food pellets in the center; latency to eat is recorded in seconds. As a control, food consumption in the home cage is quantified. Rats were administered vehicle, ketamine or d-methadone.

 

The results of the FUST demonstrate that administration of ketamine significantly increases the time male rats spent engaged in sniffing female urine compared to vehicle group. Similarly, a single dose of d-methadone significantly increased the time spent sniffing female urine compared to vehicle. In contrast, ketamine or d-methadone had no effect on time sniffing water, demonstrating that the effect of drug treatment was specific to the rewarding effects of female urine. The results of the NSFT demonstrate that a single dose of ketamine significantly decreases the latency to eat in a novel open field. Similarly, a single dose of d-methadone also significantly decreased the latency to enter and eat in the novel feed. In contrast, neither ketamine nor methadone influenced latency to feed in the home cage.

 

These findings demonstrate that ketamine and d-methadone produce rapid antidepressant actions in the FUST and NSFT, effects that are only observed after chronic administration of an SSRI antidepressant.

 

A separate in vitro electrophysiology study of d-methadone was conducted using 2 subtypes of cloned human NMDA receptors.

 

The results of this study demonstrated functional antagonist activity with d-methadone comparable to that of both racemic ketamine and the isomer [S]-ketamine.

   

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Phase 2 Program for d-Methadone

  

Combined with the results of our Phase 1 studies, the encouraging results of in vivo and in vitro studies strongly support further evaluation of d-methadone in a Phase 2 study as a rapidly acting, oral agent for the treatment of major depressive disorder. Relmada filed an Investigational New Drug (“IND”) application for the Phase 2 study with the FDA, which was accepted on January 25, 2017.

 

On April 13, 2017, we announced that the FDA granted Fast Track designation for d-methadone (REL-1017 dextromethadone) for the adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder. Fast Track designation is a process designed to facilitate the development and expedite the review of drugs to treat serious conditions and fill an unmet medical need. The purpose, according to the FDA, is to get important new drugs to the patient earlier. Drugs that receive Fast Track designation may be eligible for more frequent meetings and written communications with the FDA, accelerated review and priority approval, and rolling New Drug Application review.

 

On January 17, 2018, we announced that Relmada had acquired the global rights to develop and market dextromethadone for the treatment of neurological conditions including certain rare diseases with symptoms affecting the CNS.

 

In February 2018, Relmada initiated its Phase 2 study of d-methadone in patients with major depressive disorder.

  

d-methadone (dextromethadone, REL-1017) in other indications

 

In addition to developing dextromethadone in major depression, Relmada is initiating work in additional indications. In particular, we have initiated a preclinical program to test the potential efficacy of dextromethadone in Rett syndrome. Rett syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder with high unmet need caused by Mecp2 gene mutation. Loss of Mecp2 disrupts synaptic function and structure and neuronal networks. Rett syndrome is an Orphan Disease affecting ~15,000 in U.S., primarily girls, with no approved therapy. The disease begins with a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability.

 

Studies of ketamine, a NMDAR antagonist with mechanistic similarities with dextromethadone, in Rett Syndrome mouse models show that low-dose ketamine acutely reverses multiple disease manifestations and chronic administration of ketamine improves Rett Syndrome progression, providing a solid rationale to pursue this indication with dextromethadone.

 

Other indications that Relmada may explore in the future, potentially includes restless leg syndrome, and other neurological diseases.

  

In January 2018, we entered into an Intellectual Property Assignment Agreement (the “Assignment Agreement”) and License Agreement (the “License Agreement” and together with the Assignment Agreement, the “Agreements”) with Dr. Charles E. Inturrisi and Dr. Paolo Manfredi (collectively, the “Licensor”). Pursuant to the Agreements, Relmada assigned its existing rights, including patents and patent applications, to d-methadone in the context of psychiatric use (the “Existing Invention”) to Licensor. Licensor then granted Relmada under the License Agreement a perpetual, worldwide, and exclusive license to commercialize the Existing Invention and certain further inventions regarding d-methadone in the context of other indications such as those contemplated above.

  

LevoCap ER (REL-1015)

 

LevoCap ER (REL-1015) is a novel version of a proven drug product. LevoCap ER -is an extended release, abuse deterrent, and proprietary formulation of levorphanol (levo-3-hydroxy-N-methyl-morphinan), a unique, broad spectrum opioid with additional “non-opioid” mechanisms of action. In particular, levorphanol binds to all three opioid receptor subtypes involved in analgesia (mu, kappa, and delta), the NMDA receptor, and the norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake pumps, whereas morphine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, and other opioids are highly selective for the mu receptor subtype. Due to its multi-modal mechanism of action, levorphanol could achieve analgesia in patients resistant to other strong opioids. In clinical studies, levorphanol has demonstrated a remarkably broad spectrum of analgesic activity against many different types of pain including neuropathic pain, post-surgical pain, and chronic pain in patients refractory to other opioids.

 

Levorphanol is a potent opioid analgesic first introduced in the U.S. around 1953 for the treatment of moderate to severe pain where an opioid analgesic is appropriate. Extended-release (long-acting opioid) agents may be preferable to immediate release formulations due to better patient adherence, less dose-watching, and result in improved sleep. Both immediate- and extended-release opioids can potentially be crushed to produce concentrated drug with greater appeal to abusers. Intentional crushing or extracting the active ingredient from the extended-release dosage form by addicts and recreational drug users can destroy the timed-release mechanism and result in a rapid surge of drug into the bloodstream for the purpose of achieving a high or euphoric feeling. Serious side effects and death have been reported from such misuse.

   

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LevoCap ER is the first product candidate utilizing SECUREL™, Relmada’s proprietary abuse deterrent extended release technology for opioid drugs. SECUREL dosage forms cannot be easily crushed for inhalation or to obtain rapid euphoria from high blood levels when swallowed. It is also exceedingly difficult for intravenous abusers to extract the active drug from the dosage form using common solvents, including alcohol.

 

LevoCap ER can be developed under the 505(b)(2) regulatory pathway. Following an exchange of correspondence and meeting with the FDA in January 2017, we have defined a path forward for the Phase 3 clinical study for LevoCap ER and a new drug application (“NDA”) filing. In light of the promising data generated by Relmada’s d-methadone research program, and Relmada’s focus on the d-methadone program, Relmada is currently limiting the investments in LevoCap ER.

  

BuTab (REL-1028)

 

BuTab (REL-1028) represents a novel formulation of oral, modified release buprenorphine as a potential therapeutic for both chronic pain and opioid dependence. Buprenorphine has been widely used by the sublingual and transdermal routes of administration, but was believed to be ineffective by the oral route because of poor oral bioavailability. We have completed a preclinical program to better define the pharmacokinetic profile of BuTab and to assess the time course of systemic absorption of buprenorphine using several different oral modified release formulations of buprenorphine in dogs, compared to an intravenous administration. Based on the results of this work, we obtained approval from Health Canada and initiated a Phase 1 pharmacokinetic study in healthy volunteers in the second quarter of 2015. This trial was completed in the fourth quarter of 2015. The absolute bioavailability of BuTab relative to intravenous (IV) administration exceeded published data with non-modified buprenorphine when administered orally and compares favorably with a currently marketed transdermal patch. There were no safety or tolerability issues. The data generated by this study will guide formulation optimization and inform the design of subsequent clinical pharmacology studies. BuTab can be developed under the 505(b)(2) regulatory pathway. In light of the promising data generated by Relmada’s d-methadone research program, and Relmada’s focus on the d-methadone program, Relmada is currently limiting the investments in BuTab.

 

MepiGel (REL-1021)

 

MepiGel (REL-1021), is a proprietary topical dosage form of the local anesthetic mepivacaine for the treatment of painful peripheral neuropathies, such as painful diabetic neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia and painful HIV-associated neuropathy. Mepivacaine is an anesthetic (numbing medicine) that blocks the nerve impulses that send pain signals to the brain. It is chemically related to bupivacaine but pharmacologically related to lidocaine. Mepivacaine is currently indicated for infiltration, nerve block and epidural anesthesia. Relmada has received two FDA Orphan Drug Designations for mepivacaine, one each for “the treatment of painful HIV-associated neuropathy” and for “the management of postherpetic neuralgia,” or PHN. We have selected the formulations to be advanced into clinical studies for MepiGel after the evaluation of results from in vitro and ex vivo studies comparing various topical prototypes of mepivacaine that were conducted by MedPharm Ltd, a specialist formulation development company recognized internationally for its expertise in topical and transdermal products. Multiple toxicology studies were successfully conducted and completed in 2015. MepiGel can be developed under the 505(b)(2) regulatory pathway. In light of the promising data generated by Relmada’s d-methadone research program, and Relmada’s focus on the d-methadone program, Relmada is currently limiting the investments in MepiGel.

  

Overview of the 505(b)(2) Pathway

 

Part of our strategy is the utilization of FDA’s 505(b)(2) new drug application process for approval. The 505(b)(2) NDA is one of three FDA drug approval pathways and represents an appealing regulatory strategy for many companies. The pathway was created by the Hatch-Waxman Amendments of 1984, with 505(b)(2) referring to a section of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The provisions of 505(b)(2) were created, in part, to help avoid unnecessary duplication of studies already performed on a previously approved (“reference” or “listed”) drug; the section gives the FDA express permission to rely on data not developed by the NDA applicant.

 

A 505(b)(2) NDA contains full safety and effectiveness reports but allows at least some of the information required for NDA approval, such as safety and efficacy information on the active ingredient, to come from studies not conducted by or for the applicant. This can result in a less expensive and faster route to approval, compared with a traditional development path [such as 505(b)(1)], while creating new, differentiated products with tremendous commercial value.

 

Overview of Orphan Drug Status

 

In accordance with laws and regulations pertaining to the Regulatory Agencies, a sponsor may request that the Regulatory Agencies designate a drug intended to treat a “Rare Disease or Condition” as an “Orphan Drug.” For example, in the United States, a “Rare Disease or Condition” is defined as one which affects less than 200,000 people in the United States, or which affects more than 200,000 people but for which the cost of developing and making available the product is not expected to be recovered from sales of the product in the United States. Upon the approval of the first NDA or BLA for a drug designated as an orphan drug for a specified indication, the sponsor of that NDA or BLA is entitled to 7 years of exclusive marketing rights in the United States unless the sponsor cannot assure the availability of sufficient quantities to meet the needs of persons with the disease. In Europe, this exclusivity is 10 years, and in Australia it is 5 years. However, orphan drug status is particular to the approved indication and does not prevent another company from seeking approval of an off-patent drug that has other labeled indications that are not under orphan or other exclusivities. Orphan drugs may also be eligible for federal income tax credits for costs associated with such as the disease state, the strength and complexity of the data presented, the novelty of the target or compound, risk-management approval and whether multiple rounds of review are required for the agency to evaluate the submission. There is no guarantee that a potential treatment will receive marketing approval or that decisions on marketing approvals or treatment indications will be consistent across geographic areas

  

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Results of Operations

 

For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2019 versus March 31, 2018

 

    Three Months Ended     Three Months Ended        
    March 31,
2019
    March 31,
2018
    Increase
(Decrease)
 
Operating Expenses                  
General and administrative   $ 1,426,000     $ 883,000     $ 543,000  
Research and Development     1,275,900       1,666,900       (391,000 )
Total   $ 2,701,900       2,549,900       152,000  

 

General and Administrative Expense

 

General and administrative expense for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was approximately $1,426,000 compared to $883,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2018, an increase of approximately $543,000. The increased expense resulted from an increase in litigation costs of $254,800; an increase in stock compensation of $226,600; an increase in professional costs of $52,300; and an increase in non-stock compensation of $11,700.

 

Research and Development Expense

 

Research and development expense for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was approximately $1,275,900 compared to $1,666,900 for the three months ended March 31, 2018, a decrease of $391,000. The decrease was driven by a decrease in study costs of $427,600, offset by an increase in compensation costs of $36,600.

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

The change in the fair value of derivative liabilities was $0 for the three months ended March 31, 2019 versus a non-cash unrealized loss of approximately $254,900 for the three months ended March 31, 2018.

 

Interest income for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was $15,900 versus interest expense of $397,100 for March 31, 2018. The decrease in interest expense was due to the extinguishment of the Convertible Promissory Notes on October 18, 2018.

 

Net Loss

 

The net loss for the Company for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 was approximately $(2,686,000) and $(3,201,900), respectively. The Company had net loss per basic and diluted weighted average common share of $(0.09) and $(0.26) for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

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Results of Operations

 

For the Nine months ended March 31, 2019 versus March 31, 2018

 

    Nine months ended     Nine months ended        
    March 31,
2019
    March 31,
2018
    Increase
(Decrease)
 
Operating Expenses                  
General and administrative   $ 4,637,400     $ 3,004,000     $ 1,633,400  
Research and Development     3,954,800       1,983,400       1,971,500  
Total   $ 8,592,200     $ 4,987,400     $ 3,604,900  

 

General and Administrative Expense

 

General and administrative expense for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 was approximately $4,637,400 compared to $3,004,000 for the nine months ended March 31, 2018, an increase of approximately $1,633,400. The increased expense resulted from an increase in legal costs of $1,324,600; an increase in stock compensation of $424,100; and an increase is other G&A costs of $60,600. These were offset by a decrease in professional costs of $164,900 and decrease in non-stock compensation of $9,900.

 

Research and Development Expense

 

Research and development expense for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 was approximately $3,954,800 compared to $1,983,400 for the nine months ended March 31, 2018, an increase of $1,971,500. The increase was driven by an increase in study costs of $1,852,200 and compensation costs of $119,300.

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

The change in the fair value of derivative liabilities was a non-cash unrealized loss for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 of $54,600 vs. a non-cash unrealized gain of $80,500 for the nine months ended March 31, 2018.

 

The loss on extinguishment of debt, a non-cash item, of approximately $3,774,500 for the nine months ended March 31, 2019, versus zero for the nine months ended March 31, 2018, was due to the conversion of outstanding principal and accrued interest on Convertible Promissory Notes into 10,731,669 shares of common stock.

 

Interest expense the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 was $774,100 and $706,500, respectively.

  

Net Loss

 

The net loss for the Company for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 was approximately ($13,195,500) and ($5,610,900) respectively. The Company had net loss per basic and diluted weighted average common share of $(0.58) and $(0.45) for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

  

Liquidity

 

To date, we have financed our operations primarily through issuance of common stock and warrants and subordinated debt (convertible to common stock). Since our inception, we have not generated any product revenue and do not anticipate generating any revenues for the foreseeable future. We have incurred losses from inception to March 31, 2019 of approximately $107,539,800. We have generated negative cash flows from operations since inception. We expect to incur additional losses over the next several years developing our products. These conditions raise substantial doubt as to the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

 

At March 31, 2019, the Company had cash and cash equivalents of approximately $2,053,900. The Company will need to raise additional funds in order to continue its development plans. Insufficient funds may cause us to delay, reduce the scope of or eliminate one or more of our development programs. Our future capital needs and the adequacy of our available funds will depend on many factors, including the cost of clinical studies and other actions needed to obtain regulatory approval of our products in development. If additional funds are required, we may raise such funds from time to time through public or private sales of equity or debt securities or from bank or other loans or through strategic research and development, or licensing. Financing may not be available on acceptable terms, or at all, and our failure to raise capital when needed could materially adversely impact our growth plans and our financial condition or results of operations. Additional equity financing, if available, may be dilutive to our shareholders.

   

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The following table sets forth selected cash flow information for the periods indicated below:

 

    Nine months ended
March 31,
2019
    Nine months ended
March 31,
2018
 
Cash used in operating activities   $ (6,830,800 )   $ (3,735,900 )
Cash used in investing activities     -       (2,600 )
Cash provided by financing activities     6,645,700       6,285,600  
Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents   $ (185,100 )   $ 2,547,100  

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2019, cash used in operating activities was $6,830,800 primarily due to the loss from operations for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 of $13,195,500, offset by loss on promissory note extinguishment of $3,774,500, an increase in accrued expenses of $884,100, and stock compensation costs of 810,500.

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2018, cash used in operating activities was $3,735,900 primarily due to the loss from operations for the nine months ended March 31, 2018 of $5,610.900.

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, cash used in investing activities was $0 and $2,600, respectively, due to purchases of fixed assets.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 was $6,645,700 due to the sale of units. Net cash provided by financing activities for the nine months ended March 31, 2018 was $6,285,600 primarily due to proceeds raised through the promissory note financing.

 

Effects of Inflation

 

Our assets are primarily monetary, consisting of cash and cash equivalents. Because of their liquidity, these assets are not directly affected by inflation. Because we intend to retain and continue to use our equipment, we believe that the incremental inflation related to replacement costs of such items will not materially affect our operations. However, the rate of inflation affects our expenses, such as those for employee compensation and contract services, which could increase our level of expenses and the rate at which we use our resources.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

As part of our ongoing business, we do not participate in transactions that generate relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, such as entities often referred to as structured finance or special purpose entities (SPEs), which would have been established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually limited purposes. As of March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018, we were not involved in any SPE transactions.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

Please refer to Note 12 in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2018 under the heading Commitments and Contingencies. To our knowledge there have been no material changes to the risk factors that were previously disclosed in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2018. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial also may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and/or operating results.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

A critical accounting policy is one that is both important to the portrayal of a company’s financial condition and results of operations and requires management’s most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain.

 

Our unaudited consolidated financial statements are presented in accordance with U.S. GAAP, and all applicable U.S. GAAP accounting standards effective as of March 31, 2019 have been taken into consideration in preparing the unaudited consolidated financial statements. The preparation of unaudited consolidated financial statements requires estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, expenses and related disclosures. Some of those estimates are subjective and complex, and, consequently, actual results could differ from those estimates. The following accounting policies and estimates have been highlighted as significant because changes to certain judgments and assumptions inherent in these policies could affect our consolidated financial statements:

 

  Research and development expenses,
     
  Stock-based compensation expenses; and
     
  Fair value of derivative liabilities

 

We base our estimates, to the extent possible, on historical experience. Historical information is modified as appropriate based on current business factors and various assumptions that we believe are necessary to form a basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities. We evaluate our estimates on an on-going basis and make changes when necessary. Actual results could differ from our estimates.

 

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.

 

There have been no material changes to our exposures to market risks as disclosed under the heading “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risks” in the annual MD&A contained in our Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2018.    

 

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by an issuer in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the issuer’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Based upon our evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective as of March 31, 2019, in ensuring that material information that we are required to disclose in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission rules and forms.

 

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act, during the nine months ended March 31, 2019 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

   

25

 

       

PART II OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

From time to time, the Company may become involved in lawsuits and other legal proceedings that arise in the course of business. Litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and it is not possible to predict the outcome of litigation with total confidence. The Company is not currently aware of any legal proceedings or potential claims against it whose outcome would be likely, individually or in the aggregate, to have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, operating results, or cash flows.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

There have been no material changes to the risk factors under Part I, Item 1A of our Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2018.

 

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS.

 

On March 27, 2019 the Company sold to accredited investors an aggregate of 714,285 shares of common stock and 357,142 warrants pursuant to a private placement transaction. The price per unit was $1.40 and the exercise price of each warrant is $2.25 with a 5 year term. There were no commissions paid. We believe the issuance of the shares and warrants was exempt from  registration  and prospectus delivery requirements of the Securities Act of 1933 by virtue of Section 4(2) and/or Regulation D, Rule 506. The shares were issued directly by us and did not involve a public offering or general solicitation. The recipients of the shares were afforded an opportunity for effective  access  to our files and records that contained the relevant information needed to make their investment decision, including our financial statements and 34 Act reports. We reasonably believed that the recipients, immediately prior to granting the shares and warrants, had such knowledge and experience in our financial and business matters that they were capable of evaluating the merits and risks of their investment. The recipients had the opportunity to speak with our management on several occasions prior to their investment decision.  

 

ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES.

 

None

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1.01 Entry into a Material Definitive Agreement.

 

On May 14, 2019, the Company conducted a closing (the “Closing”) of its private placement of securities (the “Offering”) pursuant to a Unit Purchase Agreement, dated as of May 14, 2019 (the “Purchase Agreement”) and Subscription Agreement, dated as of May 14, 2019 (the “Subscription Agreement), with certain accredited investors named therein (the “Investors”).  Pursuant to the agreements, Investors at the Closing agreed to purchase (i) an aggregate of 2,276,329 shares (the “Shares”) of common stock at $1.50 per share and (ii) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 1,138,161 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $2.25 per share (the “Warrants”). The Company received $3,414,505 in gross proceeds from the sale of securities under the Purchase Agreements at the Closing.

 

As required by the  Purchase Agreements, at the Closings, the Investors also became parties to a Registration Rights Agreement dated as of May 14, 2019 pursuant to which the Company will be required to register with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission such Shares and the shares of Common Stock underlying the Warrants (the “Warrant Shares”).  If the registration statement is not filed or declared effective within the timeframe set forth in the Registration Rights Agreements, the Company is obligated to pay the investors an amount equal to 1% of the total purchase price of the securities per month (up to a maximum of 6% in the aggregate) until such failure is cured.  

  

Alexander Capital, LP (“Alexander Capital”) and Brookline Capital Markets, a Division of CIM Securities, LLC (“Brookline”), each a FINRA registered broker dealer, acted as co-placement placement agents with respect to the Offering. In connection with the Closing, Alexander Capital and Brookline received a cash fee of $79,915 and $151,730, respectively, and warrants to purchase 48,433 shares and 99,000 shares of common stock, respectively, at an exercise price of $1.65 per share and $2.25 per share respectively. Included in the $79,915 cash fee to Alexander Capital,  was a non-accountable 1% expense allowance of $7,265. Included in the $151,730 cash fee to Brookline,  was a non-accountable expense allowance of $3,230.

 

General Information

 

The foregoing is not a complete summary of the terms of the transactions contemplated by the Purchase Agreements and reference is made to the complete text of the Form of Purchase Agreement, Form of Subscription Agreement,  Form of Registration Rights Agreement, and Form of Warrant which are filed as exhibits 10.2, 10.3, 10.4 and 4.1, respectively, to this Company’s Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended March 31, 2019.

   

26

 

      

The securities offered have not been registered for primary sale by the Company under the Securities Act of 1933 and may not be offered or sold in the United States absent registration or an applicable exemption from registration requirements. This Current Report on Form 10-Q shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy, nor shall there be any sale of these securities in any state in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to the registration or qualification under the securities laws of any such state.

 

Item 3.02    Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities.

 

The information contained in Item 1.01 above is incorporated herein by reference in response to this Item 3.02.

 

The Shares and Warrants described were offered and sold solely to “accredited investors” in reliance on the exemption from registration afforded by Rule 506 of Regulation D promulgated under Section 4(2) of the Securities Act.  In connection with the sale of these securities, the Company relied on each investor’s written representations that it was an “accredited investor” as defined in Rule 501(a) of Regulation D.  In addition, neither the Company nor anyone acting on its behalf has offered or sold these securities by any form of general solicitation or general advertising.

 

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

 

Copies of the following documents are included as exhibits to this report pursuant to Item 601 of Regulation S-K

 

Exhibit No.   Title of Document   Location
         
3.1   Certificate of Amendment to Relmada Therapeutics, Inc. Articles of Incorporation, dated April 12, 2019.   Attached
         
4.1   Form of Warrant.  

Attached

         
10.1   Amendment No. 4 to the Relmada Therapeutics, Inc. 2014 Stock Option and Equity Incentive Plan, as amended.   Attached
         
10.2   Form of Unit Purchase Agreement.   Attached
         
10.3   Form of Subscription Agreement.   Attached
         
10.4   Form of Registration Rights Agreement.   Attached
         
31.1   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002   Attached
         
31.2   Certification of the Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002   Attached
         
32.1   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to U.S.C. Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002*   Attached
         
32.2   Certification of the Principal Financial Officer pursuant to U.S.C. Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002*   Attached
         
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document   Attached
         
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Calculation Linkbase Document   Attached
         
101.DEF   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document   Attached
         
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Label Linkbase Document   Attached
         
101.PRE   XBRL Taxonomy Presentation Linkbase Document   Attached

   

* The Exhibit attached to this Form 10-Q shall not be deemed “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”) or otherwise subject to liability under that section, nor shall it be deemed incorporated by reference in any filing under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Exchange Act, except as expressly set forth by specific reference in such filing.

  

27

 

      

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

Date: May 14, 2019 By: /s/ Sergio Traversa
    Sergio Traversa
    Chief Executive Officer and
Interim Chief Financial Officer
   

(Duly Authorized Executive Officer,

Principal Executive Officer and
Principal financial and Accounting Officer)

  

 

28

 

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