UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

  QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the Quarterly Period Ended: May 31, 2021

 

or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the Transition Period from _________ to _________

 

Commission file number: 000-55517

 

PUREBASE CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada   27-2060863
(State or other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 

8631 State Highway 124

Ione, California

  95640
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)

 

(209) 274-9143

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

N/A

(Former address)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading symbol(s)  

Name of exchange on which registered

None   N/A   N/A

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit). Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

       
Large accelerated filer   Accelerated filer
       
Non-accelerated filer   Smaller reporting company
       
    Emerging Growth Company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act: ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No ☒.

 

As of October 12, 2021, there were 215,380,751 shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding.

 

 

 

 
 

 

PUREBASE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

FOR THE QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED MAY 31, 2021

 

  Page
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION   
     
ITEM 1. Financial Statements (unaudited)  
     
  Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of May 31, 2021 and November 30, 2020 3
     
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three and Six Months Ended May 31, 2021 and 2020 (Unaudited) 4
     
  Condensed Consolidated Statement of Changes in Stockholders’ Deficit for the Three and Six Months Ended May 31, 2021 and 2020 (Unaudited) 5
     
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Six Months Ended May 31, 2021 and 2020 6
     
  Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements 7
     
ITEM 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 21
     
ITEM 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 26
     
ITEM 4. Controls and Procedures 26
     
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION   
     
ITEM 1. Legal Proceedings 27
     
ITEM 1A. Risk Factors 28
     
ITEM 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 28
     
ITEM 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities 28
     
ITEM 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 28
     
ITEM 5. Other Information 29
     
ITEM 6. Exhibits 29
     
SIGNATURES 30

 

2
 

 

PUREBASE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(Unaudited)

 

    May 31,     November 30,  
    2021     2020  
             
ASSETS                
                 
Current Assets:                
Cash and cash equivalents   $ 12,890     $ 7,450  
Accounts receivable, net of allowances for uncollectables of $18,277     32,500       2,500  
Prepaid expenses and other assets     1,014       5,390  
Total Current Assets     46,404       15,340  
                 
Property and equipment, net     620,000       620,000  
Right of use asset     24,169       -  
                 
Total Assets   $ 690,573     $ 635,340  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT                
                 
Current Liabilities:                
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   $ 184,249     $ 164,040  
Settlement liability     400,000       400,000  
Lease liability     17,161       -  
Note payable to officer     89,716       127,816  
Due to affiliated entities     281,000       1,091,158  
Convertible notes payable - affiliated entity, net of discount of $27,224     150,776       -  
Notes payable, related party     25,000       25,000  
Total Current Liabilities     1,147,902       1,808,014  
                 
Lease liability, net of current portion     7,408       -  
Convertible notes payable - affiliated entity, net of current portion, and net of discount of $- and $49,000, respectively     1,401,769       129,000  
                 
Total Liabilities     2,557,079       1,937,014  
                 
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 8)                
                 
Stockholders’ Deficit:                
Preferred stock, $.001 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized; 0 and 0 shares issued and outstanding, respectively     -       -  
Common stock, $.001 par value; 520,000,000 shares authorized; 215,380,741 shares issued and outstanding, at May 31, 2021 and November 30, 2020, respectively     144,977       144,547  
Additional paid in capital     11,386,887       11,307,806  
Accumulated deficit     (13,398,370 )     (12,754,027 )
                 
Total Stockholders’ Deficit     (1,866,506 )     (1,301,674 )
                 
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Deficit   $ 690,573     $ 635,340  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

3
 

 

PUREBASE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

    For the Three Months Ended     For the Six Months Ended  
    May 31, 2021     May 31, 2020     May 31, 2021     May 31, 2020  
                         
Revenue, net   $ 30,000     $ 1,619     $ 30,000     $ 6,129  
                                 
Operating Expenses:                                
Selling, general and administrative     412,861       193,456       633,787       355,434  
Product fulfillment     15,594       3,435       17,708       5,194  
Total Operating Expenses     428,455       196,891       651,495       360,628  
                                 
Loss From Operations     (398,455 )     (195,272 )     (621,495 )     (354,499 )
                                 
Other Income (Expense):                                
Other income     23,200       -       23,200       -  
Interest expense, net     (31,088 )     3,226       (46,048 )     6,041  
                                 
Total Other Income (Expense)     (7,888 )     3,226       (22,848 )     6,041  
                                 
Net Loss   $ (406,343 )   $ (192,046 )   $ (644,343 )   $ (348,458 )
                                 
Loss per Common Share - Basic and Diluted   $ (0.00 )   $ (0.00 )   $ (0.00 )   $ (0.00 )
                                 
Weighted Average Shares Outstanding - Basic and Diluted     214,981,071       208,650,741       214,965,990       208,650,741  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

4
 

 

PUREBASE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

FOR THE THREE AND SIX MONTHS ENDED MAY 31, 2021 AND 2020

(Unaudited)

 

    Preferred Stock     Common Stock    

Additional

Paid-in

    Accumulated     Stockholders’  
    Shares     Amount     Shares     Amount     Capital     Deficit     Deficit  
Balance at November 30, 2020       -     $    -       214,950,741     $ 144,547     $ 11,307,806     $ (12,754,027 )   $ (1,301,674 )
                                                         
Stock based compensation - options     -       -       -       -       10,688       -       10,688  
                                                         
Net Loss     -       -       -       -       -       (238,000 )     (238,000 )
                                                         
Balance at February 28, 2021     -       -       214,950,741       144,547       11,318,494       (12,992,027 )     (1,528,986 )
                                                         
Stock based compensation - shares     -       -       430,000       430       24,245       -       24,675  
                                                         
Stock based compensation - options     -       -       -       -       44,148       -       44,148  
                                                         
Net Loss     -       -       -       -       -       (375,753 )     (375,753 )
                                                         
Balance at May 31, 2021     -     $ -       215,380,741     $ 144,977     $ 11,386,887     $ (13,367,780 )   $ (1,866,506 )
                                                         
Balance at November 30, 2019     -       -       208,650,741       138,247       10,364,990       (11,248,870 )     (745,633 )
                                                         
Forgiveness of related party liabilities     -       -       -       -       150,257       -       150,257  
                                                         
Beneficial conversion feature on convertible debt     -       -       -       -       88,250       -       88,250  
                                                         
Net Loss     -       -       -       -       -       (156,412 )     (156,412 )
                                                         
Balance as of February 29, 2020     -       -       208,650,741       138,247       10,603,497       (11,405,282 )     (663,538 )
                                                         
Stock based compensation - options     -       -       -       -       30,335       -       30,335  
                                                         
Net loss     -       -       -       -       -       (192,046 )     (192,046 )
                                                         
Balance as of May 31, 2020     -     $ -       208,650,741     $ 138,247     $ 10,633,832     $ (11,597,328 )   $ (825,249 )

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

5
 

 

PUREBASE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

 

    For the Six Months Ended  
    May 31, 2021     May 31, 2020  
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:                
Net loss   $ (644,343 )   $ (348,458 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:                
Depreciation     -       772  
Stock based compensation     79,511       30,335  
Amortization of debt discount     21,775       17,354  
Settlement liability     -       (50,000 )
Non-cash effect of right of use asset     401       -  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:                
Accounts receivable     (30,000 )     12,700  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets     4,376       (33,332 )
Accounts payable and accrued expenses     42,359       (25,582 )
                 
Net Cash Used In Operating Activities     (525,921 )     (396,211 )
                 
Cash Flows From Financing Activities:                
Bank overdraft     -       53,795  
Advances from related parties     569,461       160,796  
Proceeds from convertible notes payable - affiliated entities     -       178,000  
Payments on notes due to officers     (38,100 )     (4,780 )
                 
Net Cash Provided By Financing Activities     531,361       387,811  
                 
Net Increase (Decrease) In Cash     5,440       (8,400 )
                 
Cash - Beginning of Period     7,450       8,400  
                 
Cash - End of Period   $ 12,890     $ -  
                 
Supplemental Cash Flow Information:                
Cash paid for:                
Interest paid   $ -     $ 4,383.00  
Income taxes paid   $ -     $ -  
Noncash investing and financing activities:                
Forgiveness of accounts payable due to USMC   $ -     $ 150,257  
Vendors paid for on behalf of the Company by USMC   $ 22,150     $ -  
Due to affiliates exchanged for convertible debt   $ 1,401,769     $ -  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

6
 

 

PUREBASE CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Unaudited)

 

Note 1 – organization and business operations

 

Corporate History

 

The Company was incorporated in the State of Nevada on March 2, 2010, under the name Port of Call Online, Inc. to create a web-based service that would offer boaters an easy, convenient, fun, easy to use, online resource to help them plan and organize their boating trips. Pursuant to a corporate reorganization consummated on December 23, 2014, the Company changed its business focus to the identification, acquisition, exploration, development and full-scale exploitation of industrial and natural mineral properties in the United States for the development of products for the construction and agriculture markets. In line with this business focus, the Company changed its name to PureBase Corporation in January 2015.

 

The Company is headquartered in Ione, California.

 

Business Overview

 

The Company, through its two divisions, Purebase Ag and Purebase SCM, is engaged in the agricultural and construction-materials sectors. In the agricultural sector, the Company’s business is to develop specialized fertilizers, sun protectants, soil amendments, and bio-stimulants for organic and non-organic sustainable agriculture.

 

In the construction sector, the Company’s focus in 2020 has been to develop and test a kaolin-based product that will help create a lower CO2-emitting concrete through the use of high-quality SCM’s. The Company is developing a SCM that it believes can potentially replace up to 40% of cement, the most polluting part of concrete. As government agencies continue to enact stricter requirements for less-polluting forms of concrete, the Company believes there are significant opportunities for high-quality SCM poducts in the construction-materials sector.

 

In the agricultural sector, the Company has developed and will seek to develop additional products derived from mineralized materials of leonardite, kaolin clay, laterite, and other natural minerals. These mineral and soil amendments are used to protect crops, plants and fruits from the sun and winter damage, to provide nutrients to plants, and to improve dormancy and soil ecology to help farmers increase the yields of their harvests.

 

The Company is building a brand family under the parent trade name “Purebase,” consisting of its Purebase Shade Advantage WP product, a kaolin-clay based sun protectant for crops. It is also involved in the early testing of soil amendment products based on humic and fulvic acids derived from leonardite. Other agricultural products are in the development stage.

 

The Company utilizes the services of US Mine Corporation (“USMC”), a Nevada corporation, and a significant shareholder of the Company for the development and contract mining of industrial mineral and metal projects throughout North America, exploration drilling, preparation of feasibility studies, mine modeling, on-site construction, production, site reclamation and for product fulfillment. Exploration services include securing necessary permits, environmental compliance, and reclamation plans. In addition, a substantial portion of the minerals to be utilized by the Company is obtained from properties owned or controlled by USMC. A. Scott Dockter and John Bremer are officers, directors, and owners.

 

NOTE 2 – GOING CONCERN AND LIQUIDITY

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the basis that the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. At May 31, 2021, the Company had a significant accumulated deficit of approximately $13,398,000 and working capital deficit of approximately $1,101,000. For the six months ended May 31, 2021, the Company had a loss from operations of approximately $621,000 and negative cash flows from operations of approximately $526,000. The Company’s operating activities consume the majority of its cash resources. The Company anticipates that it will continue to incur operating losses as it executes its development plans for 2021, as well as other potential strategic and business development initiatives. In addition, the Company has had and expects to have negative cash flows from operations, at least into the near future. The Company has previously funded, and plans to continue funding, these losses primarily with additional infusions of cash from advances from an affiliate, the sale of equity, and convertible notes. The accompanying consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

7
 

 

The Company’s plan, through the continued promotion of its services to existing and potential customers, is to generate sufficient revenues to cover its anticipated expenses. The Company is currently exploring several options to meet its short-term cash requirements, including issuances of equity securities or equity-linked securities from third parties.

 

Although no assurances can be given as to the Company’s ability to deliver on its revenue plans or that unforeseen expenses may arise, management currently believes that the revenue to be generated from operations together with equity and debt financing will provide the necessary funding for the Company to continue as a going concern. However, there currently are no arrangements or agreements for such financing and management cannot guarantee any potential debt or equity financing will be available, or if available, on favorable terms. As such, these matters raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for a period of twelve months from the issue date of these this report. If adequate funds are not available on acceptable terms, or at all, the Company will need to curtail operations, or cease operations completely.

 

NOTE 3 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared by the Company pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) including Form 10-Q and Regulation S-X. The information furnished herein reflects all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring accruals and adjustments, unless otherwise indicated) which are, in the opinion of management, necessary to fairly state the operating results for the respective periods. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally present in annual financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) have been omitted pursuant to such rules and regulations. These financial statements and the information included under the heading “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements and explanatory notes for the year ended November 30, 2020 in our Form 10-K filed on March 16, 2021 with the SEC. The results of the three and six months ended May 31, 2021 (unaudited) are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year ending November 30, 2021.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

These unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and wholly-owned subsidiaries PureBase AG and USAM. Intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated upon consolidation.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and equity-based transactions at the date of the financial statements and the revenues and expenses during the reporting period. The Company bases its estimates and assumptions on current facts, historical experience and various other factors that it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities and the accrual of costs and expenses that are not readily apparent from other sources. The actual results experienced by the Company may differ materially and adversely from the Company’s estimates. To the extent there are material differences between the estimates and the actual results, future results of operations will be affected.

 

8
 

 

The Company believes the following critical accounting policies affect its more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements. Significant estimates include the allowance for doubtful accounts, useful lives of property and equipment, deferred tax asset and valuation allowance, assumptions used in Black-Scholes-Merton, or BSM, valuation methods, such as expected volatility, risk-free interest rate, and expected dividend rate.

 

Revenue

 

The Company derives revenues from the sale of its agricultural products. The Company’s contracted transaction price is allocated to each distinct performance obligation and recognized as revenue when, or as, the performance obligation is satisfied. The Company’s contracts have a single performance obligation which are not separately identifiable from other promises in the contracts and is, therefore, not distinct. The Company’s performance obligation is satisfied upon the transfer of risk of loss to the customer.

 

Practical Expedients

 

  As part of ASC Topic 606, the Company has adopted several practical expedients including:
   
Significant Financing Component – the Company does not adjust the promised amount of consideration for the effects of a significant financing component since the Company expects, at contract inception, that the period between when the Company transfers a promised good or service to the customer and when the customer pays for that good or service will be one year or less.
Unsatisfied Performance Obligations – all performance obligations related to contracts with a duration for less than one year, the Company has elected to apply the optional exemption provided in ASC Topic 60 and therefore, is not required to disclose the aggregate amount of transaction price allocated to performance obligations that are unsatisfied or partially satisfied at the end of the reporting period.
Shipping and Handling Activities – the Company elected to account for shipping and handling activities as a fulfillment cost rather than as a separate performance obligation.
Right to Invoice – the Company has a right to consideration from a customer in an amount that corresponds directly with the value to the customer of the Company’s performance completed to date the Company may recognize revenue in the amount to which the entity has a right to invoice.

 

Disaggregated Revenue

 

Revenue consists of the following by product offering for the six months ended May 31, 2021:

 

Humate INU

Advantage

    SHADE ADVANTAGE (WP)     SulFe Hume Si ADVANTAGE     Total  
                             
$ -     $ 30,000     $ -     $ 30,000  

 

Revenue consists of the following by product offering for the six months ended May 31, 2020:

 

Humate INU Advantage    

SHADE

ADVANTAGE (WP)

    SulFe Hume Si ADVANTAGE     Total  
                             
$ 6,129     $ -     $ -     $ 6,129  

 

Cash

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with maturities of three months or less at the time of purchase to be cash equivalents. There are no cash equivalents as of May 31, 2021 and November 30, 2020.

 

9
 

 

Account Receivable

 

The Company periodically assesses its accounts and other receivables for collectability on a specific identification basis. If collectability of an account becomes unlikely, an allowance is recorded for that doubtful account. At May 31, 2021 and November 30, 2020, the Company has determined that an allowance of $18,277 for doubtful accounts was necessary.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are recorded at cost. Depreciation is computed using straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the related assets, generally three to five years. Expenditures that enhance the useful lives of the assets are capitalized and depreciated.

 

Equipment 3-5 years
Autos and trucks 5 years

 

Maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred. At the time of retirement or other disposition of property and equipment, the cost and accumulated depreciation will be removed from the accounts and the resulting gain or loss, if any, will be reflected in operations. The Company currently has $620,000 in property and equipment that it acquired on May 1, 2020. As of May 31, 2021, the Company has not put the acquired property and equipment to use. As such, the Company has not recorded depreciation.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company reviews long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of such assets may not be recoverable. Recoverability of these assets is determined by comparing the forecasted undiscounted net cash flows of the operation to which the assets relate to the carrying amount. If the operation is determined to be unable to recover the carrying amount of its assets, then these assets are written down first, followed by other long-lived assets of the operation to fair value. Fair value is determined based on discounted cash flows or appraised values, depending on the nature of the assets. No impairment losses were recorded during the three and six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

Shipping and Handling

 

The Company incurs shipping and handling costs which are charged back to the customer. There were no shipping and handling costs incurred during the three and six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

Advertising and Marketing Costs

 

The Company expenses advertising and marketing costs as they are incurred. Advertising and marketing expenses were $42,000 and $2,052 for the six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, and $26,000 and $490 for the three months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, and are recorded in selling, general and administrative expenses on the statement of operations.

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

As defined in ASC 820, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures,” fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date (exit price). The Company utilizes market data or assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, including assumptions about risk and the risks inherent in the inputs to the valuation technique. These inputs can be readily observable, market corroborated, or generally unobservable. ASC 820 establishes a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurement) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurement). This fair value measurement framework applies at both initial and subsequent measurement.

 

Level 1: Quoted prices are available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date. Active markets are those in which transactions for the asset or liability occur in sufficient frequency and volume to provide pricing information on an ongoing basis. Level 1 primarily consists of financial instruments such as exchange-traded derivatives, marketable securities and listed equities.

 

10
 

 

Level 2:

Pricing inputs are other than quoted prices in active markets included in Level 1, which are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reported date. Level 2 includes those financial instruments that are valued using models or other valuation methodologies. These models are primarily industry-standard models that consider various assumptions, including quoted forward prices for commodities, time value, volatility factors and current market and contractual prices for the underlying instruments, as well as other relevant economic measures. Substantially all of these assumptions are observable in the marketplace throughout the full term of the instrument, can be derived from observable data or are supported by observable levels at which transactions are executed in the marketplace. Instruments in this category generally include non-exchange-traded derivatives such as commodity swaps, interest rate swaps, options and collars.

 
Level 3: Pricing inputs include significant inputs that are generally less observable from objective sources. These inputs may be used with internally developed methodologies that result in management’s best estimate of fair value.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The carrying value of cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued expenses approximate their fair values based on the short-term maturity of these instruments. The carrying amount of notes approximates the estimated fair value for these financial instruments as management believes that such notes constitute substantially all of the Company’s debt and interest payable on the notes approximates the Company’s incremental borrowing rate.

 

Net Loss Per Common Share

 

Net loss per common share is computed by dividing the net loss by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the year. All outstanding options are considered potential common stock. The dilutive effect, if any, of stock options are calculated using the treasury stock method. All outstanding convertible notes are considered common stock at the beginning of the period or at the time of issuance, if later, pursuant to the if-converted method. Since the effect of common stock equivalents is anti-dilutive with respect to losses, the options have been excluded from the Company’s computation of net loss per common share for the three and six months May 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

The following table summarizes the securities that were excluded from the diluted per share calculation because the effect of including these potential shares was antidilutive due to the Company’s net loss position even though the exercise price could be less than the average market price of the common shares:

 

    Six Months Ended  
    May 31, 2021     May 31, 2020  
             
Convertible Notes     129,117,358       1,112,500  
Stock Options     1,595,000       550,000  
Total     130,712,358       1,662,500  

 

    Three Months Ended  
    May 31, 2021     May 31, 2020  
             
Convertible Notes     129,117,358       1,112,500  
Stock Options     1,595,000       550,000  
Total     130,712,358       1,662,500  

 

11
 

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company applies the provisions of ASC 718, Compensation—Stock Compensation (“ASC 718”), which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense for all stock-based awards made to employees, including employee stock options, in the statements of operations.

 

For stock options issued to employees and members of the Company’s Board of Directors (the “Board”) for their services, the Company estimates the grant date fair value of each option using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The use of the Black-Scholes option pricing model requires management to make assumptions with respect to the expected term of the option, the expected volatility of the Common Stock consistent with the expected life of the option, risk-free interest rates and expected dividend yields of the Common Stock. For awards subject to service-based vesting conditions, including those with a graded vesting schedule, the Company recognizes stock-based compensation expense equal to the grant date fair value of stock options on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting term. Forfeitures are recorded as they are incurred as opposed to being estimated at the time of grant and revised.

 

Pursuant to ASU 2018-07 Compensation – Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting, the Company accounts for stock options issued to non-employees for their services in accordance ASC 718. The Company uses valuation methods and assumptions to value the stock options that are in line with the process for valuing employee stock options noted above.

 

Income Taxes

 

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the consolidated financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets, including tax loss and credit carry forwards, and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

The Company utilizes ASC 740, “Income Taxes,” which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the consolidated financial statements or tax returns. The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method to compute the differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities and the related financial amounts, using currently enacted tax rates. A valuation allowance is recorded when it is “more likely-than-not” that a deferred tax asset will not be realized.

 

For uncertain tax positions that meet a “more likely than not” threshold, the Company recognizes the benefit of uncertain tax positions in the consolidated financial statements. The Company’s practice is to recognize interest and penalties, if any, related to uncertain tax positions in income tax expense in the consolidated statements of operations.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

All other newly issued but not yet effective accounting pronouncements have been deemed to be not applicable or immaterial to the Company.

 

NOTE 4 – MINING RIGHTS

 

Federal Preference Rights Lease in Esmeralda County NV

 

This Preference Rights Lease is granted by the Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”) covering approximately 2,500 acres of land located in the Mount Diablo Meridian area of Nevada. Contained in the leased property is the Chimney 1 Potassium/Sulfur Deposit which consists of 15.5 acres of land fully permitted for mining operation which is situated within the 2,500 acres held by the Company. All rights and obligations under the Preference Rights lease have been assigned to the Company by USMC. These rights were presented at their cost of $200,000. At November 30, 2020, the Company fully impaired the asset. This lease requires a payment of $7,503 per year to the BLM.

 

12
 

 

Snow White Mine located in San Bernardino County, CA – Deposit

 

On November 28, 2014 US Mining and Minerals Corporation entered into a Purchase Agreement in which it agreed to sell its fee simple property interest and certain mining claims to USMC. In contemplation of the Plan and Agreement of Reorganization, on December 1, 2014, USMC, a related party, assigned its rights and obligations under the Purchase Agreement to the Company pursuant to an Assignment of Purchase Agreement. As a result of the Assignment, the Company assumed the purchaser position under the Purchase Agreement. The Purchase Agreement involves the sale of approximately 280 acres of mining property containing 5 placer mining claims known as the Snow White Mine located near Barstow, California in San Bernardino County. The property is covered by a Conditional Use Permit allowing the mining of the property and a Plan of Operation and Reclamation Plan has been approved by San Bernardino County and the BLM. An initial deposit of $50,000 was paid to escrow, and the Purchase Agreement required the payment of an additional $600,000 at the end of the escrow period. There was a delay in the original seller, Joseph Richard Matthewson, receiving a clear title to the property and a fully permitted project, both of which were conditions to closing. In light of the foregoing, and the payment of an additional $25,000, the parties agreed to extend the closing. Due to delays in the Company securing the necessary funding to close the purchase of the Snow White Mine property, John Bremer, a shareholder and a director of the Company, paid $575,000 to acquire the property on or about October 15, 2015. Mr. Bremer will transfer title to the Company when the Company pays Mr. Bremer $575,000 plus expenses, however, the Company is under no obligation to do so. The mining claims require a minimum royalty payment of $3,500 per year to be made by the Company.

 

During the year ended November 30, 2017, USMC, agreed to offset the $75,000 deposit against money owed to USMC. As a result, the purchase price is $650,000 plus expenses. Mr. Bremer has not restricted the Company from continuing its exploration on or access to the Snow White mine property.

 

On September 5, 2019, the Board approved the discontinuance of all mining and related activities at the Snow White project. The Company has no further obligation related to this project.

 

On April 1, 2020, the Company entered into a purchase and sale agreement with the Bremer Family 1995 Living Trust, a related party through 19% beneficial ownership of the Company, pursuant to which the Company will purchase the Snow White Mine for $836,000 (the “Purchase Price”). The Purchase Price plus 5% interest shall be payable in full in cash at the closing which can occur at any time before April 1, 2022. As of May 31, 2021, the Company has yet to close on the purchase.

 

NOTE 5 – NOTES PAYABLE

 

Bayshore Capital Advisors, LLC

 

On February 26, 2016, the Company issued a promissory note to Bayshore Capital Advisors, LLC, an affiliate through common ownership of a 10% major shareholder of the Company, for $25,000 for working capital at an interest rate of 6% per annum. The note was payable August 26, 2016, or when the Company closes a bridge financing, whichever occurs first. The Company is in default on this note at May 31, 2021. The balance on the note was $25,000 as of May 31, 2021 and November 30, 2020. See (Note 10). Total interest expense on the note was $748 and $752 for the six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Total interest expense on the note was $370 for the three months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

A. Scott Dockter – President and Chief Executive Officer

 

On August 31, 2017, the Company issued a note in the amount of $197,096 to A. Scott Dockter, President, CEO and a director of the Company, to consolidate the total amounts due to Mr. Dockter. The note to Mr. Dockter bears interest at 6% and is due upon demand. During the six months ended May 31, 2021, the Company repaid $38,100 towards the outstanding balance of the note. The balance on the note was $89,716 and $127,816 as of May 31, 2021 and November 30, 2020, respectively (See Note 11). Total interest expense on the note was $3,368 and $4,834 for the six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Total interest expense on the note was $1,500 and $2,916 for the three months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

13
 

 

Convertible Promissory Notes – USMC

 

December 1, 2019

 

On December 1, 2019, in connection with the September 26, 2019, securities purchase agreement with USMC, a related party, (See Note 12), the Company issued a two-year convertible promissory note in the amount of $20,000 to USMC, with a maturity date of December 31, 2021 (“Tranche #1”). The note bears interest at 5% per annum which is payable on maturity. Amounts due under the note may be converted into shares of the Company’s common stock, $0.001 par value, at any time at the option of the holder, at a conversion price of $0.16 per share.

 

The issuance of Tranche #1 resulted in a discount from the beneficial conversion feature totaling $20,000. Total straight-line amortization of this discount totaled $2,417 and $4,783 for the three and six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Total interest expense on Tranche #1 was approximately $250 and $500 for the three and six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

January 1, 2020

 

On January 1, 2020, in connection with the September 26, 2019, securities purchase agreement with USMC, a related party, (See Note 11), the Company issued a two-year convertible promissory note in the amount of $86,000 to USMC, with a maturity date of January 1, 2022 (“Tranche #2”). The note bears interest at 5% per annum which is payable on maturity. Amounts due under the note may be converted into shares of the Company’s common stock, $0.001 par value, at any time at the option of the Holder, at a conversion price of $0.16 per share.

 

The issuance of Tranche #2 resulted in a discount from the beneficial conversion feature totaling $32,250. Total straight-line amortization of this discount totaled $8,029 and $6,662 for the six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Total straight-line amortization of this discount totaled $4,059 for the three months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020. Total interest expense on Tranche #2 was approximately $2,100 and $1,780 for the six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Total interest expense on Tranche #2 was approximately $1,040 and $1,080 for the three months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

February 1, 2020

 

On February 1, 2020, in connection with the September 26, 2019, securities purchase agreement with USMC, a related party, (See Note 11), the Company issued a two-year convertible promissory note in the amount of $72,000 to USMC, with a maturity date of February 1, 2022 (“Tranche #3”). The note bears interest at 5% per annum which is payable on maturity. Amounts due under the note may be converted into shares of the Company’s common stock, $0.001 par value, at any time at the option of the Holder, at a conversion price of $0.16 per share.

 

The issuance of Tranche #3 resulted in a discount from the beneficial conversion feature totaling $36,000. Total straight-line amortization of this discount totaled $8,963 and $5,910 for the six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Total straight-line amortization of this discount totaled $4,531 for the three months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020. Total interest expense on Tranche #3 was approximately $1,785 and $1,200 for the six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Total interest expense on Tranche #3 was approximately $900 for the three months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

December 1, 2020

 

On December 1, 2020, in connection with the September 26, 2019 securities purchase agreement with USMC, a related party, (See Note 11), the Company issued a two-year convertible promissory note in the amount of $822,000 to USMC, with a maturity date of November 25, 2022 (“Tranche 4”). The note bears interest at 5% per annum which is payable on maturity. Amounts due under the note may be converted into shares of the Company’s common stock at any time at the option of the noteholder, at a conversion price of $0.16 per share. Total interest expense on Tranche #4 was approximately $10,100 and $20,300 for the three and six months ended May 31, 2021, respectively.

 

14
 

 

March 17, 2021

 

On March 17, 2021, in connection with the March 11, 2021 securities purchase agreement with USMC, a related party, (See Note 11), the Company issued a two-year convertible promissory note in the amount of $579,769 to USMC, with a maturity date of March 17, 2023 (“Tranche #5”). The note bears interest at 5% per annum which is payable on maturity. Amounts due under the note may be converted into shares of the Company’s common stock at any time at the option of the noteholder, at a conversion price of $0.088 per share. Total interest on Tranche #5 was approximately $5,800 for the three and six months ended May 31, 2021.

 

Convertible Promissory Note – US Mine, LLC

 

On May 27, 2021, in connection with the Materials Extraction Agreement (the “Extraction Agreement”) with US Mine, LLC, a related party, (See Note 11), the Company issued a ten-year convertible promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000,000 to US Mine, LLC (the “US Mine Note”). The US Mine Note bears interest at 2.5% per annum which is payable upon maturity. Amounts due under the US Mine Note may be converted into shares of the Company’s common stock at the option of the noteholder, at a conversion price of $0.43 per share. The noteholder may convert (i) up to 50% of the outstanding balance on or after such date as the Company is listed for trading on any national securities exchange, (ii) up to an additional 25% of the outstanding balance on or after the six-month anniversary of the initial trading date on such national securities exchange, and (iii) the remaining 25% on or after the twelve-month anniversary of the initial trading date. Total interest on the US Mine Note was approximately $10,300 for the three and six months ended May 31, 2021.

 

NOTE 6 – ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND ACCRUED EXPENSES

 

Accounts payable and accrued expenses consist of the following amounts:

 

    May 31, 2021     November 30, 2020  
             
Accounts payable   $ 77,988     $ 84,600  
Accrued interest – related party     81,800       39,948  
Accrued compensation     21,138       39,492  
Accrued expenses     3,323       -  
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   $ 184,249     $ 164,040  

 

NOTE 7 – LEASES

 

With the adoption of ASC 842, operating lease agreements are required to be recognized on the balance sheet as Right-of-Use (“ROU”) assets and corresponding lease liabilities.

 

The Company is a party to a two-year lease, with USMC, a related party, for 1,000 square feet of office space located in Ione, California (the “Ione Lease”) with respect to its corporate operations (See Note 11). The Ione Lease expires in November 2022 (subject to automatic extensions of one month) and has an annual base rental during the initial term of $1,500.

 

On December 1, 2020, the Company recognized ROU assets and lease liabilities of $35,543. The Company elected to not recognize ROU assets and lease liabilities arising from short-term office leases (leases with initial terms of twelve months or less, which are deemed immaterial) on its balance sheets.

 

When measuring lease liabilities for leases that were classified as operating leases, the Company discounted lease payments using its estimated incremental borrowing rate at December 1, 2020. The weighted average incremental borrowing rate applied was 5%.

 

The following table presents net lease cost and other supplemental lease information:

 

   

Six Months Ended

May 31, 2021

 
Lease cost        
Operating lease cost (cost resulting from lease payments)   $ 9,000  
Short term lease cost     -  
Sublease income     -  
Net lease cost   $ 9,000  
         
Operating lease – operating cash flows (fixed payments)   $ 9,000  
Operating lease – operating cash flows (liability reduction)   $ 8,265  
Non-current leases – right of use assets   $ 24,169  
Current liabilities – operating lease liabilities   $ 17,161  
Non-current liabilities – operating lease liabilities   $ 7,407  

 

Future minimum payments under non-cancelable leases for operating leases for the remaining terms of the leases following the six months ended May 31, 2021:

 

Fiscal Year   Operating Leases  
Remainder of 2021   $ 9,000  
2022     16,500  
Total future minimum lease payments     25,500  
Amount representing interest     (932 )
Present value of net future minimum lease payments   $ 24,568  

 

NOTE 8 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Mineral Properties

 

The Company’s mineral rights require various annual lease payments (See Note 4).

 

Legal Matters

 

On July 8, 2020, former Chief Financial Officer, Al Calvanico (“Calvanico”), filed a demand for arbitration alleging retaliation, wrongful termination, and demand for a minimum amount of $600,000 in alleged stock value, plus interest, recovery of past and future wages, attorneys’ fees, and punitive damages (collectively, the “Calvanico Claims”). The Company denied all Calvanico Claims. The Company believes Calvanico is owed nothing because it takes the position that Calvanico was not terminated, but rather, his employment contract expired on September 21, 2019 in the normal course, and was not renewed by Company and because Calvanico never exercised his stock options. On February 14, 2020, the Company requested in writing that Calvanico exercise his stock options within 30 days. Calvanico failed to do so. To date, Calvanico has not exercised his stock options. This dispute is currently in the midst of the arbitration discovery phase. An arbitration hearing date has been scheduled for January 24, 2022.

 

15
 

 

On January 11, 2019, the Company filed a complaint in the Nevada District Court for Washoe County (Case # CV19-00097) against Agregen International Corp (“Agregen”) and Robert Hurtado alleging the misuse of proprietary and confidential information acquired by Mr. Hurtado while employed by the Company as VP of Agricultural Research and Development. Mr. Hurtado was terminated in March 2018 and since that time the Company alleges that he conspired with Agregen to improperly use proprietary and confidential information to compete with the Company which constitute breaches of the non-compete and confidentiality provisions of his employment agreement with the Company. The Company is seeking $100,000,000 in monetary damages. On March 14, 2019 Agregen and Mr. Hurtado filed an answer to the Company’s Complaint that the allegations were false. An Early Case Conference was held on April 26, 2019 and a pre-trial conference was held on July 10, 2019. On March 13, 2020, the Company filed a First Amended Complaint, adding Todd Gauer and John Gingerich as additional defendants. A default has been taken against Mr. Gingerich. Litigation is actively proceeding against Mr. Hurtado, Mr. Gauer, and Agregen. The June 2021 trial date was postponed due to Covid-related delays but is in the process of being rescheduled.

 

On March 29, 2019, the Company was served with a complaint filed by Superior Soils Supplements LLC (“Superior Soils”) in the Superior Court of the State of California in and for the County of Kings (Case #19C-0124) relating to 64 truckloads of soil amendments delivered to a customer by the Company on behalf of Superior Soils. Superior Soils alleged that the soil amendments were not labeled correctly requiring the entire shipment of product to be returned to the Company. The complaint alleges breach of contract, misrepresentations, fraudulent concealment and unfair competition. The complaint seeks damages of approximately $300,000. The Company filed its answer on May 6, 2019, denying responsibility for the mis-labelling and denying any liability for damages therefrom. The parties are currently in settlement negotiations. The Company believes its potential exposure to be approximately $400,000 and, as such, has accrued this amount on the unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheet at May 31, 2021.

 

On April 16, 2021, LexisNexis, a division of RELX, Inc., filed a Complaint against the Company and its former attorney, Michael Kessler, Esq., in the Superior Court of the State of California, Amador County (Case No. 21-CV-12123). This is a limited jurisdiction lawsuit seeking payment of $18,211. The basis of the Complaint is that Mr. Kessler incurred this debt to LexisNexis, a legal research company. Mr. Kessler is alleged to have failed to pay the annual bill. After the matter was sent to collections, it is the Company’s understanding that Mr. Kessler claimed that he was employed by the Company as its general counsel at the time and that Purebase is therefore responsible for payment. The Company strongly disputes this characterization and maintains that it has no obligation to LexisNexis under the facts or the law. The Company and LexisNexis are engaged in settlement negotiations. The Company believes its potential exposure to be $0 and that the lawsuit will be dismissed.

 

Contractual Matters

 

USMC

 

On November 1, 2013, the Company entered into an agreement with USMC, a related party, under which USMC performs services relating to various technical evaluations and mine development for various mining properties/rights owned by the Company. Terms of services and compensation are determined for each project undertaken by USMC.

 

On October 12, 2018, the Board approved a material supply agreement with USMC, a related party, pursuant to which USMC provides designated natural resources to the Company at predetermined prices (See Note 11).

 

NOTE 9 – STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

 

Equity Transactions During the Period

 

During the six months ended May 31, 2021, the Company issued an aggregate of 350,000 shares of common stock with a fair value range between $0.07 and $0.15 per share to an investment banking firm pursuant to an investment banking agreement for services rendered to the Company.

 

During the six months ended May 31, 2021, the Company issued 80,000 shares of common stock with a fair value of $0.15 per share to a director pursuant to a directors agreement for services rendered.

 

Note 10 – StocK-BASED COMPENSATION

 

The Company accounted for its stock-based compensation in accordance with the fair value recognition provisions of FASB ASC Topic 718, “Compensation – Stock Compensation.”

 

2017 Equity Incentive Plan

 

On November 10, 2017 the Board approved the 2017 PureBase Corporation Stock Option Plan which is intended to be a qualified stock option plan (the “Option Plan”). The Board reserved 10,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to be issued pursuant to options granted under the Option Plan. The Option Plan was subsequently approved by shareholders on September 28, 2018. As of May 31, 2021, options to purchase an aggregate of 50,000 shares of common stock have been granted under the Option Plan.

 

The Company has also granted options to purchase an aggregate of 500,000 shares of common stock pursuant to employment contracts with certain employees prior to the adoption of the Option Plan.

 

The Company granted options to purchase 250,000 shares of common stock during the six months ended May 31, 2021.

 

The Company granted options to purchase an aggregate of 450,000 shares of common stock during the six months ended May 31, 2020.

 

16
 

 

The weighted average grant date fair value of options granted and vested during the six months ended May 31, 2021 was $36,708 and $19,481, respectively. The weighted average grant date fair value of options granted and vested during the six months ended May 31, 2020, was $23,905 and $27,088, respectively. The weighted average non-vested grant date fair value of non-vested options was $32,030 at May 31, 2021.

 

Compensation based stock option activity for qualified and unqualified stock options are summarized as follows:

 

          Weighted  
          Average  
    Shares     Exercise Price  
Outstanding at November 30, 2020     1,345,000     $ 1.18  
Granted     250,000       0.10  
Exercised     -       -  
Expired or cancelled     -       -  
Outstanding at May 31, 2021     1,595,000       1.01  

 

The following table summarizes information about options to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock outstanding and exercisable at May 31, 2021:

 

            Weighted-     Weighted-        
            Average     Average        
Range of     Outstanding     Remaining Life     Exercise     Number  
exercise prices     Options     In Years     Price     Exercisable  
                           
$ 0.099       400,000       3.14     $ 0.099       200,000  
  0.10       645,000       4.29       0.10       350,000  
  0.12       50,000       7.32       0.12       50,000  
  3.00       500,000       5.76       3.00       500,000  
          1,595,000       4.24     $ 1.01       1,100,000  

 

The compensation expense attributed to the issuance of the options is recognized as they are vested.

 

The stock options granted under the Option Plan are exercisable for ten years from the grant date and vest over various terms from the grant date to three years.

 

On April 8, 2020, the Company granted a director an option to purchase 250,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share and a fair value of $27,088. The options vest immediately at the grant date. The options were valued using the Black-Scholes option pricing model under the following assumptions: stock price - $0.11; strike price - $0.10; expected volatility – 305%; risk-free interest rate – 0.47%; dividend rate – 0%; and expected term – 2.50 years.

 

On April 15, 2020, the Company granted two advisory board members options to purchase an aggregate of 200,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share and a fair value of $19,481. The options vest one year from the date of grant. The options were valued using the Black-Scholes option pricing model under the following assumptions: stock price - $0.099; strike price - $0.10; expected volatility – 304%; risk-free interest rate – 0.34%; dividend rate – 0%; and expected term – 2.50 years.

 

On April 8, 2021, the Company granted a director an option to purchase 250,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share and a fair value of $36,708. These options vest one year from the grant date. The options were valued using the Black-Scholes option pricing model under the following assumptions: stock price - $0.15; strike price - $0.10; expected volatility – 281%; risk-free interest rate – 0.85%; dividend rate – 0%; and expected term – 2.50 years.

 

17
 

 

The aggregate intrinsic value totaled $448,350 and was based on the Company’s closing stock price of $0.51 as of May 31, 2021, which would have been received by the option holders had all option holders exercised their options as of that date.

 

Total compensation expense related to the options was $44,148 and $54,836 for the three months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Total compensation expense related to the options was $24,246 and $30,335 for the six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. As of May 31, 2021, there was $36,428 in future compensation cost related to non-vested stock options.

 

NOTE 11 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

Bayshore Capital Advisors, LLC

 

On February 26, 2016, the Company issued a promissory note in the principal amount of $25,000 with an interest rate of 6% per annum to Bayshore Capital Advisors, LLC, an affiliate through common ownership of a 10% shareholder of the Company for working capital purposes. The note was payable August 26, 2016, or when the Company closes a bridge financing, whichever occurs first. The Company is in default on this note at May 31, 2021.

 

US Mine Corporation

 

The Company entered into a contract mining agreement with USMC, a company owned by the majority stockholders of the Company, A. Scott Dockter and John Bremer, pursuant to which USMC will provide various technical evaluations and mine development services to the Company. During the three and six months ended May 31, 2021 the Company made $12,000 in purchases from USMC. During the three and six months ended May 31, 2020, the Company did not make any purchases from USMC. No services were rendered by USMC for the three and six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020. In addition, during the three and six months ended May 31, 2021, USMC paid $22,150 to the Company’s vendors and creditors on behalf of the Company which is recorded as part of due to affiliates on the Company’s unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheets. During the three and six months ended May 31, 2020, USMC made no payment to the Company’s vendors and creditors on behalf of the Company. During the three and six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, USMC made cash advances to the Company of $316,000 and $558,077 and $33,000 and $125,000, respectively, which are recorded as part of due to affiliates on the Company’s unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheets. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company and USMC converted an aggregate of $1,401,769 of outstanding payables into two convertible notes (See Note 5). The balance due to USMC was $269,616 and $1,091,158 at May 31, 2021 and November 30, 2020, respectively.

 

On September 26, 2019, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement with USMC pursuant to which USMC may purchase up to $1,000,000 of the Company’s 5% unsecured convertible two-year promissory notes in one or more closings. The notes are convertible into the Company’s common stock at a conversion price of $0.16 per share. As of May 31, 2021, USMC has purchased notes totaling $1,000,000 with maturity dates ranging from December 1, 2021 through November 25, 2022 (See Note 5). Interest expense on these notes totaled $12,466 and $3,461 for the three months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Interest expense on these notes totaled $24,795 and $3,461 for the six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, and is recorded as part of accrued expenses on the unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

On November 25, 2020, the Company entered a securities purchase agreement with USMC pursuant to which USMC may purchase up to $2,000,000 of the Company’s 5% unsecured two-year promissory notes in one or more closings. The notes are convertible into the Company’s common stock at a conversion price of $0.088 per share. As of May 31, 2021, USMC has purchased notes totaling $579,8769 with a maturity date of March 17, 2023 (See Note 5). Interest expense on these notes totaled $5,877 for the three and six months ended May 31, 2021 and is recorded as part of accrued expenses on the unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

The outstanding balance due on the above notes to USMC is $1,579,769 and $178,000 at May 31, 2021 and November 30, 2020, respectively.

 

18
 

 

On April 22, 2020, the Company entered into a Material Supply Agreement (the “Supply Agreement”) with USMC which amended the prior Materials Supply Agreement entered into on October 12, 2018. All kaolin clay purchased by the Company from USMC under the Supply Agreement must be used exclusively for agricultural products and supplementary cementitious materials. Under the terms of the Supply Agreement, the Company will pay $25 per ton for the kaolin clay for supplementary cementitious materials and $145 per ton for bagged products for clay for agriculture (in each case plus an additional $5 royalty fee per ton). The Supply Agreement also provides that if USMC provides pricing to any other customer which is more favorable than that provided to the Company, USMC shall adjust the cost to the Company to conform to the more favorable terms. The initial term of the Agreement is three years, which automatically renews for three successive one-year terms, unless either party provides notice of termination at least sixty days prior to the end of the then current term. Either party has the right to terminate the Agreement for a material breach which is not cured within 90 days.

 

US Mine LLC

 

On May 27, 2021, the Company entered into the Extraction Agreement with US Mine LLC, pursuant to which the Company acquired the right to extract up to 100,000,000 of certain raw clay materials. The Extraction Agreement is effective until 100,000,000 tons of material are extracted. As compensation for such right the Company issued a ten-year convertible promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000,000 to US Mine, LLC (the “US Mine Note”). The US Mine Note bears interest at the rate of 2.5% per annum which is payable upon maturity. Amounts due under the US Mine Note may be converted into shares of the Company’s common stock at the option of the noteholder, at a conversion price of $0.43 per share. The noteholder may convert (i) up to 50% of the outstanding balance on or after such date as the Company’s common stock is listed for trading on any national securities exchange, (ii) up to an additional 25% of the outstanding balance on or after the six-month anniversary of such initial trading date, and (iii) the remaining 25% on or after the twelve-month anniversary of such initial trading date. In addition, the Company will pay US Mine LLC a royalty fee of $5.00 per ton of materials extracted and any royalty not paid in a timely manner with be subject to 15% interest per annum and compounded monthly.

 

Subsequent to May 31, 2021, on October 6, 2021, and prior to consummation of activities under the Extraction Agreement, the Company and US Mine executed an amendment to the Extraction Agreement (the “Amendment”) (See Note 13). Pursuant to the Amendment, the Note was cancelled and an option to purchase an aggregate of 116,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.38 per share until April 6, 2028 was issued to US Mine as compensation. Shares subject to the option vest as to 58,000,000 shares on April 6, 2022, 29,000,000 shares on October 6, 2022, and 29,000,000 shares on April 6, 2023.

 

Leases

 

On October 1, 2020 the Company entered into a two-year lease agreement for its office space with USMC with a monthly rent of $1,500 (See Note 7).

 

Transactions with Officers

 

On August 31, 2017, the Company issued a note in the amount of $197,096 to Arthur Scott Dockter, President, CEO and a director of the Company to consolidate the total amounts due to and assumed by Mr. Dockter. The note bears interest at 6% and is due upon demand. During the six months ended May 31, 2021, the Company repaid $38,100 towards the balance of the note. As of May 31, 2021 and November 30, 2020, the principal balance due on this note was $89,716 and $127,816, respectively, and is recorded as Note Payable to Officer on the unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheet. Total interest expense on the note was $3,368 and $4,834 for the six months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Total interest expense on the note was $1,500 and $2,916 for the three months ended May 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

NOTE 12 – CONCENTRATION OF CREDIT RISK

 

Cash Deposits

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk consist principally of cash deposits. Accounts at each institution are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to $250,000. As of May 31, 2021 and November 30, 2020, the Company had no deposits in excess of the FDIC insured limit.

 

Revenues

 

One customer accounted for 100% of total revenue for the six months ended May 31, 2021.

 

Three customers accounted for 100% of total revenue for the six months ended May 31, 2020, as set forth below:

 

Customer A     74 %
Customer B     16 %
Customer C     10 %

 

Accounts Receivable

 

One customer accounted for 92% of the accounts receivable as of May 31, 2021.

 

Two customers accounted for 100% of the accounts receivable as of November 30, 2020, as set forth below:

 

Customer A     80 %
Customer B     20 %

 

19
 

 

Vendors

 

Three vendors accounted for 84% of purchases as of May 31, 2021, as set forth below:

 

Vendor A     57 %
Vendor B – related party     15 %
Vendor C     11 %

 

One supplier accounted for 85% of purchases as of November 30, 2020.

 

NOTE 13 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

On October 6, 2021, prior to the consummation of activities under the Extraction Agreement, the Company and US Mine executed an amendment to the Extraction Agreement (the “Amendment”). Pursuant to the Amendment, the US Mine Note was cancelled and an option to purchase an aggregate of 116,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.38 per share until April 6, 2028, was issued to US Mine as compensation. Shares subject to the option vest as to 58,000,000 shares on April 6, 2022, 29,000,000 shares on October 6, 2022, and 29,000,000 shares on April 6, 2023.

 

20
 

 

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q includes forward-looking statements that reflect management’s current views with respect to future events and financial performance. Forward-looking statements are statements in respect of future events or our future financial performance. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “should,” “expects,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential” or “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. These statements include statements regarding the intent, belief or current expectations of us and members of our management team, as well as the assumptions on which such statements are based. Prospective investors are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risk and uncertainties, and that actual results may differ materially from those contemplated by such forward-looking statements. These statements are only predictions and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, including the risks set forth in the section entitled “Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended November 30, 2020, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on March 16, 2021, any of which may cause our company’s or our industry’s actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied in our forward-looking statements. These risks and factors include, by way of example and without limitation:

 

  absence of contracts with customers or suppliers;
  our ability to maintain and develop relationships with customers and suppliers;
  the impact of competitive products and pricing;
  supply constraints or difficulties;
  the retention and availability of key personnel;
  general economic and business conditions;
  business interruptions resulting from geo-political actions, including war, and terrorism or disease outbreaks (such as the outbreak of COVID-19, or the novel coronavirus);
  substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern;
  our ability to successfully implement our business plan;
  our need to raise additional funds in the future;
  our ability to successfully recruit and retain qualified personnel in order to continue our operations;
  our ability to successfully acquire, develop or commercialize new products;
  the commercial success of our products;
  the impact of any industry regulation;
  our ability to develop existing mining projects or establish proven or probable reserves;
  our dependence on once vendor for our minerals for our products;
  the impact of potentially losing the rights to properties; and
  the impact of the increase in the price of natural resources.

 

We undertake no obligation to update or revise forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances occurring after the date of this Quarterly Report, except as required by law.

 

As used in this Quarterly Report and unless otherwise indicated, the terms “Company,” “we,” “us,” and “our,” refer to PureBase Corporation and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, PureBase Agricultural, Inc., a Nevada corporation (“PureBase AG”) and U.S. Agricultural Minerals, LLC, a Nevada limited liability company (“USAM”).

 

Business Overview

 

The Company, through its two divisions, Purebase Ag and Purebase SCM, is engaged in the agricultural and construction-materials sectors.

 

In the agricultural sector, the Company’s business is to develop specialized fertilizers, sun protectants, soil amendments, and bio-stimulants for organic and non-organic sustainable agriculture.

 

21
 

 

In the construction sector, the Company’s focus since 2020 has been to develop and test a kaolin-based product that will help create a lower CO2-emitting concrete through the use of high-quality SCM’s. The Company is developing a SCM that it believes can potentially replace up to 40% of cement, the most polluting part of concrete. As government agencies continue to enact stricter requirements for less-polluting forms of concrete, the Company believes there are significant opportunities for high-quality SCM products in the construction-materials sector.

 

In the agricultural sector, the Company has developed and will seek to develop additional products derived from mineralized materials of leonardite, kaolin clay, laterite, and other natural minerals. These mineral and soil amendments are used to protect crops, plants and fruits from the sun and winter damage, to provide nutrients to plants, and to improve dormancy and soil ecology to help farmers increase the yields of their harvests.

 

The Company is building a brand family under the parent trade name “Purebase,” consisting of its Purebase Shade Advantage WP product, a kaolin-clay based sun protectant for crops. It is also involved in the early testing of soil amendment products based on humic and fulvic acids derived from leonardite. Other agricultural products are in the development stage.

 

The Company utilizes the services of US Mine Corporation, a Nevada corporation (“USMC”), and a significant shareholder of the Company for the development and contract mining of industrial mineral and metal projects throughout North America, exploration drilling, preparation of feasibility studies, mine modeling, on-site construction, production, site reclamation and for product fulfillment. Exploration services include securing necessary permits, environmental compliance, and reclamation plans. In addition, a substantial portion of the minerals to be utilized by the Company is obtained from properties owned or controlled by USMC. A. Scott Dockter and John Bremer are officers, directors, and owners of USMC.

 

Recent Developments

 

Minerals Extraction Agreement and Convertible Debt – US Mine LLC

 

On May 27, 2021, the Company entered in a Materials Extraction Agreement (the “Extraction Agreement”) with US Mine LLC, a California limited liability company (“US Mine”), pursuant to which the Company acquired the right to extract up to 100,000,000 of metakaolin supplementary cementitious materials (“SCM”) from property owned by US Mine in Ione, California (the “Property”), for a purchase price of $50,000,000, which was paid through the Company’s issuance to US Mine of a ten-year convertible promissory note (the “Note”) in the principal amount of $50,000,000. The Extraction Agreement will remain in effect until such time as 100,000,000 tons of SCM have been extracted from the Property, or the Extraction Agreement is sooner terminated.

 

On October 6, 2021, prior to the consummation of activities under the Extraction Agreement, the Company and US Mine executed an amendment to the Extraction Agreement (the “Amendment”). Pursuant to the Amendment, the Note was cancelled and an option to purchase an aggregate of 116,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.38 per share until April 6, 2028, was issued to US Mine as compensation. Shares subject to the option vest as to 58,000,000 shares on April 6, 2022, 29,000,000 shares on October 6, 2022, and 29,000,000 shares on April 6, 2023.

 

In addition, the Company will pay US Mine LLC a royalty fee of $5.00 per ton of materials extracted and any royalty not paid in a timely manner will be subject to 15% interest per annum and compounded monthly.

 

A. Scott Dockter, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and a director, and John Bremer, a director, are also owners and manager members of US Mine.

 

Results of Operations

 

Comparison of the Three Months Ended May 31, 2021 and the Three Months Ended May 31, 2020

 

A comparison of the Company’s operating results for the three months ended May 31, 2021 and May 31, 2020 are summarized as follows:

 

    May 31,     May 31,        
    2021     2020     Variance  
Revenues   $ 30,000     $ 1,619     $ 28,381  
Operating expenses:                        
Selling, general & administrative     412,861       193,456       219,405  
Product fulfillment, exploration and mining     15,594       3,435       12,159  
Loss from operations     (398,455 )     (195,272 )     (194,183 )
Other income (expense)     (7,888 )     3,226       (11,114 )
Net Loss   $ (406,343 )   $ (192,046 )   $ (214,297 )

 

22
 

 

Revenues

 

Revenue increased by $28,381, or 1,752%, for the three months ended May 31, 2021 as compared to the three months ended May 31, 2020, primarily due to the Company’s clients not buying product during the three months ended May 31, 2020 due to buying more than they anticipated needing in prior periods.

 

Operating Costs and Expenses

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased by $219,405, or 113%, for the three months ended May 31, 2021, as compared to the three months ended May 31, 2020, due to an increase of approximately (i) $38,000 in stock based compensation, (ii) $26,000 in advertising and marketing costs, (iii) $140,000 in payroll expenses resulting primarily from the Company hiring a chief financial officer and additional workforce.

 

Product fulfillment and exploration and mining expenses for the three months ended May 31, 2021 increased by $12,159, or 353%, as compared to the three months ended May 31, 2020, primarily due to the increase in revenue during the three months ended May 31, 2021.

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

Other income (expense) decreased by $11,114, or 345%, for the three months ended May 31, 2021, as compared to the three months ended May 31, 2020, primarily due to an increase in interest expense as a result of the Company issuing $50,597,769 of convertible debt to USMC during the three months ended May 31, 2021.

 

Comparison of the Six Months Ended May 31, 2021 and the Six Months Ended May 31, 2020

 

A comparison of the Company’s operating results for the six months ended May 31, 2021 and May 31, 2020 are summarized as follows:

 

    May 31,     May 31,        
    2021     2020     Variance  
Revenues   $ 30,000     $ 6,129     $ 23,871  
Operating expenses:                        
Selling, general & administrative     633,787       355,434       278,353  
Product fulfillment, exploration and mining     17,708       5,194       12,514  
Loss from operations     (621,495 )     (354,499 )     (266,996 )
Other income (expense)     (22,848 )     6,041       (28,889 )
Net Loss   $ (644,343 )   $ (348,458 )   $ (295,885 )

 

Revenues

 

Revenue increased by $23,871, or 389%, for the six months ended May 31, 2021 as compared to the six months ended May 31, 2020, primarily due to the Company’s clients not buying product during the six months ended May 31, 2020 due to buying more than they anticipated needing in prior periods.

 

Operating Costs and Expenses

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased by $278,353, or 78%, for the six months ended May 31, 2021, as compared to the six months ended May 31, 2020, due to an increase of approximately (i) $18,000 in stock based compensation, (ii) $40,000 in advertising and marketing costs, (iii) $190,000 in payroll expenses resulting primarily from the Company hiring a chief financial officer and additional workforce.

 

23
 

 

Product fulfillment and exploration and mining expenses for the six months ended May 31, 2021 increased by $12,514, or 241%, as compared to the six months ended May 31, 2020, primarily due to the increase in revenue during the six months ended May 31, 2021.

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

Other income (expense) decreased by $28,889, or 478%, for the six months ended May 31, 2021, as compared to the six months ended May 31, 2020, primarily due to an increase in interest expense as a result of the Company issuing $51,401,769 of convertible debt to USMC during the six months ended May 31, 2021.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of May 31, 2021, we had $12,890 in cash on hand and a working capital deficiency of $1,101,498, as compared to cash on hand of $7,450 and a working capital deficiency of $1,792,674 as of November 30, 2020. The decrease in working capital deficiency is mainly due to an approximate $1,401,000 decrease in due to affiliated entities as a result of the conversion of $1,401,000 in payables to a convertible note payable.

 

Future Financing

 

We will require additional funds to implement our growth strategy. We do not believe that our current cash and cash equivalents will be sufficient to meet our working capital requirements for the next twelve months. We have had negative cash flow from operating activities as we have not yet begun to generate sufficient and consistent revenues to cover our operating expenses. Until we are able to establish a sufficient revenue stream from operations our ability to meet our current financial liabilities and commitments will be primarily dependent upon proceeds from outside capital sources including USMC, an affiliated entity. There is no assurance that we will be able to obtain necessary capital or that our estimates of our capital requirements will prove to be accurate. Even if we are able to secure outside financing, it may not be available in the amounts or times when we require or on favorable terms. We currently do not have any agreements or understandings for additional financing. If we are unable to raise sufficient capital we will be required to delay or forego some portion of our business plan or cease operations.

 

Furthermore, such outside financing would likely take the form of bank loans, private offerings of debt or equity securities, advances from affiliates or some combination of these. The issuance of additional equity securities would dilute the stock ownership of current investors while incurring debt by the Company would increase the Company’s cash flow requirements and may subject the Company to restrictions on its operations and corporate actions.

 

Going Concern

 

The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements presented in this Quarterly Report have been prepared under the assumption that the Company will continue as a going concern. The Company has accumulated losses from inception through May 31, 2021, of approximately $13.4 million, as well as negative cash flows from operating activities. During the six months ended May 31, 2021, the Company received net cash proceeds of approximately $569,000 from USMC, an affiliated entity. Presently the Company does not have sufficient cash resources to meet its debt obligations in the twelve months following the date of this Quarterly Report. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management is in the process of evaluating various financing alternatives in order to finance the capital requirements of the Company. There can be no assurance that the Company will be successful with its fund-raising initiatives.

 

The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that may be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

24
 

 

Working Capital Deficiency

 

Our working capital deficiency as of May 31, 2021, in comparison to our working capital deficiency as of November 30, 2020, can be summarized as follows:

 

    May 31,     November 30,  
    2021     2020  
Current assets   $ 46,404     $ 15,340  
Current liabilities     1,147,902       1,808,014  
Working capital deficiency   $ 1,101,498     $ 1,792,674  

 

The increase in current assets is primarily due to an increase in accounts receivable of $30,000. The decrease in current liabilities is primarily due to a decrease in due to affiliated entities of approximately $821,000 during the six months ended May 31, 2021.

 

Cash Flows

 

    Six Months Ended  
    May 31, 2021     May 31, 2020  
Net cash used in operating activities   $ (525,921 )   $ (396,211 )
Net cash provided by financing activities     531,361       387,811  
Increase (decrease) in cash   $ 5,440     $ (8,400 )

 

Operating Activities

 

Net cash used in operating activities was $525,921 for the six months ended May 31, 2021, primarily due to a net loss of $644,343 which was partially offset by non-cash expenses of $101,687 related to stock based compensation and amortization of debt discount and $16,735 of cash provided by changes in the levels of operating assets and liabilities, primarily as a result of increases in accounts payable and accrued expenses, partially offset by an increase in accounts receivable. Net cash used in operating activities was $396,211 for the six months ended May 31, 2020, primarily due to a net loss of $348,458 which was partially offset by non-cash expenses of $1,539 related to stock based compensation, amortization of debt discount, and lawsuit settlement liability and $46,214 of cash provided by changes in the levels of operating assets and liabilities, primarily as a result in increases in prepaid expenses and other current assets, partially offset by a decrease in accounts receivable and accounts payable and accrued expenses.

 

Investing Activities

 

There were no investing activities during the six months ended May 31, 2021 and May 31, 2020.

 

Financing Activities

 

For the six months ended May 31, 2021, net cash provided by financing activities was $531,361, primarily due to $569,461 advanced to the Company by USMC.

 

For the six months ended May 31, 2020, net cash provided by financing activities was $387,811, which was primarily due to $178,000 received from convertible notes payable with USMC and $161,000 advanced to the Company by USMC.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Procedures

 

Our significant accounting policies are more fully described in the notes to our condensed consolidated financial statements included in this Report, and in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended November 30, 2020, as filed with the SEC on March 16, 2021.

 

25
 

 

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

 

Our recently adopted accounting pronouncements are more fully described in Note 2 to our condensed consolidated financial statements included in this Report.

 

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

As a smaller reporting company, we are not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures (as that term is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”)) that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures. In designing disclosure controls and procedures, our management necessarily was required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible disclosure controls and procedures. The design of any disclosure controls and procedures also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance of achieving the desired control objectives.

 

Our management, with the participation of our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, has evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this Report. Based upon that evaluation and subject to the foregoing, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of May 31, 2021 due to the material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting described below.

 

Material Weaknesses in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

A material weakness, as defined in the standards established by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim consolidated financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

The ineffectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was due to the following material weaknesses:

 

Inadequate segregation of duties consistent with control objectives;
Lack of formal policies and procedures;
Lack of a functioning audit committee and independent directors on the Company’s board of directors to oversee financial reporting responsibilities;
Lack of risk assessment procedures on internal controls to detect financial reporting risks on a timely manner;
Lack of personnel with GAAP experience.

 

We have engaged a third-party financial operations consulting firm to assist with the preparation of SEC reporting.

 

Our management feels the weaknesses identified above have not had any material effect on our financial results. However, we are currently reviewing our disclosure controls and procedures related to these material weaknesses and hope to implement changes in the future if and when resources permit, including identifying specific areas within our governance, accounting and financial reporting processes to add adequate resources to potentially mitigate these material weaknesses.

 

26
 

 

Our management will continue to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of our internal controls and procedures and our internal controls over financial reporting on an ongoing basis and is committed to taking further action and implementing additional enhancements or improvements, as necessary and as funds allow.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

On March 25, 2021, Michael Fay resigned as the Company’s Chief Financial Officer.

 

Other than what is stated above there have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended May 31, 2021 that have materially affected, or that are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

Except as set forth below, there are no pending legal proceedings to which the Company or its subsidiaries area a party or in which any director, officer or affiliate of the Company, any owner of record of beneficially or more than 5% of any class of voting securities of the Company, or security holder is a party adverse to the Company or has a material interest adverse to the Company. The Company’s property is not the subject of any pending legal proceedings.

 

On July 8, 2020, former Chief Financial Officer, Al Calvanico (“Calvanico”), filed a demand for arbitration alleging retaliation, wrongful termination, and demand for a minimum amount of $600,000 in alleged stock value, plus interest, recovery of past and future wages, attorneys’ fees, and punitive damages (collectively, the “Calvanico Claims”). The Company denied all Calvanico Claims. The Company believes Calvanico is owed nothing because it takes the position that Calvanico was not terminated, but rather, his employment contract expired on September 21, 2019 in the normal course, and was not renewed by Company and because Calvanico never exercised his stock options. On February 14, 2020, the Company requested in writing that Calvanico exercise his stock options within 30 days. Calvanico failed to do so. To date, Calvanico has not exercised his stock options. This dispute is currently in the midst of the arbitration discovery phase. An arbitration hearing date has been scheduled for January 24, 2022.

 

On January 11, 2019, the Company filed a complaint in the Nevada District Court for Washoe County (Case # CV19-00097) against Agregen International Corp (“Agregen”) and Robert Hurtado alleging the misuse of proprietary and confidential information acquired by Mr. Hurtado while employed by the Company as VP of Agricultural Research and Development. Mr. Hurtado was terminated in March 2018 and since that time the Company alleges that he conspired with Agregen to improperly use proprietary and confidential information to compete with the Company which constitute breaches of the non-compete and confidentiality provisions of his employment agreement with the Company. The Company is seeking $100,000,000 in monetary damages. On March 14, 2019 Agregen and Mr. Hurtado filed an answer to the Company’s Complaint that the allegations were false. An Early Case Conference was held on April 26, 2019 and a pre-trial conference was held on July 10, 2019. On March 13, 2020, the Company filed a First Amended Complaint, adding Todd Gauer and John Gingerich as additional defendants. A default has been taken against Mr. Gingerich. Litigation is actively proceeding against Mr. Hurtado, Mr. Gauer, and Agregen. The June 2021 trial date was postponed due to Covid-related delays, but is in the process of being rescheduled.

 

On March 29, 2019, the Company was served with a complaint filed by Superior Soils Supplements LLC (“Superior Soils”) in the Superior Court of the State of California in and for the County of Kings (Case #19C-0124) relating to 64 truckloads of soil amendments delivered to a customer by the Company on behalf of Superior Soils. Superior Soils alleged that the soil amendments were not labeled correctly requiring the entire shipment of product to be returned to the Company. The complaint alleges breach of contract, misrepresentations, fraudulent concealment and unfair competition. The complaint seeks damages of approximately $300,000. The Company filed its answer on May 6, 2019, denying responsibility for the mis-labelling and denying any liability for damages therefrom. The parties are currently in settlement negotiations. The Company believes its potential exposure to be approximately $400,000 and, as such, has accrued this amount on the unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheet at May 31, 2021.

 

27
 

 

On April 16, 2021, LexisNexis, a division of RELX, Inc., filed a Complaint against the Company and its former attorney, Michael Kessler, Esq., in the Superior Court of the State of California, Amador County (Case No. 21-CV-12123). This is a limited jurisdiction lawsuit seeking payment of $18,211.30. The basis of the Complaint is that Mr. Kessler incurred this debt to LexisNexis, a legal research company. Mr. Kessler is alleged to have failed to pay the annual bill. After the matter was sent to collections, it is the Company’s understanding that Mr. Kessler claimed that he was employed by Purebase Corporation as its general counsel at the time and that the Company is therefore responsible for payment. The Company strongly disputes this characterization and maintains that it has no obligation to LexisNexis under the facts or the law. The Company and LexisNexis are engaged in settlement negotiations. The Company believes its potential exposure to be $0 and that this lawsuit will be dismissed.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

As a smaller reporting company, we are not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

Investors should carefully consider the risk factors included in the “Risk Factors” section of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for our fiscal year ended November 30, 2020, as filed with SEC on March 16, 2021. The Company’s business, operating results and financial condition could be adversely affected due to any of those risks.

 

In addition:

 

We face risks related to health epidemics and other outbreaks, which could significantly disrupt our operations.

 

Our business and operating results could be adversely impacted by the effects of epidemics, including but not limited to the current COVID-19 pandemic. We are closely monitoring the impact of the COVID-19 global outbreak, although there remains significant uncertainty related to the public health situation globally.

 

Our results of operations could be adversely affected to the extent that such coronavirus or any other epidemic generally harms the global economy. In addition, our customers and/or personnel may be adversely impacted as a result of a health epidemic or other outbreak. Our operation may experience disruptions, such as temporary closure of our offices, facilities and/or those of our customers, suspension of services and the shut-down of our sales efforts. These disruptions may require us to curtail our sales efforts or even force us to reduce our workforce in effort to conserve capital. Additionally, the continued spread of COVID-19 and uncertain market conditions may limit the Company’s ability to access capital and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Except as set forth below, there were no sales of equity securities during the period covered by this Report that were not registered under the Securities Act and were not previously reported in a Current Report on Form 8-K filed by the Company.

 

On May 14, 2021, the Company issued 80,000 shares of common stock to a director pursuant to a directors agreement for services rendered.

 

On May 27, 2021, the Company issued an aggregate of 350,000 shares of common stock to an investment banking firm pursuant to an investment banking agreement for services rendered to the Company.

 

On April 8, 2021, the Company granted a director an option to purchase 250,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share. These options vest one year from the grant date.

 

ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

 

None.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

None.

 

28
 

 

ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

 

Exhibit

Number

  Description
31*   Section 302 Certification under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer
32*   Section 906 Certification under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer
101.INS   XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

29
 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

 

PUREBASE CORPORATION  
     
By: /s/ A. Scott Dockter  
  A. Scott Dockter  
  Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer  
  (Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial  
  and Accounting Officer)  
  Date: October 13, 2021  

 

30

PureBase (PK) (USOTC:PUBC)
Historical Stock Chart
From May 2022 to Jun 2022 Click Here for more PureBase (PK) Charts.
PureBase (PK) (USOTC:PUBC)
Historical Stock Chart
From Jun 2021 to Jun 2022 Click Here for more PureBase (PK) Charts.