0001064722 false --12-31 Q2 0 0 0 0 0001064722 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 2021-06-30 0001064722 2020-12-31 0001064722 gmpw:TradingSecuritiesMember 2021-04-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:TradingSecuritiesMember 2020-04-01 2020-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:TradingSecuritiesMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:TradingSecuritiesMember 2020-01-01 2020-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:PropertyMember 2021-04-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:PropertyMember 2020-04-01 2020-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:PropertyMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:PropertyMember 2020-01-01 2020-06-30 0001064722 2021-04-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 2020-04-01 2020-06-30 0001064722 2020-01-01 2020-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:PreferredStockMember 2019-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2019-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2019-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2019-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:NoncontrollingInterestMember 2019-06-30 0001064722 2019-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:PreferredStockMember 2019-07-01 2019-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2019-07-01 2019-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2019-07-01 2019-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2019-07-01 2019-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:NoncontrollingInterestMember 2019-07-01 2019-12-31 0001064722 2019-07-01 2019-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:PreferredStockMember 2019-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2019-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2019-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2019-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:NoncontrollingInterestMember 2019-12-31 0001064722 2019-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:PreferredStockMember 2020-01-01 2020-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2020-01-01 2020-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2020-01-01 2020-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2020-01-01 2020-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:NoncontrollingInterestMember 2020-01-01 2020-12-31 0001064722 2020-01-01 2020-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:PreferredStockMember 2020-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2020-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2020-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2020-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:NoncontrollingInterestMember 2020-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:PreferredStockMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:NoncontrollingInterestMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:PreferredStockMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:NoncontrollingInterestMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 2020-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:GoldsteinFranklinIncMember 2019-12-29 2019-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember 2019-12-29 2019-12-31 0001064722 gmpw:UnregisteredSecuritiesMember 2020-09-16 0001064722 gmpw:EconomicDevelopmentCapitalLLCMember 2020-09-15 2020-09-16 0001064722 gmpw:CannabinoidBiosciencesIncMember 2020-09-15 2020-09-16 0001064722 gmpw:KidCastleEducationalCorporationMember us-gaap:PreferredStockMember 2020-09-15 2020-09-16 0001064722 gmpw:CaliforniaCorporationMember 2021-04-21 0001064722 gmpw:KidCastleEducationalCorporationMember us-gaap:PreferredStockMember 2021-04-20 2021-04-21 0001064722 gmpw:KidCastleEducationalCorporationMember us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2021-04-20 2021-04-21 0001064722 srt:MinimumMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 srt:MaximumMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:BuildingsMember srt:MinimumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:BuildingsMember srt:MaximumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:PermanentInstallationsMember srt:MinimumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:PermanentInstallationsMember srt:MaximumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:MachineryAndEquipmentMember srt:MinimumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:MachineryAndEquipmentMember srt:MaximumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:FurnitureFixturesEquipmentAndVehiclesMember srt:MinimumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:FurnitureFixturesEquipmentAndVehiclesMember srt:MaximumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:LeaseholdImprovementsMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:GoldsteinFranklinIncMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:MarginalLoanPayableMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:RealEstateMember srt:MinimumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:RealEstateMember srt:MaximumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:GoldsteinFranklinMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:GoldsteinFranklinMember 2020-12-31 0001064722 gmpw:LosAngelesCommunityCapitalMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:LosAngelesCommunityCapitalMember 2020-12-31 0001064722 gmpw:TaxAssetEstimatesMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 2021-03-31 0001064722 gmpw:StockholderMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementMember gmpw:GoldsteinFranklinMember 2019-09-15 0001064722 gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementMember gmpw:GoldsteinFranklinMember 2019-09-14 2019-09-15 0001064722 gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementMember gmpw:GoldsteinFranklinMember gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementAmendmentMember 2019-09-15 0001064722 gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementMember gmpw:GoldsteinFranklinMember gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementAmendmentMember 2019-09-14 2019-09-15 0001064722 gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementMember gmpw:LosAngelesCommunityCapitalMember gmpw:FrankIIgwealorMember 2020-05-05 0001064722 gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementMember gmpw:LosAngelesCommunityCapitalMember gmpw:FrankIIgwealorMember 2020-05-04 2020-05-05 0001064722 gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementMember gmpw:LosAngelesCommunityCapitalMember gmpw:FrankIIgwealorMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2020-12-31 0001064722 gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementAmendmentMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 srt:MinimumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 srt:MaximumMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:SeptemberTwoThousandNineteenMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:SeptemberTwoThousandNineteenMember 2020-01-01 2020-12-31 0001064722 gmpw:SeptemberTwoThousandNineteenMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:SeptemberTwoThousandNineteenMember 2020-12-31 0001064722 gmpw:MayTwentyTwoThousandTwentyMember 2020-01-01 2020-12-31 0001064722 gmpw:MayTwentyTwoThousandTwentyMember 2021-01-01 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:MayTwentyTwoThousandTwentyMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:MayTwentyTwoThousandTwentyMember 2020-12-31 0001064722 gmpw:GoldsteinFranklinMember gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementAmendmentMember 2020-02-28 0001064722 gmpw:GoldsteinFranklinMember gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementAmendmentMember 2020-02-27 2020-02-28 0001064722 gmpw:GoldsteinFranklinMember gmpw:LineOfCreditAgreementAmendmentMember 2021-06-30 0001064722 gmpw:PropertyMember 2020-01-01 2020-12-31 0001064722 us-gaap:SubsequentEventMember 2022-12-29 2022-12-31 iso4217:USD xbrli:shares iso4217:USD xbrli:shares xbrli:pure

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

QUARTERLY REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2021

 

TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE EXCHANGE ACT

 

For the transition period from ___________ to _____________

 

Commission File Number 333-67318

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada   87-0291528
(State or other jurisdiction   (I.R.S. Employer
of incorporation or organization)   Identification No.)
     
370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance California   90501
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

310-895-1839

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or, an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company”, and “emerging growth company”, in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer ☐   Accelerated filer ☐
Non-accelerated filer   Smaller reporting company
(Do not check if smaller reporting company)   Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No

 

As of June 30, 2021, there were 42,724,687 shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.001 par value per share, issued and outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I. – FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
   
Item 1. Financial Statements 3
   
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 35
   
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 43
   
Item 4. Controls and Procedures 43
   
PART II. – OTHER INFORMATION  
   
Item 1. Legal Proceedings 44
   
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 45
 
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities 45
   
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 45
   
Item 5. Other Information 45
   
Item 6. Exhibits 46
   
Signatures 47

 

2
 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets As of June 30, 2021 (unaudited) and December 31, 2020 (audited) 4
   
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, and 2020 (unaudited) 5
   
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Deficit for the six months ended June 30, 2021 (unaudited) 6
   
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 (unaudited) 7
   
Notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited) 8

 

3
 

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

    June 30, 2021     December 31, 2020  
    (unaudited)     (audited)  
ASSETS                
Current Assets:                
Cash and cash equivalents   $ 62,272     $ 1,630  
Other Assets - Investments     2,227,539       91,282  
Total Current Assets     2,289,811       92,912  
                 
Property and equipment, net   $ -     $ 7,745  
Investments - real estate     -       664,111  
Entrepreneurship Development     299,095       -  
Crypto Currency Mining Rigs     19,200       -  
Total assets     2,608,106       764,767  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)                
Current Liabilities:                
Accrued expenses     1,218,613       4,542  
Accrued interest     -       2,812  
Marginal loan payable     33,792       115  
Line of credit - related party, current portion     -       63,632  
Total Current Liabilities   $ 1,252,405     $ 71,102  
                 
Long-Term Liabilities:                
Notes payable - net of current portion   $ -     $ 150,000  
Line of credit - related party, net of current portion     456,424       540,524  
Total Long-Term Liabilities     456,424       690,524  
Total Liabilities   $ 1,708,829     $ 761,626  
                 
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)                
Preferred stock, $.001 par value, 10,000,000 shares authorized, 1,000,001 issued and outstanding as at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 respectively.   $ 1,013     $ 1,013  
Common Stock, $0.001 par value, 1,200,000,000 shares authorized, 42,724,687 issued and outstanding as at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.     42,725       42,725  
Additional paid in capital     6,086,520       6,310,814  
Accumulated deficit     (5,230,981 )     (6,351,470 )
Minority Interest             59  
Total Stockholders’ Equity   $ 899,277     $ 3,141  
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity     2,608,106       764,767  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements

 

4
 

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

    2021     2020     2021     2020  
   

For the three months ended

June 30,

   

For the six months ended

June 30,

 
    2021     2020     2021     2020  
Revenue:                                
Sales of investments under trading securities   $ 2,676,143     $ 24,821     $ 3,341,809     $ 60,007  
Sales of investment under property     700,385       -       700,385       -  
Total Revenue     3,376,528       24,821       4,042,194       60,007  
                                 
Cost of goods sold:                                
Cost of sales - trading securities     2,872,611       -       3,077,026       -  
Cost of sales - property     722,341               722,341          
Total cost of goods sold     3,594,952       -       3,799,368       -  
Gross profit     (218,425 )     24,821.00       242,827       60,007  
                                 
Operating expenses:                                
General and administrative     15,038       5,313       29,233       10,515  
Professional fees     62,534               102,116          
Advertising and promotions     40               1,689          
Interest expense     33       -       85       -  
Total operating expenses     77,645       5,313       133,123       10,515  
Income (loss) from operations     (296,070 )     19,508       109,703       49,492  
                                 
Other Income                                
Dividends     32               62          
Unrealized gain (loss)     712,532       (4,402 )     756,999       (67,818 )
Net Income     416,494       15,106       866,764       (18,326 )
                                 
Earnings (loss) per Share: Basic and Diluted   $ 0.0097     $ (0.000 )   $ 0.0203     $ (0.002 )
                                 
Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding: Basic and Diluted     42,724,687       27,724,687       42,724,687       27,724,687  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements

 

5
 

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(Unaudited)

 

    Shares     Amount     Shares     Amount     Capital     Deficit     Interest     Equity  
    Preferred Stock     Common Stock     Additional Paid In     Accumulated     Minority     Total Stockholders’  
    Shares     Amount     Shares     Amount     Capital     Deficit     Interest     Equity  
Balances - July 1, 2019     -     $ -       29,321,338     $ 29,321     $ 6,072,530     $ (7,501,203 )     -     $ (1,399,352 )
Restructuring adjustments     1       10       (1,596,651 )     (1,595 )     (10 )     1,400,948       -       1,399,352  
Issuances of common stock             -                       -       -             -  
Issuances of preferred stock     -       -                               379               379  
Balances - December 31, 2019     1     $ 10       27,724,687     $ 27,725     $ 6,072,520     $ (6,099,876 )   $ -     $ 379  
Issuances of preferred stock     1,000,000       1,003       -       -       (1,000 )                     3  
Issuances of common stock                     15,000,000       15,000       15,000       -               30,000  
Acquisition of business     -       -       -       -       224,294       (168,614 )     -       55,680  
Net loss                                             (82,980 )             (82,980 )
Minority interest                                                     59       59  
                                                                 
Balances - December 31, 2020     1,000,001     $ 1,013       42,724,687     $ 42,725     $ 6,310,814     $ (6,351,470 )   $ 59     $ 3,141  
Sold Cannabinoid Biosciences for $1     -       -     -   -     $ (224,294 )   $ 253,725     $ (59 )   $ 29,372  
Net income                                             866,764       -       866,764  
                                                                 
Balances - June 30, 2021     1,000,001     $ 1,013       42,724,687     $ 42,725     $ 6,086,520     $ (5,230,980 )   $ -     $ 899,277  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements

 

6
 

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

STATEMENTS OF CASHFLOWS

(Unaudited)

 

    2021     2020  
    For the six months ended June 30,  
    2021     2020  
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:                
Net Income (Loss)   $ 866,764     $ 49,492  
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash used in operating activities:                
Inventory Asset: Trading Securities     (2,139,270 )     (69,812 )
Depreciation     800       -  
Other Accrued Liabilities     1,217,013       -  
Net Cash Flows Used in Operating Activities     (54,693 )     (20,320 )
                 
Cash flows from investing activities:                
Entrepreneurship Development     (299,095 )        
Payment for real estate investment     664,111       (321,498 )
Crypto Currency Mining Rigs     (19,200 )        
Net Cash Flows from Investing Activities     345,816       (321,498 )
                 
Cash flows from financing activities:                
Proceeds from marginal loan payable     33,676       236  
Line of credit - short term - related party     -       119,602  
Line of credit - long term - related party     (264,157 )     221,498  
New Cash Flows from Financing Activities     (230,481 )     341,335  
                 
Net Change in Cash:   $ 60,642     $ (483 )
Beginning cash:     1,627       500  
Ending Cash:   $ 62,269     $ 17  
                 
Supplemental Disclosures of Cash Flow Information:                
Cash paid for interest   $ 62     $ 12  
Cash paid for tax   $ 0     $ 0  
                 
Supplemental Disclosures of Non-Cash Financing                
Shares issued to settle accounts payable   $ 0          
Shares issued to settle accruals - related parties   $ 0          

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements

 

7
 

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

 

NOTE 1 - NATURE OF BUSINESS

 

GiveMePower Corporation (the “GMPW,” “Company,” “we,” “us” or “our”) operates and manages a portfolio of real estate and financial services assets and operations to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources. Givemepower is primarily focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate properties and businesses in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America. The Company was incorporated under the laws of the state of, Nevada on June 7, 2001, to sell software geared to end users and developers involved in the design, manufacture, and construction of engineered products located in Canada and the United States, through its wholly owned Canadian subsidiary GiveMePower Inc. On December 31, 2019, the company sold one (1) Special 2019 series A preferred share (one preferred share is convertible 100,000,000 share of common stocks) of the company for an agreed upon purchase price to Goldstein Franklin, Inc., a California corporation. The Special preferred share controls 60% of the company’s total voting rights. The issuance of the preferred share to Goldstein Franklin, Inc. gave to Goldstein Franklin, the controlling vote to control and dominate the affairs of the company going forward.

 

The Company’s operating structure did not change as a result of the change of control, however, following the transaction on December 31, 2019, in which Goldstein Franklin, Inc. acquired control of the Company, Goldstein transferred one of its operating subsidiaries, Alpharidge Capital LLC into GMPW to become one of the Company’s operating subsidiaries.

 

Alpharidge Capital LLC (“Alpharidge”) was formed under the laws of the State of California on August 30, 2019. Alpharidge has two distinct lines of businesses that comprise: (1) a specialty biopharmaceutical holding company focused on building portfolio of real estate investment properties and equity positions in select companies within select industries; and (2) an event-driven investment management operation that invests in equities, warrants, bonds and options of public and private companies in America and across the globe.

 

Prior to the transaction, the Company sell software geared to end users and developers involved in the design, manufacture, and construction of engineered products located in Canada and the United States.

 

On September 16, 2020, as part of its sales of unregistered securities to Kid Castle Educational Corporation, company related to, and controlled by GMPW President and CEO, the Company, for $3 in cash and 1,000,000 shares of its preferred stock, acquired 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (“CED Capital”), a California Limited Liability Company, and 97% of the issued and outstanding shares of Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), a California corporation. This transaction was accounted for under the Consolidation Method using the variable interest entity (VIE) model wherein the Company consolidates all investees operating results if the Company expects to assume more than 50% of another entity’s expected losses or gains. The 1,000,000 shares of our preferred stock sold to Kid Castle Educational Corporation gave to Kid Castle, approximately 87% voting control of Givemepower Corporation.

 

8
 

 

On April 21, 2021, the Company sold Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), a California corporation, to Premier Information Management, Inc. for $1 in cash. As further consideration pursuant to the stated sales, CBDX returned Kid Castle Educational Inc., the parent Company of GMPW, the 100,000 shares of KDCE preferred stock and 900,000,000 shares of KDCE common stock that CBDX bought in October of 2019. Pursuant to the April 21, 2021 transaction, CBDX ceased from being a subsidiary of GMPW, effective April 1, 2021.

 

The consolidated financial statements of the Company therefore include its wholly owned subsidiaries of Alpharidge Capital LLC. (“Alpharidge”), Community Economic Development Capital, LLC. (“CED Capital”), and subsidiaries, in which GiveMePower has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”), after elimination of intercompany transactions and accounts.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its subsidiaries, in which the Company has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”). Inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated upon consolidation.

 

ASC 810 requires that the investor with the controlling financial interest should consolidate the investee/affiliate. ASC 810-10 requires that an equity interest investor consolidates a VIE when it retains an investment in the entity, is considered a variable interest investor in the entity, and is the primary beneficiary of the entity. An investor in a VIE is a “variable interest beneficiary” when, per an arrangement’s governing documents, the investor will absorb a portion of the VIE’s expected losses or will receive a portion of the entity’s “residual returns.” The variable interest beneficiary retaining a controlling financial interest in the VIE is designated as its “primary beneficiary” and must consolidate the VIE. A variable interest beneficiary retains a “controlling financial interest” in a VIE when that beneficiary retains the power to direct the activities of the VIE that have the greatest influence over the VIE’s economic performance and retains an obligation to absorb the VIE’s significant losses or the right to receive benefits from the VIE that could potentially be significant to the VIE. Based on the ASC 810 test above, Kid Castle Educational Corporation is the primary beneficiary of GiveMePower Corporation (the “VIE”) because Kid Castle retained a controlling financial interest in the VIE and has the power to direct the activities of the VIE, having the greatest influence over the VIE’s economic performance and retains an obligation to absorb the VIE’s significant losses and the right to determine and receive benefits from the VIE.

 

Because GiveMePower Corporation is 88% controlled by Kid Castle Educational Corporation, the consolidation rule requires that the Revenue, Assets and Liabilities recognized and disclosed on the financial statements of GiveMePower Corporation are also recognized and disclosed on the financial statements of Kid Castle Educational Corporation pursuant to ASC 810.

 

9
 

 

Current Business and Organization - Alpharidge

 

The Company, through its three wholly owned subsidiaries, Alpharidge Capital, LLC (“Alpharidge”), Malcom Wingate Cush Franklin LLC (“MWCF”), and Opportunity Zone Capital LLC (“OZC”), seeks to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources as follows:

 

  Alpharidge and OZC Real estate operations – Real estate operations would consist primarily of rental real estate, affordable housing projects, opportunity zones, other property development and associated HOA activities. OZC development operations would be primarily through a real estate investment, management and development subsidiary that focuses primarily on the construction and sale of single-family and multi-family homes, lots in subdivisions and planned communities, and raw land for residential development; and
     
  MWCF financial empowerment – MWCF would utilize operate the tools of financial education/training, mergers and acquisitions, private equity and business lending to invest and empower young black entrepreneurs, seeding their viable business plans and ideas and creating jobs in their communities. MWCF is primarily focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America.
     
  Cash Management, Opportunistic and Event-Driven Investments: The Company keeps no more than 10% of its total assets in liquid cash or investments portfolio, which is actively managed by its directors and officers and invest primarily in equity investments on a long and short basis. The Company’s cash management policy which requires that the Company actively invests its excess cash into stocks, bonds and other securities is intended to provide the company greater levels of liquidity and current income. The Company uses proprietary trading models to capitalize on real-time market anomalies and generate ongoing income in the forms similar to hedge funds. Where necessary, the Company uses seeded entities to pursue real-time market transactions in publicly traded securities including but not limited to stocks, bonds, options, futures, forex, warrants, and other instruments.

 

Current Business and Organization - CED Capital

 

Community Economic Development Capital, LLC. (“CED Capital”), a California limited liability company, is a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including, affordable housing, opportunity zones properties, hemp and cannabis farms, dispensaries facilities, CBD related commercial facilities, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services. CED Capital principal business objective is to maximize returns through a combination of (1) generating good profit while making substantial social impact, (2) sustainable long-term growth in cash flows from increased rents, and (3) potential long-term appreciation in the value of its properties from capital gains upon future sale. The Company is engaged primarily in the ownership, operation, management, acquisition, development and redevelopment of predominantly multifamily housing and specialized industrial properties in the United States. Additionally, its specialized industrial property strategy is to acquire and own a portfolio of specialized industrial properties, including multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities leased to tenants holding the requisite state licenses to operate in the regulated medical-use cannabis industry. This strategy includes the following components:

 

  Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Income. The Company intends to acquire multifamily housings, economic development real estates, hemp farms, CBD processing facilities and multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities leased licensed growers who will continue their cultivation operations after its acquisition of the property. The Company expects to hold acquired properties for investment and to generate stable and increasing rental income from leasing these properties to licensed growers.

 

10
 

 

  Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Appreciation. The Company intends to lease its acquired properties under long-term, triple-net leases. However, from time to time, the Company may elect to sell one or more properties if the Company believes it to be in the best interests of its stockholders. Accordingly, the Company will seek to acquire properties that it believes also have potential for long-term appreciation in value.
  Affordable Housing. Its motto is: “acquiring distressed/troubled properties, securing generous government subsidies, empowering low-income families, and generating above-market returns to investors.”
  Preserving Financial Flexibility on the Company’s Balance Sheet. The Company intends to focus on maintaining a conservative capital structure, in order to provide us flexibility in financing its growth initiatives.

 

NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared using the accrual basis of accounting in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) promulgated in the United States of America. Inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated upon consolidation.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The Consolidated Financial Statements include the accounts of GiveMePower Corporation and all of its controlled subsidiary companies. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated. Investments in business entities in which the company does not have control, but it has the ability to exercise significant influence over operating and financial policies (generally 20% to 50% ownership) are accounted for using the equity method of accounting. Operating results of acquired businesses are included in the Consolidated Statements of Income from the date of acquisition. The company consolidates variable interest entities if it is deemed to be the primary beneficiary of the entity. Operating results for variable interest entities in which the company is determined to be the primary beneficiary are included in the Consolidated Statements of Income from the date such determination is made. For convenience and ease of reference, the company refers to the financial statement caption “Income before Income Taxes and Equity Income” as “pre-tax income” throughout the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

COVID-19 Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties

 

COVID-19 Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties — the company is subject to the risks arising from COVID-19’s impacts on the residential real estate industry. The Company’s management believes that these impacts, which include but are not limited to the following, could have a significant negative effect on its future financial position, results of operations, and cash flows: (i) prohibitions or limitations on in-person activities associated with residential real estate transactions; (ii) lack of consumer desire for in-person interactions and physical home tours; and (iii) deteriorating economic conditions, such as increased unemployment rates, recessionary conditions, lower yields on individuals’ investment portfolios, and more stringent mortgage financing conditions. In addition, the company has considered the impacts and uncertainties of COVID-19 in its use of estimates in preparation of its consolidated financial statements. These estimates include, but are not limited to, likelihood of achieving performance conditions under performance-based equity awards, net realizable value of inventory, and the fair value of reporting units and goodwill for impairment.

 

11
 

 

In April 2020, following the government lockdown order, the company asked all employees to begin to work from their homes and the company also reduced the number of hours available to each of its employees by approximately by approximately 75%. These actions taken in response to the economic impact of COVID-19 on its business resulted in a reduction of productivity for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021. All cost related to these actions are included in general and administrative expenses, as these costs were determined to be direct and incremental.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents. Negative cash balances (bank overdrafts) are reclassified on the balance sheet to “Other current liabilities.” The Company has $62,272 and $1,630 in cash and cash equivalents as at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 respectively.

 

Use of Estimates and Assumptions

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect certain reported amounts and disclosures. Accordingly, actual results could materially differ from those estimates. Management considers many factors in selecting appropriate financial accounting policies and controls, and in developing the estimates and assumptions that are used in the preparation of these financial statements. Management must apply significant judgment in this process. In addition, other factors may affect estimates, including: expected business and operational changes, sensitivity and volatility associated with the assumptions used in developing estimates, and whether historical trends are expected to be representative of future trends. This process may result in actual results differing materially from those estimated amounts used in the preparation of the financial statements.

 

Acquisitions of Businesses

 

We account for business combinations under the acquisition method of accounting (other than acquisitions of businesses under common control), which requires us to recognize separately from goodwill the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed at their acquisition date fair values. While we use our best estimates and assumptions to accurately value assets acquired and liabilities assumed at the acquisition date as well as contingent consideration, where applicable, our estimates are inherently uncertain and subject to refinement.

 

Accounting for business combinations requires us to make significant estimates and assumptions, especially at the acquisition date including our estimates for intangible assets, contractual obligations assumed, pre-acquisition contingencies, and contingent consideration, where applicable. In valuing our acquisitions, we estimate fair values based on industry data and trends and by reference to relevant market rates and transactions, and discounted cash flow valuation methods, among other factors. The discount rates used were commensurate with the inherent risks associated with each type of asset and the level and timing of cash flows appropriately reflect market participant assumptions. The primary items that generate goodwill include the value of the synergies between the acquired company and our existing businesses and the value of the acquired assembled workforce, neither of which qualifies for recognition as an intangible asset.

 

12
 

 

Acquisition, Investments and Disposition of Entities under Common Control

 

Acquisitions or investments of entities under common control are reflected in a manner similar to pooling of interests. The non-controlling interests, as applicable, are charged or credited for the difference between the consideration we pay for the entity and the related entity’s basis prior to our acquisition or investment. Net gains or losses of an acquired entity prior to its acquisition or investment date are allocated to the non-controlling interests, as applicable. In allocating gains and losses upon the sale of a previously acquired common control entity, we allocate a gain or loss for financial reporting purposes by first restoring the non-controlling interests, as applicable, for the cumulative charges or credits relating to prior periods recorded at the time of our acquisition or investment and then allocating the remaining gain or loss (“Common Control Gains or Losses”) among non-controlling interests, as applicable, in accordance with their respective ownership percentages. In the case of acquisitions of entities under common control, such Common Control Gains or Losses are allocated in accordance with their respective ownership partnership percentages.

 

Investments

 

Investment Transactions and Related Investment Income (Loss). Investment transactions of the Investment Funds are recorded on a trade date basis. Realized gains or losses on sales of investments are based on the first-in, first-out or the specific identification method. Realized and unrealized gains or losses on investments are recorded in the consolidated statements of operations. Interest income and expenses are recorded on an accrual basis and dividends are recorded on the ex-dividend date. Premiums and discounts on fixed income securities are amortized using the effective yield method.

 

Investments held by our Investment segment are carried at fair value. Our Investment segment applies the fair value option to those investments that are otherwise subject to the equity method of accounting.

 

Valuation of Investments. Securities of the Investment Funds that are listed on a securities exchange are valued at their last sales price on the primary securities exchange on which such securities are traded on such date. Securities that are not listed on any exchange but are traded over-the-counter are valued at the mean between the last “bid” and “ask” price for such security on such date. Securities and other instruments for which market quotes are not readily available are valued at fair value as determined in good faith by the Investment Funds.

 

Foreign Currency Transactions. The books and records of the Investment Funds are maintained in U.S. dollars. Assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than U.S. dollars are translated into U.S. dollars at the rate of exchange in effect at the balance sheet date. Transactions during the period denominated in currencies other than U.S. dollars are translated at the rate of exchange applicable on the date of the transaction. Foreign currency translation gains and losses are recorded in the consolidated statements of operations. The Investment Funds do not isolate that portion of the results of operations resulting from changes in foreign exchange rates on investments from the fluctuations arising from changes in the market prices of securities. Such fluctuations are reflected in net gain (loss) from investment activities in the consolidated statements of operations.

 

13
 

 

Fair Values of Financial Instruments. The fair values of the Investment Funds’ assets and liabilities that qualify as financial instruments under applicable U.S. GAAP approximate the carrying amounts presented in the consolidated balance sheets.

 

Securities Sold, Not Yet Purchased. The Investment Funds may sell an investment they do not own in anticipation of a decline in the fair value of that investment. When the Investment Funds sell an investment short, they must borrow the investment sold short and deliver it to the broker-dealer through which they made the short sale. A gain, limited to the price at which the Investment Funds sold the investment short, or a loss, unlimited in amount, will be recognized upon the cover of the short sale.

 

Due From Brokers. Due from brokers represents cash balances with the Investment Funds’ clearing brokers. These funds as well as fully-paid for and marginable securities are essentially restricted to the extent that they serve as collateral against securities sold, not yet purchased. Due from brokers may also include unrestricted balances with derivative counterparties.

 

Due To Brokers. Due to brokers represents margin debit balances collateralized by certain of the Investment Funds’ investments in securities.

 

Other Segments and Holding Company

 

Investments in equity and debt securities are carried at fair value with the unrealized gains or losses reflected in the consolidated statements of operations. For purposes of determining gains and losses, the cost of securities is based on specific identification. Dividend income is recorded when declared and interest income is recognized when earned.

 

Stock Based Compensation

 

ASC 718 “Compensation - Stock Compensation” which codified SFAS No. 123 prescribes accounting and reporting standards for all stock-based payments award to employees, including employee stock options, restricted stock, employee stock purchase plans and stock appreciation rights, may be classified as either equity or liabilities. Transactions include incurring liabilities, or issuing or offering to issue shares, options, and other equity instruments such as employee stock ownership plans and stock appreciation rights. The Company determines if a present obligation to settle the share-based payment transaction in cash or other assets exists. A present obligation to settle in cash or other assets exists if: (a) the option to settle by issuing equity instruments lacks commercial substance or (b) the present obligation is implied because of an entity’s past practices or stated policies. If a present obligation exists, the transaction is recognized as a liability; otherwise, the transaction is recognized as equity.

 

Share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, are recognized as compensation expense in the financial statements based on their fair values. That expense is recognized over the period during which an employee is required to provide services in exchange for the award, known as the requisite service period (usually the vesting period).

 

14
 

 

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation issued to non-employees and consultants in accordance with the provisions of ASC 505-50 “Equity - Based Payments to Non-Employees” which codified SFAS 123 and the Emerging Issues Task Force consensus in Issue No. 96-18 (“EITF 96-18”), “Accounting for Equity Instruments that are Issued to Other Than Employees for Acquiring or in Conjunction with Selling, Goods or Services.” Measurement of share-based payment transactions with non-employees is based on the fair value of whichever is more reliably measurable: (a) the goods or services received; or (b) the equity instruments issued. The fair value of the share-based payment transaction is determined at the earlier of performance commitment date or performance completion date. The company did not record any share-based compensation during three and six months ended June 30, 2021.

 

Sale and Repurchase of Common Stock

 

Sales of Common Stock for Cash: We account for common stock sales for cash under the par value method. Common Stock account is credited for the number of shares sold times the par value per share, and the Paid in Capital account is credited for the remainder.

 

Treasury Stock Repurchase: We account for repurchased common stock under the cost method and include such Treasury stock as a component of our Common shareholders’ equity.

 

Retirement of Treasury stock is recorded as a reduction of Common stock and Additional paid-in capital at the time such retirement is approved by our Board of Directors.

 

Receivables from Sale of Stock: Receivables from the sale of capital stock constitute unpaid capital subscriptions and are reported as deductions from stockholders’ equity, rather than as assets. However, a receivable from the sale of stock to officers or directors may be reflected as an asset if the receivable was paid in cash before the financial statements were issued and the payment date is disclosed in a note to the financial statements.

 

Expenses of Offering: Specific incremental costs directly attributable to an offering of securities are deferred and applied to the gross proceeds of the offering through additional paid-in capital. Management salaries and other general and administrative expenses are not included in costs of an offering. Deferred costs of an aborted offering, which would include a postponement of 90 days or greater, are expensed in the period incurred.

 

The company has no treasury stock and no receivables from sales of stock during three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, which requires that five basic steps be followed to recognize revenue: (1) a legally enforceable contract that meets criteria standards as to composition and substance is identified; (2) performance obligations relating to provision of goods or services to the customer are identified; (3) the transaction price, with consideration given to any variable, noncash, or other relevant consideration, is determined; (4) the transaction price is allocated to the performance obligations; and (5) revenue is recognized when control of goods or services is transferred to the customer with consideration given, whether that control happens over time or not. Determination of criteria (3) and (4) are based on our management’s judgments regarding the fixed nature of the selling prices of the products and services delivered and the collectability of those amounts. The adoption of ASC 606 did not result in a change to the accounting for any of the in-scope revenue streams; as such, no cumulative effect adjustment was recorded.

 

15
 

 

The Company generates revenue primarily from: (1) the sale of homes/properties, (2) commissions and fees charged on each real estate services transaction closed by our lead agents or partner agents, and (3) sales of trading securities using its broker firm, less original purchase cost. Net trading revenues primarily consist of revenues from trading securities earned upon completion of trade, net of any trading fees. A trading is completed when earned and recognized at a point in time, on a trade-date basis, as the Company executes trades. The Company records trading revenue on a net basis, trading sales less original purchase cost. Net realized gains and losses from securities transactions are determined for federal income tax and financial reporting purposes on the first-in, first-out method and represent proceeds on disposition of investments less the cost basis of investments. Sale of real estate properties are recognized at the sales price/amount and the total cost (including cost of rehabilitations) associated with the property acquisition and rehabilitation are classified in Cost of Goods Sold (COGS).

 

During three and six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company did recognized revenue of $3,376,528 and 4,042,194 from operations, and $32 and $62 in dividend income respectively.

 

Real Estate

 

Revenue Recognition: Revenue from real estate sales and related costs are recognized at the time of closing primarily by specific identification. We shall account for our leases as follows: (i) for operating leases, revenue is recognized on a straight line basis over the lease term and (ii) for financing leases (x) minimum lease payments to be received plus the estimated value of the property at the end of the lease are considered the gross investment in the lease and (y) unearned income, representing the difference between gross investment and actual cost of the leased property, is amortized to income over the lease term so as to produce a constant periodic rate of return on the net investment in the lease. We have no real estate sales in the three and six months ended June 30, 2021

 

Comprehensive Income

 

The Company adopted SFAS No. 130, “Reporting Comprehensive Income,” which requires that an enterprise report, by major components and as a single total, the changes in equity. The other comprehensive income items result from mark-to-market analysis of the company’s Marketable Securities. The company has zero other comprehensive income items during three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020.

 

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses include general operating expenses, costs incurred for activities which serve securing sales, administrative and advertising expenses.

 

16
 

 

Disputed Liabilities

 

The Company is involved in a variety of disputes, claims, and proceedings concerning its business operations and certain liabilities. We determine whether an estimated loss from a contingency should be accrued by assessing whether a loss is deemed probable and can be reasonably estimated. We assess our potential liability by analyzing our litigation and regulatory matters using available information. We develop our views on estimated losses in consultation with outside counsel handling our defense in these matters, which involves an analysis of potential results, assuming a combination of litigation and settlement strategies. Should developments in any of these matters cause a change in our determination as to an unfavorable outcome and result in the need to recognize a material accrual, or should any of these matters result in a final adverse judgment or be settled for significant amounts, they could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, cash flows and financial position in the period or periods in which such change in determination, judgment or settlement occurs. As of June 30, 2021 and 2020, the Company has $0 in disputed liabilities on its balance sheet.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes in accordance with ASC 740-10, “Accounting for Income Taxes.” Under this method, income tax expense is recognized for the amount of: (i) taxes payable or refundable for the current year; and, (ii) deferred tax consequences of temporary differences resulting from matters that have been recognized in an entity’s financial statements or tax returns. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the results of operations in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance is provided to reduce the deferred tax assets reported if, based on the weight of available positive and negative evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

 

ASC 740-10 prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition of a tax position taken or expected to be taken on a tax return. Under ASC 740-10, a tax benefit from an uncertain tax position taken or expected to be taken may be recognized only if it is “more likely than not” that the position is sustainable upon examination, based on its technical merits. The tax benefit of a qualifying position under ASC 740-10 would equal the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement with a taxing authority having full knowledge of all the relevant information. A liability (including interest and penalties, if applicable) is established to the extent a current benefit has been recognized on a tax return for matters that are considered contingent upon the outcome of an uncertain tax position. Related interest and penalties, if any, are included as components of income tax expense and income taxes payable.

 

As of January 1, 2021, the Company had analyzed its filing positions in each of the federal and state jurisdictions that required the filing of income tax returns, as well as all open tax years in these jurisdictions. The U.S. federal and California are identified as the “major” tax jurisdictions. Generally, the Company remains subject to Internal Revenue Service and California Franchise Board examination of our 2018 through 2020 Tax Returns. However, the Company has certain tax attribute carry forwards, which will remain subject to review and adjustment by the relevant tax authorities until the statute of limitations closes with respect to the year in which such attributes are utilized.

 

17
 

 

Management believed that the income tax filing positions and deductions will be sustained on audit and do not anticipate any adjustments that will result in a material change to the financial position. Therefore, no reserves for uncertain income tax position have been recorded pursuant to ASC 740. In addition, the Company not record a cumulative effect adjustment related to the adoption of ASC 740. Related interest and penalties, if any, are included as components of income tax expense and income taxes payable.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost and consist solely of computer equipment. Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method based on the estimated useful lives of the related assets and starts when the asset is available for use as intended by management. When significant parts of an item of property, plant and equipment have different useful lives, they are accounted for as separate components of property, plant and equipment. Land is not depreciated.

 

The useful lives of tangible fixed assets are as follows:

 

  Buildings 33 to 50 years
  Permanent installations 3 to 25 years
  Machinery and equipment 3 to 14 years
  Furniture, fixtures, equipment and vehicles 5 to 10 years
  Leasehold improvements Over the term of the lease

 

Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing the proceeds with the carrying amount and are recognized within “Other operating income” or “Other operating expenses” in the income statement. Residual values, useful lives and methods of depreciation are reviewed at each financial year-end and adjusted prospectively, if appropriate. As of June 30, 2021 the company has little property, equipment and one Crypto Currency mining rig.

 

Earnings (Loss) per Share

 

The Company has adopted ASC Topic 260, “Earnings per Share,” (“EPS”) which requires presentation of basic EPS on the face of the annual and interim income statement and requires a reconciliation of the numerator and denominator of the basic EPS computation. In the accompanying financial statements, basic loss per share is computed by dividing Net income available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. The Company’s dilutive loss per share is computed by taking basic EPS and adjusting for the assumed issuance of all potentially dilutive securities such as options, warrants, share-based payments, convertible debt and convertible preferred stock for each period since they were issued. This is calculated by dividing Net income available to common shareholders by the diluted weighted average number of shares outstanding during the period. The diluted weighted average number of shares outstanding is the basic weighted number of shares adjusted for any potentially dilutive debt or equity. On December 31, 2019, the company sold to Goldstein Franklin, Inc., a California corporation, one (1) Special 2019 series A preferred share (one preferred share is convertible 100,000,000 share of common stocks) of the company, which controls 60% of the company’s total voting rights. Similarly, on September 16, 2020, the Company sold 1,000,000 shares of its preferred stock to Kid Castle Educational Corporation, in exchange for 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (“CED Capital”). Apart from the above mentioned preferred shares, the Company has no potentially dilutive securities, such as options or warrants, currently issued and outstanding during three and six months ended June 30, 2021.

 

18
 

 

A basic earnings per share is computed by dividing net income to common stockholders by the weighted average number of shares outstanding for the year. Dilutive earnings per share include the effect of any potentially dilutive debt or equity under the treasury stock method, if including such instruments is dilutive. The Company’s diluted earnings (loss) per share is the same as the basic earnings/loss per share for the period three and six months ended June 30, 2021, as there are no potential shares outstanding that would have a dilutive effect.

 

 

   

Three months ended

June 30, 2021

   

Six months ended

June 30, 2021

 
Net income   $ 416,462       866702  
Dividends     32       62  
Adjusted Net income attribution to stockholders   $ 416,494       866,764  
                 
Weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding                
Basic and Diluted     42,724,687       42,724,687  
Net income per share                
Basic and Diluted   $ 0.0097       0.0203  

 

Accumulated Deficit

 

As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company has accumulated deficit of $5,230,981 and $6,351,470, respectively. This deficit will expire 20 years from the date the loss was incurred.

 

Concentrations of Credit Risk

 

The Company’s financial instruments that are exposed to concentrations of credit risk primarily consist of its cash and cash equivalents. The Company places its cash and cash equivalents with financial institutions of high credit worthiness. The Company maintains cash balances at financial institutions within the United States which are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to limits of approximately $250,000. The Company has not experienced any losses with regard to its bank accounts and believes it is not exposed to any risk of loss on its cash bank accounts. It is possible that at times, the company’s cash and cash equivalents with a particular financial institution may exceed any applicable government insurance limits. In such situation, the Company’s management would assess the financial strength and credit worthiness of any parties to which it extends funds, and as such, it believes that any associated credit risk exposures would be addressed and mitigated.

 

19
 

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company’s financial instruments as defined by FASB ASC 825, “Financial Instruments” include cash, trade accounts receivable, and accounts payable and accrued expenses. All instruments are accounted for on a historical cost basis. The fair value option gives entities the option to measure eligible financial assets, financial liabilities and firm commitments at fair value (i.e., the fair value option), on an instrument-by-instrument basis, that are otherwise not permitted to be accounted for at fair value pursuant to the provisions of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 825, Financial Instruments. The election to use the fair value option is available when an entity first recognizes a financial asset or financial liability or upon entering into a firm commitment. Subsequent changes in fair value must be recorded in earnings. In estimating the fair value for financial instruments for which the fair value option has been elected, we use the valuation methodologies in accordance to where the financial instruments are classified within the fair value hierarchy as discussed in Note 5, “Fair Value Measurements.” For our Investment segment, we apply the fair value option to our investments that would otherwise be accounted under the equity method.

 

FASB ASC 820 “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures” defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. ASC 820 establishes a three-tier fair value hierarchy, which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value as follows:

 

  Level 1. Observable inputs such as quoted prices in active markets;
  Level 2. Inputs, other than the quoted prices in active markets, that are observable either directly or indirectly; and
  Level 3. Unobservable inputs in which there is little or no market data, which requires the reporting entity to develop its own assumptions.

 

The Company’s financial instruments consisted of cash, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, and line of credit. The estimated fair value of cash, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, due to or from affiliated companies, and notes payable approximates its carrying amount due to the short maturity of these instruments.

 

Investment

 

Investments and securities purchased, not yet sold consist of equities, bonds, bank debt and other corporate obligations, all of which are reported at fair value in our consolidated balance sheets. These investments are considered trading securities. In addition, our Investment segment has certain derivative transactions which are discussed below in “Financial Instruments.”

 

20
 

 

Investment Securities (Trading): The Company applied the fair value accounting treatment for trading securities per ASC 320, with unrealized gains and losses recorded in net income each period. Debt securities classified as trading should be measured at fair value in the currency in which the debt securities are denominated and remeasured into the investor’s functional currency using the spot exchange rate at the balance sheet date.

 

Financial Instruments

 

In the normal course of business, the Investment Funds may trade various financial instruments and enter into certain investment activities, which may give rise to off-balance-sheet risks, with the objective of capital appreciation or as economic hedges against other securities or the market as a whole. The Investment Funds’ investments may include futures, options, swaps and securities sold, not yet purchased. These financial instruments represent future commitments to purchase or sell other financial instruments or to exchange an amount of cash based on the change in an underlying instrument at specific terms at specified future dates. Risks arise with these financial instruments from potential counterparty non-performance and from changes in the market values of underlying instruments.

 

Credit concentrations may arise from investment activities and may be impacted by changes in economic, industry or political factors. The Investment Funds routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial services industry, resulting in credit concentration with respect to the financial services industry. In the ordinary course of business, the Investment Funds may also be subject to a concentration of credit risk to a particular counterparty. The Investment Funds seek to mitigate these risks by actively monitoring exposures, collateral requirements and the creditworthiness of its counterparties.

 

The Investment Funds have entered into various types of swap contracts with other counterparties. These agreements provide that they are entitled to receive or are obligated to pay in cash an amount equal to the increase or decrease, respectively, in the value of the underlying shares, debt and other instruments that are the subject of the contracts, during the period from inception of the applicable agreement to its expiration. In addition, pursuant to the terms of such agreements, they are entitled to receive or obligated to pay other amounts, including interest, dividends and other distributions made in respect of the underlying shares, debt and other instruments during the specified time frame. They are also required to pay to the counterparty a floating interest rate equal to the product of the notional amount multiplied by an agreed-upon rate, and they receive interest on any cash collateral that they post to the counterparty at the federal funds or LIBOR rate in effect for such period.

 

The Investment Funds may trade futures contracts. A futures contract is a firm commitment to buy or sell a specified quantity of a standardized amount of a deliverable grade commodity, security, currency or cash at a specified price and specified future date unless the contract is closed before the delivery date. Payments (or variation margin) are made or received by the Investment Funds each day, depending on the daily fluctuations in the value of the contract, and the whole value change is recorded as an unrealized gain or loss by the Investment Funds. When the contract is closed, the Investment Funds record a realized gain or loss equal to the difference between the value of the contract at the time it was opened and the value at the time it was closed.

 

21
 

 

The Investment Funds may utilize forward contracts to seek to protect their assets denominated in foreign currencies and precious metals holdings from losses due to fluctuations in foreign exchange rates and spot rates. The Investment Funds’ exposure to credit risk associated with non-performance of such forward contracts is limited to the unrealized gains or losses inherent in such contracts, which are recognized in other assets and accrued expenses and other liabilities in our consolidated balance sheets.

 

The Investment Funds may also enter into foreign currency contracts for purposes other than hedging denominated securities. When entering into a foreign currency forward contract, the Investment Funds agree to receive or deliver a fixed quantity of foreign currency for an agreed-upon price on an agreed-upon future date unless the contract is closed before such date. The Investment Funds record unrealized gains or losses on the contracts as measured by the difference between the forward foreign exchange rates at the dates of entry into such contracts and the forward rates at the reporting date.

 

Furthermore, the Investment Funds may also purchase and write option contracts. As a writer of option contracts, the Investment Funds receive a premium at the outset and then bear the market risk of unfavorable changes in the price of the underlying financial instrument. As a result of writing option contracts, the Investment Funds are obligated to purchase or sell, at the holder’s option, the underlying financial instrument. Accordingly, these transactions result in off-balance-sheet risk, as the Investment Funds’ satisfaction of the obligations may exceed the amount recognized in our consolidated balance sheets.

 

Certain terms of the Investment Funds’ contracts with derivative counterparties, which are standard and customary to such contracts, contain certain triggering events that would give the counterparties the right to terminate the derivative instruments. In such events, the counterparties to the derivative instruments could request immediate payment on derivative instruments in net liability positions.

 

Derivatives

 

From time to time, our subsidiaries enter into derivative contracts, including purchased and written option contracts, swap contracts, futures contracts and forward contracts. U.S. GAAP requires recognition of all derivatives as either assets or liabilities in the balance sheet at their fair value. The accounting for changes in fair value depends on the intended use of the derivative and its resulting designation. For those derivative instruments that are designated and qualify as hedging instruments, a company must designate the hedging instrument, based upon the exposure being hedged, as a fair value hedge, cash flow hedge or a hedge of a net investment in a foreign operation. Gains and losses related to a hedge are either recognized in income immediately to offset the gain or loss on the hedged item or are deferred and reported as a component of accumulated other comprehensive loss and subsequently recognized in earnings when the hedged item affects earnings. The change in fair value of the ineffective portion of a financial instrument, determined using the hypothetical derivative method, is recognized in earnings immediately. The gain or loss related to financial instruments that are not designated as hedges are recognized immediately in earnings. Cash flows related to hedging activities are included in the operating section of the consolidated statements of cash flows. For further information regarding our derivative contracts, see Note 6, “Financial Instruments.”

 

22
 

 

Marginal Loan Payable

 

The Company entered into a marginal loan agreement as part of its new trading account process in 2019 with brokerage firms, the Company’s brokerage to continue the purchase of securities and to fund the underfunded balance. The marginal loan payable bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date. The balance of this account as of June 30, 2021 is $33,792.

 

Leases

 

As discussed below, on January 1, 2019, we adopted FASB ASC Topic 842, Leases, using the modified retrospective approach, which does not require the application of this Topic to periods prior to January 1, 2019. The application of this Topic requires the recognition of right-of-use assets and related lease liabilities on the balance sheet for operating leases in which we are the lessee beginning in 2019. Financing leases under current U.S. GAAP are classified and accounted for in substantially the same manner as capital leases under prior U.S. GAAP and therefore, we do not distinguish between financing leases and capital leases unless the context requires. The determination of whether an arrangement is or contains a lease occurs at inception. We account for arrangements that contain lease and non-lease components as a single lease component for all classes of underlying assets. The Company does not have operating and financing leases as of June 30, 2021. The adoption of ASC 842 did not materially impact our results of operations, cash flows, or presentation thereof.

 

All Segments and Holding Company

 

Leases are classified as either operating or financing by the lessee depending on whether or not the lease terms provide for control of the underlying asset to be transferred to the lessee. When control transfers to the lessee, we classify the lease as a financing lease. All other leases are recorded as operating leases. Effective January 1, 2019, for all leases with an initial lease term in excess of twelve months, we record a right-of-use asset with a corresponding liability in the consolidated balance sheet. Right-of-use assets represent our right to use an underlying asset for the lease term and lease liabilities represent our obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease. Right-of-use assets and lease liabilities are recognized at commencement of the lease based on the present value of the lease payments over the lease term. Right-of-use assets are adjusted for any lease payments made on or before commencement of the lease, less any lease incentives received. As most of our leases do not provide an implicit rate, we use the incremental borrowing rate with respect to each of our businesses based on the information available at commencement of the lease in determining the present value of lease payments. We use the implicit rate when readily determinable. The lease terms used in the determination of our right-of-use assets and lease liabilities reflect any options to extend or terminate the lease when it is reasonably certain that we will exercise such option. We and our subsidiaries, independently of each other, apply a portfolio approach to account for the right-of-use assets and lease liabilities when we or our subsidiaries do not believe that applying the portfolio approach would be materially different from accounting for right-of-use assets and lease liabilities individually.

 

Operating lease costs are recorded as a single expense recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Operating lease right-of-use assets are amortized for the difference between the straight-line expense less the accretion of interest of the related lease liability. Financing lease costs consists of interest expense on the financing lease liability as well as amortization of the right-of-use financing lease assets on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

 

23
 

 

Real Estate

 

Leases are classified as either operating, sales-type or direct financing by the lessor which are account for in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 842. These assets leased to others are recorded at cost, net of accumulated depreciation, and are included in property, plant and equipment, net on our consolidated balance sheets. Assets leased to others are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the useful lives of the assets, ranging from 5 years to 39 years. Lease revenue is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Cash receipts for all lease payments received are included in net cash flows from operating activities in the consolidated statements of cash flows.

 

Current Holdings of Real Estate Investments:

 

As of June 30, 2021, the Company has no available-for-sale real estate properties.

 

Environmental Liabilities

 

We recognize environmental liabilities when a loss is probable and reasonably estimable. Estimates of these costs are based upon currently available facts, internal and third-party assessments of contamination, available remediation technology, site-specific costs, and currently enacted laws and regulations. In reporting environmental liabilities, no offset is made for potential recoveries. Loss contingency accruals, including those for environmental remediation, are subject to revision as further information develops or circumstances change, and such accruals can take into account the legal liability of other parties. Environmental expenditures are capitalized at the time of the expenditure when such costs provide future economic benefits.

 

Litigation

 

On an ongoing basis, we assess the potential liabilities related to any lawsuits or claims brought against us. While it is typically very difficult to determine the timing and ultimate outcome of such actions, we use our best judgment to determine if it is probable that we will incur an expense related to the settlement or final adjudication of such matters and whether a reasonable estimation of such probable loss, if any, can be made. In assessing probable losses, we make estimates of the amount of insurance recoveries, if any. We accrue a liability when we believe a loss is probable and the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated. Due to the inherent uncertainties related to the eventual outcome of litigation and potential insurance recovery, it is possible that certain matters may be resolved for amounts materially different from any provisions or disclosures that we have previously made.

 

Lending Investments

 

The company intends to invest through loans and equity in targeted community-anchored businesses, properties and other viable assets. These investments and loans are short-term and long-term in nature. The firm makes investments in debt securities and loans, public and private equity securities, and real estate. As at June 30, 2021, the Company owns and holds no investments.

 

Research and Development

 

Research and development costs are expensed as incurred.

 

24
 

 

Related Parties

 

The Company follows subtopic 850-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for the identification of related parties and disclosure of related party transactions. Pursuant to Section 850-10-20 the related parties include a. affiliates of the Company; b. entities for which investments in their equity securities would be required, absent the election of the fair value option under the Fair Value Option Subsection of Section 825–10–15, to be accounted for by the equity method by the investing entity; c. trusts for the benefit of employees, such as pension and profit-sharing trusts that are managed by or under the trusteeship of management; d. principal owners of the Company; e. management of the Company; f. other parties with which the Company may deal if one party controls or can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the other to an extent that one of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests; and g. other parties that can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the transacting parties or that have an ownership interest in one of the transacting parties and can significantly influence the other to an extent that one or more of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests.

 

The financial statements shall include disclosures of material related party transactions, other than compensation arrangements, expense allowances, and other similar items in the ordinary course of business. However, disclosure of transactions that are eliminated in the preparation of consolidated or combined financial statements is not required in those statements. The disclosures shall include: a. the nature of the relationship(s) involved b. description of the transactions, including transactions to which no amounts or nominal amounts were ascribed, for each of the periods for which income statements are presented, and such other information deemed necessary to an understanding of the effects of the transactions on the financial statements; c. the dollar amounts of transactions for each of the periods for which income statements are presented and the effects of any change in the method of establishing the terms from that used in the preceding period; and d. amounts due from or to related parties as of the date of each balance sheet presented and, if not otherwise apparent, the terms and manner of settlement.

 

Related Party Transactions

 

Affiliate Receivables and Payables

 

Alpharidge considers its Founders, managing directors, employees, significant shareholders and the Portfolio Companies to be affiliates. In addition, companies controlled by any of the above named is also classified as affiliates. As at June 30, 2021 and 2020, the Company’s controlling firm and significant stockholder advanced $456,424 to the Company for working capital. These advances are non-interest bearing and payable on demand. Details of Due from Affiliates and Due to Affiliates were comprised of the following:

 

    June 31,     December 31,  
    2021     2020  
Due from Affiliates                
    $ 0     $ 0  
                 
Due to Affiliates                
Due to Goldstein Franklin who have been  lending operating capital to the company   $ 0     $ 63,201  
Due to Los Angeles Community Capital – advance used to acquire Investment Real Estate and Entrepreneurship Development     456,424       540,524  
                 
Total   $ 456,424     $ 603,725  

 

25
 

 

NOTE 3 - INCOME TAXES

 

As of June 30, 2021 and 2020, the Company had a net operating loss carry forward of $2,013,928 and $2,445,316 respectively, which may be available to reduce future years’ taxable income through 2040. The company uses the tax rate of 38.5% for tax-assets estimates.

 

The provision for income taxes differs from the amount computed by applying the statutory federal income tax rate to income before provision for income taxes. The sources and tax effects of the differences for the periods presented are as follows:

 

    Percent     30-Jun-21     31-Dec-20  
                   
Federal statutory rates     34 %   $ (1,778,534 )   $ (2,159,500 )
State income taxes     5 %     (261,549 )     (317,573 )
Permanent differences     -0.5 %     26,155       31,757  
Valuation allowance against net deferred tax assets     -38.5 %     2,013,928       2,445,316  
Effective rate     0 %   $ -     $ -  

 

At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the significant components of the deferred tax assets are summarized below:

 

    31-Mar-21     31-Dec-20  
Deferred income tax asset                
Net operation loss carryforwards     5,230,981       6,351,470  
Total deferred income tax asset     2,013,928       2,445,316  
Less: valuation allowance     (2,013,928 )     (2,445,316 )
Total deferred income tax asset   $ -     $ -  

 

Realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon sufficient future taxable income during the period that deductible temporary differences and carry-forwards are expected to be available to reduce taxable income. Due to the change in ownership provisions of the Income Tax laws of the United States, 2021 and 2020 net operating loss carry forwards of approximately $2,013,928 and $2,445,316 respectively, for federal income tax reporting purposes may be subject to annual limitations. Should a change in ownership occur net operating loss carry forwards may be limited as to use in future years. As the realization of required future taxable income is uncertain, the Company recorded a valuation allowance.

 

26
 

 

NOTE 4– RECENTLY ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

Adoption of New Accounting Standards

 

Lease Accounting Standards Updates

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), which supersedes FASB ASC Topic 840, Leases. This ASU requires the recognition of right-of-use assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases classified as operating leases under previous guidance. In addition, among other changes to the accounting for leases, this ASU retains the distinction between finance leases and operating leases. The classification criteria for distinguishing between financing leases and operating leases are substantially similar to the classification criteria for distinguishing between capital leases and operating leases under previous guidance. Furthermore, quantitative and qualitative disclosures, including disclosures regarding significant judgments made by management, will be required. This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The amendments in this ASU should be applied using a modified retrospective approach. In addition, in July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-11, Leases (Topic 842), which provides an additional (and optional) transition method to adopt the new leases standard. We adopted the new leases standards using the new transition method option effective January 1, 2019, which required a cumulative-effect adjustment recognized in equity at such date. No adjustment to prior period presentation and disclosure were required. The adoption of this standard did not have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

Other Accounting Standards Updates

 

In March 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-08, Premium Amortization on Purchased Callable Debt Securities, which amends FASB ASC Sub-Topic 310-20, Receivables-Nonrefundable Fees and Other Costs. This ASU amends the amortization period for certain purchased callable debt securities held at a premium by shortening the amortization period for the premium to the earliest call date. This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years. We have adopted this standard on January 1, 2019 using the modified retrospective application method. The adoption of this standard did not have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-12, Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities, which amends FASB ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging. This ASU includes amendments to existing guidance to better align an entity’s risk management activities and financial reporting for hedging relationships through changes to both the designation and measurement guidance for qualifying hedging relationships and the presentation of hedge results. This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years. We have adopted this standard on January 1, 2019. The adoption of this standard did not have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

27
 

 

In February 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income, which amends FASB ASC Topic 220, Income Statement - Reporting Comprehensive Income. This ASU allows a reclassification out of accumulated other comprehensive loss within equity for standard tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and consequently, eliminates the stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The adoption of this standard did not have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, which amends FASB ASC Topic 326, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses. In addition, in May 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-05, Targeted Transition Relief, which updates FASB ASU 2016-13. These ASU’s require financial assets measured at amortized cost to be presented at the net amount to be collected and broadens the information, including forecasted information incorporating more timely information, that an entity must consider in developing its expected credit loss estimate for assets measured. These ASU’s are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early application is permitted for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018. Most of our financial assets are excluded from the requirements of this standard as they are measured at fair value or are subject to other accounting standards. In addition, certain of our other financial assets are short-term in nature and therefore are not likely to be subject to significant credit losses beyond what is already recorded under current accounting standards. As a result, we currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurements, which amends FASB ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements. This ASU eliminates, modifies and adds various disclosure requirements for fair value measurements. This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Certain disclosures are required to be applied using a retrospective approach and others using a prospective approach. Early adoption is permitted. The various disclosure requirements being eliminated, modified or added are not significant to us. As a result, we currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That is a Service Contract, which amends FASB ASC Subtopic 350-40, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other-Internal-Use Software. This ASU adds certain disclosure requirements related to implementation costs incurred for internal-use software and cloud computing arrangements. The amendment aligns the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use software (and hosting arrangements that include an internal-use software license). This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The amendments in this ASU should be applied either using a retrospective or prospective approach. Early adoption is permitted. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

28
 

 

In August 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-15 on “Presentation of Financial Statements Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40) – Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern”. Currently, there is no guidance in U.S. GAAP about management’s responsibility to evaluate whether there is substantial doubt about an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern or to provide related footnote disclosures. The amendments in this update provide such guidance. In doing so, the amendments are intended to reduce diversity in the timing and content of footnote disclosures. The amendments require management to assess an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern by incorporating and expanding upon certain principles that are currently in U.S. auditing standards. Specifically, the amendments (1) provide a definition of the term substantial doubt, (2) require an evaluation every reporting period including interim periods, (3) provide principles for considering the mitigating effect of management’s plans, (4) require certain disclosures when substantial doubt is alleviated as a result of consideration of management’s plans, (5) require an express statement and other disclosures when substantial doubt is not alleviated, and (6) require an assessment for a period of one year after the date that the financial statements are issued (or available to be issued). The amendments in this update are effective for public and nonpublic entities for annual periods ending after December 15, 2016. Early adoption is permitted. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In January 2013, the FASB issued ASU No. 2013-01, “Balance Sheet (Topic 210): Clarifying the Scope of Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities.” This ASU clarifies that the scope of ASU No. 2011-11, “Balance Sheet (Topic 210): Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities.” applies only to derivatives, repurchase agreements and reverse purchase agreements, and securities borrowing and securities lending transactions that are either offset in accordance with specific criteria contained in FASB Accounting Standards Codification or subject to a master netting arrangement or similar agreement. The amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning on or after January 1, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2013, the FASB issued ASU No. 2013-02, “Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Reporting of Amounts Reclassified Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income.” The ASU adds new disclosure requirements for items reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income by component and their corresponding effect on net income. The ASU is effective for public entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2013, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, issued ASU No. 2013-04, “Liabilities (Topic 405): Obligations Resulting from Joint and Several Liability Arrangements for which the Total Amount of the Obligation Is Fixed at the Reporting Date.” This ASU addresses the recognition, measurement, and disclosure of certain obligations resulting from joint and several arrangements including debt arrangements, other contractual obligations, and settled litigation and judicial rulings. The ASU is effective for public entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

29
 

 

In March 2013, the FASB issued ASU No. 2013-05, “Foreign Currency Matters (Topic 830): Parent’s Accounting for the Cumulative Translation Adjustment upon Derecognition of Certain Subsidiaries or Groups of Assets within a Foreign Entity or of an Investment in a Foreign Entity.” This ASU addresses the accounting for the cumulative translation adjustment when a parent either sells a part or all of its investment in a foreign entity or no longer holds a controlling financial interest in a subsidiary or group of assets that is a nonprofit activity or a business within a foreign entity. The guidance outlines the events when cumulative translation adjustments should be released into net income and is intended by FASB to eliminate some disparity in current accounting practice. This ASU is effective prospectively for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In March 2013, the FASB issued ASU 2013-07, “Presentation of Financial Statements (Topic 205): Liquidation Basis of Accounting.” The amendments require an entity to prepare its financial statements using the liquidation basis of accounting when liquidation is imminent. Liquidation is imminent when the likelihood is remote that the entity will return from liquidation and either (a) a plan for liquidation is approved by the person or persons with the authority to make such a plan effective and the likelihood is remote that the execution of the plan will be blocked by other parties or (b) a plan for liquidation is being imposed by other forces (for example, involuntary bankruptcy). If a plan for liquidation was specified in the entity’s governing documents from the entity’s inception (for example, limited-life entities), the entity should apply the liquidation basis of accounting only if the approved plan for liquidation differs from the plan for liquidation that was specified at the entity’s inception. The amendments require financial statements prepared using the liquidation basis of accounting to present relevant information about an entity’s expected resources in liquidation by measuring and presenting assets at the amount of the expected cash proceeds from liquidation. The entity should include in its presentation of assets any items it had not previously recognized under U.S. GAAP but that it expects to either sell in liquidation or use in settling liabilities (for example, trademarks). The amendments are effective for entities that determine liquidation is imminent during annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2013, and interim reporting periods therein. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

We have reviewed all the recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting pronouncements. Management does not believe that any recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting standards could have a material effect on the accompanying financial statements. As new accounting pronouncements are issued, we will adopt those that are applicable under the circumstances.

 

NOTE 5 - STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

The Company is authorized to issue 1,200,000,000 shares of common stock, $0.001 par value and 10,000,000 preferred stocks, $0.001 par value. Voting rights are not cumulative and, therefore, the holders of more than 50% of the common stock could, if they chose to do so, elect all of the directors of the Company.

 

As of June 30, 2021 and 2020, there were 42,724,687 shares of common stock respectively, issued and outstanding held by 159 stockholders of record. The company had no transactions in its common stock during three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020. As of June 30, 2021, there were 1,000,001 and 1 share of preferred stock issued and outstanding held by 2 stockholder of record.

 

30
 

 

Minority Interest

 

Noncontrolling interests in consolidated subsidiaries in the consolidated balance sheets represent minority stockholders’ proportionate share of the equity (deficit) in such subsidiaries. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. As at June 30, 2021, minority shareholders’ proportionate share of the entity is three (3) percent and reflected in the equity section of the balance sheet.

 

NOTE 6 – GOING CONCERN

 

The Company’s financial statements are prepared using accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America applicable to a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has not yet established a source of revenues to cover its operating costs and allow it to continue as a going concern. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent on the Company obtaining adequate capital to fund operating losses until it becomes profitable. If the Company is unable to obtain adequate capital, it could be forced to cease operations.

 

Management intends to focus on raising additional funds for the first and second quarters going forward. We cannot provide any assurance or guarantee that we will be able to generate revenues. Potential investors must be aware if the Company were unable to raise additional funds through the sale of our common stock and generate sufficient revenues, any investment made into the Company would be lost in its entirety.

 

The Company has net has accumulated deficit for the years ended June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 of $5,230,981 and $6,351,470 respectively. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent upon its ability to successfully accomplish the plans described in the preceding paragraph and eventually secure other sources of financing and attain profitable operations. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary if the Company is unable to continue as a going concern.

 

NOTE 7 – LONG TERM LOAN

 

As at June 30, 2021, the Company has only related party long term loan, which is discussed in Note 9 under Related Parties Line of Credit.

 

NOTE 8 - RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

The managing member, CEO and director of the Company is involved in other business activities and may, in the future, become involved in other business opportunities. If a specific business opportunity becomes available, he may face a conflict in selecting between the Company and his other business interests. The Company is formulating a policy for the resolution of such conflicts.

 

31
 

 

The Company had the following related party transactions:

 

  Line of Credit – On September 15, 2019, the Company entered into a line of credit agreement in the amount of $41,200 with Goldstein Franklin, Inc. which is owned and operated by Frank I. Igwealor, Chief Executive Officer of the Company. The maturity date of the line of credit is February 15, 2020. The line of credit agreement was amended to the amount of $190,000 and maturity date of September 14, 2022. The line of credit bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date. As of June 30, 2021, the Company had repaid the entire balance on the LOC.
     
  Line of credit - On May 5, 2020, the Company entered into a line of credit agreement in the amount of $1,500,000 with Los Angeles Community Capital, which is owned and operated by Frank I. Igwealor, Chief Executive Officer of the Company. The maturity date of the line of credit is May 4, 2025. The line of credit bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date. The Company has drawn $456,424 from the line of credit as of June 30, 2021.

 

The company’s principal shareholder has advanced the Company most of the money it uses to fund working capital expenses. This advance is unsecured and does not carry an interest rate or repayment terms. As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company has $456,424 and $540,524, respectively, in long-term loans obligation from related parties.

 

The Company does not own any property. It currently shares a leased office with two other organizations that are affiliated to its principal shareholder at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, California 90501. Its principal shareholder and seasonal staff use this location. The approximate cost of the shared office space varies between $650 and $850 per month.

 

NOTE 9 – LINE OF CREDIT – RELATED PARTY

 

The Company considers its founders, managing directors, employees, significant shareholders, and the portfolio Companies to be affiliates. In addition, companies controlled by any of the above named is also classified as affiliates.

 

Line of credit from related party consisted of the following:

    June 30,
2021
    December 31,
2020
 
September 2019 (line of credit) - Line of credit with maturity date of September 14, 2022 with 0% interest per annum with unpaid principal balance and accrued interest payable on the maturity date.   $ 0     $ 63,632  
May 20, 2020 (line of credit) Line of credit with maturity date of May 4, 2025 with 0% interest per annum with unpaid principal balance and accrued interest payable on the maturity date.     456,424       540,524  
Total Line of credit - related party     456,424       603,725  
Less: current portion             (63,632 )
Total Long-term Line of credit - related party   $ 456,424     $ 540,524  

 

32
 

 

Goldstein Franklin, Inc. - $190,000 line of credit

 

On February 28, 2020, the Company amended its line of credit agreement to increase it to the amount of $190,000 with maturity date of September 14, 2022. The line of credit bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date. As of June 30, 2021, the Company had $0 balance due on this LOC.

 

Los Angeles Community Capital - $1,500,000 line of credit

 

On May 5, 2020, the Company amended its line of credit agreement to increase it to the amount of $1,500,000 with maturity date of May 4, 2025. The line of credit bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date.

 

10 SALES – INVESTMENT PROPERTY

 

Sales and other disposition of properties from Real Estate Investments holdings:

 

Dispositions

 

      30-Jun-20       31-Dec-20  
                 
Description                
Sales - Investment property   $ 700,385     $ 1,205,000  
Cost:                
Closing costs             (11,522 )
Commissions Paid     (35,019 )     (60,645 )
Developer Fees             (95,750 )
Escrow & Title     (3,617 )     (6,714 )
Investment property sold     (674,846 )     (917,825 )
Mortgage Payoff             (51,879 )
Property Taxes     (1,386 )     (20,064 )
Recording Charges     (4,213 )     (7,048 )
Seller Credit             (8,380 )
Miscellaneous Debits/Credits     (3,261 )     (8,380 )
Total costs     (722,341 )     (1,179,827 )
                 
Gain on real estate investment sales   $ (21,956 )   $ 25,173  

 

33
 

 

NOTE 11 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

The Company has no real property and do not presently owned any interests in real estate. 30% of the total office space was allocated for its office use and the rent would be shared with two other related organizations controlled by the director. At present, there is no written lease with the landlord and the rent is on a month-to-month basis. The Company’s executive, administrative and operating offices are located at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, California 90501. Its principal shareholder and seasonal staff use this location. The approximate cost of the shared office space varies between $650 and $850 per month. The Company intends to start recording rent expense of $7,800 for the year that would end December 31, 2022. Management believed that the current facilities are adequate and that any additional suitable space will be available as maybe required. The anticipated rental obligation for office space through 2022 is $7,800.

 

From time to time, the Company may be involved in certain legal actions and claims arising in the normal course of business. Management is of the opinion that such matters will be resolved without material effect on the Company’s financial condition or results of operations.

 

NOTE 12 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

In accordance with ASC 855, Subsequent Events, the Company has evaluated subsequent events occurring after June 30, 2021 through August 21, 2021.

 

Management has reviewed subsequent events through August 21, 2021, the date at which Financial Statements were issued, and determined there were no other items to disclose.

 

34
 

 

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (this “Quarterly Report”) contains forward-looking statements. The Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) encourages companies to disclose forward-looking information so that investors can better understand a company’s future prospects and make informed investment decisions. This Quarterly Report and other written and oral statements that we make from time to time contain such forward-looking statements that set out anticipated results based on management’s plans and assumptions regarding future events or performance. We have tried, wherever possible, to identify such statements by using words such as “anticipate,”“estimate,”“expect,”“project,”“intend,”“plan,”“believe,”“will” and similar expressions in connection with any discussion of future operating or financial performance. In particular, these include statements relating to future actions, future performance or results of current and anticipated sales efforts, expenses, the outcome of contingencies, such as legal proceedings, and financial results.

 

We caution that the factors described herein, and other factors could cause our actual results of operations and financial condition to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements we make and that investors should not place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements. Further, any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which such statement is made, and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which such statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of anticipated or unanticipated events or circumstances. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all of such factors. Further, we cannot assess the impact of each such factor on our results of operations or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

 

General

 

Business Overview

 

GiveMePower Corporation operates and manages a portfolio of real estate and financial services assets and operations to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources. Givemepower is primarily focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate properties and businesses in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America. This Offering represents the commencement of the Banking and financial services division of our business. This Offering will enable GMPW to become a financial technology company (FINTEC) business that (1) one-to-four branch federally licensed bank in each jurisdiction, (2) a machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) enabled loan and insurance underwriting platform, (3) blockchain-powered transaction processing and payment systems, (4) cryptocurrency transaction processing platform, and (5) emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio; giving access to the unbanked, underserved residents of majorly black communities across the United State. This is the fulfillment of mission of operating and managing a portfolio of real estate and financial services assets and operations to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources, with a primary focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate properties and businesses in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America. Our FINTEC operations would cover the basic areas of traditional banking-digitally enhance, ML and Ai enabled lending and insurance underwriting, areas of private equity, business lending and venture capital that invest in young black entrepreneurs, and seeding their viable business plans/ideas on block-chain-powered financial services delivery platform that connects, black entrepreneurs, black borrowers, consumers, banks, and institutional investors. Our real estate division invests in Opportunity Zones, Affordable Housing, and specialized real estate properties.

 

Business History

 

GiveMePower Corporation (the “PubCo” or “Company”), a Nevada corporation, was incorporated on June 7, 2001 to sell software geared to end users and developers involved in the design, manufacture, and construction of engineered products located in Canada and the United States. GiveMePower was originally incorporated in Alberta, Canada as GiveMePower.com Inc. on April 18, 2000, to sell software and web-based services geared to businesses involved in the design, manufacture, and construction of engineered products throughout North America. Effective September 15, 2000, the Company amended its Articles of Incorporation to change its corporate name to GiveMePower Inc. The founder of the Company began the implementation of this business plan under his 100%-owned private company, Sundance Marketing International Inc. (Sundance). Sundance has been in existence since 1991 and at one time was a market leader in the distribution of survey, mapping and infrastructure design software in the Canadian marketplace. On April 15, 1999, Mr. Walton entered into a license agreement with Felix Computer Aided Technologies GmbH (Felix) for the exclusive rights to distribute FCAD software in North America.

 

35
 

 

On December 20, 2000, the Company entered into a Plan and Agreement of Reorganization to undertake a reverse merger with a National Quotation Bureau public company called TelNet World Communications, Inc. (TelNet). TelNet was originally incorporated in the State of Utah on March 10, 1972 as Tropic Industries, Inc. (Tropic). Tropic became United Datacopy, Incorporated on February 24, 1987 which became Pen International, Inc. on March 21, 1994 and then TelNet World Communications, Inc. on March 4, 1998. TelNet had no operations nor any working capital when the Company entered into the reverse merger with it. GMP acquired the rights, title and interest to the domain name, givemepower.com from Sundance on February 16, 2001. In addition, Sundance agreed to assign its existing customer base to GMP and further agreed that it would terminate its license agreement with Felix immediately upon GMP securing its own agreement with Felix. GMP renegotiated the exclusive rights to co-develop, re-brand and distribute FCAD software in North America effective February 16, 2001. Effective July 5, 2001 the Company changed the name of TelNet to GiveMePower Corporation and changed the domicile from Utah to Nevada.

 

The PubCo has been dormant and non-operating since year 2009. PubCo is a public reporting company registered with the Securities Exchange Commissioner (“SEC”). In November 2009, the Company filed Form 15D, Suspension of Duty to Report, and as a result, the Company was not required to file any SEC forms since November 2009.

 

On December 31, 2019, PubCo sold one Special 2019 series A preferred share (“Series A Share”) for $38,000 to Goldstein Franklin, Inc. (“Goldstein”), a California corporation. One Series A Share is convertible to 100,000,000 shares of common stocks at any time. The Series A Share also provided with 60% voting rights of the PubCo. On the same day, Goldstein sold one-member unit of Alpharidge Capital, LLC (“Alpharidge”), a California limited liability corporation, representing 100% member owner of Alpharidge. As a result, Alpharidge become a wholly owned subsidiary of PubCo as of December 31, 2019.

 

The Company’s operating structure did not change as a result of the change of control, however, following the transaction on December 31, 2019, in which Goldstein Franklin, Inc. acquired control of the Company, Goldstein transferred one of its operating subsidiaries, Alpharidge Capital LLC into GMPW to become one of the Company’s operating subsidiaries. As the result of above transaction, Alpharidge Capital LLC became the Company’s wholly owned operating subsidiary of the Company.

 

Alpharidge Capital LLC (“Alpharidge”) was formed under the laws of the State of California on August 30, 2019. Alpharidge has two distinct lines of businesses that comprise: (1) a specialty biopharmaceutical holding company focused on building portfolio of real estate investment properties and equity positions in select companies within select industries; and (2) an event-driven investment management operation that invests in equities, warrants, bonds and options of public and private companies in America and across the globe.

 

On September 16, 2020, as part of its sales of unregistered securities to Kid Castle Educational Corporation, company related to, and controlled by GMPW President and CEO, the Company, for $3 in cash and 1,000,000 shares of its preferred stock, acquired 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (“CED Capital”), a California Limited Liability Company, and 97% of the issued and outstanding shares of Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), a California corporation. This transaction was accounted for under the Consolidation Method using the variable interest entity (VIE) model wherein the Company consolidates all investees operating results if the Company expects to assume more than 50% of another entity’s expected losses or gains. The 1,000,000 shares of our preferred stock sold to Kid Castle Educational Corporation gave to Kid Castle, approximately 87% voting control of Givemepower Corporation.

 

On April 21, 2021, the Company sold Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), a California corporation, to Premier Information Management, Inc. for $1 in cash. As further consideration pursuant to the stated sales, CBDX returned Kid Castle Educational Inc., the parent Company of GMPW, the 100,000 shares of KDCE preferred stock and 900,000,000 shares of KDCE common stock that CBDX bought in October of 2019. Pursuant to the April 21, 2021 transaction, CBDX ceased from being a subsidiary of GMPW, effective April 1, 2021.

 

36
 

 

The consolidated financial statements of the Company therefore include its wholly owned subsidiaries of Alpharidge Capital LLC. (“Alpharidge”), Community Economic Development Capital, LLC. (“CED Capital”), and subsidiaries, in which GiveMePower has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”), after elimination of intercompany transactions and accounts.

 

Most Recent Addition to Our Business and Organization

 

Crypto Currency Mining Operation

 

During the period between March 3 to March 16 2021, the Company tried unsuccessfully, to acquire Bitcentro/Buzzmehome’s CryptoCurrency mining operations in Canada for $500,000 in cash. The deal fell through because of misunderstanding between parties as to the timing and duration of due diligence period.

 

After the failed acquisition attempt, the Company contracted with Brady Fernandes, a Los Angeles resident who claimed expertise in the crypto mining industry. The Company contracted with Brady for $9,200 to commence the project of helping the company to build out its own in-house cryptocurrency mining farm. Brady has commenced building our first rig and has also ordered the necessary equipment to add rigs to our crypto currency mining farm. On April 28, 2021, the Company paid additional $10,000 to Mr. Fernandez for ordering additional equipment for building out it crypto currency mining farm.

 

We have dedicated a line-item, “Crypto Currency Mining Rigs,” on our balance to track all our investments in the Crypto Currency Mining Operation. We plan to build out a fully operating farm in California, using solar energy to mitigate the high cost of energy in California.

 

Current Business and Organization - Alpharidge

 

The Company, through its three wholly owned subsidiaries, Alpharidge Capital, LLC (“Alpharidge”), Malcom Wingate Cush Franklin LLC (“MWCF”), and Opportunity Zone Capital LLC (“OZC”), seeks to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources as follows:

 

  Alpharidge and OZC Real estate operations – Real estate operations would consist primarily of rental real estate, affordable housing projects, opportunity zones, other property development and associated HOA activities. OZC development operations would be primarily through a real estate investment, management and development subsidiary that focuses primarily on the construction and sale of single-family and multi-family homes, lots in subdivisions and planned communities, and raw land for residential development; and
     
  MWCF financial empowerment – MWCF would utilize operate the tools of financial education/training, mergers and acquisitions, private equity and business lending to invest and empower young black entrepreneurs, seeding their viable business plans and ideas and creating jobs in their communities. MWCF is primarily focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate in opportunity zones and other distressed neighbourhood across America.
     
  Cash Management, Opportunistic and Event-Driven Investments: The Company keeps no more than 10% of its total assets in liquid cash or investments portfolio, which is actively managed by its directors and officers and invest primarily in equity investments on a long and short basis. The Company’s cash management policy which requires that the Company actively invests its excess cash into stocks, bonds and other securities is intended to provide the company greater levels of liquidity and current income. The Company uses proprietary trading models to capitalize on real-time market anomalies and generate ongoing income in the forms similar to hedge funds. Where necessary, the Company uses seeded entities to pursue real-time market transactions in publicly traded securities including but not limited to stocks, bonds, options, futures, forex, warrants, and other instruments.

 

37
 

 

Current Business and Organization - CED Capital

 

Community Economic Development Capital, LLC. (“CED Capital”), a California limited liability company, is a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including, affordable housing, opportunity zones properties, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services. CED Capital principal business objective is to maximize returns through a combination of (1) generating good profit while making substantial social impact, (2) sustainable long-term growth in cash flows from increased rents, and (3) potential long-term appreciation in the value of its properties from capital gains upon future sale. The Company is engaged primarily in the ownership, operation, management, acquisition, development and redevelopment of predominantly multifamily housing and specialized industrial properties in the United States. Additionally, its specialized industrial property strategy is to acquire and own a portfolio of specialized industrial properties, including multifamily properties. This strategy includes the following components:

 

  [  ] Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Income. The Company intends to acquire multifamily housings, economic development real estates and multifamily properties. The Company expects to hold acquired properties for investment and to generate stable and increasing rental income from leasing these properties to licensed growers.
     
  [  ] Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Appreciation. The Company intends to lease its acquired properties under long-term, triple-net leases. However, from time to time, the Company may elect to sell one or more properties if the Company believes it to be in the best interests of its stockholders. Accordingly, the Company will seek to acquire properties that it believes also have potential for long-term appreciation in value.
     
  [  ] Affordable Housing. Its motto is: “acquiring distressed/troubled properties, securing generous government subsidies, empowering low-income families, and generating above-market returns to investors.”
     
  [  ] Preserving Financial Flexibility on the Company’s Balance Sheet. The Company intends to focus on maintaining a conservative capital structure, in order to provide us flexibility in financing its growth initiatives.

 

BlackBank, Blockchain-Powered Fintech, Ai and ML Enabled Lending, and CryptoCurrency Deals

 

The Company intends to actualize its banking and financial services operations goals through acquisition and management of (1) a one-to-four branch bank that is federally licensed in each jurisdiction; (2) a machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (Ai) enabled loan and insurance underwriting platform; (3) blockchain-powered transaction processing and payment systems; (4) cryptocurrency transaction processing platform; and (5) emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio; a combination of three of which would connects consumers, banks, institutional investors, and ensure access to the unbanked and underserved residents of majorly black communities across the United State of America.

 

(1) BlackBank - Proposed Federally licensed one-four branch bank

 

Jurisdictionally, GMPW intend to acquire and manage one-four branch bank in each of its relevant jurisdictional domain. Owning/controlling a bank or banks with branches across every urban/black neighborhood in the United States is not our goal. Rather we would be content to own a one-four branch bank in every relevant jurisdiction to allow us to initiate/conduct ML-Ai enabled and blockchain-powered digitized banking that is accessible to all black person and businesses across the United States. We intend to start our banking acquisition by finding targets that operates one-four branches. We intend to start with the acquisition of one-four branch bank, whose operation and back-office would be migrated unto a Blockchain-powered platform to digitize its entire banking operation to cover and serve all black persons in the United States. We believe that blockchain technology is one of the most suited platform to implement, run and manage a U.S. wide digitized banking services whose reach encompasses most black persons living in the United States.

 

(2) Machine-Learning and Ai (AI) Enabled Lending and Insurance Underwriting Platform

 

Once it has raised sufficient capital (proposed $10 million offering), the Company intends to launch the Company’s cloud-based machine learning and artificial intelligence lending platform. It is our believe that Machine-Learning (ML) and Artificial intelligence (AI), lending and insurance underwriting platform would enable a superior loan product with improved economics that can be shared between consumers and lenders. The proposed platform would aggregate consumer demand for high-quality loans and connects it to our soon-to-be-build network of ML-AI-enabled investors, lenders and bank partners. Consumers on the ML-AI platform would benefit from a highly automated, efficient, all-digital experience. Our prospective bank partners would benefit from access to new customers, lower fraud and loss rates, and increased automation throughout the lending process.

 

38
 

 

Credit is a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, and access to affordable credit is central to unlocking upward mobility and opportunity. The FICO score was invented in 1989 and remains the standard for determining who is approved for credit and at what interest rate. (Rob Kaufman, myFico Blog: The History of the FICO Score, August 2018). While FICO is rarely the only input in a lending decision, most banks use simple, rules-based systems that consider only a limited number of variables. Unfortunately, because legacy credit systems fail to properly identify and quantify risk, millions of creditworthy individuals are left out of the system, and millions more pay too much to borrow money. (Patrice Ficklin and Paul Watkins, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Blog: An Update on Credit Access and the Bureau’s First No-Action Letter, August 2019).

 

The first generation of online lenders focused on bringing credit online. Analogous to earlier internet pioneers, these companies made shopping for and accessing credit simpler and easier for consumers and businesses. It was no longer necessary to stand in line at a bank branch, to sit across the desk from a loan officer and to wait weeks or months for a decision. These lenders enabled the emergence of personal loan products that were previously unprofitable for banks to offer. While they brought the credit process online, they inherited the decision frameworks that banks had used for decades and did not address the more rewarding and challenging opportunity of reinventing the credit decision.

 

GMPW intend to leverage the power of AI to more accurately quantify the true risk of a loan. The ML- AI models would be built to continuously self-upgrade, train and refine many critical components of lending risk analytics and decision-making on a real-time basis. We intend to build discrete ML- AI models that target fee optimization, income fraud, acquisition targeting, loan stacking, prepayment prediction, identity fraud and time-delimited default prediction. These models would be designed to incorporate multiple lending underwriting variables and utilize training dataset that accounts for varieties of repayment events. It is also anticipated that the network effects generated by constantly improving ML- AI models would provide a significant competitive advantage—and more training data would lead to higher approval rates and lower interest rates at the same loss rate

 

(3) Blockchain-Powered Digital Currency Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform (“Blackchain”)

 

The Company intends to acquire an existing, or build-from-the-scratch, a Blockchain-Powered Digital Currency Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform (“Blackchain”), with home in the BlackBank alongside the ML-AI lending platform. Blockchain-powered Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform would also provide efficient and inexpensive payment platform and merchant services to black businesses across the United States.

 

The company would establish an exchange network called Blackchain Exchange Network (“BEN”), a Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform, would be a wholly-owned subsidiary, the BlackBank. We believe Blackchain would be a leading provider of innovative financial infrastructure solutions and services to participants in the nascent and expanding digital currency industry. Blackchain business strategy is floating a Blackchain Exchange Network, or BEN, a virtually instantaneous payment network for participants in the digital currency industry which would serve as a platform for the development of additional products and services. The BEN would have a network effect that would make it valuable as participants and utilization increase, leading to good growth in BEN transaction volumes. The BEN would enable the BlackBank to prioritize, build and significantly grow noninterest bearing deposit product for digital currency industry participants, which is expected to provide the majority of our bank funding in the next two years from finalizing acquisition. This unique source of funding would be a distinctive advantage over most traditional financial institutions and allows BlackBank to generate revenue from a conservative portfolio of investments in cash, short term securities and ML-Ai enabled loans that we believe generate attractive risk-adjusted returns. In addition, use of the BEN would result in an increase in noninterest income that we believe will become a valuable source of additional future revenue as we develop and deploy blockchain-powered, fee-based solutions in connection with our digital currency initiative. We would also evaluate additional products or product enhancements specifically targeted at providing further financial infrastructure solutions to our customers and strengthening BEN network effects.

 

39
 

 

Blackchain Business Overview

 

Once acquired, the Federally licensed one-four branch bank would be such that is already providing banking and financial services including commercial banking, business lending, commercial and residential real estate lending and mortgage warehouse lending, all funded primarily by interest bearing deposits and borrowings. To that up and running banking and financial services operation, we intend to insert a Blockchain-powered payment and transaction processing system and digital currency platform. We intend to pursue digital currency customers and bring them into the BlackBank to bank with us using digital currency. We believe we could effectively leverage the traditional commercial bank platform, the ML-Ai enabled lending platform and the attributes of the BEN to gain traction in the digital currency banking industry.

 

We intend to focus on the digital currency initiative as the core of our future strategy and direction. We intend to build a leadership position in the digital currency industry as a result of the BEN to enable us to establish a significant balance of noninterest bearing deposits from digital currency customer base. Over several post-acquisition years, BlackBank would have transitioned from a traditional asset based bank model focused on loan generation to a deposit and solutions based model focused on increasing noninterest bearing deposits and noninterest income. This emphasis on noninterest bearing deposits and noninterest income, is primarily associated with digital currency, will likely result in a significant shift in BlackBank’s asset composition with a greater percentage consisting of liquid assets such as interest earning deposits in other banks and investment securities, and a corresponding decrease in the percentage of loans. Most of our actions would be focused on developing and delivering highly scalable and operationally efficient solutions for BlackBank’s digital currency customers.

 

(4) Emerging Cryptocurrency Opportunities Portfolio

 

The emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio is the wildcard of our FINTEC business model. While the goals are clear, because it is a wildcard, there is no outline on what to expect or how it should be run. GMPW needs these flexibilities because many established companies are jumping into the crypocurrency opportunities on a minutes notice. For example, in 2020, Microstrategy decided to move their treasury into bitcoin as part of their cash management strategy. Marathon Patent Group moved into cryptocurrency mining as a business model. Overstock has been in cryptocurrency for a while. Square and Paypal just joined the bandwagon of American companies that try to find and exploit opportunities in the crypto currency industry without abandoning their actual businesses. GMPW’s emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio would not be different. The company would on an ongoing basis evaluate and consider investments into potentially viable cryptocurrency opportunities anywhere.

 

Black-Bank Recitations

 

The Black-Bank is a financial institution that creates, aggregates, facilitates, builds, grows, promotes, preserves and redistributes wealth to black persons. The Black-Bank was founded on 13th day of June, 2014, when certain of the descendants of Cush, the eldest son of Ham, a son of Noah, resolved to establish a bank, a financial services company to: (1) cater to black persons’ banking needs, (2) finance projects that primarily benefit black persons, (3) capitalize viable ideas by black persons, (4) fund wealth creation and community economic development visions of black persons, (5) invest in black entrepreneurs, and (6) empower black men and women across the earth to pursue worthy dreams and build great communities. The premier Black-Bank shall be headquartered in the United States of America, the land of the free and home to the brave; a land where providence had strategically place many of the best of the descendants of Cush. The bank will transact and promote activities across the earth to-and-fro beyond the rivers of Cush (Zephaniah. 3:10 (NIV)). The purpose of the establishment of this entity is to promote and carter to the financial and economic interest of black people, therefore, it shall be called or referred to as the Black Bank (Jeremiah 13:23). The Black Bank will harvest and finance the implementation of the bests of the ideas and visions of the forebears from Cush to Simon of Cyrene, Marcus Garvey, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B Dubois, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Patrice Lumumba, Thomas Sankara, Toussaint Louverture and Steve Biko for the prosperity and wellbeing of black persons across the face of the earth.”

 

40
 

 

Competition

 

Our business is highly competitive. We are in direct competition with more established private equity firms, private investors and management companies. Many management companies offer similar products and services for business rollups and consolidations. We may be at a substantial disadvantage to our competitors who have more capital than we do to carry out acquisition, operations and restructuring efforts. These competitors may have competitive advantages, such as greater name recognition, larger capital-base, marketing, research and acquisition resources, access to larger customer bases and channel partners, a longer operating history and lower labor and development costs, which may enable them to respond more quickly to new or emerging opportunities and changes in customer requirements or devote greater resources to the development, acquisition and promotion.

 

Increased competition could result in us failing to attract significant capital or maintaining them. If we are unable to compete successfully against current and future competitors, our business and financial condition may be harmed.

 

We hope to maintain our competitive advantage by keeping abreast of market dynamism that is face by our industry, and by utilizing the experience, knowledge, and expertise of our management team. Moreover, we believe that we distinguish ourselves in the ways our model envisaged transformation of businesses.

 

Government Regulation

 

Our activities currently are subject to no particular regulation by governmental agencies other than that routinely imposed on corporate businesses. However, we may be subject to the rules governing acquisition and disposition of businesses, real estates and personal properties in each of the state where we have our operations. We may also be subject to various state laws designed to protect buyers and sellers of businesses. We cannot predict the impact of future regulations on either us or our business model.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We currently have no patents, trademarks or other registered intellectual property. We do not consider the grant of patents, trademarks or other registered intellectual property essential to the success of our business.

 

Employees

 

We do not have a W-2 employee at the present. The bulk of the administration of our operating activities is shouldered by Goldstein Franklin, a California public accounting firm and our controlling shareholder. Frank Ikechukwu Igwealor, our President, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, is our only full-time staff as of June 30, 2021, pending when we could formalize an employment contract for him. In addition to Mr. Igwealor, we have three part-time unpaid staff who helps with bookkeeping and administrative chores. Most of our part-time staff, officers, and directors will devote their time as needed to our business and are expect to devote at least 15 hours per week to our business operations. We plan on formalizing employment contract for those staff currently helping us without pay. Furthermore, in the immediate future, we intend to use independent contractors and consultants to assist in many aspects of our business on an as needed basis pending financial resources being available. We may use independent contractors and consultants once we receive sufficient funding to hire additional employees. Even then, we will principally rely on independent contractors for substantially all of our technical and marketing needs.

 

The Company has no written employment contract or agreement with any person. Currently, we are not actively seeking additional employees or engaging any consultants through a formal written agreement or contract. Services are provided on an as-needed basis to date. This may change in the event that we are able to secure financing through equity or loans to the Company. As our company grows, we expect to hire more full-time employees.

 

41
 

 

Results of Operations

 

Three and Six Months ended June 30, 2021, as Compared to Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2021, 2020

 

Revenues — The Company recorded $3,376,528 and $4,042,194 in revenue for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 as compared to $24,821 and $60,007 for the same period of June 30, 2020.

 

Operating Expenses — Total operating expenses for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, was $77,645 and $133,123 as compared to $5,313 and $10,515 in the same period of June 30, 2020, due to increased operating activities during the period ended June 30, 2021.

 

Net Income — Net income for three and six months ended June 30, 2021 was $416,494 and $866,764 as compared to Net Income of $15,106 and Net Loss of $18,326 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020. Gross income from operation includes unrealized gain of $712,532 and $759,999 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021.

 

OCI - Unrealized Gain or Other Comprehensive Income for three and six months ended June 30, 2021, was of $712,532 and $759,999, as compared to Unrealized Loss of $(4,402) and $(67,818) for the three six months ended June 30, 2020. The other comprehensive income of $712,532 and $759,999 were a result of mark-to-market/fair value adjustment to Trading Securities for the period.

 

Financial Condition, Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of June 30, 2021, the Company had a working capital of $1,037,406, consisting of $62,272 in cash, $2,227,539 in Trading Securities, and $1,252,405 in short-term loan.

 

For the six months period ended June 30, 2021, the Company used cash of $54,693 on operating activities, generated cash of $19,935 on investing activities, and used cash of $230,481 on financing activities, resulting in an increase in total cash of $60,642 and a cash balance of $62,269 for the period. For the six months period ended June 30, 2020, the Company used cash of $20,320 in operating activities, used cash of $321,498 on investing activities and generated cash of $341,335 from financing activities, resulting in a decrease in cash of $483 and a cash balance of $17 at the end of that period.

 

As of June 30, 2021, total Notes Payable to related parties decreased by $84,100 from the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020.

 

As of June 30, 2021, total stockholders’ equity increased to $899,277 from $3,141 as of December 31, 2020.

 

As of June 30, 2021, the Company had a cash balance of $62,272 (i.e. cash is used to fund operations). The Company does believe our current cash balances will be sufficient to allow us to fund our operating plan for the next twelve months. However, our ability to continue as a going concern is still dependent on us obtaining adequate capital to fund operation or maintaining consecutive quarterly profitability. If we are unable to obtain adequate capital, or maintaining consecutive quarterly profitability, we could be forced to cease operations or substantially curtail its drug development activities. These conditions could raise substantial doubt as to our ability to continue as a going concern. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts and classification of liabilities should we be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Our principal sources of liquidity are: (1) Crypto Currency Mining, (2) Real Estate Sales, and (3) Trading Securities. In the past, we have been generating cash from loans to us by our major shareholder. In order to be able to achieve our strategic goals, we need to further expand our business and implement our business plan. To continue to develop our business plan and generate sales, significant capital has been and will continue to be required. Management intends to fund future operations through private or public equity and/or debt offerings. We continue to engage in preliminary discussions with potential investors and broker-dealers, but no terms have been agreed upon. There can be no assurances, however, that additional funding will be available on terms acceptable to us, or at all. Any equity financing may be dilutive to existing shareholders. We do not currently have any contractual restrictions on our ability to incur debt and, accordingly we could incur significant amounts of indebtedness to finance operations. Any such indebtedness could contain covenants which would restrict our operations.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

There are no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to investors.

 

42
 

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) requires estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. The SEC has defined a company’s critical accounting policies as the ones that are most important to the portrayal of the company’s financial condition and results of operations, and which require the company to make its most difficult and subjective judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates of matters that are inherently uncertain.

 

Based on this definition, we have identified the critical accounting policies and judgments addressed which are described in Note 2 to our condensed consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report. Although we believe that our estimates, assumptions and judgments are reasonable, they are based upon information presently available. Actual results may differ significantly from these estimates under different assumptions, judgments or conditions.

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

Not required for smaller reporting companies.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

As required by Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), Rule 13a-15(b), we have carried out an evaluation (the “Evaluation”), under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our management, and the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures As of June 30, 2021. Based upon an evaluation of the effectiveness of disclosure controls and procedures, our Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer has concluded that as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report, our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) or 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) were not effective because of the material weaknesses described below, in order to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified by the rules and forms of the SEC and is accumulated and communicated to management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure (see below for further discussion).We had neither the resources, nor the personnel, to provide an adequate control environment.

 

Due to our limited resources, the following material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting continued to exist at March 31, 2021:

 

  we do not have written documentation of our internal control policies and procedures. Written documentation of key internal controls over financial reporting is a requirement of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”);
     
  we do not have sufficient segregation of duties within accounting functions, which is a basic internal control. Due to our limited size and early stage nature of operations, segregation of all conflicting duties may not always be possible and may not be economically feasible; however, to the extent possible, the initiation of transactions, the custody of assets and the recording of transactions should be performed by separate individuals;
     
  we do not have an independent audit committee of our Board of Directors;
     
  insufficient monitoring and review controls over the financial reporting closing process, including the lack of individuals with current knowledge of GAAP that led to the restatement of our previously issued financial statements; and
     
  we continue to outsource the functions of controller on an interim basis to assist us in implementing the necessary financial controls over the financial reporting and the utilization of internal management and staff to effectuate these controls.

 

43
 

 

We believe that these material weaknesses primarily related, in part, to our lack of sufficient staff with appropriate training in GAAP and SEC rules and regulations with respect to financial reporting functions, and the lack of robust accounting systems, as well as the lack of sufficient resources to hire such staff and implement these accounting systems.

 

If and when our financial resources allow, we plan to take a number of actions to correct these material weaknesses including, but not limited to, establishing an audit committee of our Board of Directors comprised of three independent directors, hiring a full-time Chief Financial Officer, adding experienced accounting and financial personnel and retaining third-party consultants to review our internal controls and recommend improvements.

 

It should be noted that any system of controls, however well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable and not absolute assurance that the objectives of the system are met. In addition, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of certain events. Because of these and other inherent limitations of control systems, there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions, regardless of how remote.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no material changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a- 15(f) under the Exchange Act) that occurred As of June 30, 2021, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

CEO and CFO Certifications

 

Exhibits 31.1 and 31.2 to this Quarterly Report are the Certifications of the Chief Executive Officer and the Interim Chief Financial Officer, respectively. These Certifications are required in accordance with Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (the “Section 302 Certifications”). This Item 4 of this Quarterly Report, which you are currently reading, is the information concerning the Evaluation referred to above and in the Section 302 Certifications and this information should be read in conjunction with the Section 302 Certifications for a more complete understanding of the topics presented.

 

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. Legal Proceedings

 

There are no legal proceedings that have occurred within the past ten years concerning our directors or officers which involved a criminal conviction, a criminal proceeding, an administrative or civil proceeding limiting one’s participation in the securities or banking industries, or a finding of securities or commodities law violations.

 

From time to time we may be involved in litigation relating to claims arising out of the operation of our business in the normal course of business. Other than as described below, as of the date of this Registration Statement we are not aware of potential dispute or pending litigation and are not currently involved in a litigation proceeding or governmental actions the outcome of which in management’s opinion would be material to our financial condition or results of operations. An adverse result in these or other matters may have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results.

 

As of August 21, the date of this report, there was no material proceeding to which any of our directors, officers, affiliates or stockholders is a party adverse to us. During the past ten years, no present director, executive officer or person nominated to become a director or an executive officer of us:

 

(1) had a petition under the federal bankruptcy laws or any state insolvency law filed by or against, or a receiver, fiscal agent or similar officer appointed by a court for the business or property of such person, or any partnership in which he was a general partner at or within two years before the time of such filing, or any corporation or business association of which he was an executive officer at or within ten years before the time of such filing;

 

44
 

 

(2) was convicted in a criminal proceeding or subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);

 

(3) was subject to any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining him from or otherwise limiting his involvement in any of the following activities:

 

i. acting as a futures commission merchant, introducing broker, commodity trading advisor commodity pool operator, floor broker, leverage transaction merchant, any other person regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, or an associated person of any of the foregoing, or as an investment adviser, underwriter, broker or dealer in securities, or as an affiliated person, director or employee of any investment company, bank, savings and loan association or insurance company, or engaging in or continuing any conduct or practice in connection with such activity;

 

ii. engaging in any type of business practice; or

 

iii. engaging in any activity in connection with the purchase or sale of any security or commodity or in connection with any violation of federal or state securities laws or federal commodities laws; or

 

(4) was the subject of any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of an federal or state authority barring, suspending or otherwise limiting for more than 60 days the right of such person to engage in any activity described in paragraph (3) (i), above, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity; or

 

(5) was found by a court of competent jurisdiction (in a civil action), the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and for which the judgment has not been reversed, suspended or vacated.

 

ITEM 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

During the six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company issued 0 shares of its common stock.

 

Use of Proceeds of Registered Securities

 

Not applicable.

 

Purchases of Equity Securities by Us and Affiliated Purchasers

 

During the three months ended June 30, 2021, the Company has not purchased any equity securities nor have any officers or directors of the Company.

 

ITEM 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities

 

The Company is not aware of any defaults upon its senior securities.

 

ITEM 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 5. Other Information.

 

None.

 

45
 

 

ITEM 6. Exhibits

 

Exhibit    
Number   Description
     
31.1*   Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.
     
31.2*   Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.
     
32.1**   Certification of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
101.INS*   XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
104   Cover Page Interactive Data File (embedded within the Inline XBRL document)

 

* Filed herewith.
** Furnished herewith.

 

46
 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

  GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION
     
Date: August 25, 2021 By: /s/ Frank I Igwealor
    Frank I Igwealor
    President, Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer (Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer)

 

47

 

Give Me Power (PK) (USOTC:GMPW)
Historical Stock Chart
From Nov 2021 to Dec 2021 Click Here for more Give Me Power (PK) Charts.
Give Me Power (PK) (USOTC:GMPW)
Historical Stock Chart
From Dec 2020 to Dec 2021 Click Here for more Give Me Power (PK) Charts.