UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20429

 

FORM 10-K

 

þ              ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

 

or

 

¨            TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from __________ to __________

 

Commission file number: 000-31006

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

 

Nevada

 

87-0291528

 

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

 

(I.R.S. Employer

 

Incorporation or Organization)

 

Identification No.)

 

 

 

 

 

370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A

 

 

 

Torrance, California

 

90501

 

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (310) 895-1839

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:   None

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: COMMON STOCK, $0.001 PAR VALUE

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  ¨   No  þ

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes  ¨   No  þ

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  þ   No  ¨


 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (Section 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files. Yes  þ   No  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. Yes ¨   No  þ

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.   See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.   (Check one):

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

 

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨

Accelerated filer   ¨

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer   ¨

Smaller reporting company   þ

 

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

 

Emerging growth company

 þ

 

           

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ¨ No þ

 

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of a specified date within the past 60 days:

 

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2020, the Company had 19,418,181 common shares held by non-affiliates. The aggregate market value of the Registrant’s voting and non-voting stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant was approximately $776,727 using the average bid and ask price on that day of $0.0400. 

 

 

Number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock as of December 31, 2020:  42,724,687 shares.

 

 

 

 

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

None

   

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION, INC.

 

ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Form 10-K Item Number :

Page No.

 

 

 

PART I

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Business

1

 

 

 

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

5

 

 

 

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

28

 

 

 

Item 2.

Properties

28

 

 

 

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

28

 

 

 

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

29

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

29

 

 

 

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

29

 

 

 

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

29

 

 

 

Item 7a.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

18

 

 

 

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

18

 

 

 

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

19

 

 

 

Item 9a.

Controls and Procedures

19

 

 

 

Item 9b.

Other Information

19

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

20

 

 

 

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

22

 

 

 

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

22

 

 

 

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

23

 

 

 

Item 14.

Principal Accountant  Fees and Services

24

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

 

 

Item 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

25

 

 

 

Signatures

 

26


 

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Annual Report”) contains forward-looking statements. The SEC encourages companies to disclose forward-looking information so that investors can better understand a company’s future prospects and make informed investment decisions. This Annual Report and other written and oral statements that we make from time to time contain such forward-looking statements that set out anticipated results based on management’s plans and assumptions regarding future events or performance. We have tried, wherever possible, to identify such statements by using words such as “anticipate,” “estimate,” “expect,” “project,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “will” and similar expressions in connection with any discussion of future operating or financial performance. In particular, these include statements relating to future actions, future performance or results of current and anticipated sales efforts, expenses, the outcome of contingencies, such as legal proceedings, and financial results.

 

We caution that the factors described herein, and other factors could cause our actual results of operations and financial condition to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements we make and that investors should not place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements. Further, any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which such statement is made, and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which such statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of anticipated or unanticipated events or circumstances. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all of such factors. Further, we cannot assess the impact of each such factor on our results of operations or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

 

Use of Market and Industry Data

 

This Annual Report includes market and industry data that we have obtained from third-party sources, including industry publications, as well as industry data prepared by our management on the basis of its knowledge of and experience in the industries in which we operate (including our management’s estimates and assumptions relating to such industries based on that knowledge). Management has developed its knowledge of such industries through its experience and participation in these industries. While our management believes the third-party sources referred to in this Annual Report are reliable, neither we nor our management have independently verified any of the data from such sources referred to in this Annual Report or ascertained the underlying economic assumptions relied upon by such sources. Furthermore, references in this Annual Report to any publications, reports, surveys or articles prepared by third parties should not be construed as depicting the complete findings of the entire publication, report, survey or article. The information in any such publication, report, survey or article is not incorporated by reference in this Annual Report.

 

Forecasts and other forward-looking information obtained from these sources involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change based on various factors, including those discussed under “Risk Factors,” “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements,” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this Annual Report.

 

Trademarks, Service Marks and Trade Names

 

This Annual Report contains references to our trademarks, service marks and trade names and to trademarks, service marks and trade names belonging to other entities. Solely for convenience, trademarks, service marks and trade names referred to in this Annual Report, including logos, artwork and other visual displays, may appear without the ® or TM symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that their respective owners will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, their rights thereto. We do not intend our use or display of other companies’ trade names, service marks or trademarks or any artists’ or other individuals’ names to imply a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship of us by, any other companies or persons.


 

 

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1.           

BUSINESS

 

Business Overview

 

GiveMePower Corporation operates and manages a portfolio of real estate and financial services assets and operations to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources. Givemepower is primarily focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate properties and businesses in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America.  This Offering represents the commencement of the Banking and financial services division of our business. This Offering will enable GMPW to become a financial technology company (FINTEC) business that (1) one-to-four branch federally licensed bank in each jurisdiction, (2) a machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI)  enabled loan and insurance underwriting platform, (3) blockchain-powered transaction processing and payment systems, (4) cryptocurrency transaction processing platform, and (5) emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio; giving access to the unbanked, underserved residents of majorly black communities across the United State.  This is the fulfillment of mission of operating and managing a portfolio of real estate and financial services assets and operations to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources, with a primary focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate properties and businesses in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America.  Our FINTEC operations would cover the basic areas of traditional banking-digitally enhance, ML and Ai enabled lending and insurance underwriting, areas of private equity, business lending and venture capital that invest in young black entrepreneurs, and seeding their viable business plans/ideas on block-chain-powered financial services delivery platform that connects, black entrepreneurs, black borrowers, consumers, banks, and institutional investors. Our real estate division invests in Opportunity Zones, Affordable Housing, and specialized real estate properties.

 

Business History

 

GiveMePower Corporation (the “PubCo” or “Company”), a Nevada corporation, was incorporated on June 7, 2001 to sell software geared to end users and developers involved in the design, manufacture, and construction of engineered products located in Canada and the United States. The PubCo has been dormant and non-operating since year 2009. PubCo is a public reporting company registered with the Securities Exchange Commissioner (“SEC”). In November 2009, the Company filed Form 15D, Suspension of Duty to Report, and as a result, the Company was not required to file any SEC forms since November 2009.

 

On December 31, 2020, PubCo sold one Special 2019 series A preferred share (“Series A Share”) for $38,000 to Goldstein Franklin, Inc. (“Goldstein”), a California corporation. One Series A Share is convertible to 100,000,000 shares of common stocks at any time. The Series A Share also provided with 60% voting rights of the PubCo. On the same day, Goldstein sold one-member unit of Alpharidge Capital, LLC (“Alpharidge”), a California limited liability corporation, representing 100% member owner of Alpharidge. As a result, Alpharidge become a wholly owned subsidiary of PubCo as of December 31, 2020.


 

 

The Company’s operating structure did not change as a result of the change of control, however, following the transaction on December 31, 2019, in which Goldstein Franklin, Inc. acquired control of the Company, Goldstein transferred one of its operating subsidiaries, Alpharidge Capital LLC into GMPW to become one of the Company’s operating subsidiaries.

 

Alpharidge Capital LLC (“Alpharidge”) was formed under the laws of the State of California on August 30, 2019. Alpharidge has two distinct lines of businesses that comprise: (1) a specialty biopharmaceutical holding company focused on building portfolio of real estate investment properties and equity positions in select companies within select industries; and (2) an event-driven investment management operation that invests in equities, warrants, bonds and options of public and private companies in America and across the globe. 

 

Prior to the transaction, the Company sell software geared to end users and developers involved in the design, manufacture, and construction of engineered products located in Canada and the United States.

 

On September 16, 2020, as part of its sales of unregistered securities to Kid Castle Educational Corporation, company related to, and controlled by GMPW President and CEO, the Company, for $3 in cash and 1,000,000 shares of its preferred stock, acquired 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (“CED Capital”), a California Limited Liability Company, and 97% of the issued and outstanding shares of Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), a California corporation.  This transaction was accounted for under the Consolidation Method using the variable interest entity (VIE) model wherein the Company consolidates all investees operating results if the Company expects to assume more than 50% of another entity’s expected losses or gains.  The 1,000,000 shares of our preferred stock sold to Kid Castle Educational Corporation gave to Kid Castle, approximately 87% voting control of Givemepower Corporation.

 

The consolidated financial statements of the Company therefore include its wholly owned subsidiaries of Alpharidge Capital LLC. (“Alpharidge”), Community Economic Development Capital, LLC. (“CED Capital”), and Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), and subsidiaries, in which GiveMePower has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”), after elimination of intercompany transactions and accounts.

 

The Company’s principal executive office is located at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, CA 90501.   

 

The Company’s main telephone number is (310) 895-1839.

 

Current Business and Organization - Alpharidge

 

The Company, through its three wholly owned subsidiaries, Alpharidge Capital, LLC (“Alpharidge”), Malcom Wingate Cush Franklin LLC (“MWCF”), and Opportunity Zone Capital LLC (“OZC”), seeks to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources as follows:

 

·         Alpharidge and OZC Real estate operations – Real estate operations would consist primarily of rental real estate, affordable housing projects, opportunity zones, other property development and associated HOA activities. OZC development operations would be primarily through a real estate investment, management and development subsidiary that focuses primarily on the construction and sale of single-family and multi-family homes, lots in subdivisions and planned communities, and raw land for residential development; and


 

 

·         MWCF financial empowerment – MWCF would utilize operate the tools of financial education/training, mergers and acquisitions, private equity and business lending to invest and empower young black entrepreneurs, seeding their viable business plans and ideas and creating jobs in their communities. MWCF is primarily focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America.

 

·         Cash Management, Opportunistic and Event-Driven Investments:    The Company keeps no more than 10% of its total assets in liquid cash or investments portfolio, which is actively managed by its directors and officers and invest primarily in equity investments on a long and short basis.  The Company’s cash management policy which requires that the Company actively invests its excess cash into stocks, bonds and other securities is intended to provide the company greater levels of liquidity and current income.  The Company uses proprietary trading models to capitalize on real-time market anomalies and generate ongoing income in the forms similar to hedge funds.  Where necessary, the Company uses seeded entities to pursue real-time market transactions in publicly traded securities including but not limited to stocks, bonds, options, futures, forex, warrants, and other instruments.  

 

Current Business and Organization - CED Capital

 

Community Economic Development Capital, LLC. (“CED Capital”), a California limited liability company, is a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including, affordable housing, opportunity zones properties, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services.  CED Capital principal business objective is to maximize returns through a combination of (1) generating good profit while making substantial social impact, (2) sustainable long-term growth in cash flows from increased rents, and (3) potential long-term appreciation in the value of its properties from capital gains upon future sale.  The Company is engaged primarily in the ownership, operation, management, acquisition, development and redevelopment of predominantly multifamily housing and specialized industrial properties in the United States. Additionally, its specialized industrial property strategy is to acquire and own a portfolio of specialized industrial properties, including multifamily properties. This strategy includes the following components:

 

 

Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Income.  The Company intends to acquire multifamily housings, economic development real estates, and multifamily properties. The Company expects to hold acquired properties for investment and to generate stable and increasing rental income from leasing these properties to licensed growers.

 

 

Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Appreciation.  The Company intends to lease its acquired properties under long-term, triple-net leases. However, from time to time, the Company may elect to sell one or more properties if the Company believes it to be in the best interests of its stockholders. Accordingly, the Company will seek to acquire properties that it believes also have potential for long-term appreciation in value.

 

 

 

Affordable Housing.  Its motto is: “acquiring distressed/troubled properties, securing generous government subsidies, empowering low-income families, and generating above-market returns to investors.”

 

Preserving Financial Flexibility on the Company’s Balance Sheet. The Company intends to focus on maintaining a conservative capital structure, in order to provide us flexibility in financing its growth initiatives.


 

 

Current Business and Organization - CBDX

 

Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDZ”), a California corporation was incorporated on May 6, 2014, to operate as a biotechnology and specialty pharmaceutical holding company that engages in the discovery, development, and commercialization of cures and novel therapeutics from cannabinoid, cannabidiol, endocannabinoids, phytocannabinoids, and synthetic cannabinoids product platform suitable for specific treatments in a broad range of disease areas. CBDZ engages in biopharmaceutical research and development operation with aim of identifying viable drug candidates to go into clinical trials and if successful, be submitted to the FDA for approval.  

 

BlackBank, Blockchain-Powered Fintech, Ai and ML Enabled Lending, and CryptoCurrency Deals

 

The Company intends to actualize its banking and financial services operations goals through acquisition and management of (1) a one-to-four branch bank that is federally licensed in each jurisdiction; (2) a machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (Ai)  enabled loan and insurance underwriting platform; (3) blockchain-powered transaction processing and payment systems; (4) cryptocurrency transaction processing platform; and (5) emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio; a combination of three of which would connects consumers, banks, institutional investors, and ensure access to the unbanked and underserved residents of majorly black communities across the United State of America.

 

(1)   BlackBank  - Proposed Federally licensed one-four branch bank

 

Jurisdictionally, GMPW intend to acquire and manage one-four branch bank in each of its relevant jurisdictional domain.  Owning/controlling a bank or banks with branches across every urban/black neighborhood in the United States is not our goal.  Rather we would be content to own a one-four branch bank in every relevant jurisdiction to allow us to initiate/conduct ML-Ai enabled and blockchain-powered digitized banking that is accessible to all black person and businesses across the United States.  We intend to start our banking acquisition by finding targets that operates one-four branches.  We intend to start with the acquisition of one-four branch bank, whose operation and back-office would be migrated unto a Blockchain-powered platform to digitize its entire banking operation to cover and serve all black persons in the United States.   We believe that blockchain technology is one of the most suited platform to implement, run and manage a U.S. wide digitized banking services whose reach encompasses most black persons living in the United States.

 

(2)   Cloud-Based Machine-Learning and Artificial Intelligence (AI) Enabled Lending and Insurance Underwriting Platform

 

Once it has raised sufficient capital (proposed $10 million offering), the Company intends to launch the Company’s cloud-based machine learning and artificial intelligence lending platform. It is our believe that Machine-Learning (ML) and Artificial intelligence (AI), lending and insurance underwriting platform would enable a superior loan product with improved economics that can be shared between consumers and lenders. The proposed platform would aggregate consumer demand for high-quality loans and connects it to our soon-to-be-build network of ML-AI-enabled investors, lenders and bank partners. Consumers on the ML-AI platform would benefit from a highly automated, efficient, all-digital experience. Our prospective bank partners would benefit from access to new customers, lower fraud and loss rates, and increased automation throughout the lending process.

 

Credit is a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, and access to affordable credit is central to unlocking upward mobility and opportunity. The FICO score was invented in 1989 and remains the standard for determining who is approved for credit and at what interest rate. (Rob Kaufman, myFico Blog: The History of the FICO Score, August 2018). While FICO is rarely the only input in a lending decision, most banks use simple, rules-based systems that consider only a limited number of variables. Unfortunately, because legacy credit systems fail to properly identify and quantify risk, millions of creditworthy individuals are left out of the system, and millions more pay too much to borrow money.  (Patrice Ficklin and Paul Watkins, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Blog: An Update on Credit Access and the Bureau’s First No-Action Letter, August 2019).


 

 

The first generation of online lenders focused on bringing credit online. Analogous to earlier internet pioneers, these companies made shopping for and accessing credit simpler and easier for consumers and businesses. It was no longer necessary to stand in line at a bank branch, to sit across the desk from a loan officer and to wait weeks or months for a decision. These lenders enabled the emergence of personal loan products that were previously unprofitable for banks to offer. While they brought the credit process online, they inherited the decision frameworks that banks had used for decades and did not address the more rewarding and challenging opportunity of reinventing the credit decision.

 

GMPW intend to leverage the power of AI to more accurately quantify the true risk of a loan. The ML- AI models would be built to continuously self-upgrade, train and refine many critical components of lending risk analytics and decision-making on a real-time basis. We intend to build discrete ML- AI models that target fee optimization, income fraud, acquisition targeting, loan stacking, prepayment prediction, identity fraud and time-delimited default prediction. These models would be designed to incorporate multiple lending underwriting variables and utilize training dataset that accounts for varieties of repayment events.  It is also anticipated that the network effects generated by constantly improving ML- AI models would provide a significant competitive advantage—and more training data would lead to higher approval rates and lower interest rates at the same loss rate

 

(3)   Blockchain-Powered Digital Currency Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform (“Blackchain”)

 

The Company intends to acquire an existing, or build-from-the-scratch, a Blockchain-Powered Digital Currency Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform (“Blackchain”), with home in the BlackBank alongside the ML-AI lending platform.   Blockchain-powered Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform would also provide efficient and inexpensive payment platform and merchant services to black businesses across the United States. 

The company would establish an exchange network called Blackchain Exchange Network (“BEN”), a Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform, would be a wholly-owned subsidiary, the BlackBank.  We believe Blackchain would be a leading provider of innovative financial infrastructure solutions and services to participants in the nascent and expanding digital currency industry.  Blackchain business strategy is floating a Blackchain Exchange Network, or BEN, a virtually instantaneous payment network for participants in the digital currency industry which would serve as a platform for the development of additional products and services. The BEN would have a network effect that would make it valuable as participants and utilization increase, leading to good growth in BEN transaction volumes. The BEN would enable the BlackBank to prioritize, build and significantly grow noninterest bearing deposit product for digital currency industry participants, which is expected to provide the majority of our bank funding in the next two years from finalizing acquisition. This unique source of funding would be a distinctive advantage over most traditional financial institutions and allows BlackBank to generate revenue from a conservative portfolio of investments in cash, short term securities and ML-Ai enabled loans that we believe generate attractive risk-adjusted returns. In addition, use of the BEN would result in an increase in noninterest income that we believe will become a valuable source of additional future revenue as we develop and deploy blockchain-powered, fee-based solutions in connection with our digital currency initiative. We would also evaluate additional products or product enhancements specifically targeted at providing further financial infrastructure solutions to our customers and strengthening BEN network effects.


 

Blackchain Business Overview

Once acquired, the Federally licensed one-four branch bank would be such that is already providing banking and financial services including commercial banking, business lending, commercial and residential real estate lending and mortgage warehouse lending, all funded primarily by interest bearing deposits and borrowings. To that up and running banking and financial services operation, we intend to insert a Blockchain-powered payment and transaction processing system and digital currency platform.  We intend to pursue digital currency customers and bring them into the BlackBank to bank with us using digital currency.  We believe we could effectively leverage the traditional commercial bank platform, the ML-Ai enabled lending platform and the attributes of the BEN to gain traction in the digital currency banking industry.

We intend to focus on the digital currency initiative as the core of our future strategy and direction. We intend to build a leadership position in the digital currency industry as a result of the BEN to enable us to establish a significant balance of noninterest bearing deposits from digital currency customer base. Over several post-acquisition years, BlackBank would have transitioned from a traditional asset based bank model focused on loan generation to a deposit and solutions based model focused on increasing noninterest bearing deposits and noninterest income. This emphasis on noninterest bearing deposits and noninterest income, is primarily associated with  digital currency, will likely result in a significant shift in BlackBank’s asset composition with a greater percentage consisting of liquid assets such as interest earning deposits in other banks and investment securities, and a corresponding decrease in the percentage of loans.  Most of our actions would be focused on developing and delivering highly scalable and operationally efficient solutions for BlackBank’s digital currency customers.

 

(4)  Emerging Cryptocurrency Opportunities Portfolio

The emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio is the wildcard of our FINTEC business model.  While the goals are clear, because it is a wildcard, there is no outline on what to expect or how it should be run.  GMPW needs these flexibilities because many established companies are jumping into the crypocurrency opportunities on a minutes notice. For example, in 2020, Microstrategy decided to move their treasury into bitcoin as part of their cash management strategy.  Marathon Patent Group moved into cryptocurrency mining as a business model.  Overstock has been in cryptocurrency for a while.  Square and Paypal just joined the bandwagon of American companies that try to find and exploit opportunities in the crypto currency industry without abandoning their actual businesses. GMPW’s  emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio would not be different.  The company would on an ongoing basis evaluate and consider investments into potentially viable cryptocurrency opportunities anywhere. 

 

Management Capacity

 

GiveMePower Corporation (“GMPW”) intends to fulfill its goal to  become a financial technology company (FINTEC) that provides machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI)  enabled banking and financial services on blockchain-powered platforms, giving access to the unbanked, underserved, and residents of majorly black communities across the United State.  We would be empowered to actualize our banking and financial services operations which comprises of: (1) a one-four branch bank, (2) a ML-Ai lending platform, and (3) a Blockchain-Powered Payment and Financial Transactions Processing, and Digital Currency  platform. We plan to acquire a one-four branch Bank; acquire and integrate into the Bank, or build-from-the-scratch a Cloud-Based Machine-Learning and Artificial Intelligence (AI) Lending platform; and acquire and integrate into the BlackBank, or build-from-the-scratch a Blockchain-Powered Payment and Financial Transactions Processing, and Digital Currency  platform.  All three would operate together as a modern digitized banking and financial services provider focusing to giving access to black entrepreneurs, black borrowers, consumers, banks, and institutional investors. 


 

 

Our Banking and FINTEC business model is a newly created business model created in the 3rd quarter of 2020, for the purpose of effecting a merger, capital stock exchange, asset acquisition, stock purchase, reorganization or similar Business acquisition with (1) a one-four branch bank, (2) a ML-Ai lending platform, and (3) a Blockchain-Powered Payment and Financial Transactions Processing, and Digital Currency  platform.  We have not selected any specific bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  Business acquisition target and we have not, nor has anyone on our behalf, initiated any substantive discussions, directly or indirectly, with any Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  Business acquisition target.

 

Our management team is comprised of two business professionals that have a broad range of experience in executive leadership, strategy development and implementation, operations management, financial policy and corporate transactions.  Our management team members have worked together in the past, at Goldstein Franklin, Inc. and other firms as executive leaders and senior managers spearheading turnarounds, rollups and industry-focused consolidation while generating shareholder value for many for investors and stakeholders.

 

We believe that our management team is well positioned to identify acquisition opportunities in the marketplace. Our management team's industry expertise, principal investing transaction experience and business acumen will make us an attractive partner and enhance our ability to complete a successful Business acquisition. Our management believes that its ability to identify and implement value creation initiatives has been an essential driver of past performance and will remain central to its differentiated acquisition strategy.

 

Although our management team is well positioned and have experience to identify acquisition opportunities in the marketplace, past performance of our management team is not a guarantee either (i) of success with respect to any Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  business acquisition we may consummate or (ii) that we will be able to identify a suitable candidate for our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition. You should not rely on the historical performance record of our management team as indicative of our future performance. Additionally, in the course of their respective careers, members of our management team have been involved in businesses and deals that were unsuccessful. Our officers and directors have not had management experience with Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  companies in the past.

 

GiveMePower Corporation, prior to September 15, 2020, used to be a specialty real estate holding company, focuses on the acquisition, ownership, and management of specialized industrial properties.  The Company’s real estate business objective is to maximize stockholder returns through a combination of (1) distributions to our stockholders, (2) sustainable long-term growth in cash flows from increased rents, which we hope to pass on to stockholders in the form of increased distributions, and (3) potential long-term appreciation in the value of our properties from capital gains upon future sale.  As a real estate holding company, the Company is engaged primarily in the ownership, operation, management, acquisition, development and redevelopment of predominantly multifamily housing and specialized industrial properties in the United States.

 

Business Strategy and Deal Origination

 


 

We have not finalized an acquisition target yet, but making progress in identifying several potential candidates from which we intend to pick those that meet our criteria for acquisition.  Our acquisition and value creation strategy will be to identify, acquire (1) a one-four branch Bank, (2) a ML-Ai lending platform, and (3) a Blockchain-Powered Payment and Financial Transactions Processing, and Digital Currency  platform; after bank acquisition, to integrate the ML-AI lending platform and the Blackchain into the Bank’s operations.  Our Business acquisition strategy will leverage our management team's network of potential transaction sources, where we believe a combination of our relationships, knowledge and experience could effect a positive transformation or augmentation of existing businesses to improve their overall value proposition. 

 

Our management team's objective is to generate attractive returns and create value for our shareholders by applying our disciplined strategy of underwriting intrinsic worth and implementing changes after making an acquisition to unlock value. While our approach is focused on the Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  industries where we have differentiated insights, we also have successfully driven change through a comprehensive value creation plan framework. We favor opportunities where we can accelerate the target's growth initiatives. As a management team we have successfully applied this approach over approximately 16 years and have deployed capital successfully in a range of market cycles.

 

We plan to utilize the network and Finance industry experience of our Chief Executive Officer and our management team in seeking an Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition and employing our Business acquisition strategy described below. Our CEO is a top financial professional with designations that include, CPA, CMA, and CFM.  He’s very knowledgeable in the fields of corporate law, real estate, lending, turnarounds and restructuring.  Over the course of their careers, the members of our management team have developed a broad network of contacts and corporate relationships that we believe will serve as a useful source of Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition opportunities. This network has been developed through our management team's extensive experience:

 

·         investing in and operating a wide range of businesses;

·         growing brands through repositioning, increasing household penetration and geographic expansion; expanding into new distribution channels, such as e-Commerce, in an increasingly omni-channel world;

·         identifying lessons learned and applying solutions across product portfolios and channels;

·         sourcing, structuring, acquiring, operating, developing, growing, financing and selling businesses;

·         developing relationships with sellers, financing providers, advisors and target management teams; and

·         executing transformational transactions in a wide range of businesses under varying economic and financial market conditions.

 

·         In addition, drawing on their extensive investing and operating experience, our management team anticipates tapping four major sources of deal flow:

·         directly identifying potentially attractive undervalued situations through primary research into Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  industries and companies;

·         receiving information from our management team's global contacts about a potentially attractive situation;

·         leads from investment bankers and advisors regarding businesses seeking a combination or added value that matches our strengths; and

·         inbound opportunities from a company or existing stakeholders seeking a combination, including corporate divestitures.

 


 

We expect this network will provide our management team with a robust flow of Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition opportunities. In addition, we anticipate that target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  Business candidates will be brought to our attention by various unaffiliated sources, which may include investment market participants, private equity groups, investment banking firms, consultants, accounting firms and large business enterprises. Upon completion of this offering, members of our management team will communicate with their network of relationships to articulate the parameters for our search for a target company and a potential Business acquisition and begin the process of pursuing and reviewing potential leads.

 

Acquisition/Business acquisition Criteria

 

Consistent with this strategy, we have identified the following general criteria and guidelines that we believe are important in evaluating prospective target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  businesses. We will use these criteria and guidelines in evaluating acquisition opportunities. While we intend to acquire Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  companies that we believe exhibit one or more of the following characteristics, we may decide to enter into our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition with a target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  business that does not meet these criteria and guidelines. We intend to acquire Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  companies that source, design, develop, manufacture and distribute high-performance, affordable and fully Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency :

 

·         have potential for significant growth, or can act as an attractive Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition platform, following our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition;

·         have demonstrated market segment, category and/or cost leadership and would benefit from our extensive network and insights;

·         provide operational platform and/or infrastructure for variety of Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  models and/or services, with the potential for revenue, market share, footprint and/or distribution improvements;

·         are at the forefront of Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  evolution around changing consumer trends;

·         offer marketing, pricing and product mix optimization opportunities across distribution channels;

·         are fundamentally sound companies that could be underperforming their potential and/or offer compelling value;

·         offer the opportunity for our management team to partner with established target management teams or business owners to achieve long-term strategic and operational excellence, or, in some cases, where our access to accomplished executives and the skills of the management of identified targets warrants replacing or supplementing existing management;

·         exhibit unrecognized value or other characteristics, desirable returns on capital and a need for capital to achieve the company's growth strategy, that we believe have been misevaluated by the marketplace based on our analysis and due diligence review; and

·         will offer an attractive risk-adjusted return for our shareholders.

 

These criteria are not intended to be exhaustive. Any evaluation relating to the merits of a particular initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  Business acquisition may be based, to the extent relevant, on these general guidelines as well as other considerations, factors and criteria that our management may deem relevant. In the event that we decide to enter into our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  Business acquisition with a target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  Business that does not meet the above criteria and guidelines, we will disclose that the target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  Business does not meet the above criteria in our shareholder communications related to our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  Business acquisition.


 

 

Acquisition/Business acquisition Process

 

In evaluating a prospective target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  business, we expect to conduct a thorough due diligence review that will encompass, among other things, meetings with incumbent management and employees, document reviews, inspection of Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  facilities, as well as a review of financial and other information. We will also utilize our operational and capital allocation experience.

In order to execute our business strategy, we intend to:

Assemble a team of Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  industry and financial experts:    For each potential transaction, we intend to assemble a team of Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  industry and financial experts to supplement our management's efforts to identify and resolve key issues facing a target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  Business. We intend to construct an operating and financial plan that optimizes the potential to grow shareholder value. With extensive experience investing in both healthy and underperforming businesses, we expect that our management will be able to demonstrate to the target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  business and its stakeholders that we have the resources and expertise to lead the combined company through complex and potentially turbulent market conditions and provide the strategic and operational direction necessary to grow the business in order to maximize cash flows and improve the overall strategic prospects for the company.

Conduct rigorous research and analysis:    Performing disciplined, fundamental research and analysis is core to our strategy, and we intend to conduct extensive due diligence to evaluate the impact that a transaction may have on a target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  Business.

Business acquisition driven by trend analysis:    We intend to understand the underlying purchase and industry behaviors that would enhance a potential transaction's attractiveness. We have extensive experience in identifying and analyzing evolving industry and consumer trends, and we expect to perform macro as well as bottoms-up analysis on consumer and industry trends.

Acquire the target company at an attractive price relative to our view of intrinsic value:    Combining rigorous analysis as well as input from industry and financial experts, our management team intends to develop its view of the intrinsic value of a potential Business acquisition. In doing so, our management team will evaluate future cash flow potential, relative industry valuation metrics and precedent transactions to inform its view of intrinsic value, with the intention of creating a Business acquisition at an attractive price relative to its view of intrinsic value.

Implement operational and financial structuring opportunities:    Our management team has the ability to structure and execute a Business acquisition that will establish a capital structure that will support the growth in shareholder value and give it the flexibility to grow organically and/or through strategic acquisitions. We intend to also develop and implement strategies and initiatives to improve the business' operational and financial performance and create a platform for growth.

Seek strategic acquisitions and divestitures to further grow shareholder value:    Our management team intends to analyze the strategic direction of the company, including evaluating potential non-core asset sales to create financial and/or operational flexibility for the company to engage in organic and/or inorganic growth. Our management team intends to evaluate strategic opportunities and chart a clear path to take the Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  business to the next level after the Business acquisition.

After the initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition, our management team intends to apply a rigorous approach to enhancing shareholder value, including evaluating the experience and expertise of incumbent management and making changes where appropriate, examining opportunities for revenue enhancement, cost savings, operating efficiencies and strategic acquisitions and divestitures and developing and implementing corporate strategies and initiatives to improve profitability and long-term value. In doing so, our management team anticipates evaluating corporate governance, opportunistically accessing capital markets and other opportunities to enhance liquidity, identifying acquisition and divestiture opportunities and properly aligning management and board incentives with growing shareholder value. Our management team intends to pursue post-merger initiatives through participation on the board of directors, through direct involvement with company operations and/or calling upon a stable of former managers and advisors when necessary.


 

Strategic Approach to Management.     We intend to approach the management of a company as strategy consultants would. This means that we approach business with performance-based metrics based on strategic and operational goals, both at the overall company level and for specific divisions and functions.

Corporate Governance and Oversight.    Active participation as board members can include many activities ranging from conducting monthly or quarterly board meetings to chairing standing (compensation, audit or investment committees) or special committees, replacing or supplementing company management teams when necessary, adding outside directors with industry expertise which may or may not include members of our own board of directors, providing guidance on strategic and operational issues including revenue enhancement opportunities, cost savings, brand repositioning, operating efficiencies, reviewing and testing annual budgets, reviewing acquisitions and divestitures and assisting in the accessing of capital markets to further optimize financing costs and fund expansion.

Direct Operational Involvement.    Our management team members, through ongoing board service, intend to actively engage with company management. These activities may include: (i) establishing an agenda for management and instilling a sense of accountability and urgency; (ii) aligning the interest of management with growing shareholder value; (iii) providing strategic planning and management consulting assistance, particularly in regards to re-invested capital and growth capital in order to grow revenues, achieve more optimal operating scale or eliminate costs; (iv) establishing measurable key performance metrics; and (v) complementing product lines and brands while growing market share in attractive market categories. These skill sets will be integral to shareholder value creation.

M&A Expertise and Add-On Acquisitions.    Our management team has expertise in identifying, acquiring and integrating synergistic, margin-enhancing and transformational businesses. We intend to, wherever possible, utilize M&A as a strategic tool to strengthen the financial profile of a Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  business we acquire, as well as its competitive positioning. We would seek to enter into accretive Business acquisitions where our management team or an acquired company's management team can seamlessly transition to working together as one organization and team.

Access to Portfolio Company Managers and Advisors.    Through their combined 32+ year history of investing in and controlling businesses, our management team members have developed strong professional relationships with former company managers and advisors. When appropriate, we intend to bring in outside directors, managers or consultants to assist in corporate governance and operational turnaround activities. The use of supplemental advisors should provide additional resources to management to address time intensive issues that may be delaying an organization from realizing its full potential shareholder returns.

Our acquisition criteria, due diligence processes and value creation methods are not intended to be exhaustive. Any evaluation relating to the merits of a particular initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition may be based, to the extent relevant, on these general guidelines as well as other considerations, factors and criteria that our management may deem relevant. In the event that we decide to enter into our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition with a target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  that does not meet the above criteria and guidelines, we will disclose that the target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  does not meet the above criteria in our shareholder communications related to our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition, which, as discussed in this prospectus, would be in the form of tender offer documents or proxy solicitation materials that we would file with the SEC.


 

 

Sourcing of Potential Business acquisition Targets

We believe that the operational and transactional experience of our management team and their respective affiliates, and the relationships they have developed as a result of such experience, will provide us with a substantial number of potential Business acquisition targets. These individuals and entities have developed a broad network of contacts and corporate relationships around the world. This network has grown through sourcing, acquiring and financing businesses and maintaining relationships with sellers, financing sources and target management teams. Our management team members have significant experience in executing transactions under varying economic and financial market conditions. We believe that these networks of contacts and relationships and this experience will provide us with important sources of investment opportunities. In addition, we anticipate that target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  candidates may be brought to our attention from various unaffiliated sources, including investment market participants, private equity funds and large business enterprises seeking to divest noncore assets or divisions.

Other Acquisition Considerations

We are not prohibited from pursuing an initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition with a company that is affiliated with our sponsor, officers or directors. In the event we seek to complete our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition with a company that is affiliated with our officers or directors, we, or a committee of independent directors, will obtain an opinion from an independent investment banking firm or another independent firm that commonly renders valuation opinions for the type of company we are seeking to acquire or an independent accounting firm that our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition is fair to our company from a financial point of view.

Unless we complete our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition with an affiliated entity, or our Board of Directors cannot independently determine the fair market value of the target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  or businesses, we are not required to obtain an opinion from an independent investment banking firm, another independent firm that commonly renders valuation opinions for the type of company we are seeking to acquire or from an independent accounting firm that the price we are paying for a target is fair to our company from a financial point of view. If no opinion is obtained, our shareholders will be relying on the business judgment of our Board of Directors, which will have significant discretion in choosing the standard used to establish the fair market value of the target or targets, and different methods of valuation may vary greatly in outcome from one another. Such standards used will be disclosed in our tender offer documents or proxy solicitation materials, as applicable, related to our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition.

Members of our management team may directly or indirectly own our ordinary shares and/or private placement warrants following this offering, and, accordingly, may have a conflict of interest in determining whether a particular target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  is an appropriate business with which to effectuate our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition. Further, each of our officers and directors may have a conflict of interest with respect to evaluating a particular Business acquisition if the retention or resignation of any such officers and directors was included by a target Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  as a condition to any agreement with respect to our initial Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  acquisition.

In the future any of our directors and our officers may have additional, fiduciary or contractual obligations to other entities pursuant to which such officer or director is or will be required to present acquisition opportunities to such entity. Accordingly, subject to his or her fiduciary duties, if any of our officers or directors becomes aware of an acquisition opportunity which is suitable for an entity to which he or she has then current fiduciary or contractual obligations, he or she will need to honor his or her fiduciary or contractual obligations to present such acquisition opportunity to such entity, and only present it to us if such entity rejects the opportunity. We do not believe, however, that any fiduciary duties or contractual obligations of our directors or officers would materially undermine our ability to complete our Business acquisition.


 

Corporate Information

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in Section 2(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, as modified by the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act. As such, we are eligible to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies” including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a non-binding advisory vote on executive compensation and shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. If some investors find our securities less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our securities and the prices of our securities may be more volatile.

In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act also provides that an “emerging growth company” can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In other words, an “emerging growth company” can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We intend to take advantage of the benefits of this extended transition period.

We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of this offering, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion, or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our ordinary shares that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the prior June 30th, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt securities during the prior three-year period. References herein to “emerging growth company” shall have the meaning associated with it in the JOBS Act.

   

 

Competition

 

Banking, Fintec, Digital Currency and real estate are highly competitive business sectors.   Our business is therefore highly competitive.   We are in direct competition with more established firms, private investors and management companies.   Many management companies offer similar services for business rollups and consolidations.  We may be at a substantial disadvantage to our competitors who have more capital than we do to carry out acquisition, operations of Banking, Fintec, Digital Currency and real estate businesses.  These competitors may have competitive advantages, such as greater name recognition, larger capital-base, marketing, research and acquisition resources, access to larger customer bases and channel partners, a longer operating history and lower labor and development costs, which may enable them to respond more quickly to new or emerging opportunities and changes in customer requirements or devote greater resources to the development, acquisition and promotion.  For example, we tried but failed twice to acquire businesses in cryptocurrency mining and services. We failed to acquire YCO Bitcoin a Los Angeles based bitcoin ATM operations, Bitcentro and BussMeHome, a Canadian based cryptocurrency mining operation, because our competition were faster at providing the capital required to complete acquisition.


 

 

Increased competition could result in us failing to attract significant capital or maintaining them.  If we are unable to compete successfully against current and future competitors, our business and financial condition may be harmed.

 

We hope to develop and maintain competitive advantage by keeping abreast of market dynamism that is face by our industry, and by utilizing the experience, knowledge, and expertise of our management team.   Moreover, we believe that we distinguish ourselves in the ways our model envisaged transformation of businesses.

 

Government Regulation

 

Until we acquire a federally licensed bank operation, our activities currently are subject to no particular regulation by governmental agencies other than that routinely imposed on corporate businesses.   However, we may be subject to the rules governing acquisition and disposition of businesses, banks, real estates and personal properties in each of the state where we have our operations.  We may also be subject to various state laws designed to protect buyers and sellers of businesses.   We cannot predict the impact of future regulations on either us or our business model.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We currently have no patents, trademarks or other registered intellectual property.   We do not consider the grant of patents, trademarks or other registered intellectual property essential to the success of our business.

 

Plan of Operations

 

While our major focus is to find, acquire and manage a Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency, our real estate portfolio is still alive and must figure in our plan of operation.  As of December 31, 2020, we have one available-for-sale real estate property with a carrying amount of $664,111.  We bought three single family residences (SFR) with a cost/carrying amount of $1,452,897, in Los Angeles in 2019.  We bought a fourth property in June 2020.  During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020, we sold two of the four properties for a total amount of $1,205,000.  We also exchanged one property (cost plus rehabilitation $367,121) with the lender for the total amount of debt ($367,121) used to acquire and rehabilitate the property. The exchange had zero impact on our profit and loss for the period. In the next twelve months, we plan on selling the remaining property and adding the proceeds obtained from the sales to other capital for acquisition of real estate, or to finance our Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency business plan.

 

The Company will continue to evaluate its projected expenditures relative to its available cash and to seek additional means of financing in order to satisfy the Company’s working capital and other cash requirements.

Summary Risk Factors

Our business is subject to many substantial risks and uncertainties you should consider before deciding to invest in our common stock. These risks are discussed more fully in the section entitled “Risk Factors.” Some of these risks include the following:


 

·         We are a rapidly growing company with a relatively limited operating history, which may result in increased risks, uncertainties, expenses and difficulties, and makes it difficult to evaluate our future prospects.

·         Our revenue growth rate and financial performance in recent periods may not be indicative of future performance and such growth may slow over time.

·         The COVID-19 pandemic has harmed and could continue to harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

·         If we fail to effectively manage our growth, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

·         We have incurred net losses in the past, and we may not be able to maintain or increase our profitability in the future.

·         Our quarterly results are likely to fluctuate and as a result may adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

·         Risks related to our digital currency initiative, including risks that that the digital currency industry may not gain widespread adoption, that legal and regulatory uncertainty regarding the regulation of digital currencies and digital currency activities may inhibit the growth of the digital currency industry, that our low-cost funding strategy may not be sustainable, that our deposits may be adversely affected by price volatility and that our further development and/or implementation of our solutions and services may not successful;

·         risks related to cybersecurity and technology, including risks that our systems may fail or be breached, that we may not have sufficient resources to keep pace with rapid technological change in the financial services industry, that our technology may malfunction and that the third-party service providers we use may experience systems failures;

·         risks related to our proposed traditional banking business, including risks that a sustained downturn of the economy in the United States or in California may adversely impact our business, that our competitors may lower their loan rates or underwriting standards, that our risk management practices or allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient and that fluctuations in interest rates and the monetary policies and regulations of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, or the Federal Reserve, may negatively impact our business; and

·         risks related to regulation, including risks that legislative and regulatory actions may increase our costs and negatively impact our business, that the capital requirements that the Bank and the Company are subject to may limit our activities and that our compliance with anti-money laundering laws may not be adequate to detect or prevent money laundering activities and could subject us to fines or regulatory actions.

·         If we are unable to continue to develop and continuously improve our proposed ML-ML- AI models or if our ML-ML- AI models contain errors or are otherwise ineffective, our growth prospects, business, financial condition and results of operations would be adversely affected.

·         If our anticipated bank partners would cease or limit operations with us or if we are unable to attract and onboard new bank partners, our ML-AI lending business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

·         The sales and onboarding process of new bank partners could take longer than expected, leading to fluctuations or variability in expected revenues and results of operations.

·         Our business may be adversely affected by economic conditions and other factors that we cannot control.

·         Our ML- AI models have not yet been tested in any form including during down-cycle economic conditions. If our ML- AI models do not accurately reflect a borrower’s credit risk in such economic conditions, the performance of ML-AI-powered loans may be worse than anticipated.

·         If we are unable to maintain a diverse and robust loan funding program, our growth prospects, business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.


 

·         Our business is subject to a wide range of laws and regulations, many of which are evolving, and failure or perceived failure to comply with such laws and regulations could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

·         We rely on strategic relationships with loan aggregators to attract applicants to our platform, and if we cannot maintain effective relationships with loan aggregators or successfully replace their services, our business could be adversely affected.

·         Substantially, our revenue would be derived from three main sources comprising, loan product, traditional banking services fees, and platform fees from Blackchain digital currency platform, and we are thus particularly susceptible to fluctuations in the digital currency and personal finance market

·         There are other potential difficulties that we might face, including the following:

·         Competitors may develop alternatives that render our products redundant or unnecessary;

·         We may not obtain and maintain sufficient protection of our Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  models;

·         Our Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  products may not become widely accepted by consumers and merchants; and

·         We may not be able to raise sufficient additional funds to fully implement our business plan and grow our business.                     

·         Some of the most significant challenges and risks include the following:

·         Our limited operating history does not afford investors a sufficient history on which to base an investment decision.

·         Our revenues will be dependent upon acceptance of our Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency brand/models and product line by consumers and distributors. The failure of such acceptance will cause us to curtail or cease operations.

·         We cannot be certain that we will obtain patents for our product line or that such patents will protect us. Infringement or misappropriation claims (or claims for indemnification resulting from such claims) against us may be asserted or prosecuted, regardless of their merit, and any such assertions or prosecutions may adversely affect our business and/or our operating results.

·         The availability of a large number of authorized but unissued shares of Common Stock may, upon their issuance, lead to dilution of existing stockholders.

·         Our stock is thinly traded, sale of your holding may take a considerable amount of time.

 

Before you invest in our common stock, you should carefully consider all the information in this prospectus, including matters set forth under the heading “Risk Factors.”

 

Insurance

 

We carry comprehensive general liability coverage on our communities, with limits of liability customary within the multi-family properties industry to insure against liability claims and related defense costs. We are also insured, with limits of liability customary within the real estate industry, against the risk of direct physical damage in amounts necessary to reimburse us on a replacement cost basis for costs incurred to repair or rebuild each property, including loss of rental income during the reconstruction period.

 

Our primary lines of insurance coverage are property, general liability and workers’ compensation. We believe that our insurance coverages adequately insure our multifamily properties against the risk of loss attributable to fire, earthquake, hurricane, tornado, flood, terrorism and other perils, and adequately insure us against other risk. Our coverage includes deductibles, retentions and limits that are customary in the industry. We have established loss prevention, loss mitigation, claims handling and litigation management procedures to manage our exposure.

 


 

Seasonality

 

Our business has not been, and we do not expect it to become subject to, material seasonal fluctuations.

 

Employees

 

We do not have a W-2 employee at the present.  Frank Ikechukwu Igwealor, our President, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, is our only full-time staff as of December 31, 2020, pending when we could formalize an employment contract for him.   In addition to Mr. Igwealor, we have three part-time unpaid staff who helps with bookkeeping and administrative chores.  Most of our part-time staff, officers, and directors will devote their time as needed to our business and are expect to devote at least 15 hours per week to our business operations.  We plan on formalizing employment contract for those staff currently helping us without pay.  Furthermore, in the immediate future, we intend to use independent contractors and consultants to assist in many aspects of our business on an as needed basis pending financial resources being available. We may use independent contractors and consultants once we receive sufficient funding to hire additional employees. Even then, we will principally rely on independent contractors for substantially all of our technical and marketing needs.

 

The Company has no written employment contract or agreement with any person. Currently, we are not actively seeking additional employees or engaging any consultants through a formal written agreement or contract. Services are provided on an as-needed basis to date. This may change in the event that we are able to secure financing through equity or loans to the Company.  As our company grows, we expect to hire more full-time employees.

 

Where You Can Find Us

 The Company’s principal executive office and mailing address is at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200-A, Torrance, California 90501.

 Telephone: 310-895-1839.

 

Where You Can Find More Information

 

We have restarted filing annual, quarterly, and special reports, proxy statements, and other information with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Our SEC filings are available to the public over the Internet from the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov. You may also read and copy any document we file at the SEC’s public reference room in Washington, D.C. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information on the public reference room. You can also access these reports and other filings electronically on the SEC’s web site, www.sec.gov.

 

Our Filing Status as a “Smaller Reporting Company”

 

We are a “smaller reporting company,” meaning that we are not an investment company, an asset-backed issuer, or a majority-owned subsidiary of a parent company that is not a smaller reporting company and have a public float of less than $75 million and annual revenues of less than $50 million during the most recently completed fiscal year. As a “smaller reporting company,” the disclosure we will be required to provide in our SEC filings are less than it would be if we were not considered a “smaller reporting company.” Specifically, “smaller reporting companies” are able to provide simplified executive compensation disclosures in their filings; are exempt from the provisions of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requiring that independent registered public accounting firms provide an attestation report on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting; are not required to conduct say-on-pay and frequency votes until annual meetings occurring on or after January 21, 2013; and have certain other decreased disclosure obligations in their SEC filings, including, among other things, being permitted to provide two years of audited financial statements in annual reports rather than three years. Decreased disclosures in our SEC filings due to our status as a “smaller reporting company” may make it harder for investors to analyze the Company’s results of operations and financial prospects.


 

 

Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company

 

We qualify as an emerging growth company as that term is used in the JOBS Act. An emerging growth company may take advantage of specified reduced reporting and other burdens that are otherwise applicable generally to public companies. These provisions include:

 

 

A requirement to have only two years of audited financial statements and only two years of related MD&A;

 

Exemption from the auditor attestation requirement in the assessment of the emerging growth company’s internal control over financial reporting under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“SOX”);

 

Reduced disclosure about the emerging growth company’s executive compensation arrangements; and

 

No non-binding advisory votes on executive compensation or golden parachute arrangements.

 

We have already taken advantage of these reduced reporting burdens in this Prospectus, which are also available to us as a smaller reporting company as defined under Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”).

 

In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act also provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Act”) for complying with new or revised accounting standards. We have elected to take advantage of the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards, which allows us to delay the adoption of new or revised accounting standards that have different effective dates for public and private companies until those standards apply to private companies. As a result of this election, our financial statements contained in this Form S-1 may not be comparable to companies that comply with public company effective dates. The existing scaled executive compensation disclosure requirements for smaller reporting companies will continue to apply to our filings for so long as our Company is an emerging growth company, regardless of whether the Company remains a smaller reporting company.

 

We could remain an emerging growth company for up to five years, or until the earliest of (i) the last day of the first fiscal year in which our annual gross revenues exceed $1 billion, (ii) the date that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act, which would occur if the market value of our Common Stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter, or (iii) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the preceding three year period.

 


 

For more details regarding this exemption, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Critical Accounting Policies.”

 


 

 

 

ITEM 1A.        

RISK FACTORS

 

We are subject to those financial risks generally associated with development stage enterprises. Since we have sustained losses since inception, we will require financing to fund our development activities and to support our operations and will independently seek additional financing. However, we may be unable to obtain such financing. We are also subject to risk factors specific to our business strategy and the private equity industry. An investment in our securities involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described in this prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference into this prospectus. The risks and uncertainties described in this prospectus are not the only ones we face. Additional risks and uncertainties that we do not presently know about or that we currently believe are not material may also adversely affect our business, business prospects, results of operations or financial condition. If any of the risks and uncertainties described in this prospectus or the documents incorporated by reference into this prospectus actually occurs, then our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected in a material way. In addition to the other information provided in this annual report, you should carefully consider the following risk factors in evaluating our business before purchasing any of our common stock. All material risks are discussed in this section.

 

RISKS RELATED TO OUR BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY

 

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk because our business is subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, as fully described below. The principal factors and uncertainties that make investing in our common stock risky include, among others:

 

 

 

We are a small company with a relatively limited operating history, which may result in increased risks, uncertainties, expenses and difficulties, and makes it difficult to evaluate our future prospects.

  

 

Our revenue growth rate and financial performance in recent periods may not be indicative of future performance and such growth may slow over time.

  

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has harmed and could continue to harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

  

 

If we fail to effectively manage our growth, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

  

 

We have incurred net losses in the past, and we may not be able to maintain or increase our profitability in the future.

  

 

Our quarterly results are likely to fluctuate and as a result may adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

  

 

If we are unable to build and maintain a diverse and robust loan funding program, our growth prospects, business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

  

 

Our business is subject to a wide range of laws and regulations, many of which are evolving, and failure or perceived failure to comply with such laws and regulations could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

  

 

We rely on strategic relationships with loan aggregators to attract applicants to our platform, and if we cannot maintain effective relationships with loan aggregators or successfully replace their services, or if loan aggregators begin offering competing products, our business could be adversely affected.

 

 

Substantially all of our revenue is derived from a single loan product, and we are thus particularly susceptible to fluctuations in the unsecured personal loan market. We also do not currently offer a broad suite of products that bank partners may find desirable.

 


 

We are a rapidly growing company with a relatively limited operating history, which may result in increased risks, uncertainties, expenses and difficulties, and makes it difficult to evaluate our future prospects.

 

We were a small company with limited operating experience. Our limited operating history may make it difficult to make accurate predictions about our future performance. Assessing our business and future prospects may also be difficult because of the risks and difficulties we face. These risks and difficulties include our ability to:

 

 

 

Develop and improve the effectiveness and predictiveness of our ML- AI models;

 

 

Build and maintain and increase the volume of loans facilitated by our AI lending platform;

 

 

enter into new and maintain existing bank partnerships;

 

 

successfully build and maintain a diversified loan funding strategy, including bank partnerships and whole loan sales and securitization transactions that enhance loan liquidity for the Bank partners that use our loan funding capabilities;

 

 

successfully fund a sufficient quantity of our borrower loan demand with low cost bank funding to help keep interest rates offered to borrowers competitive;

 

 

maintain competitive interest rates offered to borrowers on our ML-AI platform, while enabling the Bank partners to achieve an adequate return over their cost of funds, whether through their own balance sheets or through our loan funding programs;

  

 

successfully build our brand and protect our reputation from negative publicity;

 

 

Develop and increase the effectiveness of our marketing strategies, including our direct consumer marketing initiatives;

  

 

continue to expand the number of potential borrowers;

 

 

successfully adjust our proprietary ML- AI models, products and services in a timely manner in response to changing macroeconomic conditions and fluctuations in the credit market;

  

 

comply with and successfully adapt to complex and evolving regulatory environments.

 

 

protect against increasingly sophisticated fraudulent borrowing and online theft;

 

 

successfully compete with companies that are currently in, or may in the future enter, the business of providing online lending services to financial institutions or consumer financial services to borrowers;

 

 

enter into new markets and introduce new products and services;

 

 

effectively secure and maintain the confidentiality of the information received, accessed, stored, provided and used across our systems;

 

 

successfully obtain and maintain funding and liquidity to support continued growth and general corporate purposes;

  

 

attract, integrate and retain qualified employees; and

 

 

effectively manage and expand the capabilities of our operations teams, outsourcing relationships and other business operations.

 

If we are not able to timely and effectively address these risks and difficulties as well as those described elsewhere in this “Risk Factors” section, our business and results of operations may be harmed.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has harmed and could continue to harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused extreme societal, economic, and financial market volatility, resulting in business shutdowns, an unprecedented reduction in economic activity and significant dislocation to businesses, the capital markets, and the broader economy. In particular, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the finances of borrowers on our platform has been profound, as many have been, and will likely continue to be, impacted by unemployment, reduced earnings and/or elevated economic disruption and insecurity.


 

 

The COVID-19 pandemic may lead to a continued economic downturn, which is expected to decrease technology spending generally and could adversely affect demand for our platforms and services, in addition to prolonging the foregoing challenges in our business.

 

We have taken precautionary measures intended to reduce the risk of the virus spreading to our employees, partner banks, vendors, and the communities in which we operate, including temporarily closing our offices and virtualizing, postponing, or canceling partner bank, employee, or industry events, which may negatively impact our business. Furthermore, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have required all employees who are able to do so to work remotely through the end of the first quarter of 2021. It is possible that widespread remote work arrangements may have a negative impact on our operations, the execution of our business plans, the productivity and availability of key personnel and other employees necessary to conduct our business, and on third-party service providers who perform critical services for us, or otherwise cause operational failures due to changes in our normal business practices necessitated by the outbreak and related governmental actions. If a natural disaster, power outage, connectivity issue, or other event occurred that impacted our employees’ ability to work remotely, it may be difficult or, in certain cases, impossible, for us to continue our business for a substantial period of time.

 

The increase in remote working may also result in increased consumer privacy, data security, and fraud risks, and our understanding of applicable legal and regulatory requirements, as well as the latest guidance from regulatory authorities in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic, may be subject to legal or regulatory challenge, particularly as regulatory guidance evolves in response to future developments.

 

The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact our business and results of operations will also depend on future developments that are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, including new information which may emerge concerning the severity of the disease, the duration and spread of the outbreak, the scope of travel restrictions imposed in geographic areas in which we operate, mandatory or voluntary business closures, the impact on businesses and financial and capital markets, and the extent and effectiveness of actions taken throughout the world to contain the virus or treat its impact. An extended period of economic disruption as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic could have a material negative impact on our business, results of operations, and financial condition, though the full extent and duration is uncertain. To the extent the COVID-19 pandemic continues to adversely affect our business and financial results, it is likely to also have the effect of heightening many of the other risks described in this “Risk Factors” section.

 

If we are unable to develop and continuously improve our ML- AI models or if our ML- AI models contain errors or are otherwise ineffective, our growth prospects, business, financial condition and results of operations would be adversely affected.

 

Our ability to attract potential borrowers to our proposed ML-AI lending platform and build/increase the number of ML-AI-powered loans will depend in large part on our ability to effectively evaluate a borrower’s creditworthiness and likelihood of default and, based on that evaluation, offer competitively priced loans and higher approval rates. Further, our overall operating efficiency and margins will depend in large part on our ability to develop and maintain a high degree of automation in our loan application process and achieve incremental improvements in the degree of automation. If our ML- AI models fail to adequately predict the creditworthiness of borrowers due to the design of our models or programming or other errors, and our ML- AI models do not detect and account for such errors, or any of the other components of our credit decision process fails, we may experience higher than forecasted loan losses. Any of the foregoing could result in sub-optimally priced loans, incorrect approvals or denials of loans, or higher than expected loan losses, which in turn could adversely affect our ability to attract new borrowers and bank partners to our platform, increase the number of ML-AI-powered loans or maintain or increase the average size of loans facilitated on our platform.


 

 

Our ML- AI models would also target and optimize other aspects of the lending process, such as borrower acquisition, fraud detection, default timing, loan stacking, prepayment timing and fee optimization, and our continued improvements to such models have allowed us to facilitate loans inexpensively and virtually instantly, with a high degree of consumer satisfaction and with an insignificant impact on loan performance. However, such applications of our ML- AI models may prove to be less predictive than we expect, or than they have been in the past, for a variety of reasons, including inaccurate assumptions or other errors made in constructing such models, incorrect interpretations of the results of such models and failure to timely update model assumptions and parameters. Additionally, such models may not be able to effectively account for matters that are inherently difficult to predict and beyond our control, such as macroeconomic conditions, credit market volatility and interest rate fluctuations, which often involve complex interactions between a number of dependent and independent variables and factors. Material errors or inaccuracies in such ML- AI models could lead us to make inaccurate or sub-optimal operational or strategic decisions, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Additionally, errors or inaccuracies in our ML- AI models could result in any person exposed to the credit risk of ML-AI-powered loans, whether it be us, our bank partners or investors in our loan funding programs, experiencing higher than expected losses or lower than desired returns, which could impair our ability to retain existing or attract new bank partners and investors to participate in our loan funding programs, reduce the number, or limit the types, of loans bank partners and investors are willing to fund, and limit our ability to increase commitments under our warehouse and other debt facilities. Any of these circumstances could reduce the number of ML-AI-powered loans and harm our ability to maintain a diverse and robust loan funding program and could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Continuing to improve the accuracy of our ML- AI models would be central to our business strategy. However, such improvements could negatively impact transaction volume, such as by lowering approval rates.  While we believe that continuing to improve the accuracy of our ML- AI models is key to our long-term success, those improvements could, from time to time, lead us to reevaluate the risks associated with certain borrowers, which could in turn cause us to lower approval rates or increase interest rates for any borrowers identified as a higher risk, either of which could negatively impact our growth and results of operations in the short term.

 

Risks Related to the Digital Currency Industry

 

The characteristics of digital currency have been, and may in the future continue to be, exploited to facilitate illegal activity such as fraud, money laundering, tax evasion and ransomware scams; if any of our customers do so or are alleged to have done so, it could adversely affect us.

 

Digital currencies and the digital currency industry are relatively new and, in many cases, lightly regulated or largely unregulated. Some types of digital currency have characteristics, such as the speed with which digital currency transactions can be conducted, the ability to conduct transactions without the involvement of regulated intermediaries, the ability to engage in transactions across multiple jurisdictions, the irreversible nature of certain digital currency transactions and encryption technology that anonymizes these transactions, that make digital currency particularly susceptible to use in illegal activity such as fraud, money laundering, tax evasion and ransomware scams. Two prominent examples of marketplaces that accepted digital currency payments for illegal activities include Silk Road, an online marketplace on the dark web that, among other things, facilitated the sale of illegal drugs and forged legal documents using digital currencies and AlphaBay, another darknet market that utilized digital currencies to hide the locations of its servers and identities of its users. Both of these marketplaces were investigated and closed by U.S. law enforcement authorities. U.S. regulators, including the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, or the CFTC, and Federal Trade Commission, or the FTC, as well as non-U.S. regulators, have taken legal action against persons alleged to be engaged in Ponzi schemes and other fraudulent schemes involving digital currencies. In addition, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has noted the increasing use of digital currency in various ransomware scams.


 

 

While we believe that our risk management and compliance framework, which includes thorough reviews we conduct as part of our due diligence process (either in connection with onboarding new customers or monitoring existing customers), is reasonably designed to detect any such illicit activities conducted by our potential or existing customers (or, in the case of digital currency exchanges, their customers), we cannot ensure that we will be able to detect any such illegal activity in all instances. Because the speed, irreversibility and anonymity of certain digital currency transactions make them more difficult to track, fraudulent transactions may be more likely to occur. We or our potential banking counterparties may be specifically targeted by individuals seeking to conduct fraudulent transfers, and it may be difficult or impossible for us to detect and avoid such transactions in certain circumstances. If one of our customers (or in the case of digital currency exchanges, their customers) were to engage in or be accused of engaging in illegal activities using digital currency, we could be subject to various fines and sanctions, including limitations on our activities, which could also cause reputational damage and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. For more information regarding the regulatory agencies and regulations to which we are subject, see “—Risks Related to Regulation”. Lastly, we may experience a reduction in our deposits if such an incident were to impact one of our customers, even if there was no wrongdoing on our part.

 

Risks Related to Our Digital Currency Initiative

 

The majority of the Bank’s deposits are from businesses involved in the digital currency industry. As a result, we rely heavily on the success of the digital currency industry, the development and acceptance of which is subject to a variety of factors that are difficult to evaluate.

 

We intend to create a technology-led digital currency infrastructure platform, including the BEN and cash management solutions, to facilitate cash transactions for the Bank’s digital currency deposit customers. This platform would drive growth of a customer base that would include some of the fastest growing companies within the digital currency industry, consisting primarily of digital currency exchanges, institutional investors and other industry participants. See “Prospectus Summary—Digital Currency Customers.”

 

The businesses in which these customers engage involve digital currencies such as bitcoin, other technologies underlying digital currencies such as blockchain, and services associated with digital currencies and blockchain. The digital currency industry includes a diverse set of businesses that use digital currencies for different purposes and provide services to others who use digital currencies. This is a new and rapidly evolving industry, and the viability and future growth of the industry and adoption of digital currencies and the underlying technology is subject to a high degree of uncertainty, including based upon the adoption of the technology, regulation of the industry, and price volatility, among other factors. Because the sector is relatively new, your investment may be exposed to additional risks which are not yet known or quantifiable.

 


 

Bitcoin, the first widely used digital currency, and many other digital currencies were designed to function as a form of money. However, digital currencies have only recently become selectively accepted as a means of payment for goods and services and then only by some retail and commercial businesses. Use of digital currency by consumers as a form of payment is limited. Some digital currencies were built for uses other than as a substitute for fiat money. For example, the Ethereum network is intended to permit the development and use of smart contracts, which are programs that execute on a blockchain. The digital asset known as Ether was designed to facilitate transactions involving smart contracts on the Ethereum network. Many of these digital currencies are listed on digital currency exchanges and are traded and purchased as investments by a variety of market participants.

 

Other factors affecting the further development of the digital currency industry and our business include, but are not limited to:

 

 

 

the adoption and use of digital currencies, including adoption and use as a substitute for fiat currency or for other uses, which may be adversely impacted by continued price volatility;

 

 

government and quasi-government regulation of digital currencies, their use, and intermediaries and other businesses involved in digital currencies, noting in particular that the SEC has taken action against several cryptocurrency operators and has raised questions whether certain digital currency exchanges must be registered with the SEC to continue operating;

 

 

the use of digital currencies, or the perception of such use, to facilitate illegal activity such as fraud, money laundering, tax evasion and ransomware scams by our customers;

 

 

restrictions on or regulation of access to and operation of the digital currency exchanges or other platforms that facilitate trading in digital currencies;

  

 

heightened risks to digital currency businesses, such as digital currency exchanges, of hacking, malware attacks, and other cyber-security risks, which can lead to significant losses;

  

 

developments in digital currency trading markets, including decreasing price volatility of digital currencies, resulting in narrowing spreads for digital currency trading and diminishing arbitrage opportunities across digital currency exchanges, or increased price volatility, which could negatively impact our customers and therefore our deposits, either of which in turn may reduce the benefits of the BEN and negatively impact our business;

  

 

changes in consumer demographics and public taste and preferences;

 

 

the maintenance and development of the software protocol of the digital currency networks;

 

 

the availability and popularity of other forms or methods of buying and selling goods and services, including new means of using fiat currencies;

 

 

the use of the networks supporting digital currencies for developing smart contracts and distributed applications;

  

 

general economic conditions and the regulatory environment relating to digital currencies; and

 

 

increased regulatory oversight of digital currencies and the costs associated with such regulatory oversight.

 

If any of these factors, or other factors, slows development of the digital currency industry, it could adversely affect our digital currency initiative and therefore have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operation. For example, a decline in the digital currency industry that leads to a decline in deposit balances by digital currency customers would negatively affect our anticipated sources of funding. In such circumstances, we may be forced to rely more heavily on other, potentially more expensive and less stable funding sources. Consequently, a decline in the growth of the digital currency industry could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may not be able to implement aspects of our growth strategy, which may impact our position as the leading provider of innovative financial infrastructure solutions and services to participants in the digital currency industry and adversely affect our ability to maintain our recent growth and earnings trends.


 

 

We intend to grow, primarily through ML-AI enabled lending platform and a Blockchain-powered technology platform related to our digital currency initiative. We may not be able to execute on aspects of our growth strategy, which may impair our ability to sustain this rate of growth or prevent us from growing at all. More specifically, we may not be able to generate sufficient amounts of new loans and deposits within acceptable risk and expense tolerances or obtain the personnel or funding necessary for additional growth, which may therefore preclude the proposed Bank from developing products and services relating to digital currency transaction flows and collateral, custodian services, international expansion of our customer base and other potential fintech opportunities.

 

The success of new or improved solutions and services depends on several factors, including costs, timely completion, regulatory approvals, the introduction, reliability and stability of our solutions and services, differentiation of new or improved solutions and market acceptance. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in developing and marketing our digital currency initiative in a timely manner or at all, or that our new or improved solutions and services will adequately address market demands. Market acceptance and adoption of solutions and services within our digital currency initiative will depend on, among other things, the solutions and services demonstrating a real advantage over existing products and services, the success of our sales and marketing teams in creating awareness of our solutions and services, competitive pricing of such solutions and services, customer recognition of the value of our technology and the general willingness of potential customers to try new technologies. In particular, if we are unable to achieve sufficient market adoption of the BEN, our growth strategy may be adversely affected.

 

Various factors, such as general economic conditions, conditions in the digital currency industry and competition with other financial institutions and infrastructure service providers, may impede or preclude the growth of our operations. Our business and the growth of our operations would be dependent on, among other things, the continued success and growth of the BEN. If conditions in digital currency markets change such that certain trading strategies currently employed by our institutional investor customers become less profitable, the benefits of the BEN and the API may be diminished, resulting in a decrease in our deposit balance and adversely impacting our growth strategy. In addition, if a competitor or another third party were to launch an alternative to the BEN (such as the Federal Reserve’s recently announced plan to develop a virtually real-time payment system for banks, which is expected to be available as early as 2023), we could lose noninterest bearing deposits and our business, financial condition, results of operations and growth strategy could be adversely impacted. Further, we may be unable to attract and retain experienced employees, which could adversely affect our growth.

 

The success of our proposed strategy would also depend on our ability to manage our growth effectively, which would depend on many factors, including our ability to adapt the regulatory, compliance, credit, operational, technology and governance infrastructure to accommodate expanded operations, particularly as these relate to the digital currency industry. If we are successful in continuing our growth, we cannot assure you that further growth would offer the same levels of potential profitability, or that we would be successful in controlling costs and maintaining asset quality in the face of that growth. Accordingly, an inability to build and maintain growth, or an inability to effectively manage growth, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The further development and acceptance of digital currencies and blockchain technology are subject to a variety of factors that are difficult to evaluate, as discussed above. The slowing or stopping of the development or acceptance of digital currency networks and blockchain technology may adversely affect our ability to continue to grow and capitalize on our digital currency strategy.

 


 

The Bank would have large depositor relationships that would be concentrated in the digital currency industry generally and among digital currency exchanges in particular, the loss of any of which could force us to fund our business through more expensive and less stable sources.

 

The proposed Bank, once acquired, would be exposed to high customer concentration with our BEN exchange customers. A decision by the customers of an exchange to exit the exchange or a decision by an exchange to withdraw deposits or move deposits to our competitors could result in substantial changes in the Bank’s deposit base. Exchanges present additional risks because they have been frequent targets and victims of fraud and cyber attacks and the failure or exit of one or more exchanges as customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

In addition, withdrawals of deposits by any one of the Bank’s largest depositors could force us to rely more heavily on borrowings and other sources of funding for our business and withdrawal demands, adversely affecting our net interest margin and results of operations. The Bank may also be forced, because of deposit withdrawals, to rely more heavily on other, potentially more expensive and less stable funding sources. Consequently, the occurrence of any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The prices of digital currencies are extremely volatile. Fluctuations in the price of various digital currencies may cause uncertainty in the market and could negatively impact trading volumes of digital currencies and therefore the extent to which participants in the digital currency industry demand our services and solutions, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The value of digital currencies is based in part on market adoption and future expectations, which may or may not be realized. As a result, the prices of digital currencies are highly speculative. The prices of digital currencies have been subject to dramatic fluctuations to date. Several factors may affect price, including, but not limited to:

 

 

 

Global digital currency supply, including various alternative currencies which exist, and global digital currency demand, which can be influenced by the growth or decline of retail merchants’ and commercial businesses’ acceptance of digital currencies as payment for goods and services, the security of online digital currency exchanges and digital wallets that hold digital currencies, the perception that the use and holding of digital currencies is safe and secure and regulatory restrictions on their use;

 

 

Changes in the software, software requirements or hardware requirements underlying a blockchain network. For example, a fork occurs when there is a change to a digital currency’s underlying protocol, which creates new rules for the system. Forks in the future are likely to occur and there is no assurance that such a fork would not result in a sustained decline in the market price of digital currencies;

 

 

Changes in the rights, obligations, incentives, or rewards for the various participants in a blockchain network;

 

 

The maintenance and development of the software protocol of digital currencies;

 

 

Digital currency exchanges deposit and withdrawal policies and practices, liquidity on such exchanges and interruptions in service from or failures of such exchanges;

 

 

Regulatory measures, if any, that affect the use and value of crypto-assets;

 

 

Competition for and among various digital currencies that exist and market preferences and expectations with respect to adoption of individual currencies;

 

 

Actual or perceived manipulation of the markets for digital currencies;

 

 

Actual or perceived threats that digital currencies and related activities such as mining have adverse effects on the environment or are tied to illegal activities; and

  

 

Expectations with respect to the rate of inflation in the economy, monetary policies of governments, trade restrictions and currency devaluations and revaluations.


 

 

The digital currency market is volatile, and changes in the prices and/or trading volume of digital currencies may adversely impact our growth strategy and our business. In particular, the impact that changes in prices and/or trading volume of digital currencies have on our deposit balance from customers in the digital currency industry is unpredictable, as any reduction in deposits attributable to such changes may be amplified or mitigated by other developments, such as the onboarding of new customers, loss of existing customers and changes in our customers’ operational and trading strategies. We have experienced deposit fluctuations over the last 18 months, which have been correlated with or contrary to the price and/or trading volume of digital currencies at various times. There can be no assurance that a decrease in the value of digital currencies would not adversely impact the amount of such deposits in the future. In addition, volatility in the values of digital currencies caused by the factors described above or other factors may impact the demand for our services and therefore have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Risks Related to Cybersecurity and Technology

 

System failure or cybersecurity breaches of our network security could subject us to increased operating costs as well as litigation and other potential losses.

 

 

Our computer systems and network infrastructure, including the BEN and API, could be vulnerable to hardware and cybersecurity issues. Our operations are dependent upon our ability to protect our computer equipment against damage from fire, power loss, telecommunications failure or a similar catastrophic event. We could also experience a breach by intentional or negligent conduct on the part of employees or other internal sources. Any damage or failure that causes an interruption in our operations could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our operations would be dependent upon our ability to protect our computer systems and network infrastructure, including the BEN, the API, and our other online banking systems, against damage from physical break-ins, cybersecurity breaches and other disruptive problems caused by the internet or other users. Such computer break-ins and other disruptions would jeopardize the security of information stored in and transmitted through our computer systems and network infrastructure, which may result in significant liability, damage our reputation and inhibit the use of our internet banking services by current and potential customers. We could also become the target of various cyberattacks as a result of our focus on the digital currency industry. We regularly add additional security measures to our computer systems and network infrastructure to mitigate the possibility of cybersecurity breaches, including firewalls and penetration testing. However, it is difficult or impossible to defend against every risk being posed by changing technologies as well as acts of cyber-crime. Increasing sophistication of cyber criminals and terrorists make keeping up with new threats difficult and could result in a system breach.

 

Controls employed by our information technology department and cloud vendors could prove inadequate. A breach of our security that results in unauthorized access to our data could expose us to a disruption or challenges relating to our daily operations, as well as to data loss, litigation, damages, fines and penalties, significant increases in compliance costs and reputational damage, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may not have the resources to keep pace with rapid technological changes in the industry or implement new technology effectively.

 


 

The financial services industry is undergoing rapid technological changes with frequent introductions of new technology-driven products and services. In addition to serving customers better, the effective use of technology increases efficiency and enables financial institutions to reduce costs. As a result, to stay current with the industry, our business model may need to evolve as well. Our future success will depend, at least in part, upon our ability to address the needs of our customers by using technology to provide products and services that will satisfy customer demands for convenience as well as to create additional efficiencies in our operations as we continue to grow and expand our products and service offerings. We may experience operational challenges as we implement these new technology enhancements or products, which could impair our ability to realize the anticipated benefits from such new technology or require us to incur significant costs to remedy any such challenges in a timely manner. From time to time, we may modify aspects of our business model relating to our product mix and service offerings. We cannot offer any assurance that these or any other modifications will be successful.

 

The technology relied upon by the Company, including the BEN, the API and our other on-line banking systems, may not function properly, which may have a material impact on the Company’s operations and

financial conditions. There may be no alternatives available if such technology does not work as anticipated. The importance of the BEN, the API and our other on-line banking systems to the Company’s operations means that any problems in its functionality would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s operations. This technology may malfunction because of internal problems or because of cyberattacks or external security breaches. Any such technological problems would have a material adverse impact on the Company’s business model and growth strategy.

 

Many of our prospective larger competitors have substantially greater resources to invest in technological improvements. Third parties upon which we rely for our technology needs may not be able to develop, on a cost-effective basis, systems that will enable us to keep pace with such developments. As a result, our larger competitors may be able to offer additional or superior products compared to those that we will be able to provide, which would put us at a competitive disadvantage. We may lose customers seeking new technology-driven products and services to the extent we are unable to provide such products and services. The ability to keep pace with technological change is important and the failure to do so could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our operations could be interrupted if our third-party service providers experience operational or other systems difficulties, terminate their services or fail to comply with banking regulations.

 

We intend to outsource some of our operational activities and accordingly depend on relationships with many third-party service providers. Specifically, we would rely on third parties for certain services, including, but not limited to, core systems support, informational website hosting, internet services, online account opening and other processing services. Our business depends on the successful and uninterrupted functioning of our information technology and telecommunications systems and third-party service providers. The failure of these systems, a cybersecurity breach involving any of our third-party service providers or the termination or change in terms of a third-party software license or service agreement on which any of these systems is based could interrupt our operations. Because our information technology and telecommunications systems interface with and depend on third-party systems, we could experience service denials if demand for such services exceeds capacity or such third-party systems fail or experience interruptions. Replacing vendors or addressing other issues with our third-party service providers could entail significant delay, expense and disruption of service.

 

As a result, if these third-party service providers experience difficulties, are subject to cybersecurity breaches, or terminate their services, and we are unable to replace them with other service providers, particularly on a timely basis, our operations could be interrupted. If an interruption were to continue for a significant period, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected. Even if we can replace third-party service providers, it may be at a higher cost to us, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.


 

 

In addition, the Bank’s primary federal regulator, the Federal Reserve, has issued guidance outlining the expectations for third-party service provider oversight and monitoring by financial institutions. The federal banking agencies, including the Federal Reserve, have also issued enforcement actions against financial institutions for failure in oversight of third-party providers and violations of federal banking law by such providers when performing services for financial institutions. Accordingly, our operations could be interrupted if any of our third-party service providers experience difficulties, are subject to cybersecurity breaches, terminate their services or fail to comply with banking regulations, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, our failure to adequately oversee the actions of our third-party service providers could result in regulatory actions against the Bank, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Risks Related to Our Traditional Banking Business

 

As a business operating in the financial services industry, our business and operations may be adversely affected in numerous and complex ways by weak economic conditions.

 

After the acquisition of the Bank, our business and operations, which primarily consist of lending money to clients in the form of loans, borrowing money from clients in the form of deposits and investing in interest earning deposits in other banks and securities, are sensitive to general business and economic conditions in the United States. We would solicit deposits throughout the United States and, while our primary lending market would be either the state of California or Georgia, we would purchase and originate loans throughout the United States. If the U.S. economy weakens, our growth and profitability from our lending, deposit and investment operations could be constrained. Uncertainty about the federal fiscal policymaking process, the medium- and long-term fiscal outlook of the federal government and future tax rates is a concern for businesses, consumers and investors in the United States. While there has been an improvement in the U.S. economy since the 2008 financial crisis as evidenced by a rebound in the housing market, lower unemployment and higher equity capital markets, economic growth has been uneven and opinions vary on the strength and direction of the economy. Uncertainties also have arisen regarding the potential for a reversal or renegotiation of international trade agreements, the effects of the legislation commonly known as Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, or the Tax Act, and the impact such actions and other policies the current administration may have on economic and market conditions.

 

Weak economic conditions are characterized by numerous factors, including deflation, fluctuations in debt and equity capital markets, a lack of liquidity and depressed prices in the secondary market for mortgage loans, increased delinquencies on mortgage, consumer and commercial loans, residential and commercial real estate price declines and lower levels of home sales and commercial activity. The current economic environment is characterized by lower interest rates than historically have been the case, which impacts our ability to generate attractive earnings through our loan and investment portfolios. These factors can individually or in the aggregate be detrimental to our business, and the interplay between these factors can be complex and unpredictable. Adverse economic conditions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We would face strong competition from financial services companies and other companies that offer banking services.

 

We would operate in the highly competitive financial services industry and face significant competition for customers from financial institutions located both within and beyond our principal markets. We compete with commercial banks, savings banks, credit unions, nonbank financial services companies and other financial institutions operating both within our market areas and nationally, and in respect of our digital currency initiative, 


 

we also compete with other entities in the digital currency industry, including a limited number of other banks providing services to the digital currency industry and digital currency exchanges. In addition, as customer preferences and expectations continue to evolve, technology has lowered barriers to entry and made it possible for banks to expand their geographic reach by providing services over the internet and for nonbanks to offer products and services traditionally provided by banks, such as automatic payment systems. The Banking industry is experiencing rapid changes in technology and, as a result, our future success will depend in part on our ability to address our customers’ needs by using technology. Customer loyalty can be influenced by a competitor’s new products, especially offerings that could provide cost savings or a higher return to the customer. Increased lending activity of competing banks following the 2008–2009 economic downturn has also led to increased competitive pressures on loan rates and terms for high quality credits. We may not be able to compete successfully with other financial institutions in our markets, and we may have to pay higher interest rates to attract deposits, accept lower yields to attract loans and pay higher wages for new employees, resulting in lower net interest margins and reduced profitability.

 

Many of our non-bank competitors are not subject to the same extensive regulations that govern our activities and may have greater flexibility in competing for business. The financial services industry could become even more competitive because of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and continued consolidation. In addition, some of our current commercial banking customers may seek alternative banking sources as they develop needs for credit facilities larger than we may be able to accommodate.  

 

Our inability to compete successfully in the markets in which we operate could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

We may not be able to measure and limit our credit risk adequately, which could lead to unexpected losses.

 

The business of lending is inherently risky, including risks that the principal of or interest on any loan will not be repaid in a timely manner or at all or that the value of any collateral supporting the loan will be insufficient to cover our outstanding exposure. These risks may be affected by the financial condition of the borrower, the strength of the borrower’s business sector and local, regional and national market and economic conditions. Many of our loans are made to small- to medium-sized businesses that may be less able to withstand competitive, economic and financial pressures than larger borrowers. Our risk management practices, such as monitoring the concentration of our loans within specific industries, and our credit approval practices may not adequately reduce credit risk. Further, our credit administration personnel, policies and procedures may not adequately adapt to changes in economic or any other conditions affecting customers and the quality of the loan portfolio. A failure to measure and limit the credit risk associated with our loan portfolio effectively could lead to unexpected losses and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Appraisals and other valuation techniques we use in evaluating and monitoring loans secured by real property, other real estate owned and repossessed personal property may not accurately describe the net value of the asset.

 

In considering whether to make a loan secured by real property, we generally require an appraisal of the property. However, an appraisal is only an estimate of the value of the property at the time the appraisal is made and, as real estate values may change significantly in relatively short periods of time (especially in periods of heightened economic uncertainty), this estimate may not accurately describe the net value of the real property collateral after the loan is made. As a result, we may not be able to realize the full amount of any remaining indebtedness when we foreclose on and sell the relevant property. In addition, we rely on appraisals and other valuation techniques to establish the value of our other real estate owned, or OREO, and personal property that we acquire through foreclosure proceedings and to determine certain loan impairments. If any of these valuations are inaccurate, our combined and consolidated financial statements may not reflect the correct value of our OREO, and our allowance for loan losses may not reflect accurate loan impairments. This could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.


 

 

In the case of defaults on loans secured by real estate, we may be forced to foreclose on the collateral, subjecting us to the costs and potential risks associated with the ownership of the real property, or consumer protection initiatives or changes in state or federal law that may substantially raise the cost of foreclosure or prevent us from foreclosing at all.

 

Since we intend to originate loans secured by real estate, we may have to foreclose on the collateral property to protect our investment and may thereafter own and operate such property for some period, in which case we would be exposed to the risks inherent in the ownership of real estate.  The amount that we, as a mortgagee, may realize after a default depends on factors outside of our control, including, but not limited to, general or local economic conditions, environmental cleanup liabilities, assessments, interest rates, real estate tax rates, operating expenses of the mortgaged properties, our ability to obtain and maintain adequate occupancy of the properties, zoning laws, governmental and regulatory rules, and natural disasters. Our inability to manage the amount of costs or size of the risks associated with the ownership of real estate, or write-downs in the value of other real estate owned, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Additionally, consumer protection initiatives or changes in state or federal law may substantially increase the time and expense associated with the foreclosure process or prevent us from foreclosing at all. Some states in recent years have either considered or adopted foreclosure reform laws that make it substantially more difficult and expensive for lenders to foreclose on properties in default. If new state or federal laws or regulations are ultimately enacted that significantly raise the cost of foreclosure or raise outright barriers, such laws could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operation.

 

We are subject to claims and litigation pertaining to intellectual property.

 

Banking and other financial services companies, such as our Company, rely on technology companies to provide information technology products and services necessary to support their day-to-day operations. Technology companies frequently pursue litigation based on allegations of patent infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights. In addition, patent holding companies seek to monetize patents they have purchased or otherwise obtained. Competitors of our vendors, or other individuals or companies, may from time to time claim to hold intellectual property sold to us by our vendors. Such claims may increase in the future as the financial services sector becomes more reliant on information technology vendors. The plaintiffs in these actions frequently seek injunctions and substantial damages.

 

Regardless of the scope or validity of such patents or other intellectual property rights, or the merits of any claims by potential or actual litigants, we may have to engage in protracted litigation. Such litigation is often expensive, time-consuming, disruptive to our operations and distracting to management. If we are found to infringe one or more patents or other intellectual property rights, we may be required to pay substantial damages or royalties to a third party. In certain cases, we may consider entering into licensing agreements for disputed intellectual property, although no assurance can be given that such licenses can be obtained on acceptable terms or that litigation will not occur. These licenses may also significantly increase our operating expenses. If legal matters related to intellectual property claims were resolved against us or settled, we could be required to make payments in amounts that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.


 

 

Third parties may assert intellectual property claims relating to the holding and transfer of digital assets and their source code. Regardless of the merit of any intellectual property or other legal action, any threatened action that reduces confidence in long-term viability or the ability of end-users to hold and transfer the currency may adversely affect an investment in digital currencies. Additionally, a meritorious intellectual property claim could prevent investors and other end-users from accessing, holding or transferring their digital currency, which could force the liquidation of holdings of such digital currency (if liquidation is possible). As a result, intellectual property claims against large digital currency participants could adversely affect the business and operations of digital currency exchanges as well as our own.

 

We may not be able to protect our intellectual property rights, and may become involved in lawsuits to protect or enforce our intellectual property, which could be expensive, time consuming and unsuccessful.

 

Competitors may violate our intellectual property rights. To counter infringement or unauthorized use, litigation may be necessary to enforce or defend our intellectual property rights, to protect our trade secrets and/or to determine the validity and scope of our own intellectual property rights or the proprietary rights of others. Such litigation can be expensive and time consuming, which could divert management resources and harm our business and financial results. Potential competitors may have the ability to dedicate greater resources to litigate intellectual property rights than we can. Accordingly, despite our efforts, we may not be able to prevent third parties from infringing upon or misappropriating our intellectual property.

 

We may be subject to environmental liabilities relating to the real properties we own and the foreclosure on real estate assets securing loans in our loan portfolio.

 

In conducting our business, we may foreclose on and take title to real estate or otherwise be deemed to be in control of property that serves as collateral on loans we make. As a result, we could be subject to environmental liabilities with respect to those properties. We may be held liable to a governmental entity or to third parties for property damage, personal injury, investigation and clean-up costs incurred by these parties relating to environmental contamination, or we may be required to investigate or clean up hazardous or toxic substances or chemical releases at a property. The costs associated with investigation or remediation activities could be substantial. In addition, if we are the owner or former owner of a contaminated site, we may be subject to common law claims by third parties based on damages and costs resulting from environmental contamination emanating from the property.

 

The cost of removal or abatement may substantially exceed the value of the affected properties or the loans secured by those properties, we may not have adequate remedies against the prior owners or other responsible parties and we may not be able to resell the affected properties either before or after completion of any such removal or abatement procedures. If material environmental problems are discovered before foreclosure, we generally will not foreclose on the related collateral or will transfer ownership of the loan to a subsidiary. It should be noted, however, that the transfer of the property or loans to a subsidiary may not protect us from environmental liability. Furthermore, despite these actions on our part, the value of the property as collateral will generally be substantially reduced or we may elect not to foreclose on the property and, as a result, we may suffer a loss upon collection of the loan. Any significant environmental liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.


 

 

The Bank’s mortgage warehouse division may not continue to provide us with significant noninterest income and interest income.

 

A portion of our lending would involve the funding of single family residential mortgage loans originated by third party mortgage bankers. Mortgage warehouse fee income would fluctuate with mortgage warehouse activity. The residential mortgage business is highly competitive and highly susceptible to changes in market interest rates, consumer confidence levels, employment statistics, the capacity and willingness of secondary market purchasers to acquire and hold or securitize loans, and other factors beyond our control. Additionally, in many respects, the traditional mortgage origination business is relationship-based, and dependent on mortgage banker relationships. The loss one or more mortgage banker relationships could have the effect of reducing the level or rate of growth of our mortgage warehouse activity. Because of these factors, we cannot be certain that we will be able to maintain or increase the volume or percentage of revenue or net income produced by the mortgage warehouse business.

 

The Bank’s mortgage warehouse lending business may expose us to increased lending and other risks.

 

Risks associated with the Bank’s mortgage warehouse loans include risks relating to the mortgage bankers to which we provide funding, including the risk of intentional misrepresentation or fraud; changes in the market value of mortgage loans originated by the mortgage banker, the sale of which is the expected source of repayment of the warehouse funding we provide, due to changes in interest rates during the time in warehouse; and originations of mortgage loans that are unsalable or impaired, which could lead to decreased collateral value and the failure of a prospective purchaser of the mortgage loan to ultimately purchase the loan from the mortgage banker. Any one or a combination of these events may adversely affect our loan portfolio and may result in increased delinquencies, loan losses and increased future provision levels, which, in turn, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

A lack of liquidity could impair our ability to fund operations and adversely impact the Bank’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Liquidity is essential to the Bank’s business. We would rely on the Bank’s ability to generate deposits and effectively manage the repayment and maturity schedules of our loans and investment securities, respectively, to ensure that we have adequate liquidity to fund our operations. An inability to raise funds through deposits, borrowings, sales of our investment securities, sales of loans or other sources could have a substantial negative effect on our liquidity and our ability to continue our growth strategy.

 

Additional liquidity would be provided by the Bank’s ability to borrow from the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco, or the FHLB, and the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, or the FRB.  The Bank may also borrow funds from third-party lenders, such as other financial institutions. The Bank’s access to funding sources in amounts adequate to finance or capitalize our activities, or on terms that are acceptable to us, could be impaired by factors that affect us directly or the financial services industry or economy in general, such as disruptions in the financial markets or negative views and expectations about the prospects for the financial services industry. Our access to funding sources could also be affected by one or more adverse regulatory actions against us.

 

Any decline in available funding could adversely impact the Bank’s ability to originate loans, invest in securities, meet our expenses or fulfill obligations such as repaying our borrowings or meeting deposit withdrawal demands, any of which could, in turn, have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.


 

 

By engaging in derivative transactions, we would be exposed to additional credit and market risk.

 

By engaging in derivative transactions, we would be exposed to counterparty credit and market risk. If the counterparty fails to perform, credit risk exists to the extent of the fair value gain in the derivative. Market risk exists to the extent that interest rates change in ways that are significantly different from what was modeled when we entered into the derivative transaction. The existence of credit and market risk associated with our derivative instruments could adversely affect our revenue and, therefore, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We would be  dependent on the use of data and modeling in our management’s decision-making, and faulty data or modeling approaches could negatively impact our decision-making ability or possibly subject us to regulatory scrutiny in the future.

 

The use of statistical and quantitative models and other quantitative analyses is necessary for bank decision-making, and the employment of such analyses is becoming increasingly widespread in our operations.

 

Liquidity stress testing, interest rate sensitivity analysis and the identification of possible violations of anti-money laundering regulations are all examples of areas in which we are dependent on models and the data that underlies them. The use of statistical and quantitative models is also becoming more prevalent in regulatory compliance. While we are not currently subject to annual Dodd-Frank Act stress testing and the Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review submissions, we believe that model-derived testing may become more extensively implemented by regulators in the future.

 

We anticipate data-based modeling will penetrate further into bank decision-making, particularly risk management efforts, as the capacities developed to meet rigorous stress testing requirements are able to be employed more widely and in differing applications. While we believe these quantitative techniques and approaches improve our decision-making, they also create the possibility that faulty data or flawed quantitative approaches could negatively impact our decision-making ability or, if we become subject to regulatory stress-testing in the future, adverse regulatory scrutiny. Secondarily, because of the complexity inherent in these approaches, misunderstanding or misuse of their outputs could similarly result in suboptimal decision-making.

 

The Bank’s would be subject to interest rate risk as fluctuations in interest rates may adversely affect our earnings.

 

Most of the Bank’s banking assets and liabilities would be monetary in nature and subject to risk from changes in interest rates. Like most financial institutions, our earnings are significantly dependent on our net interest income, the principal component of our earnings, which is the difference between interest earned by us from our interest earning assets, such as loans and investment securities, and interest paid by us on our interest bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowings. We expect that we will periodically experience “gaps” in the interest rate sensitivities of our assets and liabilities, meaning that either our interest bearing liabilities will be more sensitive to changes in market interest rates than our interest earning assets, or vice versa. In either case, if market interest rates should move contrary to our position, this gap will negatively impact our earnings. The impact on earnings is more adverse when the slope of the yield curve flattens; that is, when short-term interest rates increase more than long-term interest rates or when long-term interest rates decrease more than short-term interest rates. Many factors impact interest rates, including governmental monetary policies, inflation, recession, changes in unemployment, the money supply, international economic weakness and disorder and instability in domestic and foreign financial markets. In addition, the Federal Reserve has stated its intention to end its quantitative easing program and has begun to reduce the size of its balance sheet by selling securities, which might also affect interest rates.


 

 

Interest rate increases often result in larger payment requirements for the Bank’s borrowers, which increases the potential for default and could result in a decrease in the demand for loans. At the same time, the marketability of the property securing a loan may be adversely affected by any reduced demand resulting from higher interest rates. In a declining interest rate environment, there may be an increase in prepayments on loans as borrowers refinance their loans at lower rates. In addition, in a low interest rate environment, loan customers often pursue long-term fixed rate borrowings, which could adversely affect our earnings and net interest margin if rates later increase. Changes in interest rates also can affect the value of loans, securities and other assets. An increase in interest rates that adversely affects the ability of borrowers to pay the principal or interest on loans may lead to an increase in nonperforming assets and a reduction of income recognized, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows. Further, when we place a loan on nonaccrual status, we reverse any accrued but unpaid interest receivable, which decreases interest income. At the same time, we continue to incur costs to fund the loan, which is reflected as interest expense, without any interest income to offset the associated funding expense. Thus, an increase in the amount of nonperforming assets could have a material adverse impact on net interest income. If short-term interest rates remain at their historically low levels for a prolonged period and assuming longer-term interest rates fall further, we could experience net interest margin compression as our interest earning assets would continue to reprice downward while our interest bearing liability rates could fail to decline in tandem. Such an occurrence would reduce our net interest income and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The potential cessation of LIBOR and the uncertainty over possible replacements for LIBOR may adversely affect the Bank’s business.

 

On July 27, 2017, the Chief Executive of the United Kingdom Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR, announced that it intends to stop persuading or compelling banks to submit rates for the calculation of LIBOR to the administrator of LIBOR after 2021. The announcement indicates that the continuation of LIBOR on the current basis cannot and will not be guaranteed after 2021. It is impossible to predict whether and to what extent banks will continue to provide LIBOR submissions to the administrator of LIBOR or whether any additional reforms to LIBOR may be enacted in the United Kingdom or elsewhere. The potential cessation of LIBOR quotes in 2021 and the uncertainty over possible replacement rates for LIBOR creates substantial risks to the Banking industry, including us.

 

On April 3, 2018, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York commenced publication of three reference rates based on overnight U.S. Treasury repurchase agreement transactions, including the Secured Overnight Financing Rate, which has been recommended as an alternative to U.S. dollar LIBOR by the Alternative Reference Rates Committee. Further, the Bank of England is publishing a reformed Sterling Overnight Index Average, comprised of a broader set of overnight Sterling money market transactions, which has been selected by the Working Group on Sterling Risk-Free Reference Rates as the alternative rate to Sterling LIBOR. Central bank-sponsored committees in other jurisdictions, including Europe, Japan and Switzerland, have, or are expected to, select alternative reference rates denominated in other currencies. However, at this time, no consensus exists as to what rate or rates may become accepted alternatives to LIBOR and it is impossible to predict the cost of transitioning to or the effect of any such alternatives on the value of LIBOR-based securities or the outstanding loans with interest rates based on LIBOR that the Bank had made to borrowers, including certain of the Company’s derivatives, other securities or financial arrangements given LIBOR’s role in determining market interest rates globally. If a published LIBOR rate is unavailable after 2021, the interest rates on our subordinated debentures, which are currently based on the LIBOR rate, will be determined as set forth in the accompanying offering documents, and the value of such securities may be adversely affected. Uncertainty as to the nature of alternative reference rates and as to potential changes or other reforms to LIBOR could also cause confusion that could disrupt the capital and credit markets more broadly. Currently, the manner and impact of this transition and related developments, as well as the effect of an alternative reference rate on our future and legacy funding costs, loan and investment securities portfolios, asset-liability management and business, is uncertain.


 

 

Any future failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting could impair the reliability of our financial statements, which in turn could harm our business, impair investor confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports and our access to the capital markets and cause the price of our common stock to decline and subject us to regulatory penalties.

 

If we fail to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to report our financial results accurately and in a timely manner, in which case our business may be harmed, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, we could be subject to regulatory penalties and the price of our common stock may decline.

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting and for evaluating and reporting on that system of internal control. Our internal control over financial reporting consists of a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP. As a public company, we will be required to comply with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and other rules that govern public companies. We will be required to certify our compliance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act beginning with our second annual report on Form 10-K, which will require us to furnish annually a report by management on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. In addition, our independent registered public accounting firm may be required to report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting beginning as of that second annual report on Form 10-K.

 

The accuracy of our financial statements and related disclosures could be affected if the judgments, assumptions or estimates used in our critical accounting policies are inaccurate.

 

The preparation of financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with GAAP requires us to make judgments, assumptions and estimates that affect the amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Our critical accounting policies, which are included in the section captioned “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this prospectus, describe those significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements that we consider critical because they require judgments, assumptions and estimates that materially affect our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures. As a result, if future events or regulatory views concerning such analysis differ significantly from the judgments, assumptions and estimates in our critical accounting policies, those events or assumptions could have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures, in each case resulting in our need to revise or restate prior period financial statements, cause damage to our reputation and the price of our common stock and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

There could be material changes to our financial statements and disclosures if there are changes in accounting standards or regulatory interpretations of existing standards

 

From time to time the FASB or the SEC may change the financial accounting and reporting standards that govern the preparation of our financial statements. Such changes may result in us being subject to new or changing accounting and reporting standards. In addition, the bodies that interpret the accounting standards (such as banking regulators or outside auditors) may change their interpretations or positions on how new or existing standards should be applied. These changes may be beyond our control, can be hard to predict and can materially impact how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. In some cases, we could be required to apply a new or revised standard retrospectively, or apply an existing standard differently and retrospectively, in each case resulting in our needing to revise or restate prior period financial statements, which could materially change our financial statements and related disclosures, cause damage to our reputation and the price of our common stock, and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.


 

 

We could recognize losses on investment securities held in our securities portfolio, particularly if interest rates increase or economic and market conditions deteriorate.

 

We invest a percentage of our total assets in investment securities with the primary objectives of providing a source of liquidity, providing an appropriate return on funds invested, managing interest rate risk and meeting pledging requirements. Factors beyond our control can significantly and adversely influence the fair value of securities in our portfolio. For example, fixed-rate securities are generally subject to decreases in market value when interest rates rise. Additional factors include, but are not limited to, rating agency downgrades of the securities, defaults by the issuer or individual borrowers with respect to the underlying securities and instability in the credit markets. Any of the foregoing factors could cause other-than-temporary impairment in future periods and result in realized losses. The process for determining whether impairment is other-than-temporary usually requires difficult, subjective judgments about the future financial performance of the issuer and any collateral underlying the security to assess the probability of receiving all contractual principal and interest payments on the security. Because of changing economic and market conditions affecting interest rates, the financial condition of issuers of the securities and the performance of the underlying collateral, we may recognize realized and/or unrealized losses in future periods, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We are subject to certain operational risks, including, but not limited to, customer, employee or third-party fraud and data processing system failures and errors.

 

Employee errors and employee or customer misconduct could subject us to financial losses or regulatory sanctions and seriously harm our reputation. Misconduct by our employees could include hiding unauthorized activities from us, improper or unauthorized activities on behalf of our customers or improper use of confidential information. It is not always possible to prevent employee errors and misconduct, and the precautions we take to prevent and detect this activity may not be effective in all cases. Employee errors could also subject us to financial claims for negligence.

 

We maintain a system of internal controls to mitigate operational risks, including data processing system failures and errors and customer or employee fraud, as well as insurance coverage designed to protect us from material losses associated with these risks, including losses resulting from any associated business interruption. If our internal controls fail to prevent or detect an occurrence, or if any resulting loss is not insured or exceeds applicable insurance limits, it could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

In addition, we rely heavily upon information supplied by third parties, including the information contained in credit applications, property appraisals, title information and employment and income documentation, in deciding which loans we will originate, as well as the terms of those loans. If any of the information upon which we rely is misrepresented, either fraudulently or inadvertently, and the misrepresentation is not detected prior to loan funding, the value of the loan may be significantly lower than expected, or we may fund a loan that we would not have funded or on terms that do not comply with our general underwriting standards. Whether a misrepresentation is made by the applicant or another third party, we generally bear the risk of loss associated with the misrepresentation. A loan subject to a material misrepresentation is typically unsellable or subject to repurchase if it is sold prior to detection of the misrepresentation. The sources of the misrepresentations are often difficult to locate, and it is often difficult to recover any of the resulting monetary losses we may suffer, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.


 

 

We rely heavily on our executive management team and other key employees, and we could be adversely affected by the unexpected loss of their services.

 

We are led by an experienced core management team with substantial experience in the markets that we serve, and our operating strategy focuses on providing products and services through long-term relationship managers and ensuring that our largest clients have relationships with our senior management team. Accordingly, our success depends in large part on the performance of these key personnel, as well as on our ability to attract, motivate and retain highly qualified senior and middle management. Competition for employees is intense and the process of locating key personnel with the combination of skills and attributes required to execute our business plan may be lengthy. If any of our executive officers, other key personnel or directors leaves us or our Bank, our financial condition and results of operations may suffer because of his or her skills, knowledge of our market, years of industry experience and the difficulty of promptly finding qualified personnel to replace him or her.

 

Negative public opinion regarding the Company or failure to maintain our reputation in the communities we serve could adversely affect our business and prevent us from growing our business.

 

As a community bank and service provider to the digital currency industry, our Bank’s reputation within the communities we serve is critical to our success. We believe we have built strong personal and professional relationships with our customers and are active members of the communities we serve. As such, we strive to enhance our reputation by recruiting, hiring and retaining employees who share our core values of being an integral part of the communities we serve and delivering superior service to our customers. If our reputation is negatively affected by the actions of our employees or otherwise, including because of a successful cyberattack against us or other unauthorized release or loss of customer information, we may be less successful in attracting new talent and customers or may lose existing customers, and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected. In addition, if the reputation of the digital currency industry as a whole is harmed, including due to events such as cybersecurity breaches, scams perpetrated by bad actors or other unforeseen developments as a result of the evolving regulatory landscape of the digital currency industry, our reputation may be negatively affected due to our connection with the digital currency industry, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our exposure to and interactions with the digital currency industry put us at a higher risk of media attention and scrutiny. Further, negative public opinion can expose us to litigation and regulatory action and delay and impede our efforts to implement our expansion strategy, which could further adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may not be able to raise the additional capital needed, in absolute terms or on terms acceptable to us, to fund our growth in the future if we continue to grow at our current pace.

 

After giving effect to this offering, we believe that we will have sufficient capital to meet our capital needs for our immediate growth plans. However, we will continue to need capital to support our longer-term growth plans. If capital is not available on favorable terms when we need it, we will have to either issue common stock or other securities on less than desirable terms or reduce our rate of growth until market conditions become more favorable. Either of such events could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.


 

 

 

 

Risks Related to Regulation

 

There is substantial legal and regulatory uncertainty regarding the regulation of digital currencies and digital currency activities. This uncertainty or adverse regulatory changes may inhibit the growth of the digital currency industry, including our customers, and therefore have a material adverse effect on the digital currency initiative.

 

The U.S. Congress, U.S. state legislatures, and a number of U.S. federal and state regulators and law enforcement agencies, including FinCEN, U.S. federal banking regulators, SEC, CFTC, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, or FINRA, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, or CFPB, the Department of Justice, the Department of Homeland Security, the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Internal Revenue Service, or the IRS, and state banking regulators, state financial services regulators, and states attorney generals, have been examining the operations of digital currency networks, exchanges, and digital currency businesses, with particular focus on the extent to which digital currencies can be used for illegal activities, including but not limited to laundering the proceeds of illegal activities, funding criminal or terrorist enterprises, engaging in fraudulent activities (see “—Risks Related to the Digital Currency Industry”), as well as whether and the extent to which digital currency businesses should be subject to existing or new regulation, including those applicable to banks, securities intermediaries, derivatives intermediaries, or money transmitters.

 

For example, FinCEN requires firms engaged in the business of administration, exchange, or transmission of a virtual currency to register with FinCEN under its money services business licensing regime. The New York DFS has established a licensing regime for businesses involved in virtual currency business activity in or involving New York, commonly known as BitLicense regime. The SEC and CFTC have each issued formal and informal guidance on the applicability of securities and derivatives regulations to digital currencies and digital currency activities. The SEC has suggested that, depending on the circumstances, an initial coin offering, or ICO, may constitute securities offerings subject to the provisions of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, and that some ICOs in the past have been illegal, which could, in turn, result in regulatory actions or other scrutiny against our customers or us. The SEC has also stated that venues that permit trading of tokens that are deemed securities are required to either register as national securities exchanges under Section 6 of the Exchange Act or obtain an exemption. If we or any of our digital currency customers are subject to regulatory actions relating to illegal securities offerings or are required to register as a national securities exchange under the Exchange Act, we may experience a substantial loss of deposits and our business may be materially adversely affected.

 

Many state and federal agencies have also issued consumer advisories regarding the risks posed to users and investors in digital currencies. U.S. federal and state legislatures, regulators and law enforcement agencies continue to develop views and approaches to a wide variety of digital currencies and activities involved in digital currencies and it is likely that, as the legal and regulatory landscape develops, additional regulatory requirements could apply to digital currency businesses, including our digital currency customers and us. U.S. state and federal, and foreign regulators and legislatures have taken legal actions against digital currency businesses or adopted restrictions in response to adverse publicity arising from hacks, consumer harm, criminal activity, or other activities related to digital currencies. Ongoing and future regulatory actions may alter, perhaps to a materially adverse extent, the nature of the digital currency industry or the ability of our customers to continue to operate. This may significantly impede the viability or growth of our existing funding sources based on deposits from digital currency business as well as our digital currency initiative. In addition, we may become subject to additional regulatory scrutiny as a result of certain aspects of our growth strategy, including our plans to develop credit products for the purchase of digital currency, custodian services and to expand our international customer base.


 

 

 

Digital currencies and digital currency related activities also currently face an uncertain regulatory landscape in many foreign jurisdictions such as the European Union, China, the United Kingdom, Australia, Japan, Russia, Israel, Poland, India, Hong Kong, Canada and Singapore. Various foreign jurisdictions may adopt laws regulations or directives that affect digital currencies. Such laws, regulations or directives may conflict with those of the United States and may negatively impact the acceptance of digital currencies by users, merchants and service providers  outside the United States and may therefore impede the growth or sustainability of the digital currency industry in these jurisdictions as well as in the United States and elsewhere, or otherwise negatively affect the digital currency industry or our customers, which may adversely affect our digital currency initiative and could therefore result in a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and growth prospects.

 

Legislative and regulatory actions taken now or in the future may increase our costs and impact our business, governance structure, financial condition or results of operations.

 

Economic conditions that contributed to the financial crisis in 2008, particularly in the financial markets, resulted in government regulatory agencies and political bodies placing increased focus and scrutiny on the financial services industry. The Dodd-Frank Act, which was enacted in 2010 as a response to the financial crisis, significantly changed the regulation of financial institutions and the financial services industry. The Dodd-Frank Act and the regulations thereunder have affected both large and small financial institutions. The Dodd-Frank Act, among other things, imposed new capital requirements on bank holding companies; changed the base for FDIC insurance assessments to a bank’s average consolidated total assets minus average tangible equity, rather than upon its deposit base; raised the standard deposit insurance limit to $250,000; and expanded the FDIC’s authority to raise insurance premiums. The Dodd-Frank Act established the CFPB as an independent entity within the Federal Reserve, which has broad rulemaking authority over consumer financial products and services, including deposit products, residential mortgages, home-equity loans and credit cards, and contains provisions on mortgage-related matters, such as steering incentives, determinations as to a borrower’s ability to repay and prepayment penalties. Compliance with the Dodd-Frank Act and its implementing regulations has and may continue to result in additional operating and compliance costs that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and growth prospects.

 

On May 24, 2018, President Trump signed into law the “Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act,” or the Regulatory Relief Act, which amends parts of the Dodd-Frank Act, as well as other laws that involve regulation of the financial industry. While the Regulatory Relief Act keeps in place fundamental aspects of the Dodd-Frank Act’s regulatory framework, it does make regulatory changes that are favorable to depository institutions with assets under $10 billion, such as the Bank, and to bank holding companies, or BHCs, with total consolidated assets of less than $10 billion, such as the Company, and also makes changes to consumer mortgage and credit reporting regulations and to the authorities of the agencies that regulate the financial industry. These and other changes are more fully discussed under “Supervision and Regulation—The Regulatory Relief Act.” Certain provisions of the Regulatory Relief Act favorable to the Company and the Bank require the federal banking agencies to either promulgate regulations or amend existing regulations, and it may take some time for these agencies to implement the necessary regulations or amendments.

 


 

Federal and state regulatory agencies frequently adopt changes to their regulations or change the way existing regulations are applied. Regulatory or legislative changes to laws applicable to the financial industry, if enacted or adopted, may impact the profitability of our business activities, require more oversight or change certain of our business practices, including the ability to offer new products, obtain financing, attract deposits, make loans and achieve satisfactory interest spreads and could expose us to additional costs, including increased compliance costs. These changes also may require us to invest significant management attention and resources to make any necessary changes to operations to comply and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Changes in tax laws and regulations, or changes in the interpretation of existing tax laws and regulations, may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and growth prospects.

 

We operate in an environment that imposes income taxes on our operations at both the federal and state levels to varying degrees. We engage in certain strategies to minimize the impact of these taxes. Consequently, any change in tax laws or regulations, or new interpretation of existing laws or regulations, could significantly alter the effectiveness of these strategies.

 

In December 2017, the Tax Act was signed into law. The act includes numerous changes to existing U.S. federal income tax law, including a reduction in the federal corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%, which took effect January 1, 2018. The reduction in the federal corporate income tax rate resulted in an impairment of our net deferred tax asset based on our reevaluation of the future tax benefit of these deferrals using the lower tax rate.

 

Because of the Dodd-Frank Act and related rulemaking, the Bank and the Company are subject to more stringent capital requirements.

 

In July 2013, the U.S. federal banking authorities approved the implementation of regulatory capital reforms of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, which is referred to as Basel III, and issued rules effecting certain changes required by the Dodd-Frank Act. Basel III is applicable to all U.S. banks that are subject to minimum capital requirements as well as to bank and saving and loan holding companies other than those subject to the Federal Reserve’s Small Bank Holding Company Policy Statement. The Small Bank Holding Company Policy Statement currently applies to certain holding companies with consolidated assets of less than $3.0 billion that do not have a material amount of SEC-registered debt or equity securities outstanding. While the Company is exempt from the consolidated capital requirements at June 30, 2019, it will not be eligible for the Small Bank Holding Company Policy Statement upon the issuance of the equity securities that are the subject of this registration statement.

 

Relative to the capital requirements that predated it, Basel III increased most of the required minimum regulatory capital ratios and introduced a new common equity Tier 1 capital ratio and the concept of a capital conservation buffer. Basel III also narrowed the definition of capital by establishing additional criteria that capital instruments must meet to be considered additional Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital. The Basel III capital rules became effective as applied to the Bank on January 1, 2015 and to the Company on January 1, 2018 prior to the amendment to the Small Bank Holding Company Statement discussed above. See “Supervision and Regulation—Capital Adequacy Guidelines.”

 

Certain ratios calculated under the Basel III rules are sensitive to changes in total deposits, including the minimum leverage ratio that is discussed further under “Supervision and Regulation—Capital Adequacy Guidelines.” Due to the potential volatility of deposits related to our Digital Currency Initiative, the Bank may be at increased risk of a sudden adverse change in these ratios.

 


 

The failure to meet applicable regulatory capital requirements could result in one or more of the Bank’s regulators placing limitations or conditions on our activities, including our growth initiatives, or restricting the commencement of new activities, and could affect customer and investor confidence, our costs of funds and FDIC insurance costs, our ability to pay dividends on our common stock, our ability to make acquisitions, and our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Federal banking agencies periodically conduct examinations of our business, including our compliance with laws and regulations, and our failure to comply with any supervisory actions to which we are or become subject based on such examinations could adversely affect us.

 

As part of the Bank regulatory process, the Federal Reserve and the California Department of Business Oversight, Division of Financial Institutions, or the DBO, would periodically conduct examinations of our business, including compliance with laws and regulations. If, based on an examination, one of these federal banking agencies were to determine that the financial condition, capital resources, asset quality, earnings prospects, management, liquidity, asset sensitivity, risk management or other aspects of any of our operations have become unsatisfactory, or that the Company, the Bank or their respective management were in violation of any law or regulation, it may take such remedial actions as it deems appropriate. These actions include the power to enjoin unsafe or unsound practices, to require affirmative actions to correct any conditions resulting from any violation or practice, to issue an administrative order that can be judicially enforced, to direct an increase in our capital levels, to restrict our growth, to assess civil monetary penalties against us, the Bank or their respective officers or directors, to remove officers and directors and, if it is concluded that such conditions cannot be corrected or there is an imminent risk of loss to depositors, to terminate the Bank’s deposit insurance. If the Bank become subject to such regulatory actions, our business, financial condition, results of operations and reputation could be adversely affected.

 

Our regulators may limit current or planned activities related to the digital currency industry.

 

The digital currency industry is relatively new and is subject to significant risks. The digital currency initiative involves customers and activities with which regulators, including our primary banking regulators the Federal Reserve and DBO, may be less familiar and which they may consider higher risk than those involving more established industries. While we have consulted, and will continue to consult with, our regulators regarding our activities involving digital currency industry customers and the digital currency initiative, in the future a regulator may determine to limit or restrict one or more of these activities. Such actions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

 

Financial institutions, such as the Bank, face risks of noncompliance and enforcement actions related to the BSA and other anti-money laundering statutes and regulations (in particular, as such statutes and regulations relate to the digital currency industry).

 

The BSA, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001, or the USA PATRIOT Act, FinCEN and other laws and regulations require financial institutions, among other duties, to institute and maintain an effective anti-money laundering program and file suspicious activity and currency transaction reports as appropriate. To administer the Bank Secrecy Act, FinCEN is authorized to impose significant civil money penalties for violations of those requirements and has recently engaged in coordinated enforcement efforts with the individual federal banking regulators, as well as the U.S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration and the IRS. There is also increased scrutiny of compliance with the sanctions programs and rules administered and enforced by the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control.

 


 

The Bank’s compliance with the anti-money laundering laws is in part dependent on our ability to adequately screen and monitor our customers for their compliance with these laws. Customers associated with our digital currency initiative may represent an increased compliance risk given the prevalence of money laundering activities using digital currencies. We intend to develop enhanced procedures to screen and monitor these customers, which include, but are not limited to, system monitoring rules tailored to digital currency activities, a system of “red flags” specific to various customer types and activities, the development of and investment in proprietary technology tools to supplement our third-party transaction monitoring system, customer risk scoring with risk factors specific to the digital-currency industry, and the use of various blockchain monitoring tools. We believe these enhanced procedures adequately screen and monitor our customers associated with the digital currency initiative for their compliance with anti-money laundering laws; however, given the rapid developments in digital currency markets and technologies, there can be no assurance that these enhanced procedures will be adequate to detect or prevent money laundering activity. If regulators determine that the Bank’s enhanced procedures are insufficient to address the financial crimes risks posed by digital currencies, the digital currency initiative may be adversely affected, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

To comply with regulations, guidelines and examination procedures in this area, the Bank intend to dedicate significant resources to its anti-money laundering program. If the Bank’s policies, procedures and systems are deemed deficient, we could be subject to liability, including fines and regulatory actions such as restrictions on our ability to pay dividends and the inability to obtain regulatory approvals to proceed with certain aspects of our business plans, including acquisitions and de novo branching.

 

We are subject to anticorruption laws, including the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA, and we may be subject to other anti-corruption laws, as well as anti-money laundering and sanctions laws and other laws governing our operations, to the extent our business expands to non-U.S. jurisdictions. If we fail to comply with these laws, we could be subject to civil or criminal penalties, other remedial measures, and legal expenses, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We would pursue deposit sourcing opportunities outside of the United States. Once we acquire a bank, we would be subject to anti-corruption laws, including the FCPA. The FCPA and other applicable anti-corruption laws generally prohibit us, our employees and intermediaries from bribing, being bribed or making other prohibited payments to government officials or other persons to obtain or retain business or gain other business advantages. We may also participate in collaborations and relationships with third parties whose actions could potentially subject us to liability under the FCPA or other jurisdictions’ anti-corruption laws. There is no assurance that we will be completely effective in ensuring our compliance with all applicable anti-corruption laws, including the FCPA. If we are not in compliance with the FCPA or other anti-corruption laws, we may be subject to criminal and civil penalties, disgorgement and other sanctions and remedial measures, and legal expenses, which could have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Similarly, any investigation of any potential violations of the FCPA or other anti-corruption laws by authorities in the United States or other jurisdictions where we conduct business could also have an adverse impact on our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Once we acquire a bank, we would be subject to numerous laws and regulations, designed to protect consumers, including the Community Reinvestment Act and fair lending laws, and failure to comply with these laws or regulations could lead to a wide variety of sanctions.

 

The Community Reinvestment Act, or CRA, directs all insured depository institutions to help meet the credit needs of the local communities in which they are located, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. Each institution is examined periodically by its primary federal regulator, which assesses the institution’s performance. The Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Housing Act and other fair lending laws and regulations impose nondiscriminatory lending requirements on financial institutions. The CFPB, the U.S. Department of Justice and other federal agencies are responsible for enforcing these laws and regulations. The CFPB was created under the Dodd-Frank Act to centralize responsibility for consumer financial protection with broad rulemaking authority to administer and carry out the purposes and objectives of federal consumer financial laws with respect to all financial institutions that offer financial products and services to consumers. The CFPB is also authorized to prescribe rules applicable to any covered person or service provider, identifying and prohibiting acts or practices that are “unfair, deceptive, or abusive” in any transaction with a consumer for a consumer financial product or service, or the offering of a consumer financial product, or service. The ongoing broad rulemaking powers of the CFPB have potential to have a significant impact on the operations of financial institutions offering consumer financial products or services. The CFPB has indicated that it may propose new rules on overdrafts and other consumer financial products or services, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations if any such rules limit our ability to provide such financial products or services.


 

 

A successful regulatory challenge to an institution’s performance under the CRA, fair lending or consumer lending laws and regulations could result in a wide variety of sanctions, including damages and civil money penalties, injunctive relief, restrictions on mergers and acquisitions activity, restrictions on expansion, and restrictions on entering new business lines. Private parties may also challenge an institution’s performance under fair lending laws in private class action litigation. Such actions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Increases in FDIC insurance premiums could adversely affect our earnings and results of operations.

 

Once we acquire a bank, the deposits of our Bank would be insured by the FDIC up to legal limits and, accordingly, subject it to the payment of FDIC deposit insurance assessments as determined according to the calculation described in “Supervision and Regulation—Deposit Insurance.” To maintain a strong funding position and restore the reserve ratios of the DIF following the financial crisis, the FDIC increased deposit insurance assessment rates and charged special assessments to all FDIC-insured financial institutions. Further increases in assessment rates or special assessments may occur in the future, especially if there are significant additional financial institution failures. Any future special assessments, increases in assessment rates or required prepayments in FDIC insurance premiums could reduce our profitability or limit our ability to pursue certain business opportunities, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The Federal Reserve may require us  to commit capital resources to support the Bank at a time when our resources are limited, which may require us to borrow funds or raise capital on unfavorable terms.

 

Once we acquire a bank, we would be classified as a Bank Holding Company (BHC). The Federal Reserve requires a BHC to act as a source of financial and managerial strength to its subsidiary banks and to commit resources to support its subsidiary banks. Under the “source of strength” doctrine that was codified by the Dodd-Frank Act, the Federal Reserve may require a BHC to make capital injections into a troubled subsidiary bank at times when the BHC may not be inclined to do so and may charge the BHC with engaging in unsafe and unsound practices for failure to commit resources to such a subsidiary bank. Accordingly, we could be required to provide financial assistance to the Bank if it experiences financial distress.

 

A capital injection may be required at a time when our resources are limited, and we may be required to borrow the funds or raise capital to make the required capital injection. Any loan by a BHC to its subsidiary bank is subordinate in right of repayment to payments to depositors and certain other creditors of such subsidiary bank. In the event of a BHC’s bankruptcy, the Bankruptcy trustee will assume any commitment by the holding company to a federal bank regulatory agency to maintain the capital of a subsidiary bank. Moreover, bankruptcy law provides that claims based on any such commitment will be entitled to a priority of payment over the claims of the holding company’s general unsecured creditors, including the holders of any note obligations. Thus, any borrowing by a BHC for making a capital injection to a subsidiary bank often becomes more difficult and expensive relative to other corporate borrowings. Borrowing funds or raising capital on unfavorable terms for such a capital injection may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.


 

 

We are exposed to a various types of credit risk due to interconnectivity in the financial services industry and could be adversely affected by the insolvency of other financial institutions.

 

Financial services institutions are interrelated based on trading, clearing, counterparty or other relationships. We have exposure to many different industries and counterparties, and routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial services industry, including commercial banks, brokers and dealers, investment banks and other institutional clients. Many of these transactions expose us to credit risk in the event of a default by a counterparty or client. In addition, our credit risk may be exacerbated when our collateral cannot be foreclosed upon or is liquidated at prices not sufficient to recover the full amount of the credit or derivative exposure due. Any such losses could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Monetary policies and regulations of the Federal Reserve could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

In addition to being affected by general economic conditions, our earnings and growth are affected by the policies of the Federal Reserve. An important function of the Federal Reserve is to influence the U.S. money supply and credit conditions. Among the traditional methods that have been used to achieve this objective are open market operations in U.S. government securities, changes in the discount rate for bank borrowings, expanded access to funds for non-banks and changes in reserve requirements against bank deposits. More recently, the Federal Reserve has, as a response to the financial crisis, significantly increased the size of its balance sheet by buying securities and has paid interest on excess reserves held by banks at the Federal Reserve. Both the traditional and more recent methods are used in varying combinations to influence overall growth and distribution of bank loans, investments and deposits, interest rates on loans and securities, and rates paid for deposits.

 

The monetary policies and regulations of the Federal Reserve have had a significant effect on the operating results of commercial banks in the past and are expected to continue to do so in the future. The monetary policies of the Federal Reserve are influenced by various factors, including inflation, unemployment, and short-term and long-term changes in the international trade balance and in the fiscal policies of the U.S. government. Following a prolonged period in which the federal funds rate was stable or decreasing, the Federal Reserve has begun to increase this benchmark rate. In addition, the Federal Reserve Board has stated its intention to end its quantitative easing program and has begun to reduce the size of its balance sheet by selling securities. Future monetary policies, including whether the Federal Reserve will continue to increase the federal funds rate and whether or at what pace it will continue to reduce the size of its balance sheet, cannot be predicted, and although we cannot determine the effects of such policies on us now, such policies could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Risks Related to an Investment in Our Common Stock

 


 

The market price of our common stock may be subject to substantial fluctuations, which may make it difficult for you to sell your shares at the volume, prices and times desired.

 

The market price of our common stock may be highly volatile, which may make it difficult for you to resell your shares at the volume, prices and times desired. There are many factors that may affect the market price and trading volume of our common stock, including, without limitation, the risks discussed elsewhere in this “Risk Factors” section and:

 

 

 

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our operating results, financial condition or asset quality;

 

 

changes in general economic or business conditions;

 

 

changes in digital currency industry conditions;

 

 

the effects of, and changes in, trade, monetary and fiscal policies, including the interest rate policies of the Federal Reserve;

 

 

publication of research reports about us, our competitors or the financial services industry generally, or changes in, or failure to meet, securities analysts’ estimates of our financial and operating performance, or lack of research reports by industry analysts or ceasing of coverage;

 

 

operating and stock price performance of companies that investors deem comparable to us;

 

 

additional or anticipated sales of our common stock or other securities by us or our existing shareholders;

 

 

additions or departures of key personnel;

 

 

perceptions in the marketplace regarding our competitors or us;

 

 

significant acquisitions or business combinations, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments by or involving our competitors or us;

 

 

other economic, competitive, governmental, regulatory or technological factors affecting our operations, pricing, products and services; and

 

 

other news, announcements or disclosures (whether by us or others) related to us, our competitors, our core markets or the financial services industry.

 

The stock market and the market for financial institution stocks has experienced substantial fluctuations in recent years, which in many cases have been unrelated to the operating performance and prospects of particular companies. In addition, significant fluctuations in the trading volume in our common stock may cause significant price variations to occur. Increased market volatility may materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock, which could make it difficult to sell your shares at the volume, prices and times desired.

 

While our growth strategy is focused on the digital currency industry, investors should not expect that the value of our common stock to be correlated with the value of digital currencies. Investing in our common stock is not a proxy for gaining exposure to digital currencies.

 

While our growth strategy is focused on the digital currency industry and the majority of the Bank’s deposits are from digital currency-related activities, investors should not expect that investing in our common stock is a proxy for gaining exposure to digital currencies. The impact of fluctuations in prices and/or trading volume of digital currencies on our deposit balance from customers in the digital currency industry and, by extension, our profitability, is unpredictable, and the price of our common stock may not be correlated to the prices of digital currencies.

 

Though not a proxy for gaining exposure to digital currencies, market participants may view our common stock as such, which could in turn attract investors seeking to buy or sell short our common stock in order to gain such exposure, therefore increasing the price volatility of our common stock. There may also be a heightened level of speculation in our common stock as a result of our exposure to the digital currency industry. For more information regarding the volatility of digital currencies, see “—Risks Related to Our Digital Currency Initiative—The prices of digital currencies are extremely volatile. Fluctuations in the price of various digital currencies may cause uncertainty in the market and could negatively impact trading volumes of digital currencies and therefore the extent to which participants in the digital currency industry demand our services and solutions, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.”


 

 

 

 RISKS RELATED TO OUR INDUSTRY

 

Our limited operating history makes evaluating our business and future prospects difficult, and may increase the risk of your investment.

 

On September 15, 2020, the Company spun-off its specialty real estate holding business to an operating subsidiary and then pivot back to being a technology company. Going forward, the Company intends to acquire: (1) a cloud-based machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) enabled lending platform; (2) a one-four branch Bank that serves majority black neighborhoods; and (3) Blockchain-Powered Payment and Financial Transactions Processing and Digital Currency  platform that connects consumers, banks, and institutional investors.  The Company has not been in the business services and finance industry before.  Thus, in the Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency, the Company is an early stage company.  You must consider the risks and difficulties we face as an early stage company with limited operating history. If we do not successfully address these risks, our business, prospects, operating results and financial condition will be materially and adversely harmed.  We have a very limited operating history on which investors can base an evaluation of our business, operating results and prospects.  We intend to derive our revenues from lending fees, interest income and digital currency transactions fees.  However, there is no assurance that we could achieve this goal because we are new to this industry.

 

 

 

RISKS RELATED TO OUR BUSINESS

 

Our business, operating results, cash flows and financial condition are subject to various risks and uncertainties, including, without limitation, those set forth below, any one of which could cause our actual operating results to vary materially from recent results or from our anticipated future results.

 

We have a limited operating history, and may not be able to operate our business successfully or generate sufficient cash flow to sustain distributions to our stockholders.

 

We have a limited operating history. We currently own three investment properties. We are subject to many of the business risks and uncertainties associated with any new business enterprise. We cannot assure you that we will be able to operate our business successfully or profitably or find additional suitable investments. Our ability to provide attractive risk-adjusted returns to our stockholders over the long term is dependent on our ability both to generate sufficient cash flow to pay an attractive dividend and to achieve capital appreciation, and we cannot assure you we will do either. There can be no assurance that we will be able to continue to generate sufficient revenue from operations to pay our operating expenses and make distributions to stockholders. The results of our operations and the execution on our business plan depend on several factors, including the availability of additional opportunities for investment, the performance of our existing properties and tenants, the availability of adequate equity and debt financing, the federal and state regulatory environment relating to the conditions in the financial markets and economic conditions.

 

 


 

Risks Related to Our Real Estate Investments and Operations

 

Our current real estate portfolio consists of three investment properties and will likely continue to be concentrated in a limited number of properties in the future, which subjects us to an increased risk of significant loss if any property declines in value or if we are unable to lease a property.

 

As at December 31, 2020, we owned one real estate investment property. We have no tenant nor rental revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020.  A significant decline in the value of any single property would materially adversely affect our business, financial position and results of operations, including our ability to make distributions to our stockholders. A lack of diversification may also increases the potential that a single underperforming investment could have a material adverse effect on our cash flows and the price we could realize from the sale of our properties. Any adverse change in the financial condition of any of our future tenants would subject us to a significant risk of loss.

 

In addition, failure by any our future tenants to comply with the terms of its lease agreement with us could require us to find another lessee for the applicable property. We may experience delays in enforcing our rights as landlord and may incur substantial costs in protecting our investment and re-leasing that property. Furthermore, we cannot assure you that we will be able to re-lease that property for the rent we currently receive, or at all, or that a lease termination would not result in our having to sell the property at a loss. The result of any of the foregoing risks could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

 

General real estate investment risks may adversely affect property income and values. 

 

Real estate investments are subject to a variety of risks. If the multifamily properties and other real estate investments do not generate sufficient income to meet operating expenses, including debt service and capital expenditures, cash flow and the ability to make distributions to GMPW's stockholders will be adversely affected. Income from the multifamily properties may be further adversely affected by, among other things, the following factors:

 

·        

changes in the general or local economic climate, including layoffs, plant closings, industry slowdowns, relocations of significant local employers and other events negatively impacting local employment rates and wages and the local economy;

·        

local economic conditions in which the multifamily properties are located, such as oversupply of housing or a reduction in demand for rental housing;

·        

the attractiveness and desirability of our multifamily properties to tenants, including, without limitation, our technology offerings and our ability to identify and cost effectively implement new, relevant technologies, and to keep up with constantly changing consumer demand for the latest innovations;

·        

inflationary environments in which the costs to operate and maintain multifamily properties increase at a rate greater than our ability to increase rents, or deflationary environments where we may be exposed to declining rents more quickly under our short-term leases;

·        

competition from other available housing alternatives;

 

·        

changes in rent control or stabilization laws or other laws regulating housing;

 

·        

the Company’s ability to provide for adequate maintenance and insurance;

 

·        

declines in the financial condition of our tenants, which may make it more difficult for us to collect rents from some tenants;

·        

tenants' perceptions of the safety, convenience and attractiveness of our multifamily properties and the neighborhoods where they are located; and

changes in interest rates and availability of  financing.

         

 


As leases at the multifamily properties expire, tenants may enter into new leases on terms that are less favorable to the Company. Income and real estate values also may be adversely affected by such factors as applicable laws, including, without limitation, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (the "Disabilities Act"), Fair Housing Amendment Act of 1988 (the "FHAA"), permanent and temporary rent control laws, rent stabilization laws, other laws regulating housing that may prevent the Company from raising rents to offset increased operating expenses, and tax laws.

 

Short-term leases expose us to the effects of declining market rents, and the Company may be unable to renew leases or relet units as leases expire. 

 

Substantially all of our apartment leases are for a term of one year or less. If the Company is unable to promptly renew the leases or relet the units, or if the rental rates upon renewal or reletting are significantly lower than expected rates, then the Company’s results of operations and financial condition will be adversely affected. With these short term leases, our rental revenues are impacted by declines in market rents more quickly than if our leases were for longer terms.

 

National and regional economic environments can negatively impact the Company’s liquidity and operating results. 

 

The Company's forecast for the national economy assumes growth of the gross domestic product of the national economy and the economies of the west coast states. In the event of a recession, the Company could incur reductions in rental rates, occupancy levels, property valuations and increases in operating costs such as advertising and turnover expenses. A recession may affect consumer confidence and spending and negatively impact the volume and pricing of real estate transactions, which could negatively affect the Company’s liquidity and its ability to vary its portfolio promptly in response to changes to the economy. Furthermore, if residents do not experience increases in their income, they may be unable or unwilling to pay rent increases, and delinquencies in rent payments and rent defaults may increase.

 

Rent control, or other changes in applicable laws, or noncompliance with applicable laws, could adversely affect the Company's operations or expose us to liability. 

 

The Company must own, operate, manage, acquire, develop and redevelop its properties in compliance with numerous federal, state and local laws and regulations, some of which may conflict with one another or be subject to limited judicial or regulatory interpretations. These laws and regulations may include zoning laws, building codes, rent control or stabilization laws, federal, state and local tax laws, landlord tenant laws, environmental laws, employment laws, immigration laws and other laws regulating housing or that are generally applicable to the Company's business and operations. Noncompliance with laws could expose the Company to liability. If the Company does not comply with any or all of these requirements, it may have to pay fines to government authorities or damage awards to private litigants, and/or may have to decrease rents in order to comply with such requirements. The Company does not know whether these requirements will change or whether new requirements will be imposed. Changes in, or noncompliance with, these regulatory requirements could require the Company to make significant unanticipated expenditures, which could have a material adverse effect on the Company's financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

In addition, rent control or rent stabilization laws and other regulatory restrictions may limit our ability to increase rents and pass through new or increased operating costs to our tenants. There has been a recent increase in municipalities, including those in which we own properties, considering or being urged by advocacy groups to consider rent control or rent stabilization laws and regulations or take other actions which could limit our ability to raise rents based solely on market conditions. These initiatives and any other future enactments of rent control or rent stabilization laws or other laws regulating multifamily housing, as well as any lawsuits against the Company arising from such rent control or other laws, may reduce rental revenues or increase operating costs. Such laws and regulations limit our ability to charge market rents, increase rents, evict tenants or recover increases in our operating expenses and could reduce the value of our multifamily properties or make it more difficult for us to dispose of properties in certain circumstances. Expenses associated with our investment in these multifamily properties, such as debt service, real estate taxes, insurance and maintenance costs, are generally not reduced when circumstances cause a reduction in rental income from the community. Furthermore, such regulations may negatively impact our ability to attract higher-paying tenants to such multifamily properties.


 

 

Acquisitions of multifamily properties involve various risks and uncertainties and may fail to meet expectations. 

 

The Company intends to continue to acquire apartment multifamily properties. However, there are risks that acquisitions will fail to meet the Company’s expectations. The Company’s estimates of future income, expenses and the costs of improvements or redevelopment that are necessary to allow the Company to market an acquired apartment community as originally intended may prove to be inaccurate. In addition, following an acquisition, the value and operational performance of an apartment community may be diminished if obsolescence or neighborhood changes occur before we are able to redevelop or sell the community. Also, in connection with such acquisitions, we may assume unknown liabilities, which could ultimately lead to material costs for us that we did not expect to incur. The Company expects to finance future acquisitions, in whole or in part, under various forms of secured or unsecured financing or through the issuance of partnership units by the Operating Partnership or related partnerships or joint ventures or additional equity by the Company. The use of equity financing, rather than debt, for future developments or acquisitions could dilute the interest of the Company’s existing stockholders. If the Company finances new acquisitions under existing lines of credit, there is a risk that, unless the Company obtains substitute financing, the Company may not be able to undertake additional borrowing for further acquisitions or developments or such borrowing may be not available on advantageous terms.

 

Development and redevelopment activities may be delayed, not completed, and/or not achieve expected results. 

 

The Company pursues development and redevelopment projects and these projects generally require various governmental and other approvals, which have no assurance of being received and/or the timing of which may be delayed from the Company’s expectations. The Company defines development projects as new multifamily properties that are being constructed or are newly constructed and are in a phase of lease-up and have not yet reached stabilized operations, and redevelopment projects as existing properties owned or recently acquired that have been targeted for additional investment by the Company with the expectation of increased financial returns through property improvement.

 

The Company’s development and redevelopment activities generally entail certain risks, including, among others:

 

 

funds may be expended and management's time devoted to projects that may not be completed on time or at all;

 

construction costs of a project may exceed original estimates possibly making the project economically unfeasible;

projects may be delayed due to, without limitation, adverse weather conditions, labor or material shortage, or environmental remediation;


 

 

occupancy rates and rents at a completed project may be less than anticipated;

 

expenses at completed development or redevelopment projects may be higher than anticipated, including, without limitation, due to costs of environmental remediation or increased costs for labor, materials and leasing;

 

we may be unable to obtain, or experience a delay in obtaining, necessary zoning, occupancy, or other required governmental or third party permits and authorizations, which could result in increased costs or delay or abandonment of opportunities;

 

we may be unable to obtain financing with favorable terms, or at all, for the proposed development or redevelopment of a community, which may cause us to delay or abandon an opportunity; and

 

we may incur liabilities to third parties during the development process, for example, in connection with managing existing improvements on the site prior to tenant terminations and demolition (such as commercial space) or in connection with providing services to third parties (such as the construction of shared infrastructure or other improvements.)


These risks may reduce the funds available for distribution to our stockholders. Further, the development and redevelopment of multifamily properties is also subject to the general risks associated with real estate investments. For further information regarding these risks, please see the risk factor above titled "
General real estate investment risks may adversely affect property income and values."

 

Our apartment multifamily properties may be subject to unknown or contingent liabilities which could cause us to incur substantial costs. 

 

The properties that the Company owns or may acquire are or may be subject to unknown or contingent liabilities for which the Company may have no recourse, or only limited recourse, against the sellers. In general, the representations and warranties provided under the transaction agreements related to the sales of the properties may not survive the closing of the transactions. While the Company will seek to require the sellers to indemnify us with respect to breaches of representations and warranties that survive, such indemnification may be limited and subject to various materiality thresholds, a significant deductible or an aggregate cap on losses. As a result, there is no guarantee that we will recover any amounts with respect to losses due to breaches by the sellers of their representations and warranties. In addition, the total amount of costs and expenses that may be incurred with respect to liabilities associated with apartment multifamily properties may exceed our expectations, and we may experience other unanticipated adverse effects, all of which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The geographic concentration of the Company’s multifamily properties and fluctuations in local markets may adversely impact the Company’s financial condition and operating results. 

 

The geographic concentration of our properties could present risks if local property market performance falls below expectations. In general, factors that may adversely affect local market and economic conditions include, among others, the following:

 

 

the economic climate, which may be adversely impacted by a reduction in jobs or income levels, industry slowdowns, changing demographics and other factors;

 

local conditions, such as oversupply of, or reduced demand for, apartment homes;

 

declines in household formation or employment or lack of employment growth;

 

rent control or stabilization laws, or other laws regulating rental housing, which could prevent the Company from raising rents to offset increases in operating costs, or the inability or unwillingness of tenants to pay rent increases;

 


 

competition from other available apartments and other housing alternatives and changes in market rental rates;

 

economic conditions that could cause an increase in our operating expenses, including increases in property taxes, utilities and routine maintenance; and

 

regional specific acts of nature (e.g., earthquakes, fires, floods, etc.).

 

Because the Company’s multifamily properties would be primarily located in Southern California, Northern California, Clark County, Nevada, and Baltimore, Maryland and other metropolitan area, the Company is exposed to greater economic concentration risks than if it owned a more geographically diverse portfolio. The Company is susceptible to adverse developments in California, Nevada, Maryland  and Urban/metropolitan economic and regulatory environments, such as increases in real estate and other taxes, and increased costs of complying with governmental regulations. In addition, the State of California is generally regarded as more litigious and more highly regulated and taxed than many states, which may reduce demand for the Company’s properties. Any adverse developments in the economy or real estate markets in California, Nevada, Maryland  and Urban/metropolitan, or any decrease in demand for the Company’s multifamily properties resulting from the California, Nevada, Maryland  and Urban/metropolitan regulatory or business environments, could have an adverse effect on the Company’s business and results of operations.

 

Our success depends on certain key personnel.

 

Our performance to date has been and will continue to be largely dependent on the talents, efforts and performance of our senior management and key technical personnel. It is anticipated that our executive officers will enter into employment agreements. However, while it is customary to use employment agreements as a method of retaining the services of key personnel, these agreements do not guarantee us the continued services of such employees. In addition, we have not entered into employment agreements with most of our key personnel. The loss of our executive officers or our other key personnel, particularly with little or no notice, could cause delays on projects and could have an adverse impact on our client and industry relationships, our business, operating results or financial condition.

 

We rely on highly skilled and qualified personnel, and if we are unable to continue to attract and retain such qualified personnel it will adversely affect our businesses.

 

Our success depends to a significant extent on our ability to identify, attract, hire, train and retain qualified creative, technical and managerial personnel. We expect competition for personnel with the specialized creative and technical skills needed to provide our services will continue to intensify. We often hire individuals on a project-by-project basis, and individuals who work on one or more projects for us may not be available to work on future projects. If we have difficulty identifying, attracting, hiring, training and retaining such qualified personnel, or incur significant costs in order to do so, our business and financial results could be negatively impacted.

 

If we are unable to effectively manage organizational productivity and global supply chain efficiency and flexibility, then our business could be adversely affected.

 

We need to continually evaluate our organizational productivity and supply chains and assess opportunities to reduce costs. We must also enhance quality, speed and flexibility to meet changing and uncertain market conditions. Our success also depends in part on refining our cost structure and supply chains so that we have flexibility and are able to respond to market pressures to protect profitability and cash flow or ramp up quickly and effectively to meet demand. Failure to achieve the desired level of quality, capacity or cost reductions could adversely affect our financial results. Despite our efforts to control costs and increase efficiency in our facilities, increased competition could still cause us to realize lower operating margins and profitability.


 

 

Our operating results may fluctuate significantly, which may cause the market price of our common stock to decrease significantly.

 

Our operating results may fluctuate as a result of a number of factors, many of which are outside of our control. As a result of these fluctuations, financial planning and forecasting may be more difficult and comparisons of our operating results on a period-to-period basis may not necessarily be meaningful. Accordingly, you should not rely on our annual and quarterly results of operations as any indication of future performance. Each of the risk factors described in this “Risks Related to Our Business” section, and the following factors, may affect our operating results:

 

 

our ability to continue to attract clients for our services and products;

 

the amount and timing of operating costs and capital expenditures related to the maintenance and expansion of our businesses, operations and infrastructure;

 

our focus on long-term goals over short-term results;

 

the results of our investments in high risk products;

 

general economic conditions and those economic conditions specific to our industries;

 

changes in business cycles that affect the markets in which we sell our products and services; and

 

geopolitical events such as war, threat of war or terrorist actions.

 

In response to these fluctuations, the value of our common stock could decrease significantly in spite of our operating performance. In addition, our business, and the alcoholic beverage business, has historically been cyclical and seasonal in nature, reflecting overall economic conditions as well as client budgeting and buying patterns.  The cyclicality and seasonality in our business could become more pronounced and may cause our operating results to fluctuate more widely.

 

We have a history of losses, have generated limited revenue to date, and may continue to suffer losses in the future.

 

We have a history of losses and have generated limited revenue to date. We expect to continue to incur losses for the foreseeable future. If we cannot become profitable, our financial condition will deteriorate, and we may be unable to achieve our business objectives, including without limitation, having to cease operations due to a lack of capital.

 

We will require substantial additional funding, which may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all, and, if not available may require us to delay, scale back or cease our marketing or product development activities and operations.

 

We will require substantial additional capital in order to continue the marketing of our existing products and complete the development of our contemplated products. Raising funds in the current economic climate may be difficult and additional funding may not be available on acceptable terms, or at all.

 

The amount and timing of our future funding requirements, both near- and long-term, will depend on many factors, including, but not limited to:

 


 

the number and characteristics of investments or products that we pursue;

our potential need to expand operations, including the hiring of additional employees;

the costs of licensing, acquiring or investing in complimentary businesses, products and technologies;

the effect of any competing technological or market developments;

the need to implement additional internal systems and infrastructure, including financial and reporting  systems; and

the economic and other terms, timing of and success of our co-branding, licensing, collaboration or marketing relationships into which we have entered or may enter in the future.

 

Some of these factors are outside of our control. We will require an additional capital infusion in order to get back to as an operating technology-focused company that design, manufacture, install and sell Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency , Power Controls, Battery Technology, Wireless Technology, and Residential utility meters and remote, mission-critical devices mostly engineered through Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Robotic technologies. In addition, we cannot guarantee that future financing will be available in sufficient amounts or on terms acceptable to us, if at all. If we are unable to raise additional capital when required or on acceptable terms, we may be required to significantly delay, scale back or discontinue the development or marketing of one or more of our products or product candidates or curtail our operations, which will have a Material Adverse Effect on our business, operating results and prospects.

 

We may sell additional equity or debt securities or enter into other arrangements to fund our operations, which may result in dilution to our stockholders and impose restrictions or limitations on our business.

 

We may seek additional funding through a combination of equity offerings, debt-financings, or other third party funding or other collaborations, strategic alliances or licensing arrangements. These financing activities may have an adverse impact on our stockholders’ rights as well as our operations. For instance, any debt financing may impose restrictive covenants on our operations or otherwise adversely affect the holdings or the rights of our stockholders. In addition, if we seek funds through arrangements with partners, these arrangements may require us to relinquish rights to some of our technologies, products or product candidates or otherwise agree to terms unfavorable to us.

 

Acquisitions we pursue in our industry and related industries could result in operating difficulties, dilution to our stockholders and other consequences harmful to our business.

 

As part of our growth strategy, we may selectively pursue strategic acquisitions in our industry and related industries. We may not be able to consummate such acquisitions, which could adversely impact our growth. If we do consummate acquisitions, integrating an acquired company, business or technology may result in unforeseen operating difficulties and expenditures, including:

 

 

increased expenses due to transaction and integration costs;

 

potential liabilities of the acquired businesses;

 

potential adverse tax and accounting effects of the acquisitions;

 

diversion of capital and other resources from our existing businesses;

 

diversion of our management’s attention during the acquisition process and any transition periods;

 

loss of key employees of the acquired businesses following the acquisition; and

 

inaccurate budgets and projected financial statements due to inaccurate valuation assessments of the acquired businesses.


 

 

 

Foreign acquisitions also involve unique risks related to integration of operations across different cultures and languages, currency risks and the particular economic, political and regulatory risks associated with specific countries.

 

Our evaluations of potential acquisitions may not accurately assess the value or prospects of acquisition candidates, and the anticipated benefits from our future acquisitions may not materialize. In addition, future acquisitions or dispositions could result in potentially dilutive issuances of our equity securities, including our common stock, the incurrence of debt, contingent liabilities or amortization expenses, or write-offs of goodwill, any of which could harm our financial condition.

 

Interruption or failure of our information technology systems could impair our ability to effectively and timely provide our services and products, which could damage our reputation and have an adverse impact on our operating results.

 

Our systems are vulnerable to damage or interruption from earthquakes, hurricanes, terrorist attacks, floods, fires, power loss, telecommunications failures, computer viruses or other attempts to harm our systems, and similar events. Our facilities are located in areas with a high risk of major earthquakes and are also subject to break-ins, sabotage and intentional acts of vandalism. Some of our systems are not fully redundant, and our disaster recovery planning cannot account for all eventualities. The occurrence of a natural disaster or other unanticipated problems at our Santa Monica, California facility or manufacturing facility located in Orange County, California could result in lengthy interruptions in our projects and our ability to deliver services. An error or defect in the software, a failure in the hardware, a failure of our backup facilities could delay our delivery of products and services and could result in significantly increased production costs, hinder our ability to retain and attract clients and damage our brand if clients believe we are unreliable. Given our reliance on our industry relationships, it could also result in a decrease in our revenues and otherwise adversely affect our business and operating results.

 

Our insurance policies are expensive and only protect us from some business risks, which will leave us exposed to significant uninsured liabilities.

 

We do not carry insurance for all categories of risk that our business may encounter. Some of the policies that we generally maintain include general liability, automobile and property insurance. We do not know, however, if we will be able to maintain insurance with adequate levels of coverage. In addition, we do not know if we will be able to obtain and maintain coverage for the business in which we engage. No assurance can be given that an insurance carrier will not seek to cancel or deny coverage after a claim has occurred. Any significant uninsured liability may require us to pay substantial amounts, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition and business results.

 

Our business is subject to the risks of earthquakes, fires, floods, power outages and other catastrophic events, and to interruption by manmade problems such as terrorism. A disruption at our production facility could adversely impact our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

 

All of our products are produced in one location, which is located in Southern California. A significant natural disaster, such as an earthquake, fire or a flood or a significant power outage could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition or operating results. If there were a catastrophic failure at our major production facility, our business would be adversely affected. The loss of a substantial amount of inventory – through fire, other natural or man-made disaster, contamination, or otherwise – could result in a significant reduction in supply of the affected product or products. Similarly, if we experienced a disruption in the supply of our products, our business could suffer. A consequence of any of these supply disruptions could be our inability to meet consumer demand for the affected products for a period of time. In addition, there can be no assurance that insurance proceeds would cover the replacement value of our products or other assets if they were to be lost. In addition, if a catastrophe such as an earthquake, fire, flood or power loss should affect one of the third parties on which we rely, our business prospects could be harmed. Moreover, acts of terrorism could cause disruptions in our business or the business of our third-party service providers, partners, customers or the economy as a whole.


 

 

Future tax law changes and/or interpretation of existing tax laws may adversely affect our effective income tax rate and the resolution of unrecognized tax benefits.

 

We are subject to income taxation in the U.S. It is possible that future income tax legislation may be enacted that could have a material impact on our income tax provision. We believe that our tax estimates are reasonable and appropriate, however, there are inherent uncertainties in these estimates. As a result, the ultimate outcome from any potential audit could be materially different from amounts reflected in our income tax provisions and accruals. Future settlements of income tax audits may have a material effect on earnings between the period of initial recognition of tax estimates in the financial statements and the timing of ultimate tax audit settlement.

 

Potential liabilities and costs from litigation and other legal proceedings could adversely affect our business.

 

From time to time we may be subject to various lawsuits, claims, disputes and investigations in the normal conduct of our operations. These include, but are not limited to, commercial disputes, including purported class actions, employment claims, actions by tax and customs authorities, and environmental matters. Some of these legal proceedings may include claims for substantial or unspecified damages. It is possible that some of the actions could be decided unfavorably and could adversely affect our results of operations, cash flows or financial condition. In addition, because litigation and other legal proceedings can be costly to defend, even actions that are ultimately decided in our favor could have a negative impact on our results of operations and cash flows. If Tara Spencer enforces the Labor Commission judgment against the Company for the amount owed, this may result in a material adverse effect on our financial condition.

 

Historical financial statements may not be reflective of our future results of operations, cash flows, and financial condition.

 

Although we believe that you have been provided access to all material information necessary to make an informed assessment of our assets and liabilities, financial position, profits and losses and prospects, historical financial statements do not represent what our results of operations, cash flows, or financial position will be in the future.

 

  

We must expend time and resources addressing potential cybersecurity risk, and any breach of our information security safeguards could have a material adverse effect on the Company.

 

The threat of cyber attacks requires additional time and money to be expended in efforts to prevent any breaches of our information security protocols. However, we can provide no assurances that we can prevent all such attempts from being successful, which could result in expenses to address and remediate such breaches as well as potentially losing the confidence of our customers who depend upon our services to prevent and mitigate such attacks on their respective business. Should a material breach of our information security systems occur, it would likely have a material adverse impact on our business operations, our customer relations, and our current and future sales prospects, resulting in a significant loss of revenue.


 

 

 

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

 

There currently is only a minimal public market for our common stock. Failure to develop or maintain a trading market could negatively affect the value of our common stock and make it difficult or impossible for you to sell your shares.

 

There currently is only a minimal public market for shares of our common stock and an active market may never develop. Our common stock is currently subject to quotation on the OTC Pink Market operated by the OTC Market’s Group, Inc. under the symbol “GMPW”. We plan  to apply for uplisting of our Common Stock  on the OTCQB. We may not be able to satisfy the listing requirements for our Common Stock to be listed on the OTCQB which is often more widely-traded and liquid markets than the OTC Pink Market. Some, but not all, of the factors which may delay or prevent the listing of our Common Stock on a more widely-traded and liquid market include the following: our stockholders’ equity may be insufficient; the market value of our outstanding securities may be too low; our net income from operations may be too low; our common stock may not be sufficiently widely held; we may not be able to secure market makers for our common stock; and we may fail to meet the rules and requirements mandated by OTCQB markets to have our common stock listed.

 

The market price for our common stock is particularly volatile given our status as a relatively unknown company with a small and thinly traded public float, limited operating history and lack of profits which could lead to wide fluctuations in our share price. You may be unable to sell your common stock at or above your conversion price, which may result in substantial losses to you.

 

The market for our common stock is characterized by significant price volatility when compared to seasoned issuers, and we expect that our share price will continue to be more volatile than a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future. The volatility in our share price is attributable to a number of factors. First, as noted above, our common stock are sporadically and thinly traded. As a consequence of this lack of liquidity, the trading of relatively small quantities of shares by our shareholders may disproportionately influence the price of those shares in either direction.  The price for our shares could, for example, decline, precipitously or otherwise, in the event that a large number of our common stock are sold on the market without commensurate demand, as compared to a seasoned issuer which could better absorb those sales without adverse impact on its share price. Secondly, we are a speculative or “risky” investment due to our limited operating history and lack of profits to date, and uncertainty of future market acceptance for our potential products and services. As a consequence of this enhanced risk, more risk-adverse investors may, under the fear of losing all or most of their investment in the event of negative news or lack of progress, be more inclined to sell their shares on the market more quickly and at greater discounts than would be the case with the stock of a seasoned issuer. Many of these factors are beyond our control and may decrease the market price of our common stock, regardless of our operating performance. We cannot make any predictions or projections as to what the prevailing market price for our common stock will be at any time, including as to whether our common stock will sustain their current market prices, or as to what effect that the sale of shares or the availability of common stock for sale at any time will have on the prevailing market price.

 


 

The application of the “penny stock” rules could adversely affect the market price of our common stock and increase your transaction costs to sell those shares.

 

The SEC has adopted rule 3a51-1 which establishes the definition of a “penny stock,” for the purposes relevant to us, as any equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share or with an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. For any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, Rule 15g-9 requires:

 

 

that a broker or dealer approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, and

 

the broker or dealer receives from the investor a written agreement to the transaction, setting forth the

 identity and quantity of the penny stock to be purchased.

 

In order to approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, the broker or dealer must:

 

 

obtain financial information and investment experience objectives of the person, and

 

make a reasonable determination that the transactions in penny stocks are suitable for that person and

the person has sufficient knowledge and experience in financial matters to be capable of evaluating the risks of transactions in penny stocks.

 

The broker or dealer must also deliver, prior to any transaction in a penny stock, a disclosure schedule prescribed by the SEC relating to the penny stock market, which, in highlight form:

 

sets forth the basis on which the broker or dealer made the suitability determination, and

 

that the broker or dealer received a signed, written agreement from the investor prior to the transaction.

 

Generally, brokers may be less willing to execute transactions in securities subject to the “penny stock” rules. This may make it more difficult for investors to dispose of our common stock and cause a decline in the market value of our stock.

 

The application of Rule 144 creates some investment risk to potential investors; for example, existing shareholders may be able to rely on Rule 144 to sell some of their holdings, driving down the price of the shares you purchased.

 

The SEC adopted amendments to Rule 144 which became effective on February 15, 2008 that apply to securities acquired both before and after that date. Under these amendments, a person who has beneficially owned restricted shares of our common stock for at least six months would be entitled to sell their securities provided that: (i) such person is not deemed to have been one of our affiliates at the time of, or at any time during the three months preceding a sale, (ii) we are subject to the Exchange Act periodic reporting requirements for at least 90 days before the sale and (iii) if the sale occurs prior to satisfaction of a one-year holding period, we provide current information at the time of sale.

 

Persons who have beneficially owned restricted shares of our common stock for at least six months but who are our affiliates at the time of, or at any time during the three months preceding a sale, would be subject to additional restrictions, by which such person would be entitled to sell within any three-month period only a number of securities that does not exceed the greater of either of the following:

 


 

 

1% of the total number of securities of the same class then outstanding (shares of common stock as of  the date of this Report); or

 

the average weekly trading volume of such securities during the four calendar weeks preceding the filing of a notice on Form 144 with respect to the sale;

 

Provided, in each case, that we are subject to the Exchange Act periodic reporting requirements for at least three months before the sale. Such sales by affiliates must also comply with the manner of sale, current public information and notice provisions of Rule 144.

 

Our common stock may experience volatility in trading or loss in value as a result of the effects of the coronavirus on the US and global economies.

 

Uncertainties surrounding the effects of the coronavirus on the US and global economies has resulted in an increase in volatility and violent drops in the value of publicly traded securities. While the price of our common stock has not experienced such volatility or loss in value, we can offer no assurances that the long-term effects on the overall US economy will not negatively affect us in the future.

 

Fluctuations in our quarterly revenues may cause the price of our common stock to decline.

 

Our operating results have varied significantly from quarter to quarter in the past, and we expect our operating results to vary from quarter to quarter in the future due to a variety of factors, many of which are outside of our control. Therefore, if revenues are below our expectations, this shortfall is likely to adversely and disproportionately affect our operating results. Accordingly, we may not attain positive operating margins in future quarters. Any of these factors could cause our operating results to be below the expectations of securities analysts and investors, which likely would negatively affect the price of our common stock.

 

Our management and larger stockholders currently exercise significant control over our Company and will continue to have influence over our Company after the offering has concluded, and such influence may be in conflict to your interests.

 

As of September 30, 2020, our executive officers and directors beneficially own approximately 57.32% of our voting power. As a result, these stockholders have been able to exercise significant control over all matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions, including the details of this offering.

 

We do not intend to pay dividends on our common stock.

 

We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. We currently anticipate that we will retain all of our available cash, if any, for use as working capital and for other general corporate purposes. Any payment of future dividends will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend upon, among other things, our earnings, financial condition, capital requirements, level of indebtedness, statutory and contractual restrictions applying to the payment of dividends and other considerations that the Board of Directors deems relevant. Investors must rely on sales of their common stock after price appreciation, which may never occur, as the only way to realize a return on their investment. Investors seeking cash dividends should not purchase our common stock.

 

Compliance with changing regulations concerning corporate governance and public disclosure may result in additional expenses.

 


 

In recent years, there have been several changes in laws, rules, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure, including the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”), the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“Sarbanes-Oxley”) and various other new regulations promulgated by the SEC and rules promulgated by the national securities exchanges. The Dodd-Frank Act, enacted in July 2010, expands federal regulation of corporate governance matters and imposes requirements on publicly-held companies, including us, to, among other things, provide stockholders with a periodic advisory vote on executive compensation and also adds compensation committee reforms and enhanced pay-for-performance disclosures. While some provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act were effective upon enactment, others will be implemented upon the SEC’s adoption of related rules and regulations. The scope and timing of the adoption of such rules and regulations is uncertain and accordingly, the cost of compliance with the Dodd-Frank Act is also uncertain.

 

In addition, Sarbanes-Oxley specifically requires, among other things, that we maintain effective internal control over financial reporting and disclosure of controls and procedures.

 

These and other new or changed laws, rules, regulations and standards are, or will be, subject to varying interpretations in many cases due to their lack of specificity. As a result, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance is provided by regulatory and governing bodies, which could result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and higher costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to disclosure and governance practices. Our efforts to comply with evolving laws, regulations and standards are likely to continue to result in increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities. Further, compliance with new and existing laws, rules, regulations and standards may make it more difficult and expensive for us to maintain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain coverage. Members of our board of directors and our principal executive officer and principal financial officer could face an increased risk of personal liability in connection with the performance of their duties. As a result, we may have difficulty attracting and retaining qualified directors and executive officers, which could harm our business. We continually evaluate and monitor regulatory developments and cannot estimate the timing or magnitude of additional costs we may incur as a result.

 

Risks Related to Our Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency  Business Acquisition Strategy

 

We are dependent upon our ability to successfully complete acquisitions of One-four branch bank or successful execution of a Joint Venture agreement with an One-four branch bank to grow our business.

 

We intend to re-launch our technology focused business model through acquisitions and Joint Ventures (JV) with willing businesses that source, design, develop, manufacture, install and distribute Bank, Fintec or Digital Currency , Power Control, Battery Technology, Wireless Technology, and Residential utility meters and remote, mission-critical devices mostly engineered through Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Robotic technologies.

 

We also intend to pursue and consummate one or more acquisitions using part of the Offering Proceeds from the sale of our Class B Common Stock as well as other funding sources, which have not yet been determined, if any, to fund any cash portion of the consideration we will pay in connection with those acquisitions. However, such acquisitions may also be subject to conditions and other impediments to closing, including some that are beyond our control, and we may not be able to close any of them successfully, in a timely manner. In addition, our future acquisitions will be required to be closed within certain timeframes as negotiated between us and the acquisition target, and if we are unable to meet the closing deadlines for a given transaction, we may be required to forfeit payments we have made, if any, be forced to renegotiate the transaction on less advantageous terms and could fail to consummate the transaction at all.


 

 

Further, we may not be able to identify suitable acquisition candidates, and even if we were to do so, we may only be able to consummate them on less advantageous terms. In addition, some of the businesses we would acquire may incur significant losses from operations, which, in turn, could have a material and adverse impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

We may face unforeseen difficulties in the future in fully-integrating the operations of One-four branch bank to be acquired using the proceeds from this offering, or any other businesses we may acquire in the future. Acquisitions will be an important component of our growth strategy; however, we will need to integrate these acquired businesses successfully in order for our growth strategy to succeed and for us to become profitable. We expect that the management teams of the acquired businesses will adopt our policies, procedures and best practices, and cooperate with each other in scheduling events, booking talent and in other aspects of their operations. We may face difficulty with the integration of One-four branch bank to be acquired using the proceed from this offering, and any other business we may acquire, such as coordinating geographically dispersed organizations, integrating personnel with disparate business backgrounds and combining different corporate cultures, the diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns, the inherent risks in entering markets or lines of business in which we have either limited or no direct experience; and the potential loss of key employees, individual service providers, customers and strategic partners of acquired companies.

 

Further, we expect that future target companies may have material weaknesses in internal controls relating to the proper application of accrual based accounting under the accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) prior to our acquiring them. The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the “PCAOB”) defines a material weakness as a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. We will be relying on the proper implementation of our policies and procedures to remedy any such material weaknesses and prevent any potential material misstatements in our financial reporting. Any such misstatement could adversely affect the trading price of our common stock, cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, and subject us to civil and criminal fines and penalties. If our acquired companies fail to integrate in these important ways, or we fail to adequately understand the business operations of our acquired companies, our growth and financial results could suffer.

 

We may enter into acquisitions and take actions in connection with such transactions that could adversely affect our business and results of operations.

 

Our future growth rate depends in part on our selective acquisition of One-four branch bank or successful execution of a Joint Venture agreement with an One-four branch banks. We may be unable to identify suitable targets for acquisition or make further acquisitions at favorable prices. If we identify a suitable acquisition candidate, our ability to successfully complete the acquisition would depend on a variety of factors and may include our ability to obtain financing on acceptable terms and requisite government approvals. In addition, any credit agreements or credit facilities that we may enter into in the future may restrict our ability to make certain acquisitions. In connection with future acquisitions, we could take certain actions that could adversely affect our business, including:

 

 

using a significant portion of our available cash;

 

issuing equity securities, which would dilute current stockholders’ percentage ownership;

 

incurring substantial debt;

 

incurring or assuming contingent liabilities, known or unknown;

 

incurring amortization expenses related to intangibles; and

 

incurring large accounting write-offs or impairments.


 

 

We may also enter into joint ventures, which involve certain unique risks, including, among others, risks relating to the lack of full control of the joint venture, potential disagreements with our joint venture partners about how to manage the joint venture, conflicting interests of the joint venture, requirement to fund the joint venture and its business not being profitable.

 

In addition, we cannot be certain that the due diligence investigation that we conduct with respect to any investment or acquisition opportunity will reveal or highlight all relevant facts that may be necessary or helpful in evaluating such investment opportunity. For example, instances of fraud, accounting irregularities and other deceptive practices can be difficult to detect. Executive officers, directors and employees may be named as defendants in litigation involving a company we are acquiring or have acquired. Even if we conduct extensive due diligence on a particular investment or acquisition, we may fail to uncover all material issues relating to such investment, including regarding controls and procedures of a particular target or the full scope of its contractual arrangements. We rely on our due diligence to identify potential liabilities in the businesses we acquire, including such things as potential or actual lawsuits, contractual obligations or liabilities imposed by government regulation. However, our due diligence process may not uncover these liabilities, and where we identify a potential liability, we may incorrectly believe that we can consummate the acquisition without subjecting ourselves to that liability. Therefore, it is possible that we could be subject to litigation in respect of these acquired businesses. If our due diligence fails to identify issues specific to an investment or acquisition, we may obtain a lower return from that transaction than the investment would return or otherwise subject ourselves to unexpected liabilities. We may also be forced to write-down or write-off assets, restructure our operations or incur impairment or other charges that could result in our reporting losses. Charges of this nature could contribute to negative market perceptions about us or our shares of common stock.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

Included in this annual report are “forward-looking” statements, as well as historical information.   Although we believe that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot assure you that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements will prove to be correct.   Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in forward-looking statements as a result of certain factors, including matters described in the section titled “Risk Factors.”   Forward-looking statements include those that use forward-looking terminology, such as the words “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “project,” “plan,” “will,” “shall,” “should” and similar expressions, including when used in the negative.   Although we believe that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are reasonable and achievable, these statements involve risks and uncertainties and no assurance can be given that actual results will be consistent with these forward-looking statements.   Actual results may be materially different than those described in this annual report.   Important factors that could cause our actual results, performance or achievements to differ from these forward-looking statements include the factors described in the “Risk Factors” section and elsewhere in this annual report.

 

All forward-looking statements attributable to us are expressly qualified in their entirety by these and other factors.   Except as required by federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to update or revise these forward-looking statements, whether to reflect events or circumstances after the date initially filed or published, to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events or otherwise.

 

ITEM 1B.    

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None

 

ITEM 2.    

PROPERTIES

 

We do not own any property as at the date of filing we have no properties.  Our principal business, executive and registered statutory office is located at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, CA 90501 and our telephone number is (310) 895-1839 and email contact is invest@cbdxfund.com..

 

ITEM 3.    

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

As of December 31, 2020, we are not involved in any pending or threatened legal proceedings.

 

ITEM 4.    

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable

 

 

 


 

PART II

 

ITEM 5.    

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

General

 

We are authorized to issue 1,200,000,000 shares of Common Stock $0.001 par value per share (the “Common Stock”). We are also authorized to issue 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.001(the “Preferred Stock”). 

 

Common Stock

 

We are authorized to issue 1,200,000,000 shares of Common Stock $0.001 par value per share. As of December 31, 2020, there were 1 share of preferred shares and 42,724,687.00 shares of Common Stock outstanding held by 158 stockholders of record. Our Common Stock is subject to quotation on the OTC Pink Market under the trading symbol: “GMPW.” Our plan is to apply for listing of our Common Stock on the NASDAQ Capital Market after the Closing of the Offering of our Class B Common Stock. See the discussion under “Description Of The Class B Common Stock” below.

 

Each share of Common Stock shall have one (1) vote per share for all purpose. Our Common Stock does not provide a preemptive, subscription or conversion rights and there are no redemption or sinking fund provisions or rights. Our Common Stock holders are not entitled to cumulative voting for election of Board of Directors.

 

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock is currently quoted on the OTC Pink under the trading symbol “GMPW”. Trading in stocks quoted on the OTC Pink is often thin and is characterized by wide fluctuations in trading prices due to many factors that may have little to do with a company’s operations or business prospects. We cannot assure you that there will be a market for our common stock in the future.

 

The market prices noted below were obtained from the OTC market and reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not represent actual transactions.

 For the periods indicated, the following table sets forth the high and low bid prices per share of common stock based on inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not represent actual transactions.

 

 

Fiscal 2020

 

Fiscal 2019

 

High

 

Low

 

High

 

low

First Quarter

 $  0.0600

 

 $ 0.0071

 

 $ 0.0200

 

 $ 0.0059

Second Quarter

 $  0.0300

 

 $ 0.0060

 

 $ 0.0059

 

 $ 0.0036

Third Quarter

 $  0.0300

 

 $ 0.0070

 

 $ 0.0100

 

 $ 0.0060

Fourth Quarter

 $  0.0700

 

 $ 0.0092

 

 $ 0.0200

 

 $ 0.0100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

The Company does not have common equity subject to outstanding options or warrants to purchase or securities convertible into our common equity. In general, under Rule 144, a holder of restricted common shares who is an affiliate at the time of the sale or any time during the three months preceding the sale can resell shares, subject to the restrictions described below.

 

If we have been a public reporting company under the Exchange Act for at least 90 days immediately before the sale, then at least six months must have elapsed since the shares were acquired from us or one of our affiliates, and we must remain current in our filings for an additional period of six months; in all other cases, at least one year must have elapsed since the shares were acquired from us or one of our affiliates.

 

The number of shares sold by such person within any three-month period cannot exceed the greater of:

  • 1% of the total number of our common shares then outstanding; or
  • The average weekly trading volume of our common shares during the four calendar weeks preceding the date on which notice on Form 144 with respect to the sale is filed with the SEC (or, if Form 144 is not required to be filed, the four calendar weeks preceding the date the selling broker receives the sell order) This condition is not currently available to the Company because its securities do not trade on a recognized exchange.

 

Conditions relating to the manner of sale, notice requirements (filing of Form 144 with the SEC) and the availability of public information about us must also be satisfied.

 

42,724,687 and 27,724,684 shares of our common stock have been issued and outstanding as at December 31, 2020 and 2019.  Of the amount of the outstanding shares, 18,894,381are unrestricted and free-trading.  The remaining 23,830,306 of the issued shares are restricted and could only be sold subject to the restriction.

 

23,830,306 of the presently outstanding shares of our common stock are "restricted securities" as defined under Rule 144 promulgated under the Securities Act and may only be sold pursuant to an effective registration statement or an exemption from registration, if available. The SEC has adopted final rules amending Rule 144, which have become effective on February 15, 2008. Pursuant to the new Rule 144, one year must elapse from the time a “shell company,” as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act and Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act, ceases to be a “shell company” and files a Form 8-K addressing Item 5.06 with such information as may be required in a Form 10 Registration Statement with the SEC, before a restricted shareholder can resell their holdings in reliance on Rule 144. Form 10 information is equivalent to information that a company would be required to file if it were registering a class of securities on Form 10 under the Exchange Act. Under the amended Rule 144, restricted or unrestricted securities, that were initially issued by a reporting or non-reporting shell company or a company that was at anytime previously a reporting or non-reporting shell company, can only be resold in reliance on Rule 144 if the following conditions are met:

 

  • the issuer of the securities that was formerly a reporting or non-reporting shell company has ceased to be a shell company;
  • the issuer of the securities is subject to the reporting requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act;
  • the issuer of the securities has filed all reports and material required to be filed under Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, as applicable, during the preceding twelve months (or shorter period that the Issuer was required to file such reports and materials), other than Form 8-K reports; and
  • at least one year has elapsed from the time the issuer filed the current Form 10 type information with the SEC reflecting its status as an entity that is not a shell company.

 

 

Current Public Information

 

In general, for sales by affiliates and non-affiliates, the satisfaction of the current public information requirement depends on whether we are a public reporting company under the Exchange Act:

  • If we have been a public reporting company for at least 90 days immediately before the sale, then the current public information requirement is satisfied if we have filed all periodic reports (other than Form 8-K) required to be filed under the Exchange Act during the 12 months immediately before the sale (or such shorter period as we have been required to file those reports).
  • If we have not been a public reporting company for at least 90 days immediately before the sale, then the requirement is satisfied if specified types of basic information about us (including our business, management and our financial condition and results of operations) are publicly available.

 

However, no assurance can be given as to:

  • the likelihood of a market for our common shares developing,
  • the liquidity of any such market,
  • the ability of the shareholders to sell the shares, or
  • the prices that shareholders may obtain for any of the shares.

 

No prediction can be made as to the effect, if any, that future sales of shares or the availability of shares for future sale will have on the market price prevailing from time to time. Sales of substantial amounts of our common shares, or the perception that such sales could occur, may adversely affect prevailing market prices of the common shares.

 

Dividends

 

Holders of common stock are entitled to receive ratably such dividends, if any, as may be declared by the board of directors out of our surplus. We have not paid any dividends since our inception, and we presently anticipate that all earnings, if any, will be retained for development of our business. Any future disposition of dividends will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon, among other things, our future earnings, operating and financial condition, capital requirements and other factors.

 

Preferred Stock

 

We are authorized to issue 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock and we have 1 preferred stock issued as of December 31, 2020

  

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

We do not have any compensation plans or arrangements under which equity securities are authorized for issuance.

 

 

 

ITEM 6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Not applicable

 


 
 

ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Our Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations section discusses our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of these financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. On an on-going basis, management evaluates its estimates and judgments, including those related to revenue recognition, accrued expenses, financing operations, and contingencies and litigation. Management bases its estimates and judgments on historical experience and on various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. The most significant accounting estimates inherent in the preparation of our financial statements include estimates as to the appropriate carrying value of certain assets and liabilities which are not readily apparent from other sources.

 

You should read the following description of our financial condition and results of operations in conjunction with the financial statements and accompanying notes included in this annual report beginning on page F-1.

 

This section includes a number of forward-looking statements that reflect our current views with respect to future events and financial performance.   Forward-looking statements are often identified by words like “believe,” “expect,” “estimate,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “project” and similar expressions, or words which, by their nature, refer to future events.   You should not place undue certainty on these forward-looking statements.   These forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from our predictions.

 

Business Overview

 

GiveMePower Corporation operates and manages a portfolio of real estate and financial services assets and operations to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources. Givemepower is primarily focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate properties and businesses in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America.  This Offering represents the commencement of the Banking and financial services division of our business. This Offering will enable GMPW to become a financial technology company (FINTEC) business that (1) one-to-four branch federally licensed bank in each jurisdiction, (2) a machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI)  enabled loan and insurance underwriting platform, (3) blockchain-powered transaction processing and payment systems, (4) cryptocurrency transaction processing platform, and (5) emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio; giving access to the unbanked, underserved residents of majorly black communities across the United State.  This is the fulfillment of mission of operating and managing a portfolio of real estate and financial services assets and operations to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources, with a primary focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate properties and businesses in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America.  Our FINTEC operations would cover the basic areas of traditional banking-digitally enhance, MLand Ai enabled lending and insurance underwriting, areas of private equity, business lending and venture capital that invest in young black entrepreneurs, and seeding their viable business plans/ideas on block-chain-powered financial services delivery platform that connects, black entrepreneurs, black borrowers, consumers, banks, and institutional investors. Our real estate division invests in Opportunity Zones, Affordable Housing, and specialized real estate properties.


 

 

Corporate History

 

GiveMePower Corporation (the “PubCo” or “Company”), a Nevada corporation, was incorporated on June 7, 2001 to sell software geared to end users and developers involved in the design, manufacture, and construction of engineered products located in Canada and the United States. GiveMePower was originally incorporated in Alberta, Canada as GiveMePower.com Inc. on April 18, 2000, to sell software and web-based services geared to businesses involved in the design, manufacture, and construction of engineered products throughout North America. Effective September 15, 2000, the Company amended its Articles of Incorporation to change its corporate name to GiveMePower Inc.  The founder of the Company began the implementation of this business plan under his 100%-owned private company, Sundance Marketing International Inc. (Sundance). Sundance has been in existence since 1991 and at one time was a market leader in the distribution of survey, mapping and infrastructure design software in the Canadian marketplace. On April 15, 1999, Mr. Walton entered into a license agreement with Felix Computer Aided Technologies GmbH (Felix) for the exclusive rights to distribute FCAD software in North America.

 

On December 20, 2000, the Company entered into a Plan and Agreement of Reorganization to undertake a reverse merger with a National Quotation Bureau public company called TelNet World Communications, Inc. (TelNet).  TelNet was originally incorporated in the State of Utah on March 10, 1972 as Tropic Industries, Inc. (Tropic).  Tropic became United Datacopy, Incorporated on February 24, 1987 which became Pen International, Inc. on March 21, 1994 and then TelNet World Communications, Inc. on March 4, 1998.  TelNet had no operations nor any working capital when the Company entered into the reverse merger with it.  GMP acquired the rights, title and interest to the domain name, givemepower.com from Sundance on February 16, 2001.  In addition, Sundance agreed to assign its existing customer base to GMP and further agreed that it would terminate its license agreement with Felix immediately upon GMP securing its own agreement with Felix.  GMP renegotiated the exclusive rights to co-develop, re-brand and distribute FCAD software in North America effective February 16, 2001.  Effective July 5, 2001 the Company changed the name of TelNet to GiveMePower Corporation and changed the domicile from Utah to Nevada.

 

The PubCo has been dormant and non-operating since year 2009. PubCo is a public reporting company registered with the Securities Exchange Commissioner (“SEC”). In November 2009, the Company filed Form 15D, Suspension of Duty to Report, and as a result, the Company was not required to file any SEC forms since November 2009.

 

On December 31, 2019, PubCo sold one Special 2019 series A preferred share (“Series A Share”) for $38,000 to Goldstein Franklin, Inc. (“Goldstein”), a California corporation. One Series A Share is convertible to 100,000,000 shares of common stocks at any time. The Series A Share also provided with 60% voting rights of the PubCo. On the same day, Goldstein sold one-member unit of Alpharidge Capital, LLC (“Alpharidge”), a California limited liability corporation, representing 100% member owner of Alpharidge. As a result, Alpharidge become a wholly owned subsidiary of PubCo as of December 31, 2019.

 

The Company’s operating structure did not change as a result of the change of control, however, following the transaction on December 31, 2019, in which Goldstein Franklin, Inc. acquired control of the Company, Goldstein transferred one of its operating subsidiaries, Alpharidge Capital LLC into GMPW to become one of the Company’s operating subsidiaries. As the result of above transaction, Alpharidge Capital LLC became the Company’s wholly owned operating subsidiary of the Company.


 

 

Alpharidge Capital LLC (“Alpharidge”) was formed under the laws of the State of California on August 30, 2019. Alpharidge has two distinct lines of businesses that comprise: (1) a specialty biopharmaceutical holding company focused on building portfolio of real estate investment properties and equity positions in select companies within select industries; and (2) an event-driven investment management operation that invests in equities, warrants, bonds and options of public and private companies in America and across the globe. 

 

On September 16, 2020, as part of its sales of unregistered securities to Kid Castle Educational Corporation, company related to, and controlled by GMPW President and CEO, the Company, for $3 in cash and 1,000,000 shares of its preferred stock, acquired 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (“CED Capital”), a California Limited Liability Company, and 97% of the issued and outstanding shares of Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), a California corporation.  This transaction was accounted for under the Consolidation Method using the variable interest entity (VIE) model wherein the Company consolidates all investees operating results if the Company expects to assume more than 50% of another entity’s expected losses or gains.  The 1,000,000 shares of our preferred stock sold to Kid Castle Educational Corporation gave to Kid Castle, approximately 87% voting control of Givemepower Corporation.

 

The consolidated financial statements of the Company therefore include its wholly owned subsidiaries of Alpharidge Capital LLC. (“Alpharidge”), Community Economic Development Capital, LLC. (“CED Capital”), and Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), and subsidiaries, in which GiveMePower has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”), after elimination of intercompany transactions and accounts.

 

Current Business and Organization - Alpharidge

 

The Company, through its three wholly owned subsidiaries, Alpharidge Capital, LLC (“Alpharidge”), Malcom Wingate Cush Franklin LLC (“MWCF”), and Opportunity Zone Capital LLC (“OZC”), seeks to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources as follows:

 

·         Alpharidge and OZC Real estate operations – Real estate operations would consist primarily of rental real estate, affordable housing projects, opportunity zones, other property development and associated HOA activities. OZC development operations would be primarily through a real estate investment, management and development subsidiary that focuses primarily on the construction and sale of single-family and multi-family homes, lots in subdivisions and planned communities, and raw land for residential development; and

 

·         MWCF financial empowerment – MWCF would utilize operate the tools of financial education/training, mergers and acquisitions, private equity and business lending to invest and empower young black entrepreneurs, seeding their viable business plans and ideas and creating jobs in their communities. MWCF is primarily focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America.

 

·         Cash Management, Opportunistic and Event-Driven Investments:    The Company keeps no more than 10% of its total assets in liquid cash or investments portfolio, which is actively managed by its directors and officers and invest primarily in equity investments on a long and short basis.  The Company’s cash management policy which requires that the Company actively invests its excess cash into stocks, bonds and other securities is intended to provide the company greater levels of liquidity and current income.  The Company uses proprietary trading models to capitalize on real-time market anomalies and generate ongoing income in the forms similar to hedge funds.  Where necessary, the Company uses seeded entities to pursue real-time market transactions in publicly traded securities including but not limited to stocks, bonds, options, futures, forex, warrants, and other instruments.  


 

 

Current Business and Organization - CED Capital

 

Community Economic Development Capital, LLC. (“CED Capital”), a California limited liability company, is a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including, affordable housing, opportunity zones properties, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services.  CED Capital principal business objective is to maximize returns through a combination of (1) generating good profit while making substantial social impact, (2) sustainable long-term growth in cash flows from increased rents, and (3) potential long-term appreciation in the value of its properties from capital gains upon future sale.  The Company is engaged primarily in the ownership, operation, management, acquisition, development and redevelopment of predominantly multifamily housing and specialized industrial properties in the United States. Additionally, its specialized industrial property strategy is to acquire and own a portfolio of specialized industrial properties, including multifamily properties. This strategy includes the following components:

 

 

Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Income.  The Company intends to acquire multifamily housings, economic development real estates and multifamily properties. The Company expects to hold acquired properties for investment and to generate stable and increasing rental income from leasing these properties to licensed growers.

 

 

Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Appreciation.  The Company intends to lease its acquired properties under long-term, triple-net leases. However, from time to time, the Company may elect to sell one or more properties if the Company believes it to be in the best interests of its stockholders. Accordingly, the Company will seek to acquire properties that it believes also have potential for long-term appreciation in value.

 

 

 

Affordable Housing.  Its motto is: “acquiring distressed/troubled properties, securing generous government subsidies, empowering low-income families, and generating above-market returns to investors.”

 

Preserving Financial Flexibility on the Company’s Balance Sheet. The Company intends to focus on maintaining a conservative capital structure, in order to provide us flexibility in financing its growth initiatives.

 

Current Business and Organization - CBDX

 

Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDZ”), a California corporation was incorporated on May 6, 2014, to operate as a biotechnology and specialty pharmaceutical holding company that engages in the discovery, development, and commercialization of cures and novel therapeutics from cannabinoid, cannabidiol, endocannabinoids, phytocannabinoids, and synthetic cannabinoids product platform suitable for specific treatments in a broad range of disease areas. CBDZ engages in biopharmaceutical research and development operation with aim of identifying viable drug candidates to go into clinical trials and if successful, be submitted to the FDA for approval.  

 

BlackBank, Blockchain-Powered Fintech, Ai and ML Enabled Lending, and CryptoCurrency Deals

 


 

The Company intends to actualize its banking and financial services operations goals through acquisition and management of (1) a one-to-four branch bank that is federally licensed in each jurisdiction; (2) a machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (Ai)  enabled loan and insurance underwriting platform; (3) blockchain-powered transaction processing and payment systems; (4) cryptocurrency transaction processing platform; and (5) emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio; a combination of three of which would connects consumers, banks, institutional investors, and ensure access to the unbanked and underserved residents of majorly black communities across the United State of America.

 

(1)  BlackBank  - Proposed Federally licensed one-four branch bank

 

Jurisdictionally, GMPW intend to acquire and manage one-four branch bank in each of its relevant jurisdictional domain.  Owning/controlling a bank or banks with branches across every urban/black neighborhood in the United States is not our goal.  Rather we would be content to own a one-four branch bank in every relevant jurisdiction to allow us to initiate/conduct ML-Ai enabled and blockchain-powered digitized banking that is accessible to all black person and businesses across the United States.  We intend to start our banking acquisition by finding targets that operates one-four branches.  We intend to start with the acquisition of one-four branch bank, whose operation and back-office would be migrated unto a Blockchain-powered platform to digitize its entire banking operation to cover and serve all black persons in the United States.   We believe that blockchain technology is one of the most suited platform to implement, run and manage a U.S. wide digitized banking services whose reach encompasses most black persons living in the United States.

 

(2)  Machine-Learning and Ai (AI) Enabled Lending and Insurance Underwriting Platform

 

Once it has raised sufficient capital (proposed $10 million offering), the Company intends to launch the Company’s cloud-based machine learning and artificial intelligence lending platform. It is our believe that Machine-Learning (ML) and Artificial intelligence (AI), lending and insurance underwriting platform would enable a superior loan product with improved economics that can be shared between consumers and lenders. The proposed platform would aggregate consumer demand for high-quality loans and connects it to our soon-to-be-build network of ML-AI-enabled investors, lenders and bank partners. Consumers on the ML-AI platform would benefit from a highly automated, efficient, all-digital experience. Our prospective bank partners would benefit from access to new customers, lower fraud and loss rates, and increased automation throughout the lending process.

 

Credit is a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, and access to affordable credit is central to unlocking upward mobility and opportunity. The FICO score was invented in 1989 and remains the standard for determining who is approved for credit and at what interest rate. (Rob Kaufman, myFico Blog: The History of the FICO Score, August 2018). While FICO is rarely the only input in a lending decision, most banks use simple, rules-based systems that consider only a limited number of variables. Unfortunately, because legacy credit systems fail to properly identify and quantify risk, millions of creditworthy individuals are left out of the system, and millions more pay too much to borrow money.  (Patrice Ficklin and Paul Watkins, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Blog: An Update on Credit Access and the Bureau’s First No-Action Letter, August 2019).

 

The first generation of online lenders focused on bringing credit online. Analogous to earlier internet pioneers, these companies made shopping for and accessing credit simpler and easier for consumers and businesses. It was no longer necessary to stand in line at a bank branch, to sit across the desk from a loan officer and to wait weeks or months for a decision. These lenders enabled the emergence of personal loan products that were previously unprofitable for banks to offer. While they brought the credit process online, they inherited the decision frameworks that banks had used for decades and did not address the more rewarding and challenging opportunity of reinventing the credit decision.


 

 

GMPW intend to leverage the power of AI to more accurately quantify the true risk of a loan. The ML- AI models would be built to continuously self-upgrade, train and refine many critical components of lending risk analytics and decision-making on a real-time basis. We intend to build discrete ML- AI models that target fee optimization, income fraud, acquisition targeting, loan stacking, prepayment prediction, identity fraud and time-delimited default prediction. These models would be designed to incorporate multiple lending underwriting variables and utilize training dataset that accounts for varieties of repayment events.  It is also anticipated that the network effects generated by constantly improving ML- AI models would provide a significant competitive advantage—and more training data would lead to higher approval rates and lower interest rates at the same loss rate

 

(3)  Blockchain-Powered Digital Currency Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform (“Blackchain”)

 

The Company intends to acquire an existing, or build-from-the-scratch, a Blockchain-Powered Digital Currency Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform (“Blackchain”), with home in the BlackBank alongside the ML-AI lending platform.   Blockchain-powered Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform would also provide efficient and inexpensive payment platform and merchant services to black businesses across the United States. 

 

The company would establish an exchange network called Blackchain Exchange Network (“BEN”), a Payment and Financial Transactions Processing platform, would be a wholly-owned subsidiary, the BlackBank.  We believe Blackchain would be a leading provider of innovative financial infrastructure solutions and services to participants in the nascent and expanding digital currency industry.  Blackchain business strategy is floating a Blackchain Exchange Network, or BEN, a virtually instantaneous payment network for participants in the digital currency industry which would serve as a platform for the development of additional products and services. The BEN would have a network effect that would make it valuable as participants and utilization increase, leading to good growth in BEN transaction volumes. The BEN would enable the BlackBank to prioritize, build and significantly grow noninterest bearing deposit product for digital currency industry participants, which is expected to provide the majority of our bank funding in the next two years from finalizing acquisition. This unique source of funding would be a distinctive advantage over most traditional financial institutions and allows BlackBank to generate revenue from a conservative portfolio of investments in cash, short term securities and ML-Ai enabled loans that we believe generate attractive risk-adjusted returns. In addition, use of the BEN would result in an increase in noninterest income that we believe will become a valuable source of additional future revenue as we develop and deploy blockchain-powered, fee-based solutions in connection with our digital currency initiative. We would also evaluate additional products or product enhancements specifically targeted at providing further financial infrastructure solutions to our customers and strengthening BEN network effects.

Blackchain Business Overview

Once acquired, the Federally licensed one-four branch bank would be such that is already providing banking and financial services including commercial banking, business lending, commercial and residential real estate lending and mortgage warehouse lending, all funded primarily by interest bearing deposits and borrowings. To that up and running banking and financial services operation, we intend to insert a Blockchain-powered payment and transaction processing system and digital currency platform.  We intend to pursue digital currency customers and bring them into the BlackBank to bank with us using digital currency.  We believe we could effectively leverage the traditional commercial bank platform, the ML-Ai enabled lending platform and the attributes of the BEN to gain traction in the digital currency banking industry.


 

We intend to focus on the digital currency initiative as the core of our future strategy and direction. We intend to build a leadership position in the digital currency industry as a result of the BEN to enable us to establish a significant balance of noninterest bearing deposits from digital currency customer base. Over several post-acquisition years, BlackBank would have transitioned from a traditional asset based bank model focused on loan generation to a deposit and solutions based model focused on increasing noninterest bearing deposits and noninterest income. This emphasis on noninterest bearing deposits and noninterest income, is primarily associated with  digital currency, will likely result in a significant shift in BlackBank’s asset composition with a greater percentage consisting of liquid assets such as interest earning deposits in other banks and investment securities, and a corresponding decrease in the percentage of loans.  Most of our actions would be focused on developing and delivering highly scalable and operationally efficient solutions for BlackBank’s digital currency customers.

 

(4)  Emerging Cryptocurrency Opportunities Portfolio

The emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio is the wildcard of our FINTEC business model.  While the goals are clear, because it is a wildcard, there is no outline on what to expect or how it should be run.  GMPW needs these flexibilities because many established companies are jumping into the crypocurrency opportunities on a minutes notice. For example, in 2020, Microstrategy decided to move their treasury into bitcoin as part of their cash management strategy.  Marathon Patent Group moved into cryptocurrency mining as a business model.  Overstock has been in cryptocurrency for a while.  Square and Paypal just joined the bandwagon of American companies that try to find and exploit opportunities in the crypto currency industry without abandoning their actual businesses. GMPW’s  emerging cryptocurrency opportunities portfolio would not be different.  The company would on an ongoing basis evaluate and consider investments into potentially viable cryptocurrency opportunities anywhere. 

 


 

 

Results of Operations

 

For the year ended December 31, 2020 compared with the year ended December 31, 2019

 

Revenue

 

We are generating substantially all our revenue from sales of real estate investment property and our proprietary trading operation.  For the year ended December 31, 2020, revenue from real estate sales was $1,205,000 and revenue from proprietary trading was $423,136 for a total revenue of $1,628,136.    Compared to proprietary trading revenue of $464 for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Cost of Revenues

 

Our cost of revenue is totally related to the cost of acquiring the real estate investment property and the trading securities sold.  Cost related to our real estate investment property and the trading securities sold for the year December 31, 2020 were $1,179,827 and 374,691 respectively.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expense for the year was $159,463.  Operating expense consists of costs related to the establishment of corporate governances; and costs associated with our plans and preparations for a future potential capital raise. These expenses also include the costs of conducting market research, attending and/or participating in industry conferences and seminars, business development activities, and professional fees, other general business outside consulting activities. Operating expense also includes travel costs, for third-party consultants, legal and accounting fees and other professional and administrative costs.

 

We expect that our operating expenses will increase in the future as we add to our personnel and expand our infrastructure to support the requirements of being a public company.

 

Net Loss

 

Net Loss for the year was $82,980. 

 

 

Related Party Transactions

 

The following individuals and entities have been identified as related parties based on their affiliation with our CEO and director, Frank I Igwealor:

 

Frank I Igwealor

 

Goldstein Franklin, Inc.

  

 

The following amounts were owed to related parties, affiliated with the CEO and Chairman of the Board, at the dates indicated:

 

   

31-Dec-20

 

31-Dec-19

Los Angeles Community Capital (controlled by Frank I Igwealor)

 

$

540,524

 

$

               -  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goldstein Franklin Inc (controlled by Frank I Igwealor)

 

$

63,632

 

$

41,200


 

 

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of December 31, 2020, we had $500 cash on hand.   We anticipate that our cash position is not sufficient to fund current operations.   We have limited lending relationships with commercial banks and are dependent upon the completion of one or more financings or equity raises to fund our continuing operations.   We anticipate that we will seek additional capital through debt or equity financings.   While we are aggressively pursuing financing, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in our capital raising efforts.   Any additional equity financing may result in substantial dilution to our stockholders.

 

Since 2019, all of our operations have been financed through advances from a company controlled by our president and CEO.  As of December 31, 2020, the company controlled by our president and CEO has loaned $604,156 to us, with no formal commitments or arrangements to advance or loan any additional funds to us in the future.  We have not yet achieved significant profitability.  We expect that our general and administrative expenses will continue to increase and, as a result, we will need to generate significant revenues to achieve significant profitability. We may never achieve significant profitability.

 

The revenues, if any, generated from our operations or acquisitions may not be sufficient to fund our operations or planned growth. We will require additional capital to continue to operate our business, and to further expand our business. Sources of additional capital through various financing transactions or arrangements with third parties may include equity or debt financing, bank loans or revolving credit facilities. We may not be successful in locating suitable financing transactions in the time period required or at all, and we may not obtain the capital we require by other means.

 

We will now be obligated to file annual, quarterly and current reports with the SEC pursuant to the Exchange Act. In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“Sarbanes-Oxley”) and the rules subsequently implemented by the SEC and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board have imposed various requirements on public companies, including requiring changes in corporate governance practices. We expect these rules and regulations to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and to make some activities of ours more time- consuming and costly. In order to meet the needs to comply with the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act, we will need investment of capital.

 

Management has determined that additional capital will be required in the form of equity or debt securities. There is no assurance that management will be able to raise capital on terms acceptable to the Company. If we are unable to obtain sufficient amounts of additional capital, we may have to cease filing the required reports and cease operations completely. If we obtain additional funds by selling any of our equity securities or by issuing common stock to pay current or future obligations, the percentage ownership of our shareholders will be reduced, shareholders may experience additional dilution, or the equity securities may have rights preferences or privileges senior to the common stock.

  

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 


 

There are no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that are material to investors.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

From time-to-time, new accounting pronouncements are issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board or other standard setting bodies, relating to the treatment and recording of certain accounting transactions. Unless otherwise discussed herein, management of the Company has determined that these recent accounting pronouncements will not have a material impact on the financial position or results of operations of the Company.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Estimates

 

Our management’s discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based on our financial statements which we have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. In preparing our financial statements, we are required to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods.

 

Critical accounting estimates are estimates for which (a) the nature of the estimate is material due to the levels of subjectivity and judgment necessary to account for highly uncertain matters or the susceptibility of such matters to change and (b) the impact of the estimate on financial condition or operating performance is material.

 

These significant accounting estimates or assumptions bear the risk of change due to the fact that there are uncertainties attached to these estimates or assumptions, and certain estimates or assumptions are difficult to measure or value.

 

Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.

 

Management regularly evaluates the key factors and assumptions used to develop the estimates utilizing currently available information, changes in facts and circumstances, historical experience and reasonable assumptions. After such evaluations, if deemed appropriate, those estimates are adjusted accordingly.

 

Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

While our significant accounting policies are described in more detail in Note 2 of our annual financial statements included in this Annual Report, we believe the following accounting policies to be critical to the judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our financial statements: 

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company utilizes ASC 820-10, Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure, for valuing financial assets and liabilities measured on a recurring basis. Fair value is defined as the exit price, or the amount that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants as of the measurement date. The guidance also establishes a hierarchy for inputs used in measuring fair value that maximizes the use of observable inputs and minimizes the use of unobservable inputs by requiring that the most observable inputs be used when available. Observable inputs are inputs market participants would use in valuing the asset or liability and are developed based on market data obtained from sources independent of the Company. Unobservable inputs are inputs that reflect the Company’s assumptions about the factors market participants would use in valuing the asset or liability. The guidance establishes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:


 

 

Level 1. Observable inputs such as quoted prices in active markets;

Level 2. Inputs, other than the quoted prices in active markets, that are observable either directly or indirectly; and

Level 3. Unobservable inputs in which there is little or no market data, which require the reporting entity to develop its own assumptions.

 

Financial assets are considered Level 3 when their fair values are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques and at least one significant model assumption or input is unobservable.

 

The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. If the inputs used to measure the financial assets and liabilities fall within more than one level described above, the categorization is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement of the instrument.

 

Transactions involving related parties cannot be presumed to be carried out on an arm’s-length basis, as the requisite conditions of competitive, free-market dealings may not exist. Representations about transactions with related parties, if made, shall not imply that the related party transactions were consummated on terms equivalent to those that prevail in arm’s-length transactions unless such representations can be substantiated.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

We measure the cost of services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the fair value of the award. For employees and directors, the fair value of the award is measured on the grant date and for non-employees, the fair value of the award is generally re-measured on vesting dates and interim financial reporting dates until the service period is complete. The fair value amount is then recognized over the period during which services are required to be provided in exchange for the award, usually the vesting period. Stock-based compensation expense is recorded by us in the same expense classifications in the consolidated statements of operations, as if such amounts were paid in cash.

 

Deferred Tax Assets and Income Taxes Provision

 

The Company adopted the provisions of paragraph 740-10-25-13 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Paragraph 740-10-25-13 which addresses the determination of whether tax benefits claimed or expected to be claimed on a tax return should be recorded in the financial statements. Under paragraph 740-10-25-13, the Company may recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position should be measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent (50%) likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Paragraph 740-10-25-13 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties on income taxes, accounting in interim periods and requires increased disclosures. The Company had no material adjustments to its liabilities for unrecognized income tax benefits according to the provisions of paragraph 740-10-25-13.


 

  

The estimated future tax effects of temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities are reported in the accompanying balance sheets, as well as tax credit carry-backs and carry-forwards. The Company periodically reviews the recoverability of deferred tax assets recorded on its balance sheets and provides valuation allowances as management deems necessary.

 

Management makes judgments as to the interpretation of the tax laws that might be challenged upon an audit and cause changes to previous estimates of tax liability. In addition, the Company operates within multiple taxing jurisdictions and is subject to audit in these jurisdictions. In management’s opinion, adequate provisions for income taxes have been made for all years. If actual taxable income by tax jurisdiction varies from estimates, additional allowances or reversals of reserves may be necessary.

 

Management assumes that the realization of the Company’s net deferred tax assets resulting from its net operating loss (“NOL”) carry–forwards for Federal income tax purposes that may be offset against future taxable income was not considered more likely than not and accordingly, the potential tax benefits of the net loss carry-forwards are offset by a full valuation allowance. Management made this assumption based on (a) the Company has incurred recurring losses and presently has no revenue-producing business; (b) general economic conditions; and, (c) its ability to raise additional funds to support its daily operations by way of a public or private offering, among other factors.

   

Seasonality

 

Although our operating history is limited, we do not consider our business to be seasonal.

 

Commercial Real Property

 

As at December 31, 2020, the Company has no commercial real estate.

 

Line of Credit

 

As at December 31, 2020, we have on our book $63,632 classified as long-term debt.  This debt is from an interest-free line of credit from a related party.

 

 

 

ITEM 7A.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not applicable

 

 

ITEM 8.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

The consolidated financial statements of Givemepower Corporation including the notes thereto, are presented beginning at page F-1 and are incorporated by reference herein.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

   
     
   

Page

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

F-1

 

 

 

For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

F-2

Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

F-3

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Deficit

 

F-4

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

F-5

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

F-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

AND SUBSIDIARY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Financial Statements

As of December 31, 2020

 


 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

 

To The Board of Directors and Shareholders

        Givemepower Corporation

        370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A

        Torrance, CA 90501

 

Opinion on the financial statements

 

We audited the accompanying balance sheets of Givemepower Corporation (“the Company”) as of December 31, 2020 and the related statements of operations, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for year then ended and the related notes (collectively referred to as “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2020, and the results of its operations and cash flows for the year then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis of Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) ("PCAOB") and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits. we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

Going Concern

                                                                                                                       

The Company’s financial statements are prepared using the generally accepted accounting principles applicable to a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and liquidation of the liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has an accumulated deficit of $6,351,470 and had a negative cash flow from operations amounting to $120,008 for the year ended December 31, 2020. These factors as discussed in Note 6 of the financial statements raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management's plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 6. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.


 

 

Critical Audit Matters

 

Critical audit matters arising from the current period of the financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that (1) relate to accounts or disclosure that are material to the financial statements and (2) involve especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgements. The communication of critical audit matters does not alter in any way our opinion on the financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit below, providing separate opinions on the critical audit matters or the accounts or disclosures to which they relate.

 

Related party transactions.

 

As discussed in Note 9 to the financial statement, the Company has borrowed from related parties an amount $604,157 as of the date of December 31, 2020.

 

The procedure performed to address the matter included: obtaining confirmation from related party.

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2020.

 

/Sd/ M.S. Madhava Rao

M. S. Madhava Rao, Chartered Accountant

Bangalore, India

April 13, 2021

 

 


 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2020

 

December 31, 2019

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

$

           1,630

 

$

             500

 

Investments - trading securities

 

         91,282

 

 

        45,396

 

Accounts receivable

 

                   -  

 

 

               -  

 

Total Current Assets

 

         92,912

 

 

        45,896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Property and equipment, net

 

           7,745

 

 

 

 

Investments -   real estate

$

       664,111

 

$

               -  

 

Total assets

 

       764,767

 

 

        45,896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accrued expenses

 

           4,542

 

 

 

 

Accrued interest

 

           2,812

 

 

 

 

Marginal loan payable

 

              115

 

 

          4,317

 

Line of credit - related party, current portion

 

         63,632

 

 

        41,200

 

Total Current Liabilities

$

         71,102

 

$

        45,517

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-Term Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes payable - net of current portion

$

       150,000

 

$

               -  

 

Line of credit  - related party, net of current portion

 

       540,524

 

 

0

 

       Total Long-Term Liabilities

 

       690,524

 

 

0

 

Total Liabilities

$

       761,626

 

$

        45,517

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $.001 par value, 1,000,000 and 10,000,000 shares authorized, 0 and I,000,000 issued and outstanding as at December 31, 2020 and 2019 respectively.

 

                1,013

 

$

               10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common  Stock, $0.001 par value, 1,200,000,000  and 49,000,000 shares authorized, 42, 724,687 and 27,724,687 issued and outstanding as at December 31, 2020 and 2019 respectively.

 

               42,784

 

$

        27,725

 

Additional paid in capital

 

    6,310,814

 

 

    6,072,520

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 (6,351,470)

 

 

   (6,099,876)

 

     Total Stockholders’ equity

 

           3,016

 

 

               -  

 

     Minority interest

 

                85

 

 

               -  

 

       Total Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)

$

           3,141

 

$

379

 

Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity

 

      764,767

 

 

        45,896

 

 

The accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

For the Year Ended

 

December 31,

 
 

2020

 

 

2019

 
   

 

       

Revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Sales of investments under trading securities

 

$

     423,136

 

$

   464.00

 

   Sales of investment under property

 

 

   1,205,000

 

 

         -  

 

Total Revenue

 

 

1,628,136

 

 

   464.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of goods sold:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Cost of sales - trading securities

 

 

     374,691

 

 

         -  

 

   Cost of sales - property

 

 

   1,179,827

 

 

 

 

Total cost of goods sold

 

 

   1,554,518

 

 

         -  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   General and administrative

 

 

       57,073

 

 

     71.00

 

   Professional fees

 

 

         73,059

 

 

 

 

   Advertising and promotions

 

 

       16,325

 

 

 

 

   Interest expense

 

 

            3,006

 

 

     14.00

 

   Stock-based compensation

 

 

       10,000

 

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

       159,463

 

 

         85

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operations

 

 

 (85,845.39)

 

 

       379

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Dividends, net

 

 

           174

 

 

 

 

  Unrealized gain (loss)

 

 

         2,692

 

 

         -  

 

Total other expense, net

 

 

         2,866

 

 

         -  

 

Loss before income tax provision

 

 

      (82,980)

 

 

       379

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income tax provision

 

 

             -  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

      (82,980)

 

$

       379

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earnings (loss) per Share:                Basic and Diluted

 

$

       (0.002)

 

$

 0.00001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding: Basic and Diluted

 

 

42,724,687

 

 

27,724,687

 
               
 
 

The accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements


 

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

 

STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred Stock

Common Stock

Additional

Accumulated

Total Stockholders'

 

Shares

Amount

Shares

Amount

Paid In Capital

Deficit

Equity

Balance as of July 1, 2020

1

 $       -  

27,724,687

 $         -  

 $                   -  

 $      (88,122)

 $       (88,122)

Issuances of preferred stock

1,000,000

           3

                 -  

            -  

                      -  

                   -  

                     3

Issuances of common stock

 

 

 

    1,975

                      -  

                   -  

               1,975

Acquisition of business

              -  

          -  

                 -  

            -  

             53,763

                   -  

            53,763

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

         (43,992)

          (43,992)

Balances - September 30, 2020

1,000,001

 $        3

27,724,687

 $  1,975

 $         53,763

 $    (132,114)

 $       (76,373)

 

Preferred Stock

Common Stock

Additional

Accumulated

Total Stockholders'

 

Shares

Amount

Shares

Amount

Paid In Capital

Deficit

Equity

Balances - July 1, 2019

              -  

 $       -  

29,321,338

 29,321

 $     6,072,530

 $ (7,501,203)

 $  (1,399,352)

Restructuring adjustments

 

          -  

(1,596,651)

  (1,587)

                 (10)

      1,400,948

       1,399,352

Issuances of common stock

 

          -  

 

 

                      -  

                   -  

                     -  

Issuances of preferred stock

              1

       

                379

                  379

Balances - December 31, 2019

               1

 $       -  

  27,724,687

 $ 27,734

 $       6,072,520

 $ (6,099,876)

 $                 379

 

Preferred Stock

Common Stock

Additional

Accumulated

Total Stockholders'

 

Shares

Amount

Shares

Amount

Paid In Capital

Deficit

Equity

Balance as of January 1, 2020

1

 $       -  

27,724,687

 $27,734

 $     6,072,520

 $ (6,099,876)

 $               379

Issuances of preferred stock

1,000,000

         13

                 -  

            -  

                      -  

                   -  

                    13

Issuances of common stock

 

 

15,000,000

   16,966

             15,000

                   -  

             31,966

Acquisition of business

              -  

          -  

                 -  

            -  

           222,378

         (92,209)

             53,763

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

         (82,980)

          (82,980)

Balances - December 31, 2020

1,000,001

 $      13

42,724,687

 $44,700

 $     6,309,898

 $ (6,275,065)

 $            3,141

 

 

 The accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GIVEMEPOWER CORPORATION

STATEMENTS OF CASHFLOWS

Years Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

         
   

DECEMBER 31,

   

2020

 

2019

   

 

 

 

Cash Flows from Operating Activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss)

 

$

     (82,980)

 

 

$

          379

 Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inventory Asset: Trading Securities

 

 

     (45,886)

 

 

 

   (45,396)

Depreciation

 

 

         2,304

 

 

 

 

Other Accrued Liabilities

 

 

         6,554

 

 

 

 

Net Cash Flows Used in Operating Activities

 

 

   (120,008)

 

 

 

   (45,017)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer and Internet

 

 

         7,502

 

 

 

 

Payment for real estate investment

 

 

421,666

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Cash Flows from Investing Activities

 

 

     429,167

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of notes payable

 

 

     150,000

 

 

 

41,200

Proceeds from issuance of marginal loan payable

 

 

      (4,201)

 

 

 

4,317

Proceeds from short term line of credit - related party

 

 

     122,432

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from long-term line of credit - related party

 

 

   (643,686)

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of stocks

 

 

       55,697

 

 

 

 

New Cash Flows from Financing Activities

 

 

   (319,758)

 

 

 

45,517