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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 7, 2022

No. 333-263800

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

Amendment No. 2

to

FORM F-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

Super Group (SGHC) Limited

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Island of Guernsey   7990   Not Applicable
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (Primary Standard Industrial
Classification Code Number)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

Super Group (SGHC) Limited

Bordeaux Court, Les Echelons

St. Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 1AR

Telephone: +44 (0) 14 8182-2939

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant’s principal executive offices)

 

 

Donald J. Puglisi

Puglisi & Associates

850 Library Avenue #204

Newark, Delaware 19711

Telephone: (302) 738-6680

(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

 

 

Copies to:

 

Justin Stock

Dave Peinsipp

Brian Leaf

Cooley (UK) LLP
22 Bishopsgate
London, EC2M 1QS, UK
Telephone: +44 (0) 20 7583-4055

 

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: As soon as practicable after this Registration Statement becomes effective.

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box:  ☒

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an emerging growth company as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act of 1933.

Emerging growth company  ☐

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act.  ☐

 

The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

 

 

 

The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or until this Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 


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The information contained in this preliminary prospectus is not complete and may be changed. Neither we nor the selling securityholders may sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This preliminary prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it’s not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED JULY 7, 2022

Up to 481,074,588 Ordinary Shares

Up to 11,000,000 Warrants

 

LOGO

Super Group (SGHC) Limited

(a non-cellular company limited by shares incorporated and registered under the laws of the Island of Guernsey)

 

 

This prospectus relates to the offer and sale from time to time by the selling securityholders or their permitted transferees (collectively, the “selling securityholders”) of (i) up to 481,074,588 ordinary shares, no par value (including up to 11,000,000 ordinary shares that may be issued upon exercise of the private placement warrants) and (ii) up to 11,000,000 private placement warrants (as defined below). This prospectus also covers any additional securities that may become issuable by reason of share splits, share dividends or other similar transactions. Capitalized terms used in this Prospectus and not otherwise defined have the meanings set forth in the “Frequently Used Terms.”

We are registering the offer and sale of the securities described above to satisfy certain registration rights we have granted. The selling securityholders may offer all or part of the securities for resale from time to time through public or private transactions, at either prevailing market prices or at privately negotiated prices. Our ordinary shares and public warrants are currently listed on the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) under the symbols “SGHC” and “SGHC WS,” respectively. The last reported sale price of our ordinary shares on July 5, 2022 was $4.36 per share.

The selling securityholders acquired their securities at prices that are significantly less than the current trading price of our ordinary shares. Certain of the selling securityholders, referred to as the Founder Holders (including PJT Partners Holdings LP, through its economic interest in Sport Entertainment Acquisition Holdings LLC) paid an average price of approximately $0.002 per share for each ordinary share and $1.00 per private placement warrant for each warrant being offered by this prospectus. The other selling securityholders similarly acquired their ordinary shares at nominal prices.

These securities are being registered to permit the selling securityholders to sell securities from time to time, in amounts, at prices and on terms determined at the time of offering. The selling securityholders may sell these securities through ordinary brokerage transactions, directly to market makers of our shares or through any other means described in the section titled “Plan of Distribution”. In connection with any sales of ordinary shares offered hereunder, the selling securityholders, any underwriters, agents, brokers or dealers participating in such sales may be deemed to be “underwriters” within the meaning of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”).

The ordinary shares being offered for resale pursuant to this prospectus by the selling securityholders would represent approximately 98% of our outstanding ordinary shares as of May 31, 2022 (after giving effect to the issuance of the shares issuable upon exercise of the warrants held by the selling securityholders). Given the substantial number of ordinary shares being registered for potential resale by selling securityholders pursuant to this prospectus, the sale of shares by the selling securityholders, or the perception in the market that the selling securityholders of a large number of shares intend to sell shares, could increase the volatility of the market price of our ordinary shares or result in a significant decline in the public trading price of our ordinary shares. Even if our trading price is significantly below $10.00, the offering price for the units offered in the initial public offering of Sports Entertainment Acquisition Corp., or SEAC, the purchasers of which exchanged their SEAC shares for our ordinary shares in the business combination described in this prospectus, the selling securityholders may still have an incentive to sell our ordinary shares because they purchased the shares at prices that are significantly lower than the purchase prices paid by our public investors or the current trading price of our ordinary shares. While the selling securityholders may experience a positive rate of return on their investment in our ordinary shares as a result, the public securityholders may not experience a similar rate of return on the securities they purchased due to differences in their purchase prices and the trading price. For example, based on the closing price of our ordinary shares of $4.36 as of July 5, 2022, the Founder Holders would experience a potential profit of up to approximately $4.36 per share, or up to approximately $86.0 million in the aggregate (after giving effect to the issuance of ordinary shares issuable upon exercise of the private placement warrants held by the Founder Holders). The other selling securityholders would similarly experience a profit of up to $4.36 per share or up to approximately $2.09 billion in the aggregate.

All of the securities offered by the selling securityholders pursuant to this prospectus will be sold by the selling securityholders for their respective accounts. We will not receive any of the proceeds from such sales, except with respect to amounts received by us upon exercise of warrants to the extent such warrants are exercised for cash. The exercise price of our outstanding warrants is $11.50 per share, which exceeds the trading price of our ordinary shares as of the date of this prospectus. If the trading price of our ordinary shares remains below the exercise price of the warrants, the warrants may never be exercised and we may never receive the cash proceeds of such exercises. We will pay certain expenses associated with the registration of the securities covered by this prospectus, as described in the section titled “Plan of Distribution”.

We may amend or supplement this prospectus from time to time by filing amendments or supplements as required. You should read this entire prospectus and any amendments or supplements carefully before you make your investment decision.

We are a “foreign private issuer” as defined under the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, rules and will be subject to reduced public company reporting requirements for this prospectus and future filings. See, “Prospectus Summary—Implications of Being a Foreign Private Issuer.”

Our business and an investment in our ordinary shares involves a high degree of risk. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 30 of this prospectus, and under similar headings in any amendments or supplements to this prospectus.

Neither the SEC nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 

Prospectus dated July     , 2022


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

FREQUENTLY USED TERMS

     iii  

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

     1  

SUMMARY CONSOLIDATED HISTORICAL AND OTHER FINANCIAL INFORMATION

     24  

SUMMARY UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

     28  

RISK FACTORS

     30  

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

     79  

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

     80  

USE OF PROCEEDS

     93  

DIVIDEND POLICY

     94  

CAPITALIZATION

     95  

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

     96  

BUSINESS

     131  

MANAGEMENT

     163  

BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP OF SECURITIES

     178  

SELLING SECURITYHOLDERS

     180  

RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

     184  

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES

     186  

MATERIAL TAX CONSIDERATIONS

     203  

ENFORCEABILITY OF JUDGMENTS

     212  

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

     214  

LEGAL MATTERS

     217  

EXPERTS

     217  

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

     217  

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

     F-1  

 

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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS

Unless otherwise indicated or the context otherwise requires, all references in this prospectus to “Super Group,” the “Company,” “we,” “our,” “ours,” “us” or similar terms refer to (i) Super Group (SGHC) Limited and its consolidated subsidiaries after the Closing and (ii) SGHC Limited and its consolidated subsidiaries prior to the Closing. Super Group (SGHC) Limited is the new combined company in connection with the Business Combination, in which shareholders of Super Group and SEAC exchanged their shares for shares in Super Group (SGHC) Limited.

Neither we nor the selling securityholders have authorized anyone to provide any information other than that contained in this prospectus or in any free writing prospectus prepared by or on behalf of us or to which we may have referred you. Neither we nor the selling securityholders take any responsibility for, or provide any assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that others may give you. Neither we nor the selling securityholders are making an offer to sell the ordinary shares in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted. You should assume that the information appearing in this prospectus is accurate only as of the date on the front cover of this prospectus, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or any sale of the ordinary shares. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since the date on the front cover of this prospectus.

For investors outside the United States: neither we nor the selling securityholders have done anything that would permit the possession or distribution of this prospectus in any jurisdiction, other than the United States, where action for that purpose is required. Persons outside the United States who come into possession of this prospectus must inform themselves about, and observe any restrictions relating to, the offering of the ordinary shares and the distribution of this prospectus outside the United States.

 

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FREQUENTLY USED TERMS

Unless otherwise stated in this prospectus or the context otherwise requires, references to:

Business Combination” means the transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement.

Business Combination Agreement” means the Business Combination Agreement, dated as of April 23, 2021, by and among SEAC, SGHC, Super Group, Merger Sub and Sponsor, a copy of which was filed as Exhibit 2.1 to Sports Entertainment Acquisition Corp.’s Current Report on Form 8-K with the SEC on April 26, 2021.

Class A Shares” means SEAC’s Class A common stock, par value $0.0001.

Class B Shares” means SEAC’s Class B common stock, par value $0.0001.

Closing” means the closing of the Business Combination.

common stock” means Class A Shares and Class B Shares.

Company” means Super Group.

Continental” means Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company.

DGCL” means the Delaware General Corporation Law as the same may be amended from time to time.

DTC” means the Depository Trust Company.

Exchange Act” means the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

Founder Holders” means each of Sponsor, Natara Holloway Branch, Timothy Goodell and their permitted transferees.

Guernsey Companies Law” means the Companies (Guernsey) Law, 2008 (as amended).

IFRS” means the International Financial Reporting Standards as set forth by the International Accounting Standards Board.

IPO” means SEAC’s October 6, 2020 initial public offering of units, with each unit consisting of one Class A Share and one-half of one warrant, raising total gross proceeds of approximately $450,000,000.

Merger Sub” means Super Group (SGHC) Merger Sub, Inc., a Delaware corporation and a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company.

NYSE” means the New York Stock Exchange.

Pre-Closing Holders” means the existing shareholders of SGHC prior to the Closing.

private placement warrants” means the warrants issued to the Sponsor and PJT Partners Holdings LP in a private placement simultaneously with the closing of the IPO as well as in connection with the closing of the partial exercise by the underwriters of their over-allotment option, with each such warrant entitling the holder thereof to purchase one Class A Share at a price of $11.50 per share.

public warrants” means the 22,500,000 redeemable warrants sold as part of the units in the IPO.

Sarbanes-Oxley Act” means the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

SEAC” means Sports Entertainment Acquisition Corp., a Delaware corporation.

SEAC Holders” means Founder Holders and PJT Partners Holdings LP.

SEC” means the United States Securities and Exchange Commission.

Securities Act” means the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

 

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Sellers” means certain shareholders who are officers and employees of the Target Companies (“Management”) and certain other existing shareholders of SGHC (the “Co-Investors”).

SGHC” means SGHC Limited, a non-cellular company limited by shares incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey.

Sponsor” means Sport Entertainment Acquisition Holdings LLC, a Delaware limited liability company.

Super Group” means Super Group (SGHC) Limited, a non-cellular company limited by shares incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey, and its subsidiaries when the context requires.

Super Group Board” means the board of directors of Super Group.

Super Group Governing Documents” means the Super Group Amended and Restated Memorandum of Incorporation and the Super Group Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation.

Super Group ordinary shares” or “ordinary shares” means the ordinary redeemable shares of Super Group, of no par value.

Super Group Sponsor warrants” means the Super Group warrants converted from the private placement warrants issued by SEAC to the Sponsor or PJT Partners Holdings LP.

Super Group Warrants” means each issued and outstanding SEAC warrant to purchase a share of SEAC Class A common stock that has become exercisable for one Super Group ordinary share.

Target Companies” means, collectively, SGHC, the Company, Merger Sub and all direct and indirect subsidiaries of SGHC.

Transfer Agent” means Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company.

underwriters” means Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC and PJT Partners LP.

warrants” means the private placement warrants and public warrants.

 

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EXPLANATORY NOTE

On April 23, 2021, Sport Entertainment Acquisition Corp., a Delaware corporation, entered into a Business Combination Agreement with SGHC Limited, a non-cellular company limited by shares incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey, Super Group (SGHC) Limited, a non-cellular company limited by shares incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey, Super Group (SGHC) Merger Sub, Inc., a Delaware corporation and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Super Group, and Sports Entertainment Acquisition Holdings LLC, a Delaware limited liability company.

The Company was incorporated on March 29, 2021 for the purpose of effectuating the Business Combination described herein. Prior to the Business Combination, the Company had nominal assets and liabilities, contingencies, or commitments, and did not conduct any operations other than costs incurred to acquire 100% of the equity interests of SGHC Limited and to effect the Business Combination. Following these exchanges, SGHC Limited became a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company. Accordingly, the financial statements of the Company for the period from March 29, 2021 through December 31, 2021 have been included in this prospectus. The Business Combination was first accounted for as a capital reorganization whereby the Company is the successor to its predecessor SGHC. As a result of the first step described above, the existing shareholders of SGHC continued to retain control through ownership of the Company. The capital reorganization was immediately followed by the acquisition of SEAC, which was accounted for within the scope of International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) 2, Share-based Payments (“IFRS 2”). Under this method of accounting, SEAC was treated as the “acquired” company for financial reporting purposes. Accordingly, for accounting purposes, the Business Combination was treated as the equivalent of the Company issuing ordinary redeemable shares of Super Group, of no par value for the net assets of SEAC, accompanied by a recapitalization.

Pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, prior to the closing of the Business Combination, SGHC underwent a pre-closing reorganization (the “Reorganization”) wherein all existing shareholders of SGHC exchanged their shares in SGHC for Super Group ordinary shares. As described in the Business Combination Agreement, effective immediately following and conditioned upon the Closing, Super Group purchased Super Group ordinary shares from certain Pre-Closing Holders in exchange for cash consideration equal to $10.00 per Super Group ordinary share.

Pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, subject to the satisfaction or waiver of certain conditions set forth therein, the following has occurred: (a) SEAC’s issued and outstanding Class B Shares, subject to the terms of the Founder Holder Consent Letter (as defined and described below), have converted automatically on a one-for-one basis into Class A Shares; and (b) Merger Sub has merged with and into SEAC, with SEAC continuing as the surviving company, as a result of which (i) SEAC has become a wholly-owned subsidiary of Super Group; (ii) each issued and outstanding unit of SEAC, consisting of one Class A Share and one-half of one warrant (the “SEAC warrants”), were automatically detached, (iii) each issued and outstanding Class A Share was converted into the right to receive one Super Group ordinary share; and (iv) each issued and outstanding SEAC warrant to purchase a Class A Share have become exercisable for one Super Group ordinary share.

The Business Combination was consummated on January 27, 2022.

Certain amounts that appear in this prospectus may not sum due to rounding.

 

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CONVENTIONS WHICH APPLY TO THIS PROSPECTUS AND EXCHANGE RATE PRESENTATION

In this prospectus, unless otherwise specified or the context otherwise requires:

 

   

“$,” “USD” and “U.S. dollar” each refer to the United States dollar;

 

   

“£,” “GBP” and “pounds” each refer to the British pound sterling; and

 

   

“€,” “EUR” and “Euro” each refer to the Euro.

Certain amounts described herein have been expressed in U.S. dollars for convenience, and when expressed in U.S. dollars in the future, such amounts may be different from those set forth herein due to intervening exchange rate fluctuations. The exchange rate used for conversion between U.S. dollars and pounds is based on the historical exchange rate of the pound released by the Federal Reserve, the central bank of the United States.

TRADEMARKS, TRADE NAMES AND SERVICE MARKS

SGHC, the Company, Merger Sub, SEAC and their respective subsidiaries own or have rights to trademarks, trade names and service marks that they use in connection with the operation of their businesses. In addition, their names, logos and website names and addresses are their trademarks or service marks. Other trademarks, trade names and service marks appearing in this prospectus are the property of their respective owners. Solely for convenience, in some cases, the trademarks, trade names and service marks referred to in this prospectus are listed without the applicable ® and SM symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that we or the owners thereof will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our or their rights to these trademarks, trade names and service marks.

MARKET AND INDUSTRY DATA

In this prospectus, we present industry data, information and statistics regarding the markets in which Super Group competes, as well as statistics, data and other information provided by third parties relating to markets, market sizes, market shares, market positions and other industry data (collectively, “Industry Analysis”). Such information is supplemented where necessary with Super Group’s internal estimates, taking into account publicly available information about other industry participants and the judgment of Super Group’s management where information is not publicly available. This information appears in “Business and other sections of this prospectus.

Industry publications, research, studies and forecasts generally state that the information they contain has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but that the accuracy and completeness of such information is not guaranteed. Forecasts and other forward-looking information obtained from these sources are subject to the same qualifications and uncertainties as the other forward-looking statements in this prospectus. These forecasts and forward-looking information are subject to uncertainty and risk due to a variety of factors, including those described under “Risk Factors.” These and other factors could cause results to differ materially from those expressed in any forecasts or estimates.

 

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights information contained elsewhere in this prospectus. This summary may not contain all the information that may be important to you, and we urge you to read this entire prospectus carefully, including the “Risk Factors,” “Business” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” sections and our consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto, included elsewhere in this prospectus, before deciding to invest in our ordinary shares. For purposes of this section, unless otherwise indicated or the context otherwise requires, all references to “Super Group,” the “Company,” “we,” “our,” “ours,” “us” or similar terms refer to (i) Super Group (SGHC) Limited and its consolidated subsidiaries after the Closing and (ii) SGHC Limited and its consolidated subsidiaries prior to the Closing.

Our Business

Overview

Super Group is a leading global online sports betting and gaming operator. Super Group’s mission is to responsibly provide first-class entertainment to the worldwide online betting and gaming community. Super Group’s strategy for achieving this is built around three key pillars:

 

  1.

Expanding its global footprint into as many regulated markets as possible in order to engage with as many customers as it can possibly reach;

 

  2.

Increasing awareness of its brands through strategic partnerships and coordinated sponsorship and marketing campaigns; and

 

  3.

Utilizing enhanced proprietary data to optimize the confluence of ethical corporate culture, responsible gaming values, value-for-money product offerings and customer-centric service delivery.

As of the date of this prospectus, Super Group subsidiaries are licensed in 24 jurisdictions and manage approximately 4,000 employees. Over the twelve months of 2021, on average, over 2.8 million customers per month have yielded in excess of $3.2 billion in wagers per month. During the period January 1, 2020 to December 31, 2021, total wagers amounted to €38 billion. Super Group’s business generated €1.26 billion ($1.48 billion) of net gaming revenue between January 1, 2021 and December 31, 2021 in different geographic regions, including the Americas, Europe, Africa and the rest of the world, such regions accounting for approximately 47%, 11%, 17% and 25%, respectively, of Super Group’s total revenue in 2021.

What Super Group Does

Super Group’s global online sports betting and casino gaming services are delivered to customers by way of two primary product offerings:

 

   

Betway, a single-brand premier online sports betting offering, and

 

   

Spin, a multi-brand online casino offering.

Betway is SGHC’s single-brand online sports betting offering with a global footprint derived from licenses to operate throughout Europe, the Americas and Africa. The brand is sports-led but also offers casino games. Betway seeks to continue to grow brand awareness, including through an expanding portfolio of partnerships and collaborations with sports teams and leagues worldwide. As of the date of this prospectus, Betway has more than 70 such arrangements and is actively negotiating for further expansion.

 

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Spin is SGHC’s multi-brand online casino offering. Spin’s diverse portfolio of more than 20 casino brands is designed to be culturally relevant across the globe while aiming to offer a wide range of casino products. Spin is casino-led but some of its brands also offer sports betting products. Spin seeks to achieve growth through a broad range of targeted marketing channels in which SGHC believes an expansive brand portfolio to be a significant asset.

SGHC aims to further expand its global footprint through the acquisition of Digital Gaming Corporation Limited (“DGC”), which is the parent of Digital Gaming Corporation USA (“DGC USA”), which holds the exclusive license to use the Betway brand in the United States. On April 7, 2021, SGHC entered into a definitive agreement to acquire DGC, subject to certain regulatory approvals and customary closing conditions. This transaction is expected to close in the second half of 2022. DGC USA has already secured market access in up to an initial 12 regulated or expected-to-be regulated states in the United States and its acquisition will enable SGHC to penetrate and leverage its capabilities in these new markets. As of the date of this prospectus, the Betway brand (operated by licensee, DGC USA) is live in 6 US states, being Arizona, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Iowa and Colorado. DGC USA’s subsidiary, DGC VA, received its Temporary Permit to operate in the Commonwealth of Virginia in November 2021 and is expected to launch a Betway-branded sports betting offering in the Commonwealth in the second quarter of 2022. For the remaining 5 states, being Ohio, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Missouri, as a result of a combination of timing around the introduction of regulations and/or receipt of required licenses and approvals, there is currently no specific timeline for go-live. An agreement is also in place for the provision of an additional casino brand in Pennsylvania.

Following Betway’s global expansion, the Company has, in certain circumstances, licensed the brand to third parties in certain jurisdictions where licensees are in a better position to capture market opportunity while taking advantage of the global brand, in consideration for a license fee.

Company Background

Super Group, is a holding company incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey, and was incorporated for the purpose of effectuating the Business Combination described in this prospectus. Prior to the Business Combination, which occurred on January 27, 2022, Super Group had no material assets and did not operate any businesses. SGHC is a holding company incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey and its business and operations are conducted through numerous subsidiaries that are incorporated in various jurisdictions around the world. The principal executive office of SGHC and Super Group are located in Bordeaux Court, Les Echelons, St. Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 1AR.

SGHC was incorporated in July 2020, with the designed purpose of becoming the ultimate parent company of Pindus Holdings Limited (“Pindus”), Fengari Holdings Limited (“Fengari”), and Pelion Holdings Limited (“Pelion”), through a reorganization of entities with common ownership. Pelion and Fengari collectively house the Spin business while Pindus and other entities also acquired pursuant to the reorganization collectively house the Betway business. Predecessor companies for the two businesses were established from 1997 onwards. Of the founders and early staff members of these predecessor companies, more than 20 remain who have been employed by the Company for more than 20 years, including CEO Neal Menashe and CFO Alinda van Wyk.

On October 7, 2020, SGHC entered into an agreement with the shareholders of Fengari, a holding company incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey, pursuant to which it acquired the entire issued share capital of Fengari. The purpose of this transaction was to consolidate Fengari and its subsidiaries into the SGHC group while retaining the ultimate beneficial ownership position of Fengari. On October 7, 2020, SGHC entered into an agreement with the shareholders of Pelion, a holding company incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey, pursuant to which it acquired the entire issued share capital of Pelion. The purpose of this transaction was to consolidate Pelion and its subsidiaries into the SGHC group while retaining the ultimate beneficial ownership position of Pelion. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Conditions and Results of Operations — Comparability of Financial Information.

 

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SGHC’s Opportunity and Large and Expanding Total Addressable Market

The Growing Global Sports Betting and Online Casino Gaming Markets

SGHC’s brands operate in two distinct sectors of the global online gaming market, namely sports betting and online casino gaming, both of which have recently experienced significant growth and which are expected to continue to grow further in the coming years.

According to H2 Gambling Capital (“H2”), global online sports betting gross gaming revenue (“GGR”) is projected to grow from $53.8 billion in 2021 to $87.2 billion by 2026, while the global online casino gaming market is projected to grow from $33.0 billion in 2021 to $61.3 billion by 2026, in part due to projected strong growth in newly regulated markets, including within the United States.

Several countries in Africa and Europe have already liberalized and regulated sports betting and/or online casino gaming with several more in the early stages of doing so. H2 has projected European sports betting and online casino gaming GGR to grow from $38.1 billion in 2021 to as much as $54.8 billion by 2026, and projects African GGR to grow from $1.5 billion in 2021 to $4.1 billion by 2026. Africa and Europe are already significant markets for SGHC and the Company believes that it is well-positioned to take advantage of opportunities as and when jurisdictions within these regions regulate online sports betting and online casino gaming.

In May 2018 the U.S. Supreme Court repealed the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992 (“PASPA”), the effect of which was to remove federal restrictions on sports betting and give individual states control over the legalization of sports betting within their jurisdictions. As of December 31, 2021, 33 states plus Washington, DC have passed measures to legalize sports betting (three of those states are not yet operational) . Out of that number, 22 states have authorized statewide online sports betting while 11 remain retail-only at casino or retail locations. Seven states have passed measures to legalize online casino gaming. In Canada, Parliament recently passed legislation allowing provinces to regulate single-game wagering within each province and Ontario has initiated a regime where it has begun accepting applications for registrations for regulated sports betting and casino gaming.

H2 currently projects that the North American online sports betting and casino market will generate an estimated $40.6 billion in GGR in 2026, increased from $12.2 billion in 2021, of which $35.3 billion and $9.6 billion respectively is projected to come from the United States (excluding state lotteries).

SGHC is a market leader in sports betting and online casino gaming, with net gaming revenue of $1.48 billion (€1.26 billion) in the year ended December 31, 2021, of which approximately 49.2% was generated by Betway and the remainder from Spin. The Company holds licenses, which include both sports betting and online casino gaming, in 24 jurisdictions, excluding up to 12 jurisdictions in which DGC USA has obtained initial agreed market access deals in the United States (either via obtaining the required licenses or approvals from the relevant state authorities or via commercial arrangements through which DGC USA leases a license from a land-based operator to satisfy the legal requirement that any online operation must be tethered to a land-based operation), and is currently applying for or negotiating licenses in other states and jurisdictions. As of the date of this prospectus, the Betway brand (operated by licensee, DGC USA) is live in 6 US states, being Arizona, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Iowa and Colorado. DGC USA’s subsidiary, DGC VA, received its Temporary Permit to operate in the Commonwealth of Virginia in November 2021 and is expected to launch a Betway-branded sports betting offering in the Commonwealth in the second quarter of 2022. For the remaining 5 states, being Ohio, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Missouri, as a result of a combination of timing around the introduction of regulations and/or receipt of required licenses and approvals, there is currently no specific timeline for go-live. An agreement is also in place for the provision of an additional casino brand in Pennsylvania.

 

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SGHC’s Core Strengths

Management believes that the following are key factors underlying SGHC’s successful expansion:

Betway’s global single brand offers significant marketing economies of scale

SGHC’s flagship brand, Betway, operates as a global, online, sports-led betting brand that is consistently positioned in all markets. This approach aims to leverage national, regional and local marketing spend for global benefit, and management believes that it will generate significant marketing economies of scale as the business expands and Betway continues to launch into new markets. See the sections titled “— Strategy, Products and Business Model” and “Business — Sales and Marketing” for further detail.

For example, in advance of launching in the United States, Betway has entered into marketing partnerships with U.S. sports franchises such as the Chicago Bulls, the Cleveland Cavaliers, the Los Angeles Clippers, the Golden State Warriors and the New York Islanders. Management believes that, in addition to raising the profile of Betway’s brand in the United States, the global reach of these brands will benefit the Company in markets outside of the United States where U.S. sports are followed. Previous examples of the value of this strategy include the Company’s partnership with the English Premier League team West Ham United, which according to independent assessment has to date returned value equivalent to 5.8 times the cost thereof.

Management actively seeks to validate its belief in this approach by means of regular brand awareness studies, as evidenced by the following chart:

 

 

LOGO

Spin’s multi-brand casino portfolio maximizes market share

Spin’s multi-brand online casino offering is designed with the intention of capturing additional shelf space across a myriad of marketing channels, particularly in markets where opportunities for effective large scale brand advertising are harder to come by and/or where more diverse marketing approaches are necessary.

For example, in some markets the Company believes that the predominant or more effective form of marketing is with the assistance of independent “affiliates” marketers. In particular, in such circumstances the Company believes that there is significant benefit in providing such “affiliates” with a wide array of brands to market. See the section titled “Business — Sales and Marketing.”

Strategic use of data optimizes customer enjoyment and Company profitability

SGHC’s strategic focus on data and analytics is embodied in the development of proprietary technology systems designed to leverage the large volumes of proprietary data that SGHC collects and analyses on a daily

 

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basis. These systems and this data collection and analysis are designed to operate in conjunction with all of the Company’s product platforms, regardless of whether the latter are proprietary or supplied by third parties. See the section titled “— SGHC’s Technology and Data-Driven Approach.”

These systems aim to analyze and understand customer behaviors in as close to real-time as possible. Using this intelligence, the Company aims to responsibly and profitably optimize customer enjoyment and longevity via interactions, interventions and recommendations delivered as close to real-time as possible, to minimize fraud and other financial risks to the Company, and to meet the Company’s regulatory and compliance requirements as efficiently and effectively as possible.

Strategic technology selection maximizes speed-to-market, geographic expansion and competitive advantage

The Company’s customer-facing product technology decisions are governed by management’s belief that product selection for new markets must seek to optimize speed-to-market, product-market fit and competitive advantage. Elsewhere and wherever commercially possible, the Company seeks to use technology for competitive advantage, particularly with regards to anything related to data and analytics.

Diversification and visibility

The Company’s strategy of expanding into as many regulated markets as possible has resulted in having gaming licenses in 24 diverse jurisdictions, excluding up to 12 jurisdictions in which DGC USA has obtained initial market access deals in the United States, and additional states and jurisdictions for which it is currently applying for or negotiating licenses. Management believes that such diversification is key to good future revenue and profit visibility. The Company’s teams in 23 countries around the world ensure a natural degree of protection for the Company against natural disasters, geopolitical risks or other potential operational disruptions. With licenses and access in additional jurisdictions and U.S. states currently being applied for or negotiated, management believes that the Company’s diversification and revenue and profits visibility will continue to improve. See “Risk Factors — Litigation and Regulatory Risks — Our growth prospects and market potential will depend on our ability to obtain licenses to operate in a number of regulated jurisdictions and if we fail to obtain such licenses our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be impaired.

Global expansion, local focus

The Company approaches each market individually, tailoring product, staffing and marketing decisions to meet local conditions. In some countries, dedicated in-country staff are employed in order to coordinate jurisdiction-specific marketing campaigns and for local operational or other purposes, including 24/7/365 customer service, production of local content for customer engagement, locally relevant branding and marketing campaigns, acquisition of local payment processing mechanisms, and engagement with local social responsibility and community upliftment organizations.

Worldwide, the Company’s sportsbook trading team of 120 employees benefits from long-term relationships with third-party technology providers. Across Africa, the Company employs an operational team of approximately 600 employees to develop, expand and operate the Company’s proprietary sportsbook and purpose-built African market platform.

Proven ability to launch and scale new markets quickly

A typical entry into a new market requires an upfront capital investment that will vary depending on how much customization is required for compliance with local regulatory and other conditions. In addition, some

 

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markets are more restrictive and/or more specific in their regulation than other markets which can increase the amount of time required until full integration is achieved. However, SGHC has proven its ability to enter and profitably launch in new markets despite varying integration times.

For example, within 24 months of the April 2018 commencement of marketing in one new African market, revenue grew by 16.5 times from approximately $145,000 at the outset to $2.35 million GGR per month and has continued to grow since. During the same period, first time depositors increased by 12.6 times. Similarly, in another new market in Europe (non-English-speaking, highly competitive), marketing commenced in September 2018, resulting in 10.3 times growth in revenue over the following 24 months from approximately $175,000 to $1.75 million GGR per month. During the same period, first time depositors increased by 13.6 times.

Management believes that these results are indicative of the global strength of the Betway brand. In effect, management’s belief is that Betway’s global brand presence creates latent demand within new markets owing to the fact that even prior to Betway’s entry into a market it will be well-known to potential customers by virtue of the wide range of partnerships and sponsorships that the Betway brand engages in around the world.

Management further believes that SGHC’s results to date are evidence that this latent demand can be successfully leveraged by proven marketing strategies (see “Business — Sales and Marketing”), flexible and pragmatic technology selection (see “— SGHC’s Technology and Data-Driven Approach”) and, where necessary, in-country focused teams with local skills and knowledge.

Shared centers of operational excellence and operational economies of scale

Whereas management believes that marketing, product and customer service often require a significant degree of localization, other areas within the business are expected to benefit from centralization and economies of scale.

Examples of this include technology and software, data and analytics, payment processing, fraud detection, compliance and risk management. Certain aspects of marketing, product and customer service are also believed to be best centralized, albeit with careful consideration of how not to inhibit regional innovation, quality and delivery.

SGHC aims to strike a considered balance between centralization and distributed localization to achieve optimal customer service, effective overall delivery and meaningful economies of scale, all in service of continued growth and optimal long-term expected returns to shareholders.

Responsible Gaming

SGHC views responsible gaming as both a challenge and an opportunity, and ultimately as a barrier to entry and a source of competitive advantage.

The challenge of meeting regulatory requirements in a commercially prudent and effective manner is clear. Management believes that SGHC has thus far been successful in meeting this challenge, as evidenced by the 24 licensed jurisdictions that the Company already holds licenses in.

The opportunity arises from the Company’s view that attempting to meet the betting and gaming entertainment needs of customers in a responsible manner will ultimately lead to more satisfied customers, which in turn will generate more sustainable and more stable revenues, and hence better long-term visibility of revenues and profits.

As the sports betting and online casino gaming business has matured over time, naturally the level of complexity in the business has increased. This is in part due to some significant variation in regulations in

 

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different jurisdictions that have in aggregate created natural barriers to entry. Smaller operators have increasingly struggled to survive the demands of growing operational complexity, which management believes has contributed in part to recent consolidation within the industry.

Management believes that SGHC’s shared centers of operational excellence and economies of scale in conjunction with a strategic focus on data, analysis and timeous customer interaction (see the section titled “— SGHC’s Technology and Data-Driven Approach”) create a significant competitive advantage for SGHC. SGHC’s ability to gather and analyze data regarding customer behaviors and experience both enables the provision of an individualized experience to customers as well as real-time identification of potential problem gaming or risk of harm. As set out further in the section titled “— SGHC’s Technology and Data-Driven Approach”, the Company employs numerous real-time interventions when appropriate to do so and subject to relevant regulation.

Management experience

SGHC’s CEO, Neal Menashe, has more than two decades of experience in the sports betting and online casino gaming industry. The Company’s President and COO, Richard Hasson, has more than 12 years of experience in investment banking, sports betting and online casino gaming. The Company’s CFO, Alinda van Wyk, also has more than two decades of experience in the financial management of sports betting and online casino gaming businesses. The Company benefits from a deep bench of professionals in its management team with significant experience, either with the Company, or in the industry.

Strategy, Products and Business Model

Strategy

SGHC’s diagnosis of the key challenges and opportunities in the global online gaming market follow from the Company’s belief that:

 

   

Over time a significant additional number of jurisdictions will regulate sports betting and/or online casino gaming.

 

   

Jurisdictions which explicitly regulate sports betting and/or online casino gaming will become easier to market in at scale, but simultaneously will likely become more competitive, in which case brand strength will become an important determinant of success.

 

   

Jurisdictions which have not yet introduced explicit regulatory frameworks may still be legal to operate in (subject to certain limited regulations), but marketing at scale may be harder to achieve, in which case a portfolio of brands will be a significant asset.

In order to address these challenges, the Company’s three key strategies serve as its guiding policies that govern everything that the Company does.

 

  1.

Expanding its global footprint into as many regulated markets as possible in order to engage with as many customers as it can possibly reach;

 

  2.

Increasing awareness of its brands through strategic partnerships and coordinated sponsorship and marketing campaigns; and

 

  3.

Utilizing enhanced proprietary data to optimize the confluence of ethical corporate culture, responsible gaming values, value-for-money product offerings and customer-centric service delivery.

The Company believes that maximum value for shareholders will be delivered by seeking to operate in as many different jurisdictions as it is legal and commercially viable to do so, and that it is imperative that the Company seeks to continue its expansion into and growth in jurisdictions where robust regulatory frameworks provide long-term visibility of revenues and profits.

 

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The Company further believes that a single-brand online sports and multi-brand online casino strategy is the optimal way to leverage its available marketing budget. Given the Company’s belief that over time more and more jurisdictions will regulate sports betting and/or online casino gaming, this strategy aims to generate increasing economies of marketing scale, improved global brand awareness, increasing market share and ultimately enhanced returns to shareholders.

Proprietary, bespoke and common technology stacks and service infrastructures are leveraged where the Company believes that it makes commercial sense to do so, whilst third-party products and services are incorporated where the Company believes that doing so will achieve market entry faster, more effectively and more profitably. The Company aims to layer its proprietary data collection and analysis, together with proprietary interaction systems, on top thereof so as to responsibly optimize the entertainment, well-being and profitability of its customers. See “— SGHC’s Technology and Data-Driven Approach” for further detail.

For strategic reasons set out below, the Company has intentionally set out to differentiate the Betway and Spin product offerings and business models.

Betway’s sports betting products

Betway is positioned as a premium sportsbook that offers full-featured sports betting products for pre-game and in-game wagering. Different products and/or features are offered in different geographic markets depending on regulatory constraints, product availability, market maturity and strategic value of the market.

Betway’s flagship sports betting product is bespoke-developed exclusively for Betway (see the sections titled “— SGHC’s Technology and Data-Driven Approach” and “— Partnerships, Suppliers and Strategic Collaborations”) and is currently capable of accepting wagers on more than 60 different sports. This product is offered in the majority of the relatively mature markets in which Betway operates, such as the UK and most European markets. For other markets, the Company has developed a proprietary sports betting platform that it will aim to re-use where appropriate.

The global sports betting market is constantly evolving and new markets are regulating or re-regulating all the time, often with very specific and sometimes complex regulatory requirements that require significant development work in order to achieve compliance. For this reason, even the world’s largest sports betting businesses struggle to keep pace with adapting their existing products for regulatory compliance and/or product and cultural requirements of new markets.

Accordingly, in addition to the exclusive flagship sportsbook and the proprietary sportsbook platforms, in some new markets (particularly those where the proprietary and flagship products are not yet customized for specific local regulations), the Company may partner with additional third-party product providers in order to minimize delays to market entry.

Betway’s online casino gaming products

Betway’s sports-led marketing places sports betting products front and center to reinforce the brand’s premium sportsbook positioning. A significant percentage of sports betting customers nonetheless also enjoy casino gambling and hence Betway also offers casino games in those jurisdictions where regulatory frameworks allow.

Slightly differing products may be offered in different jurisdictions depending on regulatory requirements and product availability. Casino games are sourced from third-party suppliers selected for their appropriateness for each market. Currently, Betway offers in excess of 1,350 unique casino games from 28 different suppliers.

 

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Spin’s multiple online casino gaming brands

Spin operates a portfolio of more than 20 brands, the majority of which are translated into multiple languages and offer customers the ability to play in excess of 1,400 online casino games from seven different suppliers. The five largest brands accounted for 94% of Spin’s revenue in 2021.

In markets where the regulatory framework permits and where SGHC believes there is strategic value in doing so, Spin also offers ancillary sport betting products, typically sourced from third-party suppliers.

In contrast with Betway’s single-brand scale-marketing approach, Spin seeks to compete in markets where marketing at scale is often much harder, and hence where a large portfolio of brands and a diverse product range offers Spin the ability to attract a wider variety of customers than a single brand would be able to do in the absence of meaningful large-scale marketing.

Management believes that the effectiveness of this strategy is further enhanced by a wide variety of marketing channels (see “Business — Sales and Marketing”).

Worldwide, Betway and Spin products are available for play in 40 different currencies and customers are serviced in 27 different languages.

In aggregate, SGHC offers its customers in excess of 1,900 unique online casino games.

SGHC’s Technology and Data-Driven Approach

SGHC manages over 1,000 technology-focused staff to support and enhance its product offerings. Teams are grouped into product-focused and system-oriented portfolios aimed at driving effective ownership of solutions and enabling efficient delivery and scaling.

Teams are responsible for their own plans in support of SGHC’s strategy, derived from a combination of customer requirements, regulatory frameworks, competitor analysis, product performance metrics and hypothesis-driven engineering. In combination, this approach aims to maximally optimize SGHC’s technology flexibility, functionality, delivery, reliability and competitive edge.

Operationally, SGHC embraces DevOps principles, including continuous delivery of systems aimed at minimizing deployment pain and maximizing end-user trust and confidence.

Information security is assigned a very high priority by the Company. Key subsidiaries involved in the handling of sensitive information are either already ISO 27001 certified or are actively working towards being certified. Where the latter is the case, management is satisfied that relevant and necessary processes, systems and practices are already substantially in place.

With particular reference to customer-facing products, SGHC operates a mix of its own technology and long-term partnerships with leading third-party providers (see the section titled “— Partnerships, Suppliers and Strategic Collaborations”), a flexible approach that is intended to increase speed to market and decrease friction associated with adjusting the technology stack to new markets.

In other non-customer-facing areas of technology, SGHC may utilize the products and services of third-party suppliers, in particular where management does not believe that competitive advantage will be served by developing proprietary technology or where it might not be commercially prudent to do so. However, in areas where management believes that meaningful competitive advantage can be profitably achieved, the Company

 

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will seek to develop and maintain its own proprietary technology. Where systems are intended to deliver competitive advantage, the Company will seek to ensure interoperability with all of its product platforms, including those supplied by third parties. Some examples of this are highlighted below.

Overall, SGHC’s approach to technology can broadly be divided into three areas:

Customer-facing products and platforms

SGHC’s proprietary sportsbook product is offered by Betway in the majority of African countries in which the Company is licensed. With this notable exception, in most jurisdictions the major components of customer-facing sports betting and online casino gaming products are sourced from third-party suppliers. Notwithstanding this, the Company always seeks to be highly involved in the specification and customization of third-party product and generally works in close collaboration with all of its suppliers.

This is particularly true of the Company’s relationship with Apricot, which provides Betway’s bespoke-developed flagship sports betting system on an exclusive-use basis as well as the Player Account Management (“PAM”) system utilized for the majority of SGHC’s operations. Apricot also provides a significant portion of the casino games offered by Betway and Spin (see the section titled “— Partnerships, Suppliers and Strategic Collaborations”).

Data and related systems

SGHC seeks to derive significant competitive advantage from its proprietary data by collecting granular detail regarding all steps in the customer lifecycle, always within the constraints of relevant data protection legislation. In particular, once customers commercially engage with one of the Company’s brands, then significant amounts of proprietary data regarding wagering and other product interactions will be collected and made available downstream for real-time analysis and decision-making.

Proprietary real-time systems transform and analyze this data in order to understand each individual customer experience within SGHC’s products. The Company utilizes this information (in real-time where appropriate) to maximize customer value and enjoyment in a safe and responsible manner. Dedicated customer experience teams aim to measure and monitor all points of interaction and all steps in the customer journey with the ultimate aim of minimizing friction and maximizing customers’ ease of use of the Company’s products.

The Company maintains a range of highly-engineered proprietary systems for the complex processing of millions of events per day in order to deliver bespoke customer experiences that react dynamically to individual customer behavior. Examples of real-time interventions generated in this way include:

 

   

Betting Behavior: The Company aims to monitor and analyze customer behavior in real-time with the intention of detecting unsustainable or potentially harmful deviations in betting behavior so that in turn the Company can attempt to intervene appropriately and timeously. In addition to being a requirement of regulatory responsible gaming obligations in several jurisdictions, the Company believes that interventions of this nature ultimately generate more satisfied and sustainable customers, improved retention rates, and longer customer lifecycles, thereby enhancing customer lifetime values.

 

   

Personalized Wagering Recommendations: Seeking to understand individual customer preferences and attributes in combination with machine learning and data science in turn generates personalized wagering recommendations that aim to remove user interface friction and increase customer satisfaction and enjoyment.

 

   

Individual Profitability Analysis and Personalized Incentivization: The Company employs statisticians and data scientists to model and validate the expected profitability of short-, medium- and long-term

 

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customer behavior with reference to a range of activities and metrics. The Company believes that these models enable it to profitably and responsibly incentivize and/or encourage (or discourage, as the case may be) specific behaviors, which the Company attempts to do in real-time. The Company believes that these models and associated interventions in aggregate form a significant competitive advantage that generates more satisfied and sustainable customers, improved retention rates, and longer customer lifecycles, thereby enhancing customer lifetime values.

 

   

Monitoring and Mitigation of Potentially Fraudulent Activities: Similar models and systems seek to identify potentially fraudulent or otherwise problematic activity in real-time and thereby aim to limit the potential financial harm and/or regulatory risk to the business.

For all of the above examples, the Company seeks to ensure that the relevant systems are capable of processing data from all of its product platforms, including those supplied by third parties, and that customer interactions and interventions can be executed on all of its product platforms, including those supplied by third parties.

The Company’s analysis and data science capabilities are also applied in the acquisition of new customers, for example, by adapting marketing and related campaigns for specific markets, channels and marketing partners. Where possible and in collaboration with third party marketing technology providers, the Company employs real-time bidding, spend and allocation optimization algorithms in conjunction with dynamic creative optimization and personalized messaging, all with the intention of reducing the cost of acquiring new customers.

Where possible the Company’s marketing spend is tracked and measured, with the aim of enabling the Company to react quickly to changes in the expected profitability of marketing channels. For large branding and sponsorship campaigns, where lead times can be long and performance measurement is as much art as science, the Company’s annual marketing budgets and plans are optimized by reference to complex econometric models, cross-referenced and validated against proprietary and third-party data with the aim of optimizing efficiencies throughout the marketing funnel.

Budget proposals and other relevant expected operational factors are then fed into a detailed actuarial model of the business that projects expected financial results for Betway and Spin separately for all major markets. These results are then aggregated and evaluated to ensure the financial soundness of the Company’s plans under a range of potential scenarios. This model is updated regularly throughout the year for financial management and monitoring purposes and is also employed for audit and regulatory requirements.

Other enabling platforms and shared services

Over time, the Company has developed a wide range of proprietary systems for enabling the operational effectiveness of the business, including in the areas listed below. In all cases the Company aims to continuously evolve and improve its systems over time.

Acquisition Marketing Systems

Proprietary models in combination with third party systems and tools are maintained for the deployment, management, measurement and monitoring of customer acquisition campaigns across a variety of marketing channels (see “Business — Sales and Marketing”).

Responsible Gaming Systems

The Company has developed various systems with the intention of meeting the Company’s regulatory requirements for customer protection against risk of harm from gambling. Certain related products and systems provided by third-party suppliers are also integrated into the Company’s responsible gaming processes.

 

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Customer Retention Systems

The Company maintains a number of proprietary systems aimed at ensuring the profitable retention of customers and also makes use of certain third-party systems and components as part of its customer retention processes. The Company believes that maximizing customer lifetime value over the long-term is only possible when responsible gaming principles are adhered to. Accordingly, customer retention systems are generally closely integrated with or otherwise share significant components with responsible gaming systems.

Messaging and Communications Systems

The Company believes that customer satisfaction is underpinned by an ability to deliver the right message to the right customer at the right time and has therefore developed proprietary software systems (some of which are integrated into third-party supplier systems) for messaging and communicating with customers in-app, in real-time, as well as other related systems for doing so by other mechanisms and at different times. These systems are crucial for the effective delivery of responsible gaming and retention interventions.

Banking and Finance Systems

A dedicated subsidiary is responsible for ensuring that the Company is able to offer customers a range of mechanisms for deposit and withdrawal of funds in each of the markets that the Company operates in. Currently, the Company offers well in excess of 100 different deposit and withdrawal mechanisms worldwide.

Related systems ensure that necessary financial data is made available downstream for financial management and reporting purposes. The Company develops and maintains automated reporting and reconciliation systems and processes to allow for the production of internal management accounts (including monthly unaudited financial statements produced separately for each entity in each jurisdiction) within a few weeks of month-end and audited financial statements within a few months of year-end.

Risk, Fraud and Compliance Systems

The Company encounters sophisticated attempts at fraud on a regular basis and is required to verify customers and their source of funds in accordance with varying regulations in each jurisdiction. Significant customer volumes (an average of more than 2.8 million customers per month over the twelve months of 2021) mean that systems for the detection and prevention of attempted fraud and ensuring compliance with “know your customer” and anti-money laundering regulations must be substantially automated. In addition to rules-based systems that codify the Company’s 20+ years of experience in combating fraud, managing risk and ensuring compliance, the Company also expends considerable effort in the development of new systems for this purpose, including the employment of machine learning and other data science techniques.

Managing Wagering Risk

The Company manages its own teams of experienced traders to set and maintain sports betting odds. These teams use their own expertise and internal pricing models in conjunction with external data feeds, odds monitoring services and various competitive factors to derive opening prices for each market. Thereafter, prices will be adjusted based on news events of relevance to the market, as well as wagers placed by customers and competitive forces. The Company cannot guarantee that it is capable of always offering the best price in all markets at all times, but continuously strives to remain competitive and offer customers attractive value for their money.

Various systems are deployed to measure and monitor the margin on the sportsbook, which is the percentage of wagers that the book is expected (in terms of the Company’s pricing models) to win on average over a

 

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particular period of time. Individual customer wagering is also closely monitored and alerts are raised for wagering activity considered unusual. In particular, evidence of potentially illegal or collusive behavior (such as suspicion of match-fixing) will be shared with the necessary legal and/or sporting authorities. Where appropriate, customers will be limited by reference to maximum wager size and/or wager type.

The Company’s products currently support wagering on more than 60 different sports, each of which in turn encompasses a wide range of events and outcomes that can be wagered on (also referred to as “betting markets”) both pre-game and in-game. The Company actively seeks to add additional betting markets, both for purposes of customer enjoyment and Company financial benefit, including diversification of risk, reduction of margin volatility and increased profitability.

For online casino games, the Company seeks to offer an entertaining range of games with value-for-money “return to player” (“RTP”) and (for slot games in particular) entertaining “volatility” (“Vx”) characteristics. RTP measures the expected return to customers as a percentage of wagers while Vx is a measure of the expected variance thereof. Most notably for slot games, customers have varying individual preferences for volatility and hence the Company attempts to recommend games to customers that are appropriate given their preferences. Game suppliers may offer games in multiple variants with differing combinations of RTP and Vx, in which case the Company seeks to ensure that it selects only those variants which it believes will optimize both value-for-money entertainment for its customers and long-term profitability for the Company.

A necessary requirement for successful management of wagering risk is appropriate control of customer incentivization. Without suitable systems and controls for customer incentives it is possible for wagering opportunities to arise that are mathematically unprofitable for the Company. Examples include arbitrage of sports wagers and situations where adroit betting with incentive funds can create expected RTP in excess of 100% for casino games. The Company believes that optimal individual customer evaluation and incentivization (see the paragraph “— Individual Profitability Analysis and Personalized Incentivization” in the section titled “— SGHC’s Technology and Data-Driven Approach” above) will largely obviate this potential problem but, where this is not the case, the Company has many years of experience in detecting and preventing such situations and maintains a number of proprietary systems with the intention of doing so.

Partnerships, Suppliers and Strategic Collaborations

SGHC engages in long-term partnerships, including with leading third-party technology providers which, together with the Company’s own technology, increases the speed with which its offerings are brought to market and decreases the friction associated with adjusting its technology to new markets.

Relationship with Apricot

SGHC has entered into several software and services agreements with Apricot (and its affiliates and subsidiaries), one of the leading gaming software and content providers, including casino software licensing agreements, jackpot services and licensing agreements and sportsbook software licensing agreements. Through these agreements, SGHC engages members of the Apricot group for the provision of the Apricot group’s sportsbook and PAM software systems in a number of SGHC’s most significant markets.

It is noted that Mr. Martin Moshal is the named individual beneficiary of certain trusts, which trusts are the ultimate controlling shareholders of Apricot and also the named individual beneficiary of a further trust that ultimately controls Knutsson Limited, a major shareholder of SGHC. A beneficiary of these trusts has neither any right to control or voting investment power over the trusts, nor does it have the right to appoint or replace the trustees.

 

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Casino Software Licensing Agreements

Pursuant to various casino software licensing agreements entered into by subsidiaries of SGHC, SGHC has been granted non-exclusive software licenses for use of a suite of gaming software in different territories in which SGHC operates. Several of the agreements permit the advertising, marketing and promotion of the software suite in each respective territory and certain of the agreements allow for the licensee to sub-license the use of the system. As at March 15, 2022, subsidiaries of SGHC had entered into seven casino software licensing agreements with affiliates of Apricot.

The term and termination provisions of the casino software and licensing agreements are summarized as follows. The initial term of all casino software licensing agreements with Apricot expires on December 31, 2035. Under all these agreements, termination for convenience by either party is not possible until expiry of the initial term and then must be on not less than 12 months’ written notice, although one casino software licensing agreement with Apricot does not permit termination for convenience at all, allowing only for termination in accordance with its terms (as summarized in the remainder of this paragraph) after December 31, 2035. A party may also unilaterally terminate the relevant agreement in the event that the other party (a) breaches a material obligation or undertaking under such agreement and which, where such breach is capable of remedy, is not remedied within the specified timeframe to the reasonable satisfaction of the other party; or (b) suffers an insolvency event. In a number of the agreements, a party may terminate for change of control when control of the other party is obtained by a competitor. The Apricot company in the relevant agreement may unilaterally terminate such agreement in the event the relevant SGHC subsidiary (a) fails to pay monies to as they fall due under the agreement; (b) uses the software system illegally; (c) markets a branded game without Apricot’s consent; (d) fails to notify Apricot of a change in control of such party; (e) breaches non-solicitation, non-competition or data protection obligations; (f) is convicted (or any of its directors are convicted) of an offense in terms of any applicable gaming legislation or regulations, or of any crime or offense reasonably likely to cause reputational damage or damage to goodwill to Apricot; or (g) fails to procure the appropriate gaming license.

In a number of the agreements: (i) Apricot may terminate the agreement if the relevant SGHC subsidiary: (a) provides false or inaccurate information which has an adverse effect on Apricot; (b) accepts a real money bet from end users located outside the appropriate territory or within the USA; (c) fails to pay the minimum agreed gaming fee; (d) becomes a competitor to Apricot; or (e) fails to pay its players or depositors within the specified time period; (ii) Apricot may terminate the agreement if it becomes unlawful or impossible for Apricot to license, maintain or use the system, or a court or arbitrator declares any provision of the agreement void or unenforceable; and (iii) the relevant SGHC subsidiary may terminate the agreement if Apricot (or any of its directors) are convicted of an offense in terms of any applicable gaming legislation or regulations, or of any crime or offense reasonably likely to cause reputational damage or damage to goodwill of the other.

Jackpot Services and Licensing Agreements

Various subsidiaries of SGHC have entered into jackpot services and licensing agreements with Jumbo Jackpots Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of Apricot. Pursuant to these jackpot services and licensing agreements, Jumbo Jackpots Limited grants non-exclusive licenses of trademarks as supplied within the software licensed through separate casino software licensing agreements and provides services to enable the licensee to run jackpot games. As at March 15, 2022, subsidiaries of SGHC had entered into seven Jackpot Services and Licensing Agreements with Jumbo Jackpots Limited.

The term and termination provisions of the jackpot services are summarized as follows. All jackpot services and licensing agreements have an indefinite term, and do not permit termination for convenience, except for one agreement which permits termination by either party on two months’ written notice. All of these agreements permit either party to terminate immediately by written notice if a petition or resolution is passed for the winding

 

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up of the other party. The agreements also terminate automatically if the applicable SGHC subsidiary’s gaming license is withdrawn. Jumbo Jackpots Limited may terminate the agreement if any of the following events occur: (a) the other party commits a breach of the agreement and fails to remedy such breach within the specified time period; (b) the other party fails to pay sums as they fall due; (c) it becomes unlawful or impossible for Jumbo Jackpots Limited to license, maintain or use the relevant trademarks or provide the services under the agreement; (d) bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings are filed against the other party; (e) the other party can no longer perform its business activities or fulfil its commitments to Jumbo Jackpots Limited; or (f) the other party (or any other entity having common shareholders or control with that party) becomes a competitor to Jumbo Jackpots Limited. The counterparty may terminate the agreement with 14 days’ written notice if Jumbo Jackpots Limited raises the agreed service fee. In addition, each agreement automatically terminates on termination of the corresponding casino software licensing agreement between the SGHC subsidiary which is party to the relevant jackpot services and licensing agreement and Apricot or PNL or Kova (as defined below) as applicable, the termination provisions of which are summarized above.

Sportsbook Software Licensing Agreement

Through its subsidiary Betway Limited, SGHC engages in an agreement for the exclusive provision of Apricot’s sportsbook software in a number of SGHC’s most significant markets. This exclusive arrangement prevents Apricot from licensing its sportsbook software to any other customers in those jurisdictions, but does not prevent SGHC from utilizing its own or other suppliers’ sportsbook software where it chooses to do so. The agreement also permits the advertising, marketing and promotion of the software system in each respective territory.

The term and termination provisions of the sportsbook software licensing agreement are summarized as follows. The initial term of the sportsbook software licensing agreement expires on December 31, 2030. Under this agreement, termination for convenience by either party is not possible until expiry of such initial term and thereafter must be on not less than 180 days’ written notice. Betway Limited may also terminate the agreement for convenience after December 31, 2025 with at least 18 months’ written notice. The agreement also permits either party to terminate by written notice if: (a) the other party is in breach of the agreement and, where such breach is capable of remedy, fails to remedy such breach within 30 days of notice to the reasonable satisfaction of the other party; (b) bankruptcy, insolvency or analogous proceedings are commenced against the other party; or (c) when control of the other party is obtained by a competitor (on 18 months’ written notice).

SGHC works closely with Apricot and its affiliates in the ongoing development of the sportsbook product and the PAM system and the customization thereof for SGHC’s needs. The Company has direct access to dedicated Apricot resources for this purpose and plays a meaningful role in the strategic direction and prioritization of these resources.

Apricot supplies a significant portion of the casino games available for play across all SGHC websites and apps. Other significant online casino gaming software suppliers contracted directly and indirectly include IGT, Scientific Gaming and Evolution (including NetEnt and Red Tiger).

Prima Networks Limited, Prima Networks Spain PLC and Kova SRL (“PNL/PNS/Kova”) similarly engage Apricot in agreements for the provision of Apricot’s casino and sportsbook software. PNL/PNS/Kova sublicenses the Apricot software to subsidiaries of SGHC, such as Betway. As of March 15, 2022, PNL/PNS/Kova had entered into eleven casino software licensing agreements and five sportsbook software licensing agreements with subsidiaries of SGHC.

The casino software licensing agreements and sportsbook licensing agreements entered into by subsidiaries of SGHC and PNL/PNS/Kova have term and termination rights which are materially similar to those applicable to the casino software licensing agreements and sportsbook licensing agreements with Apricot summarized above.

 

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Other Partnerships, Suppliers and Strategic Collaborations

SGHC’s Betway brand has engaged in key relationships (most of them multi-year) with professional sports teams and leagues around the world, starting with front of shirt sponsorship of the English Premier League’s West Ham United in 2015. Subsequent partnerships have included several football (soccer) teams in other major European and African leagues, major horse racing events, eSports teams and events, major cricket leagues, tennis tournaments and sporting celebrities as brand ambassadors. Many of these arrangements have since been extended well beyond their original terms. Currently, more than 70 brand partnerships are in place with several more actively being negotiated.

SGHC has continued this strategy during Betway’s nascent expansion into the United States by engaging in similar partnerships with professional sports teams in the United States with global brand recognition, such as the Chicago Bulls, the Cleveland Cavaliers, the Los Angeles Clippers, the Golden State Warriors and the New York Islanders.

These arrangements all serve to bolster Betway’s global brand recognition. Management believes that over time this strategy has worked as a flywheel to progressively and more effectively amortize Betway’s brand marketing spend, in part explaining improvements in Betway’s growth and financial performance over recent years.

SGHC benefits from a number of long-established “affiliates” marketing partnerships (see “Business — Sales and Marketing”) that have historically generated a stable and significant stream of new customers.

SGHC enters into strategic, multi-year partnerships with land-based gaming operators in order to facilitate entry into markets where a land-based license or partner is prerequisite for market access. Examples include Casino Austria International Belgium NV and Espectaculos Deportivos Fronton Mexico S.A de C.V, both for access to sports betting and online casino gaming, in Belgium and Mexico respectively.

SGHC enters into multi-year agreements with sports data suppliers for data to inform the Company’s odds making and sports trading activities, as well as for content for the Company’s websites and apps. Significant suppliers include SportRadar, BetGenius, Perform Content Limited, and IMG. Key summaries of these agreements are described below.

SportRadar Agreements

SportRadar is a leading information supplier for sport related data and statistics as well as sophisticated technical solutions. We have agreements, including four statements of work (“SOW”), with SportRadar as part of a global deal, which includes the Managed Trading Services platform for Betway Africa. These SOWs provide that SportRadar will supply products and services for its sports betting and sportsbook operation globally to Betway Limited, who can sublicense its rights to its affiliates.

BetGenius Agreements

BetGenius is a provider of sportsbook data, content, analysis tools, software and related services to sports betting operators worldwide. We have agreements in place between BetGenius and Betway Limited that allow Betway Limited and its affiliates to use BetGenius services through a non-exclusive, non-transferable non-sublicensable right and license.

Perform Content Limited Agreements

Perform owns, operates and provides video and consumer data services to betting operators throughout the world. We have four agreements in place with Perform, each for a different product. Each agreement is between Perform and Betway Limited and each provide access to SGHC and its brand license partners, where appropriate.

 

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IMG

IMG is in the business of distributing sports information, data and statistics to third parties. Under our data subscription agreement, IMG agrees to license certain of its content to Betway Limited and provide related technical support services. The content provided under the agreement includes the ATP World Tour, the WTA Tour, the French Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. The agreement also includes the consumption of IMG UFC and Golf scoreboards and data as well as streaming services.

Recent Developments

Business Combination

On April 23, 2021, SGHC entered into the Business Combination Agreement with SEAC, the Company, SGHC Merger Sub, Inc., and Sports Entertainment Acquisition Holdings LLC. Pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, prior to the closing of the Business Combination, SGHC underwent a pre+closing reorganization wherein all existing shareholders of SGHC exchanged their shares in SGHC for newly issued ordinary shares in the Company. SGHC is deemed the accounting predecessor and the combined entity is the successor registrant. The Business Combination closed on January 27, 2022.

Financial Results for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2022

 

   

Revenue of €334.5 million up 7% period over period

 

   

Loss after tax of €163.2 million includes €201.5 million of costs and changes in fair values associated with the business combination and listing as a public company

 

   

Cash and cash equivalents of €272.7 million

This unaudited financial information for the fiscal quarter ended March 31, 2022 is based upon our estimates. This financial information has been prepared solely on the basis of currently available information by, and is the responsibility of, management. The unaudited preliminary financial information for the fiscal quarter ended March 31, 2022 has not been reviewed or audited by our independent public accounting firm. This financial information is not a comprehensive statement of our financial results for this period. Our unaudited interim condensed consolidated statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive Income for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021, unaudited interim condensed consolidated statement of financial position as of March 31, 2022 and unaudited interim condensed consolidated statements of cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 have been filed as an exhibit to the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part.

Grant of RSUs pursuant to the 2021 EIP

On May 31, 2022 the Company granted and approved to grant up to a maximum of 6,699,900 RSUs pursuant to the 2021 EIP.

Summary of Risk Factors

Our business faces significant risks and uncertainties. You should carefully consider all of the information set forth in this prospectus and in other documents we file with or furnish to the SEC, including the following risk factors, before deciding to invest in or to maintain an investment in our securities. Our business, as well as our reputation, financial condition, results of operations and share price, could be materially adversely affected by any of these risks, as well as other risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or not currently considered material. These risks include, among others, the following:

 

   

Our business depends on the success, including win or hold rates, of existing and future online betting and gaming products, which rely on a variety of factors and are not completely controlled by us.

 

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Competition within the broader entertainment industry is intense and our existing and potential customers may be attracted to competing betting and gaming options, as well as other forms of entertainment such as video games, television, movies and sporting events. If our offerings do not continue to be popular with existing customers and attract potential customers, our business would be harmed.

 

   

COVID-19 has affected our business and operations in a variety of ways. The pandemic restrictions may have affected our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects, including as a result of the reduction in the quantity of global sporting events, closures or restrictions on business operations of our suppliers, partners and sports organizations and a decrease in consumer spending, and it may continue to do so in the future. On the other hand, we cannot assure you that consumers will not decrease online gaming activities as pandemic restrictions are loosened. These cross-currents may have unknown and adverse effects that are impossible for us to predict.

 

   

We rely on third-party service providers such as (i) third-party providers to validate the identity and identify the location of our customers, (ii) third-party payment processors to process deposits and withdrawals made by our customers into our platforms, (iii) third-party marketing and customer communications systems providers, (iv) third-party casino content, product and technology providers, (v) third-party sportsbook technology providers, (vi) third-party sports data providers for real-time and accurate data for sporting events, and (vii) third-party outsourced services providers, among others. If our third-party providers do not perform adequately or terminate their relationships with us, our costs may increase and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

   

We license the Betway brand, for a fixed fee, for use by DGC USA in the United States and, for a fixed fee plus an additional fee equal to a percentage of Betway’s global brand marketing spend, to a third party for use in China and Thailand. A decline in such third-party operators’ financial performance or a termination of the brand licenses by such third parties could have an adverse effect on our business.

 

   

If we fail to detect fraud or theft related to our offerings, including by our customers and employees, we will suffer financial losses and our reputation may suffer which could harm our brand and reputation and negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations and can subject us to investigations and litigation, which could ultimately lead to regulatory penalties, including potential loss of licensure.

 

   

We rely on strategic relationships with land-based casinos, sports teams, event planners, local licensing partners and advertisers in order to be able to offer and market our products in certain jurisdictions. If we cannot maintain these relationships and establish additional relationships, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

   

The requirements of being a public company, including compliance with the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and maintaining effective internal controls over financial reporting, may strain our resources and divert management’s attention, and the increases in legal, accounting and compliance expenses associated with being a public company may be greater than we anticipate.

 

   

As a private company, we were not required to document and test internal controls over financial reporting nor was our management required to certify the effectiveness of internal controls or have our auditors opine on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Failure to maintain adequate financial, information technology and management processes and controls could result in material weaknesses which could lead to errors in our financial reporting, which could adversely affect our business as a public company.

 

   

If our existing material weaknesses persist or we experience additional material weaknesses in the future or otherwise fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls in the future, we may not be

 

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able to accurately report our financial condition or results of operation, which may adversely affect investor confidence in us and, as a result, the value of our ordinary shares and our overall business.

 

   

The gaming laws of different jurisdictions vary in both nature and application, and may be subject to alternate interpretations. Jurisdictions may or may not incorporate regulatory frameworks that provide a clear basis for the licensed provision of our gaming products and services to their residents. As a consequence, legal and enforcement risk may be unclear or uncertain in a number of the jurisdictions in which we operate and from which we generate a significant portion of our revenue, and there is a risk that regulators or prosecutors in these territories may seek to take legal action against us even in jurisdictions in which we believe our offerings are lawful based on advice from local counsel. Furthermore, we have in the past faced claims from customers contesting the legal basis of our services in certain jurisdictions, and may face similar claims again in the future.

 

   

Failure to comply with legal or regulatory requirements in a particular regulated jurisdiction, or the failure to successfully obtain a license or permit in a particular jurisdiction, could impact our ability to comply with licensing and regulatory requirements in other regulated jurisdictions, or could cause the rejection of license applications or cancellation of existing licenses in other regulated jurisdictions, or could cause financial institutions, online and mobile platforms, advertisers and distributors to stop providing services to us which we rely upon to receive payments from, or distribute amounts to, our customers, or otherwise to deliver and promote our offerings.

 

   

We are party to pending litigation and regulatory and tax audits in various jurisdictions and with various plaintiffs and we may be subject to future litigation and regulatory and tax audits in the operation of our business. An adverse outcome in one or more proceedings could adversely affect our business.

 

   

Failure to protect or enforce our intellectual property rights, the confidentiality of our trade secrets and confidential information, or the costs involved in protecting or enforcing our intellectual property rights and confidential information, could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

   

Our collection, storage and use, including sharing and international transfers, of personal data are subject to applicable data protection and privacy laws, and any actual or perceived failure to comply with such laws may harm our reputation and business or expose us to fines, civil claims (including class actions), and other enforcement action. The protection of personal information is becoming increasingly regulated and changes in applicable laws may require changes to our policies, practices, procedures and personnel which may require material expenditures and harm our financial condition and results of operations.

 

   

We will rely on licenses to use the intellectual property rights of third parties which are incorporated into our products and offerings. Failure to maintain, renew or expand existing licenses may require us to modify, limit or discontinue certain offerings, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

   

We rely on information technology and other systems and platforms, and any failures, errors, defects or disruptions in our systems or platforms could diminish our brand and reputation, subject us to liability, disrupt our business, affect our ability to scale our technological infrastructure and adversely affect our operating results and growth prospects. Our games and other software applications and systems, and the third-party platforms upon which they are made available could contain undetected errors.

 

   

Our internal forecasts are subject to significant risks, assumptions, estimates and uncertainties, including assumptions regarding future legislation and changes in regulations of the jurisdictions in which we operate, or seek to operate, our business. As a result, our projected revenues, market share, expenses and profitability may differ materially from our expectations.

 

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The coverage of our business or our securities by securities or industry analysts or the absence thereof could adversely affect our securities and trading volume.

 

   

Because Super Group is incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey, you may face difficulties in protecting your interests, and your ability to protect your rights through the U.S. courts may be limited.

 

   

Sales of our ordinary shares, or the perception of such sales, by us or the selling securityholders pursuant to this prospectus in the public market or otherwise could cause the market price for our ordinary shares to decline, even though the selling securityholders would still realize a profit on sales at lower prices.

Selling Securityholders and Securities being Registered

With respect to the securities being registered for resale by this prospectus, the Pre-Closing Holders exchanged their shares of SGHC for newly issued ordinary shares of the Company based on a valuation of $10.00 per ordinary share of the Company in connection with the Business Combination. However, the actual prices paid by the Pre-Closing Holders in connection with their acquisitions of SGHC shares were nominal. In addition, the Founder Holders (including PJT Partners Holdings LP, through its economic interest in the Sponsor) paid an aggregate of $25,000 for Class B Shares of SEAC, which converted into 11,250,000 Class A Shares of SEAC and then into an equal number of ordinary shares of the Company at the Closing. The Sponsor and PJT Partners Holdings LP paid $10,388,888 and $611,112 for 10,388,888 and 611,112 private placement warrants at a price of $1.00 per warrant, respectively, in a private placement simultaneously with the closing of the IPO as well as in connection with the closing of the partial exercise by the underwriters of their over-allotment option, with each such warrant entitling the holder thereof to purchase one ordinary share at a price of $11.50 per share. Therefore, after giving effect to the exchange of the SEAC ordinary shares for ordinary shares of the Company in the Business Combination, the Founder Holders paid an average price of approximately $0.002 per share for each ordinary share and $1.00 per private placement warrant for each warrant being offered by this prospectus.

Given the substantial number of ordinary shares being registered for potential resale by selling securityholders pursuant to this prospectus, the sale of shares by the selling securityholders, or the perception in the market that the selling securityholders of a large number of shares intend to sell shares, could increase the volatility of the market price of our ordinary shares or result in a significant decline in the public trading price of our ordinary shares. Even if the prevailing market price of our ordinary shares is below the current trading price, the selling securityholders may still have an incentive to sell our ordinary shares because they purchased the shares at prices lower than the public investors or the current trading price of our ordinary shares. While the selling securityholders may experience a positive rate of return on their investment in our ordinary shares, public securityholders who purchased their ordinary shares at higher prices may not experience a similar rate of return. Based on the closing price of our ordinary shares of $4.36 as of July 5, 2022, the selling securityholders, if they sold all of the shares registered for sale by this prospectus, would experience a potential profit of up to approximately $2.09 billion in the aggregate.

Corporate Information

The legal name of the Company is Super Group (SGHC) Limited. The Company was incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey as a non-cellular company limited by shares on March 29, 2021. The Company’s registered office in Guernsey is Kingsway House, Havilland Street, St. Peter Port, Guernsey GY1 2QE. The address of the principal executive office of the Company is Super Group (SGHC) Limited, Bordeaux Court, Les Echelons, St. Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 1AR, and the telephone number of the Company is +44 (0) 14 8182 2939.

 

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Investors should contact us for any inquiries through the address and telephone number of our principal executive office. Our principal website is https://www.sghc.com. The information contained on, or accessible from, or hyperlinked to, our website is not a part of this prospectus and you should not consider information on our website to be part of this prospectus.

Implications of Being a Foreign Private Issuer

We report under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), as a non-U.S. company with foreign private issuer status. As long as we qualify as a foreign private issuer under the Exchange Act we will be exempt from certain provisions of the Exchange Act that are applicable to U.S. domestic public companies, including, but not limited to:

 

   

the rules under the Exchange Act requiring domestic filers to issue financial statements prepared under U.S. GAAP;

 

   

the sections of the Exchange Act regulating the solicitation of proxies, consents or authorizations in respect of a security registered under the Exchange Act;

 

   

the sections of the Exchange Act requiring insiders to file public reports of their stock ownership and trading activities and liability for insiders who profit from trades made in a short period of time; and

 

   

the rules under the Exchange Act requiring the filing with the SEC of quarterly reports on Form 10-Q containing unaudited financial and other specific information, or current reports on Form 8-K, upon the occurrence of specified significant events.

We may take advantage of these exemptions until such time as we are no longer a foreign private issuer. We would cease to be a foreign private issuer at such time as (i) more than 50% of our outstanding voting securities are held by U.S. residents and (ii) any of the following three circumstances applies: (A) the majority of our executive officers or directors are U.S. citizens or residents, (B) more than 50% of our assets are located in the United States or (C) our business is administered principally in the United States.

Foreign private issuers are also exempt from certain more stringent executive compensation disclosure rules. Thus, we will continue to be exempt from the more stringent compensation disclosures required of companies that are not foreign private issuers and will continue to be permitted to follow our home country practice on such matters.

 

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THE OFFERING

 

Ordinary shares that may be offered and sold from time to time by the selling securityholders

   Up to 481,074,588 ordinary shares (including up to 11,000,000 ordinary shares that may be issued upon exercise of the private placement warrants).

Warrants that may be offered and sold from time to time by the selling securityholders

   Up to 11,000,000 private placement warrants.
Exercise price of Warrants    $11.50 per share.
Ordinary shares outstanding    490,197,468 ordinary shares.
Use of proceeds   

All of the securities offered by the selling securityholders pursuant to this prospectus will be sold by the selling securityholders for their respective accounts. We will not receive any of the proceeds from such sales. We will pay certain expenses associated with the registration of the securities covered by this prospectus, as described in the section titled “Plan of Distribution”.

 

However, we may receive up to an aggregate of $126,500,000 from the exercise of warrants for the ordinary shares being offered by the selling securityholders in this prospectus, assuming the exercise in full of all such warrants for cash at an exercise price of $11.50 per ordinary share for private placement warrants, respectively. The exercise price exceeds the current trading price of the ordinary shares and, therefore, there can be no assurance that such warrants will ever be exercised for cash. If the trading price for our common stock is less than $11.50 per share, we believe holders of our warrants will be unlikely to exercise their warrants. We intend to use the net proceeds from any cash exercise of such warrants for general corporate purposes.

 

See “Use of Proceeds.”

Dividend policy    We have not paid any cash dividends on our ordinary shares to date. The Super Group Board intends to evaluate adopting a policy of paying cash dividends. In evaluating any dividend policy, the Super Group Board must consider Super Group’s financial condition and may consider results of operations, certain tax considerations, capital requirements, alternative uses for capital, industry standards and economic conditions. Whether Super Group adopts such a dividend policy and the frequency and amount of any dividends declared on the Super Group ordinary shares will be within the discretion of the Super Group Board. See “Dividend Policy.”

 

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NYSE listing symbol    Our ordinary shares and public warrants are currently listed on the NYSE under the symbol “SGHC” and “SGHC WS,” respectively.
Risk factors    See “Risk Factors” and the other information included in this prospectus for a discussion of factors you should consider before deciding to invest in our ordinary shares.

Unless we specifically state otherwise or the context otherwise requires, the share information in this prospectus is as of March 31, 2022, and excludes:

 

   

22,500,000 of our ordinary shares issuable upon the exercise of public warrants outstanding as of March 31, 2022;

 

   

11,000,000 of our ordinary shares issuable upon the exercise of private placement warrants outstanding as of March 31, 2022;

 

   

43,312,150 of our ordinary shares reserved for future issuance under the 2021 Equity Incentive Plan as of March 31, 2022. See “Management — Compensation — The 2021 Equity Incentive Plan”; and

 

   

4,812,460 of our ordinary shares reserved for future issuance under the 2021 Employee Stock Purchase Plan as of March 31, 2022. See “Management — Compensation — The 2021 Employee Stock Purchase Plan.”

 

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SUMMARY CONSOLIDATED HISTORICAL AND OTHER FINANCIAL INFORMATION

SGHC Limited

The following table sets forth selected historical consolidated financial information of SGHC Limited (“SGHC”). The consolidated statement of profit or loss data and consolidated cash flow data for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 and the consolidated statement of financial position data as of December 31, 2021 and 2020 are derived from SGHC’s audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. Our statement of financial position data as of December 31, 2019 is derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included in the registration statement filed on March 23, 2022.

The following information is only a summary and should be read in conjunction with SGHC’s audited consolidated financial statements and related notes contained elsewhere in this prospectus and related information under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” SGHC’s audited consolidated financial statements are prepared and presented in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the IASB (“IFRS”). SGHC has applied IFRS for the first time for the year December 31, 2020 with a transition date of January 1, 2019. The transition to IFRS is more fully described in Note 24 to SGHC’s audited financial statements, which are included elsewhere in the prospectus.

The following historical financial information of SGHC is impacted by business combinations (the “Reorganization Transaction”) which took place during 2020 and 2019 and impact the comparability of financial information between the year ended December 31, 2020 and 2019. The Reorganization Transaction is more fully described in Note 1 and Note 4 to SGHC’s audited financial statements, which are included elsewhere in the prospectus. The historical results included below and elsewhere in this prospectus are not necessarily indicative of SGHC’s future performance.

 

€ ‘000s    For the year ended
December 31, 2021
    For the year ended
December 31, 2020
    For the year ended
December 31, 2019
 

Consolidated Statement of Profit or Loss Data

      

Revenue

   1,320,658     908,019     476,040  

Direct and marketing expenses

     (896,494     (612,689     (430,984

Other operating income

     8,042       —         —    

General and administrative expenses

     (149,859     (114,538     (69,967

Depreciation and amortization expense

     (83,560     (55,407     (30,460
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Profit/(loss) from operations

   198,787     125,385     (55,371

Finance income

     1,312       257       158  

Finance expense

     (6,370     (10,991     (7,735

Gain on derivative contracts

     15,830       —         —    

Gain on bargain purchase

     16,349       34,995       45,331  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Profit/(loss) before taxation

   225,908     149,646     (17,617

Income tax expense

     9,970       (429     (333
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Profit/(loss) for the year

   235,878     149,217     (17,950
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings/(loss) per share, Basic and Diluted

   4.25     2.74     (0.33

 

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€ ‘000s    As of
December 31, 2021
    As of
December 31, 2020
    As of
December 31, 2019
 

Consolidated Statement of Financial Position Data:

      

Total Non-current assets

   284,920     287,675     193,207  

Total Current assets

     559,152       263,477       149,728  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   844,072     551,152     342,935  

Total Current liabilities

     309,112       437,312       396,677  

Lease liabilities

     10,896       6,754       8,068  

Deferred tax liability

     9,248       9,211       5,146  

Interest-bearing loans and borrowings

     764       27,001       7,220  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

   330,020     480,278     417,111  

Issued capital

     269,338       61,222       55,001  

Foreign exchange reserve

     (2,094     (1,278     (890

Retained profit/(accumulated deficit)

     246,808       10,930       (128,287
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Equity/(Deficit)

   514,052     70,874     (74,176
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

€ ‘000s    For the year ended
December 31, 2021
    For the year ended
December 31, 2020
    For the year ended
December 31, 2019
 

Consolidated Cash Flow Data:

      

Net cash flows generated from/(used in) operating activities

   209,853     151,325     3,591  

Net cash flows (used in)/generated from investing activities

   (18,160   (5,838   49,637  

Net cash flows used in financing activities

   (39,763   (81,088   (7,889

Non-IFRS Financial Measures

In addition to SGHC’s results determined in accordance with IFRS, this prospectus includes EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA which are non-GAAP company-specific performance measures that Super Group uses to supplement the Company’s results presented in accordance with IFRS. EBITDA is defined as profit for the period before depreciation, amortization, financial income, financial expense and income tax expense/credit. Adjusted EBITDA is defined as EBITDA less gain on bargain purchase and gain on derivative contracts plus transaction costs. SGHC believes that EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are useful in evaluating the Company’s operating performance as they are similar to measures reported by the Company’s competitors and are regularly used by securities analysts, institutional investors and other interested parties in analyzing operating performance and prospects. EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are not intended to be a substitute for any IFRS financial measure and, as calculated, may not be comparable to other similarly titled measures of performance of other companies in other industries or within the same industry.

Because of these limitations, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for performance measures calculated in accordance with IFRS. SGHC compensates for these limitations by relying primarily on its IFRS results and using EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA on a supplemental basis. You should review the reconciliation of net profit/(loss) to EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA below and not rely on any single financial measure to evaluate SGHC’s business.

 

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The table below presents SGHC’s (unaudited) Adjusted EBITDA reconciled to SGHC’s profit / (loss), the closest IFRS measure, for the periods indicated:

 

€ ‘000s    For the year ended
December 31, 2021
    For the year ended
December 31, 2020
    For the year ended
December 31, 2019
 

Profit/(loss) for the year

   235,878     149,217     (17,950

Income tax expense

     (9,970     429       333  

Finance income

     (1,312     (257     (158

Finance expense

     6,370       10,991       7,735  

Depreciation and amortization expense

     83,560       55,407       30,460  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

EBITDA

   314,526     215,787     20,420  

Transaction costs

     7,107       —         —    

Gain on derivative contracts

     (15,830     —         —    

Gain on bargain purchase

     (16,349     (34,995     (45,331
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

   289,454     180,792     (24,911
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

SEAC

The following tables set forth the selected historical financial information derived from Sports Entertainment Acquisition Corp’s (“SEAC”) audited financial statements (as restated) for the period from July 30, 2020 (inception) through December 31, 2020 and as of December 31, 2020 and SEAC’s unaudited interim financial statements (as restated) for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and as of September 30, 2021. The following summary financial information should be read in conjunction with SEAC’s financial statements and related notes. The restatement is more fully described in Note 2 of the notes to SEAC’s audited financial statements, which, together with SEAC’s unaudited interim financial statements, are included in this prospectus. SEAC’s audited financial statements and unaudited interim financial statements are prepared and presented in accordance with U.S. GAAP.

As of September 30, 2021, SEAC had neither engaged in any operations nor generated any revenues. All activity for the period from inception through September 30, 2021 related to organizational activities, execution of the initial public offering, identifying a target for a business combination and activities pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement.

 

     For the period from
July 30, 2020
(inception) through
December 31, 2020
(As Restated)
    For the nine months
ended September 30, 2021
(As Restated)
 

Statement of Operations Data:

    

Formation and operational costs

   $ (203,809   $ (6,478,621

Loss from operations

   $ (203,809   $ (6,478,621

Other income (expense):

    

Changes in fair value of warrant liability

     (15,007,134     (34,170,000

Transaction costs allocated to warrant liabilities

     (1,152,775     —    

Interest earned on marketable securities held in Trust Account

     67,669       55,228  

Other expense, net

     (16,092,210     (34,114,772

Net loss

   $ (16,296,019   $ (40,593,393

Weighted average shares outstanding of Class A common stock

     24,837,662       45,000,000  

 

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     For the period from
July 30, 2020
(inception) through
December 31, 2020
(As Restated)
    For the nine months
ended September 30, 2021
(As Restated)
 

Basic and diluted income per share, Class A common stock

   $ (0.46   $ (0.72

Weighted average shares outstanding of Class B common stock

     10,625,000       11,250,000  

Basic and diluted net loss per share, Class B common stock

   $ (0.46   $ (0.72

 

     As of
December 31, 2020
(As Restated)
    As of
September 30, 2021
(As Restated)
 

Balance Sheet Data:

    

Total Assets

   $ 451,445,969     $ 450,330,974  

Total Current liabilities

     125,583       5,433,981  

Warrant liability, at fair value

     45,225,000       79,395,000  

Deferred underwriting fee payable

     15,750,000       15,750,000  

Total liabilities

   $ 61,100,583     $ 100,578,981  

Commitments and contingencies

                                                              

Class A common stock subject to possible redemption, 45,000,000 shares at $10.00 per share redemption value

     450,000,000       450,000,000  

Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value; 1,000,000 shares authorized; none issued or outstanding

     —         —    

Class A common stock, $0.0001 par value; 200,000,000 shares authorized;

     —         —    

Class B common stock, $0.0001 par value; 20,000,000 shares authorized; 11,250,000 shares issued and outstanding

     1,125       1,125  

Additional paid-in capital

     —         —    

Accumulated deficit

     (59,655,739     (100,249,132

Total Stockholders’ Deficit

   $ (59,654,614   $ (100,248,007

Total Liabilities and Stockholder’s Deficit

   $ 451,445,969     $ 450,330,974  

 

     For the period from
July 30, 2020
(inception) through
December 31, 2020
(As Restated)
    For the nine months
ended September 30, 2021
(As Restated)
 

Cash Flow Data:

                                                              

Net cash used in operating activities

   $ (385,100   $ (2,021,835

Net cash used in investing activities

   $ (450,000,000   $ —    

Net cash provided by financing activities

   $ 451,472,976     $ 983,520  

 

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SUMMARY UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

The following summary unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information (the “summary pro forma information”) gives effect to the Business Combination transactions described in the section entitled “Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information.” The first step within the Business Combination was accounted for as a capital reorganization whereby Super Group acquired the assets, liabilities and subsidiaries of SGHC. The capital reorganization was followed on closing by the acquisition of SEAC, which is accounted for within the scope of IFRS 2.

Under this method of accounting, there is no acquisition accounting and no recognition of goodwill, as a result of SEAC not being considered a business, as defined by IFRS 3 (Business Combination) given it consisted predominantly of cash in the Trust Account. Under this method of accounting, SEAC was treated as the “acquired” company for financial reporting purposes. Accordingly, for accounting purposes, the Business Combination was treated as the equivalent of Super Group issuing shares and warrants as consideration for the net assets of SEAC. The net assets acquired were stated at historical cost, with no goodwill or other intangible assets recorded. The summary unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position data as of December 31, 2021 gives pro forma effect to the Business Combination transactions as if they had occurred on December 31, 2021. The summary unaudited pro forma condensed combined income statement data for the year ended December 31, 2021 gives pro forma effect to the Business Combination transactions as if they had been consummated on January 1, 2021.

The summary pro forma information has been derived from, and should be read in conjunction with, the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information appearing elsewhere in this prospectus and the accompanying notes. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information is based upon, and should be read in conjunction with, the historical financial statements of SGHC and related notes and the historical financial statements of SEAC (as restated) and related notes included in this prospectus. The summary pro forma information has been presented for informational purposes only and are not necessarily indicative of what the combined company’s financial position or results of operations actually would have been had the Business Combination and related transactions been completed as of the dates indicated. In addition, the summary pro forma information does not purport to project the future financial position or operating results of the combined company.

The following table presents summary pro forma information after giving effect to the Business Combination, as at January 27, 2022:

 

     Reflecting Actual
Redemptions
upon the
Closing of the
Business
Combination on
January 27, 2022
 

Summary Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined

  

Statement of Profit or Loss data for the year ended December 31, 2021

  

Revenue

   1,320,658  

Profit for the year

     71,681  

Basic earnings per share, common stock

     0.15  

Weighted average shares outstanding — basic

     490,197,468  

Diluted earnings per share, common stock

     0.12  

Weighted average shares outstanding — diluted

     574,666,556  

 

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     Reflecting Actual
Redemptions
upon the
Closing of the
Business
Combination on
January 27, 2022
 

Summary Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined

  

Statement of Financial Position Data as of December 31, 2021

  

Total assets

   760,236  

Total liabilities

     660,628  

Total shareholders’ equity

     99,608  

 

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RISK FACTORS

You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below and the other information in this prospectus before making an investment in our ordinary shares. Our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially and adversely affected if any of these risks occurs, and as a result, the market price of our ordinary shares could decline and you could lose all or part of your investment. This prospectus also contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. See “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements.” Our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of certain factors.

Risks Related to Super Group’s Business

Our business depends on the success, including win or hold rates, of existing and future online betting and gaming products, which rely on a variety of factors and are not completely controlled by us.

The sports betting and online casino gaming industries are characterized by an element of chance. Accordingly, we employ theoretical win rates, probability distributions and related models to estimate what a certain type of sports bet or online casino game, on average, will win or lose in the long run. Our revenue is impacted by variations in the hold percentage (the ratio of net win to total amount wagered), or actual outcome, on the sports betting and online casino games that we offer to our customers. We use the hold percentage as an indicator of an online casino game’s or sports bet’s performance against its expected outcome. Although each sports bet or online casino game generally performs within a defined statistical range of outcomes, actual outcomes may vary for any given period, particularly in the short term.

In the short term, for online casino wagering and online sports wagering, the element of chance may affect win rates (hold percentages); these win rates, particularly for online sports wagering, may also be affected in the short term by factors that are largely beyond our control, such as unanticipated event outcomes, a customer’s skill, experience and behavior, the mix of games played or wagers placed, the financial resources of customers, the volume of wagers placed and the amount of time spent gambling. For online casino games, it is possible a random number generator outcome or game will malfunction or is otherwise misprogrammed to pay out wins in excess of the game’s mathematical design and award errant prizes. Factors that are nominally within our control, such as the level of incentives or bonuses or comps given to customers, might, for various reasons both within and beyond our control, not be well-controlled and hence in turn might impact win rates. For online sports wagering, it is possible that our platform erroneously posts odds or is otherwise misprogrammed to pay out odds that are highly favorable to bettors, and bettors place wagers before the odds are corrected. Additionally, odds compilers and risk managers are capable of human error, so even if our wagering products are subject to a capped payout, significant volatility can occur. Similarly, inadvertently over-incentivizing customers can convert a sports wager or casino game that would otherwise have been expected to be profitable for the Company into one with a positive expectation for the player.

As a result of the variability in these factors, the actual win rates on our sports betting and online casino gaming offerings may differ from the theoretical win rates we have estimated and could result in the winnings of our sports betting or online casino gaming customers exceeding those anticipated. The variability of win rates (hold rates) also has the potential to negatively impact our business, financial condition, results of operations, prospects and cash flows.

Our business relies for its success on entertaining customers by means of a wide range of potential wagering opportunities. In recent years an increasing percentage of sports betting wagering has been derived from “in-play” or “in-game” wagering, which refers to the wagers that customers make during the course of a sports event (as opposed to “pre-game” or “ante-post” wagers made before the start of a sports event) on the outcome of related events that occur pursuant to the primary event. Examples of this include “Scorer of the next goal” in a soccer match, or “Winner of the next point” in a tennis match. Where such wagers are allowed, there can be no

 

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assurance that regulators will not in the future seek to prohibit such forms of wagering, and where such wagers are not yet allowed there can be no assurance that regulators will ever allow them. If such “in-play” wagering is prohibited in any market then our business, financial condition, results of operations, prospects and cash flows might be negatively impacted.

Similarly, for casino games there can be no assurance that existing casino game features will always be allowed or that new casino game features will be allowed or that regulators will not seek to constrain the operation of games in any way, for example by limiting the rate or speed of game play. If game features or other relevant aspects of casino game design are constrained then our business, financial condition, results of operations, prospects and cash flows might be negatively impacted.

The success of our business depends on the quality of our strategy and our ability to execute on it.

Our business strategy makes a number of assumptions about the current and future state of the industry that we operate in, including but not limited to environmental factors such as the current and future state of the markets and economies that we operate in, the current and expected future actions of governments around the world, the current and future capacity and effectiveness of our competitors, and the current and future desires and wants and means of our customers. Our strategy also makes assumptions about the current and future state of our own business, including our capacity and effectiveness and our ability to respond to all of the aforementioned environmental factors, amongst others. All of these assumptions are informed by data and information that is publicly available and which we gather for ourselves and by our ability to process and understand such data and information. Any or all of our assumptions may prove to be faulty and/or our data and/or information may be inaccurate or incomplete, in which case our strategy may prove to be incorrect or inadequate for the demands of our industry. Even if our strategy is a good one, we cannot be certain that our business is equipped to execute the plans and actions that might be necessary to achieve success. If any of our assumptions are incorrect and/or our strategy is poor and/or we are unable to execute on our strategy then our business, financial condition, results of operations, prospects and cash flows might be negatively impacted.

The success of our business depends in part on our ability to anticipate and satisfy customer preferences in a timely manner.

As we operate in a dynamic environment characterized by rapidly changing industry and legal standards, our products are subject to changing consumer preferences that cannot be predicted with certainty. We need to continually introduce new offerings and identify future product offerings that complement our existing platforms, respond to our customers’ needs and improve and enhance our existing platforms to maintain or increase our customer engagement and growth of our business. We may not be able to compete effectively if our sports betting odds pricing and casino game design are not competitive and/or unless our product selection keeps up with trends in the digital sports entertainment and gaming industries in which we compete, or trends in new gaming products. If we are unable to anticipate and satisfy customer preferences in a timely manner and/or we are unable to provide competitive and appealing products to our customers, then our business, financial condition, results of operations, prospects and cash flows might be negatively impacted.

Competition within the broader entertainment industry is intense and our existing and potential customers may be attracted to competing betting and gaming options, as well as other forms of entertainment such as video games, television, movies and sporting events. If our offerings do not continue to be popular with existing customers and attract potential customers, our business would be harmed.

We operate in the global entertainment betting and gaming industries within the broader entertainment industry with our business-to-consumer offerings, including sports betting and online casino gaming. Our customers are offered a vast array of entertainment choices. Other forms of entertainment, such as television, movies, sporting events, other forms of non-gambling games and in-person casinos, are well established and may be perceived by our customers to offer greater variety, affordability, interactivity and enjoyment. New and

 

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alternative product categories are continuously evolving that may be perceived by our customers to offer equivalent or better entertainment, including casual games, daily fantasy sports (a variation on fantasy sports leagues), and apps and websites that offer the trading of financial instruments in a manner that incorporates elements that are similar to gambling. We compete with these other forms of entertainment for the discretionary time and income of our customers. If we are unable to sustain sufficient interest in our product offerings in comparison to other forms of entertainment, including new forms of entertainment, our business model may not continue to be viable.

The specific industries in which we operate are characterized by dynamic customer demand and technological advances, and there is intense competition among online gaming and entertainment providers. A number of established, well-financed companies producing online gaming and/or interactive entertainment products and services compete with our offerings, and other well-capitalized companies may introduce competitive services. Such competitors may spend more money and time on developing and testing products and services, undertake more extensive marketing campaigns, adopt more aggressive pricing or promotional policies or otherwise develop more commercially successful products or services than ours, which could negatively impact our business. Our competitors may also develop products, features, or services that are similar to ours or that achieve greater market acceptance. Furthermore, new competitors, whether licensed or not, may enter the online gaming industry. There has also been considerable consolidation among competitors in the entertainment, betting and gaming industries and such consolidation and future consolidation could result in the formation of larger competitors with increased financial resources and altered cost structures, which may enable them to offer more competitive products, gain a larger market share, expand offerings and broaden their geographic scope of operations. If we are not able to maintain or improve our market shares, or if our offerings do not continue to be popular, our business could suffer.

COVID-19 has affected our business and operations in a variety of ways. The pandemic restrictions may have affected our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects, including as a result of the reduction in the quantity of global sporting events, closures or restrictions on business operations of our suppliers, partners and sports organizations and a decrease in consumer spending, and it may continue to do so in the future. On the other hand, we cannot assure you that consumers will not decrease online gaming activities as pandemic restrictions are loosened. These cross-currents may have unknown and adverse effects that are impossible for us to predict.

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the novel coronavirus (“COVID-19”) outbreak to be a pandemic. Actions taken around the world to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 include restrictions on travel, cancellation of sporting events, quarantines in certain areas and forced closures for certain types of public places and businesses. COVID-19 and actions taken to mitigate its spread have had and are expected to continue to have an adverse impact on the economies and financial markets of many countries, including the geographical areas in which we operate. COVID-19 and these actions have also had a significant impact on our business, our suppliers and our customers. The direct impact on our business, beyond disruptions in normal business operations, was driven by the suspension, postponement and cancellation of major sports seasons and events. While many sports have since restarted, some have been played on a reduced or uncertain schedule, and there can be no assurance that such sports seasons and events will not be cancelled or further impacted again due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The ultimate impact of COVID-19 on our financial performance will depend on the length of time that these disruptions exist. Conversely, hard lockdowns, stay-at-home or shelter-in-place orders for the general populace in many jurisdictions accelerated the shift to online commerce, which management believes has benefited the business in some areas. The extent to which the removal of such restrictions will have lasting effects on the business is not yet known and may take some time to become clear, particularly if subsequent waves of the pandemic lead to the reinstatement of similar restrictions in the future.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve, the ultimate extent of the impact on our business, operating results, cash flows, liquidity and financial condition will be primarily driven by the severity and duration of the pandemic, the pandemic’s impact on global economies and the timing, scope and effectiveness of

 

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federal, state and local governmental responses to the pandemic in the United States and national, provincial/ state/regional and local responses elsewhere around the world. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in government authorities implementing numerous measures to try to contain the virus, such as travel bans and restrictions, quarantines, stay-at-home or shelter-in-place orders, and business shutdowns. These measures may adversely impact our relationships with existing and potential new business partners globally, our employees and operations and the operations of our business partners, and may negatively impact our business. Our sports betting revenues are dependent on interest in sporting events, which have been, and may be in the future, substantially limited during times of business shutdowns, the prohibition or reduction of physical participation in such activities or the cancellation or postponement of sporting events, such as the postponement of the 2020 Summer Olympic Games. In addition, global travel restrictions could impact our relationships with existing or potential new partners around the world.

In recent periods coinciding with the COVID-19 pandemic, we have seen significant growth in online sports betting and casino gaming revenues from existing and new customers, as the COVID-19 pandemic has shifted customers to online entertainment. As government restrictions ease, this trend may not continue or could even be reversed as customers seek to spend their entertainment dollars through physical participation and not online activities, resulting in a decrease in our share of the entertainment wallet. These effects make the comparison of our current and historical performance very difficult. In particular, the growth or otherwise in our active wagering customer numbers and our revenues may be distorted and hence our historic growth may not be a useful or accurate guide to our expected future performance.

There is no certainty that any actions taken by us will be sufficient to mitigate the risks posed by the COVID-19 pandemic or that any of the secular factors arising from COVID-19 (such as the general trend towards online commerce that has benefited all digital businesses) will continue to be of benefit to us, especially in light of potential new strains of the virus. These factors related to COVID-19 are beyond our knowledge and control and, as a result, at this time, we are unable to predict the ultimate impact, both in terms of severity and duration, that the COVID-19 pandemic will have on our business, operating results, cash flows and financial condition.

Our results of operations may fluctuate due to seasonality and other factors and, therefore, our periodic operating results will not be guarantees of future performance.

Although the sporting calendar is year-round, there is seasonality in sporting events that may impact our operations. The broad geographical mix of our customer base also impacts the effect of seasonality as customers in different territories will place differing importance on different sporting competitions and those competitions will often have different sporting calendars. Sports organizations have their own significant sporting events such as the playoffs and championship games, which may cause increases in our revenues, and their own respective off-seasons, which may cause decreases in our revenues. Certain sports only hold events during portions of the calendar year. For example, our revenues are significantly impacted by the calendars of the major European and African football (soccer) leagues, international and Indian Premier League cricket, major American sports leagues, marquee horse racing events and major professional tennis tournaments. Our revenues may also be affected by the scheduling of major sporting events that do not occur annually, such as the FIFA World Cup, or the cancellation or postponement of sporting events. Similarly, management believes that there is some evidence that seasonality in casino gaming may occur at the time of certain major national holidays and/or vacation periods and hence it may occur that revenues and cashflow might be adversely affected during times of year when customers are naturally more likely to engage with other non-gaming activities. Such fluctuations and uncertainties may negatively impact our cash flows.

 

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Because a significant portion of our sports betting business is based on open-air, live events, extreme weather conditions may result in the postponement or cancellation of such events and negatively impact our associated revenues.

Extreme weather conditions may interrupt live sporting events, causing their postponement or, in unusual circumstances, their cancellation. In such circumstances, because our sports betting operations rely on such events being carried out in accordance with pre-set timetables, we may be forced to reverse wagers already placed or remove future betting propositions. Climate change may make past weather conditions unrepresentative of future weather conditions and extreme weather conditions may increase in number or severity in the future. While certain sporting events may shift to closed environments, other sporting events may be ill-suited or less popular in such environments. We do not currently maintain insurance coverage applicable to cover either the costs or loss of revenue that we may incur due to the postponement or cancellation of events caused by extreme weather conditions. These circumstances may adversely affect our revenues and our customer relationships.

We make use of machine learning and other data science and analytics techniques and technologies throughout our business and attempt to integrate this into customer-facing systems in ways that may have significant effects on our revenues and profits. The nature of such systems is that their outcomes cannot always be predicted and, therefore, our periodic operating results will not be guarantees of future performance.

We use machine learning and data science and analytics methodologies and techniques to seek to understand individual customer preferences and attributes as well as to detect fraud and manage risk. Machine learning systems are by their nature often opaque and can evolve over time. If we fail to implement or maintain adequate controls over such systems, then they may evolve to produce outcomes that could adversely affect our results of operations.

Our machine learning and data science and analytics models are designed to analyze data attributes in order to identify complex transaction and behavior patterns. We do this for a number of purposes, including but not limited to fraud detection, determination of when and how to intervene in customer wagering activity for responsible gaming purposes, generation of personalized wagering and game recommendations in order to remove customer interface friction, and generation of personalized incentives (or disincentives, as the case may be) in order to optimize customer satisfaction, enjoyment and profitability. Our ability to continuously train and/or improve these systems will have material impacts on our revenues, especially as methods of committing fraud evolve and become more sophisticated and as competitors become better at evaluating and incentivizing and interacting with customers. However, it is possible that these systems may prove to be less accurate than we expect, or than they have been in the past, for a variety of reasons, including inaccurate assumptions or other errors made in building or training such systems, incorrect interpretations of the results of such systems, increased fraud sophistication beyond the capabilities of such systems, the emergence of very high value but very low volume or short-term transient risks that models of this nature might struggle to detect, and failure to timely update system assumptions and parameters. Further, the successful performance of our machine learning and data science and analytics models relies on the ability to constantly review and process large amounts of transactions and other data.

If we are unable to attract new customers or retain existing customers, or if our systems for capturing and processing data were to degrade or fail in any way, then the amount of data reviewed and processed by our machine learning and data science and analytics models will be reduced or fail to grow at a pace that will allow us to continue to improve the efficiency of our models, which may reduce the accuracy of such systems. Additionally, such systems may not be able to effectively account for matters that are inherently difficult to predict or are otherwise beyond our control, such as social engineering and other methods of perpetrating fraud that do not lend themselves well to risk-based analysis. Material errors or inaccuracies in such machine learning and data science and analytics models could lead us to make inaccurate or sub-optimal operational or strategic decisions, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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We rely on third-party service providers such as (i) third-party providers to validate the identity and identify the location of our customers, (ii) third-party payment processors to process deposits and withdrawals made by our customers into our platforms, (iii) third-party marketing and customer communications systems providers, (iv) third-party casino content, product and technology providers, (v) third-party sportsbook technology providers, (vi) third-party sports data providers for real-time and accurate data for sporting events, and (vii) third-party outsourced services providers, among others. If our third-party providers do not perform adequately or terminate their relationships with us, our costs may increase and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

There is no guarantee that the third-party geolocation and identity verification systems that we rely on will perform adequately or will be effective. We rely on our geolocation and identity verification systems to ensure that we are in compliance with certain laws and regulations, and any service disruption to those systems would prohibit us from operating our platform, and would adversely affect our business. Additionally, incorrect or misleading geolocation and identity verification data with respect to our current or potential customers received from third-party service providers may result in us inadvertently allowing access to our offerings to individuals who should not be permitted to access them, or otherwise inadvertently deny access to individuals who should be able to access our offerings, in each case based on inaccurate identity or geographic location determination. Our third-party geolocation service providers rely on their ability to obtain information necessary to determine geolocation from mobile devices, operating systems, and other sources. Changes, disruptions or temporary or permanent failure to access such sources by our third-party service providers may result in their inability to accurately determine the location of our customers. Moreover, our inability to maintain our existing contracts with third-party service providers, or to replace them with equivalent third parties, may result in our inability to access geolocation and identity verification data necessary for our day-to-day operations. If any of these risks materializes, we may be subject to disciplinary action, fines, lawsuits, and our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be adversely affected.

We also rely on a limited number of third-party payment processors to process deposits and withdrawals made by our customers into our platform. If any of our third-party payment processors terminates its relationship with us or refuses to renew its agreement with us on commercially reasonable terms, we would need to find an alternate payment processor, and may not be able to secure similar terms or replace such payment processor in an acceptable time frame. Further, the software and services provided by our third-party payment processors may not meet our expectations, contain errors or vulnerabilities, be compromised or experience outages. Any of these risks could cause us to lose our ability to accept online payments or other payment transactions or make timely payments to customers on our platform, any of which could make our platform less trustworthy and convenient and adversely affect our ability to attract and retain our customers.

All of our payments are made by credit card, debit card or through other third-party payment services, which subjects us to certain regulations and to the risk of fraud. We may in the future offer new payment options to customers that may be subject to additional regulations and risks and/or may incur higher transaction charges. We are also subject to a number of other laws and regulations relating to the payments we accept from our customers, including with respect to money laundering, money transfers, privacy and information security. Although we have implemented processes and have dedicated teams to ensure compliance with applicable rules and regulations, there have in the past, and there may be in the future, incidences where certain relevant information relating to “know your customer” (“KYC”) and/or anti-money laundering (“AML”) is not detected or established. If we fail to comply with applicable rules and regulations, we may be subject to civil or criminal penalties, fines and/or higher transaction fees and may lose our ability to accept online payments or other payment card transactions, which could make our offerings less convenient and attractive to our customers. If any of these events were to occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be adversely affected.

For example, if we are deemed to be a money transmitter as defined by applicable regulation, we could be subject to certain laws, rules and regulations enforced by multiple authorities and governing bodies in the United

 

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States and numerous state and local agencies who may define money transmitter differently. For example, certain U.S. states may have a more expansive view of who qualifies as a money transmitter. Additionally, we could be subject to additional laws, rules and regulations related to the provision of payments and financial services, and if we expand into new jurisdictions, the various regulations and regulators governing our business that we are subject to will expand as well. In addition to fines, penalties for failing to comply with applicable rules and regulations could include criminal and civil proceedings, forfeiture of significant assets or other enforcement actions. We could also be required to make changes to our business practices or compliance programs as a result of regulatory scrutiny.

Additionally, our payment processors require us to comply with payment card network operating rules, which are set and interpreted by the payment card networks. The payment card networks could adopt new operating rules or interpret or reinterpret existing rules in ways that might prohibit us from providing certain offerings to some customers, be costly to implement or difficult to follow. We have agreed to reimburse our payment processors for fines they are assessed by payment card networks if we or the customers on our platform violate these rules. Any of the foregoing risks could adversely affect our regulatory licensure, business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Additionally, outages in our connectivity with our payment processors or their connectivity with downstream processors and networks might inhibit our ability to successfully process deposits and withdrawals on behalf of our customers. Errors in any of these systems may cause transactions to be processed multiple times or not at all, which may in turn result in customers being overcharged, overpaid or not paying us. Overcharging customers might result in representations, returns or chargebacks which might in turn jeopardize our relationships with our payment processors and potentially lead to fines and additional transaction costs or even the termination of our relationships with our payment processors. If we do not detect these errors timeously then we might over-credit to or under-deduct from our customers’ sports betting or casino accounts which might in turn result in customers being inadvertently given risk-free opportunities to gamble and thereby potentially win even larger amounts. We cannot guarantee that we will detect such outages or errors timeously nor that we will be able to recover any resulting losses from customers or third-party providers. Any attempts by us to recover such losses from our customers may cause our customers to have a negative experience and our brand or reputation may be negatively affected and our customers may be less inclined to continue or resume utilizing our products or recommend our platform to other potential customers. As such, any such outages or errors could harm our reputation, business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and prospects.

Furthermore, if any of our payment processors terminates its relationship with us or refuses to renew its agreement with us on commercially reasonable terms, we might need to find an alternate provider. Given the sometimes unique benefits and features of different payment options, exact replacement might not be possible and we may not be able to secure similar terms or benefits or features or replace such payment processors in an acceptable time frame. Any of these risks could increase our costs and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects. Further, any negative publicity related to any of our payment processors, including any publicity related to regulatory concerns, could adversely affect our reputation and brand, and could potentially lead to increased regulatory or litigation exposure.

We rely on third-party service providers for components of our marketing and customer communications processes and systems. Failures or outages in these systems may inhibit our ability to acquire new customers or retain existing customers. The nature of these processes means that certain customer personal information may be transmitted through these systems. If these systems are compromised in any way then customer personal data might be compromised and in turn our customers’ perception of our reliability and security might be impacted. Any of the foregoing risks could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Furthermore, if any of our marketing and customer communications providers terminates its relationship with us or refuses to renew its agreement with us on commercially reasonable terms, we might need to find an

 

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alternate provider. Given the sometimes unique benefits and features of different marketing and customer communications systems, exact replacement might not be possible and we may not be able to secure similar terms or benefits or features or replace such systems in an acceptable time frame. Any of these risks could increase our costs and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects. Further, any negative publicity related to any of our marketing and customer communications providers, including any publicity related to regulatory concerns, could adversely affect our reputation and brand, and could potentially lead to increased regulatory or litigation exposure.

We rely on third-party providers for nearly all of our casino games. These third parties are responsible for the design, development and maintenance of these games. In the past there have been outages during which time one or more games have been unavailable. There have also been incidents where errors in the design or development or maintenance of these games has result in erroneous payouts to customers, including instances where games have erroneously produced positive expected returns to customers and hence losses for the casino. We cannot be certain that we will always detect such outages and errors timeously nor that we will be able to recover any losses resulting from errors either from customers or third-party providers. Any outages or attempts by us to recover such losses from errors from our customers may cause our customers to have a negative experience and our brand or reputation may be negatively affected and our customers may be less inclined to continue or resume utilizing our products or recommend our platform to other potential customers. As such, any such outages and errors could harm our reputation, business and operating results.

Furthermore, if any of our casino game suppliers terminates its relationship with us or refuses to renew its agreement with us on commercially reasonable terms, we might need to find an alternate provider. Given the unique design of each casino game, exact replacement would not be possible and we may not be able to secure similar terms or product features or extent of product range or replace such providers in an acceptable time frame. Any of these risks could increase our costs and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects. Further, any negative publicity related to any of our third-party casino game supplier partners, including any publicity related to regulatory concerns, could adversely affect our reputation and brand, and could potentially lead to increased regulatory or litigation exposure.

We rely on third-party providers for the majority of our sports betting product platforms. These third parties are responsible for the design, development and maintenance of these platforms. In the past there have been outages during which time wagering was either severely inhibited, delayed or unavailable. We cannot be certain that we will always detect such outages timeously nor that we will be able to recover any resulting losses from third-party providers. Any such outages may cause our customers to have a negative experience and our brand or reputation may be negatively affected and our customers may be less inclined to continue or resume utilizing our products or recommend our product to other potential customers. As such, any such outages could harm our reputation, business and operating results.

Furthermore, if any of our third-party sports betting product platform providers terminates its relationship with us or refuses to renew its agreement with us on commercially reasonable terms, we might need to find an alternate provider. Given the sometimes unique features of different sports betting platforms, exact replacement might not be possible and we may not be able to secure similar terms or features or replace such sports betting product platform providers in an acceptable time frame. Any of these risks could increase our costs and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects. Further, any negative publicity related to any of our sports betting product platform providers, including any publicity related to regulatory concerns, could adversely affect our reputation and brand, and could potentially lead to increased regulatory or litigation exposure.

We also rely on third-party sportsbook technology providers with whom we have long-term relationships. We have agreements with Apricot Investments Limited (“Apricot”), one of the leading gaming software and content providers, for the exclusive provision of the Apricot sportsbook software and Player Account Management (“PAM”) system in a number of Super Group’s most significant markets. Apricot supplies a

 

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significant portion of the casino games available for play across all Super Group websites and apps. Any disruption in or termination of these relationships could harm our strategic growth.

We also rely on third-party sports data providers to obtain accurate information regarding schedules, results, performance and outcomes of sporting events. We rely on this data to display sporting events, odds and outcomes to customers and/or to determine when and how bets are settled. We have experienced, and we may continue to experience, errors in this data feed which may result in us incorrectly displaying events, odds and outcomes and/ or settling bets. If we cannot adequately resolve any such issues then our customers may have a negative experience with our offerings, our brand or reputation may be negatively affected and our customers may be less inclined to continue or resume utilizing our products or recommend our platform to other potential customers. As such, a failure or significant interruption in our service could harm our reputation, business and operating results.

Furthermore, if any of our sports data partners terminates its relationship with us or refuses to renew its agreement with us on commercially reasonable terms, we would need to find an alternate provider, and may not be able to secure similar terms or product features or replace such providers in an acceptable time frame.

Any of these risks could increase our costs and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects. Further, any negative publicity related to any of our third-party sports data partners, including any publicity related to regulatory concerns, could adversely affect our reputation and brand, and could potentially lead to increased regulatory or litigation exposure.

We also rely on third-party outsourced services providers for a variety of services or components thereof, including but not limited to customer support, risk and fraud prevention, “know-your-customer” and anti-money- laundering, software development, information technology and infrastructure maintenance and support, information and data security, database management, data analysis, marketing and related services, and product and website design and development. We rely on these third-party outsourced services providers to enable some of our products and offerings and in our interactions with suppliers and customers. If any of our third-party outsourced services providers provide inadequate or substandard service then our customers may have a negative experience with our offerings, our brand or reputation may be negatively affected and our customers may stop utilizing our products and/or be less inclined to continue or resume utilizing our products or recommend our platform to other potential customers. As such, inadequate or substandard service from any of our third-party outsourced services providers could harm our reputation, business and operating results.

Furthermore, if any of our third-party outsourced services providers terminates its relationship with us or refuses to renew its agreement with us on commercially reasonable terms, we would need to find an alternate provider, and may not be able to secure similar terms or services or replace such third-party providers in an acceptable time frame. Any of these risks could increase our costs and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects. Further, any negative publicity related to any of our third-party outsourced services providers, including any publicity related to regulatory concerns, could adversely affect our reputation and brand, and could potentially lead to increased regulatory or litigation exposure.

We license the Betway brand, for a fixed fee, for use by DGC USA in the United States and, for a fixed fee plus an additional fee equal to a percentage of Betway’s global brand marketing spend, to a third party for use in China and Thailand. A decline in such third-party operators’ financial performance or a termination of the brand licenses by such third parties could have an adverse effect on our business.

We license the Betway brand to DGC USA for a fixed fee in the United States and, for a fixed fee plus an additional fee equal to a percentage of Betway’s global brand marketing spend, to a third-party operator for use in China and Thailand. Our financial performance depends in part on maintaining our licenses with these third- party operators. Fees earned from third-party operators accounted for approximately 5.4% of our revenue in the year ended December 31, 2021. A decline in the third-party operators’ financial performance, competition from competitors or a deterioration in our relationships for other reasons could lead to termination of the brand

 

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licenses by such third-party operators, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and prospects.

Our business depends on a strong brand, and if we are not able to develop, maintain and enhance our brand and reputation, including as a result of negative publicity, our business and operating results may be harmed.

We believe that developing, maintaining and enhancing our brands, especially our single-brand sportsbook Betway but also our multi-brand portfolio of casinos, Spin, is critical to achieving widespread acceptance of our products and services, attracting new customers, retaining existing customers, persuading existing customers to adopt additional products and services and hiring and retaining our employees. We believe that the importance of our brand will increase as competition in our markets further intensifies. Successful promotion of our brand will depend on a number of factors, including the effectiveness of our marketing efforts, our ability to provide high-quality, reliable and cost-effective products and services, the perceived value of our products and services and our ability to provide quality customer support. Brand promotion activities require us to make substantial expenditures. To date, we have made significant investments in the promotion of our brands, including more than 70 Betway brand partnerships with sports teams and leagues worldwide. The promotion of our brands, however, may not generate customer awareness or increase revenue to the extent we anticipate, or at all, and any increase in revenue may not offset the expenses we incur in building and maintaining our brand.

We operate in a public-facing industry where negative publicity, including from our customers, whether or not justified, can spread rapidly through, among other things, social media. To the extent that we are unable to respond timeously and appropriately to negative publicity or to the extent our responses to negative publicity are not fairly published or not positively received, our reputation and brands could be harmed. Moreover, even if we are able to respond in a timely and appropriate manner, we cannot predict how negative publicity may affect our reputation and business.

We and our employees also use social media to communicate externally. There is risk that the use of social media by us or our employees to communicate about our business or for any other purpose even in a personal capacity may give rise to negative publicity or liability or result in public exposure of personal information of our employees or customers, each of which could affect our reputation, revenue, business, results of operations and financial condition.

We rely on several different marketing channels to acquire and retain customers and to promote our brands and our products. If we are not able to effectively acquire and retain customers via such channels then our business and operating results may be harmed.

The Company undertakes a variety of marketing initiatives, include traditional marketing channels (such as television, print and radio), digital marketing (such as online display advertising, search engine marketing, social media and “affiliates” marketing) and retention marketing (including via email, text messages and social media). Traditional marketing channels are by their nature difficult to measure. Digital marketing is typically more measurable but somewhat more complex to undertake. Retention marketing is subject to customer consent which is not always granted or may be revoked. Our ability to execute on our marketing plans is subject to regulatory constraints in each market and it is not unusual for marketing-related regulations to change from time to time. If our ability to monitor and measure performance of any of these channels is compromised or if our ability to execute our plans in any of these channels is in any way inhibited then our ability to acquire and retain customers may be hampered and our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and prospects may suffer.

In some regions and for some brands or products we may rely extensively on independent third-party marketers, known as “affiliates” marketers. “Affiliates” is an industry term that describes independent third- parties which assist the Company to acquire new customers and which are generally paid on a revenue-share or cost-per-acquisition basis. Despite the word “affiliate”, these are independent parties that are not otherwise affiliated with the Company in the ordinary sense of the word. Notwithstanding that in some jurisdictions for

 

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license purposes we are deemed to control these “affiliates” marketers, their actions in the marketing of our brands are not directly within our control and hence actions, errors, omissions or intentional malfeasance on their part may cause damage to our brands, our business, our prospects and our financial results before we are able to detect such actions, errors, omissions or intentional malfeasance and/or do anything to mitigate the effects thereof. In particular, we can be held accountable by regulatory authorities for actions by such third parties in contravention of our license in a given jurisdiction, which in turn may lead to fines, license suspension, loss of license or other censure, which may in turn harm our business, our prospects and/or our financial performance. Our agreements with such marketers are sometimes such that we are obliged to pay them an ongoing share of revenues derived from customers that they introduce to us, or sometimes such that we are required to pay them a “cost per acquisition” capitation fee for each customer introduced, or sometimes a combination of both. Such third-party “affiliates” are under no obligation to continue introducing customers to us, but we may be obliged to continue to pay them future revenue shares where applicable nonetheless.

In some regions and for some brands we may make use of search engine marketing (SEM, which is the purchase of advertising against keywords on search engines) and search engine optimization (SEO, which is the adaptation of our websites and employment of other techniques in order to achieve more favorable rankings when customers search for gambling-related keywords on search engines). Search engines such as Google regularly change their internal proprietary and confidential algorithms by which SEM and SEO operate and typically do so in ways that are not predictable as to timing or effect. If we fail to adapt our marketing methods to these changes or if our competitors do so better than we do then our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and prospects may suffer.

Several of our marketing channels rely on being able to successfully track customers across different websites and apps and/or to augment our own data with additional marketing data for purposes of measuring and monitoring the effectiveness of our marketing campaigns and/or effectively adapting or executing on our marketing campaigns. The ability to do this is under threat of restrictive legislation in some jurisdictions and technology platform providers such as Google and Apple have taken steps to restrict such tracking and augmentation and we expect that further restrictions may be added in future. Such restrictions may hamper our ability to acquire or retain customers and thereby cause our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and prospects to suffer.

Our growth depends in part, on the success of our strategic relationships with third parties. Overreliance on certain third parties, or our inability to extend existing relationships or agree to new relationships may cause unanticipated costs for us and impact our financial performance in the future.

We rely on relationships with sports teams and leagues worldwide, advertisers, casinos and other third parties in order to attract and retain customers to our offerings. These relationships along with providers of online services, search engines, social media, directories and other websites and ecommerce businesses direct consumers to our offerings. In addition, many of the parties with whom we have advertising arrangements provide advertising services to other companies, including other online betting and online casino gaming products with whom we compete. While we believe that there are other third parties that could drive customers to our offerings, adding or transitioning to them may disrupt our business and increase our costs. In the event that any of our existing relationships or our future relationships fail to provide services to us in accordance with the terms of our arrangement, or at all, and we are not able to find suitable alternatives, this could impact our ability to attract and retain customers cost effectively and harm our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

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Our growth prospects may suffer if we are unable to develop successful offerings or if we fail to pursue additional offerings. In addition, if we fail to make the right investment decisions in our offerings and technology, we may not attract and retain customers and partners, and our revenue and results of operations may decline.

The industries in which we operate are subject to rapid and frequent changes in standards, technologies, products and service offerings, as well as in customer demands and expectations and regulations. We must continuously make decisions regarding in which offerings and technology we should invest to meet customer demand in compliance with evolving industry standards and regulatory requirements and must continually introduce and successfully market new and innovative technologies, offerings and enhancements to remain competitive and effectively stimulate customer demand, acceptance and engagement. Our ability to engage, retain, and increase our customer base and to increase our revenue will depend on our ability to successfully create new offerings, both independently and together with third parties. We may introduce significant changes to our existing technology and offerings or develop and introduce new and unproven products and services, with which we have little or no prior development or operating experience. The process of developing new offerings and systems is inherently complex and uncertain, and new offerings may not be well received by customers, even if well-reviewed and of high quality. If we are unable to develop technology and products that address customers’ needs or enhance and improve our existing technology and offerings in a timely manner, this could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Although we intend to continue investing in our research and development efforts, if new or enhanced offerings fail to engage our customers, we may fail to attract or retain customers or to generate sufficient revenue, operating margin, or other value to justify our investments, any of which may seriously harm our business. In addition, management may not properly ascertain or assess the risks of new initiatives, and subsequent events may alter the risks that were evaluated at the time that we decided to execute any new initiative. Creating additional offerings can also divert our management’s attention from other business issues and opportunities. Even if our new offerings attain market acceptance, those new offerings could exploit the market share of our existing product offerings or share of our customers’ wallets in a manner that could negatively impact our business. Furthermore, such expansion of our business increases the complexity of our business and places an additional burden on our management, operations, technical systems and financial resources and we may not recover the often-substantial up-front costs of developing and marketing new offerings, or recover the opportunity cost of diverting management and financial resources away from other offerings. In the event of continued growth of our operations, products or in the number of third-party relationships, we may not have adequate resources, operationally, technologically or otherwise to support such growth and the quality of our technology, offerings or our relationships with third parties could suffer. In addition, failure to effectively identify, pursue and execute new business initiatives, or to efficiently adapt our processes and infrastructure to meet the needs of our innovations, may adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Additionally, we may make bad or unprofitable decisions regarding these investments. If new or existing competitors offer more attractive offerings, we may lose customers or customers may decrease their spending on our offerings. New customer demands, superior competitive offerings, new industry standards or changes in the regulatory environment could render our existing offerings unattractive, unmarketable or obsolete and require us to make substantial unanticipated changes to our technology or business model. Our failure to adapt to a rapidly changing market or evolving customer demands could harm our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

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Our internal forecasts are subject to significant risks, assumptions, estimates and uncertainties, including assumptions regarding future legislation and changes in regulations of the jurisdictions in which we operate, or seek to operate, our business. As a result, our projected revenues, market share, expenses and profitability may differ materially from our expectations.

We operate in a rapidly evolving and highly competitive industry and our internal forecasts are subject to the risks and assumptions made by management with respect to this industry. Operating results are difficult to forecast because they generally depend on our assessment of factors that are inherently beyond our control and impossible to predict with certainty, such as the timing of adoption of future legislation and regulations by different jurisdictions. Furthermore, if we invest in the development of new products or distribution channels that do not achieve commercial success, whether because of competition or otherwise, we may not recover the often material “up front” costs of developing and marketing those products and distribution channels, or recover the opportunity cost of diverting management and financial resources away from other products or distribution channels.

Additionally, our business may be affected by reductions in customer acquisition, customer persistency and customer spending as a result of numerous factors which may be difficult to predict. This may result in decreased revenue levels, and we may be unable to adopt timely measures to compensate for any unexpected shortfall in income. Our profitability projections make numerous assumptions about the expected future levels of various expense items. Historically most of these expense items have been relatively stable or predictable either in absolute terms or in relation to revenue but there is no certainty that such stability or predictability will continue into the future. These inabilities could cause our operating results in a given period to be higher or lower than expected. If actual results differ from our estimates, analysts may negatively react and our share price could be adversely impacted.

Our contemplated acquisition of DGC is subject to various conditions, including the requirement that certain regulatory approvals in the United States are obtained. Further, if we are able to successfully consummate our transaction with DGC, the integration of the DGC business, which is incorporated in a different country, with geographically dispersed operations from our own, and with its own business culture and compensation structure, may present significant management challenges. There can be no assurance that the DGC acquisition will be completed or, even if completed, that the integration, and the synergies expected to result from that integration, will be achieved to the extent currently anticipated.

From time to time, we expect that we will pursue acquisitions in support of our strategic goals. In furtherance of such goals, we have executed a binding, definitive agreement to acquire DGC. However, our contemplated acquisition of DGC is subject to various conditions, including regulatory approvals in the United States. There can be no assurance that such conditions will be satisfied or that we will be able to successfully complete our contemplated acquisition of DGC. Further, if we are able to successfully consummate our transaction with DGC, our ability to succeed in implementing our strategy will depend on some degree upon the ability of our management to successfully integrate the DGC business. The integration of the DGC business, which is incorporated in a different country, with geographically dispersed operations from our own, and with its own business culture and compensation structure, may present significant challenges to our management and may disrupt our ongoing business. In addition, we may incur unexpected costs or fail to realize the expected benefits from such acquisition.

We may require additional capital to support our growth plans, and such capital may not be available on terms acceptable to us, if at all. This could hamper our growth and adversely affect our business.

We intend to make significant investments to support our business growth and may require additional funds to respond to business challenges, including the need to develop new offerings and features or enhance our existing offerings and features, undertake large scale brand and other marketing campaigns, enter into strategic partnerships with multiple sports teams and leagues, enter into market access agreements, launch into new

 

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markets, improve our operating infrastructure or acquire complementary businesses, personnel and technologies. Accordingly, we may need to engage in equity or debt financings to secure additional funds. Our ability to obtain additional capital, if and when required, will depend on our business plans, investor demand, our operating performance, capital markets conditions and other factors. If we raise additional funds by issuing equity, equity- linked or debt securities, those securities may have rights, preferences or privileges senior to the rights of our currently issued and outstanding equity or debt, and our existing shareholders may experience dilution. If we are unable to obtain additional capital when required, or on satisfactory terms, our ability to continue to support our business growth or to respond to business opportunities, challenges or unforeseen circumstances could be adversely affected, and our business may be harmed.

Negative events or negative media coverage relating to, or a declining popularity of, online sports betting, online casino gaming or the underlying sports or athletes on which sports betting is derived, or other negative coverage may adversely impact our ability to retain or attract customers, which could have an adverse impact on our business.

Public opinion can significantly influence our business. Unfavorable publicity regarding, for example, us, our product changes, product quality, litigation, or regulatory activity, or regarding the actions of third parties with whom we have relationships or the underlying sports (including declining popularity of the sports or athletes) could harm our reputation. In addition, a negative shift in the perception of sports betting and online casino gaming by the public or by politicians, lobbyists or others could affect future legislation of sports betting and online casino gaming, which could cause jurisdictions to impose new restrictions on or prohibit sports betting or online casino gaming in jurisdictions in which we currently operate. Furthermore, illegal betting activity by athletes could result in negative publicity for our industry and could harm our brand reputation. Negative public perception could also cause jurisdictions to abandon current plans or proposals to legalize sports betting and online casino gaming, thereby limiting our future growth potential. Such negative publicity could also adversely affect the size, demographics, engagement, and loyalty of our customer base and result in decreased revenue or slower customer growth rates, which could harm our business.

Fraud, corruption or negligence related to sports events, of any sort, whether by or involving our employees or not, may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations and negatively impact our reputation.

Our reputation and the strength of our brand are key competitive strengths. To the extent that the sports and sports betting industry as a whole or the Company, relative to its competitors, suffers a loss in credibility, our business will be significantly impacted. Factors that could potentially have an impact in this regard include fraud, corruption or negligence related to sports events, including as a result of actual or attempted or alleged match fixing, whether this involves our employees or not. Damage to reputation and credibility could have a material adverse impact on our regulatory licensure, business, financial condition and results of operations.

If we fail to detect fraud or theft related to our offerings, including by our customers and employees, we will suffer financial losses and our reputation may suffer which could harm our brand and reputation and negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations and can subject us to investigations and litigation, which could ultimately lead to regulatory penalties, including potential loss of licensure.

We have in the past incurred, and may in the future incur, losses from various types of financial fraud, including use of stolen or fraudulent credit card data, claims of unauthorized payments by customers and attempted payments by customers with insufficient funds. Bad actors use increasingly sophisticated methods to engage in illegal activities involving personal information, such as unauthorized use of another person’s identity, account information or payment information and unauthorized acquisition or use of credit or debit card details, bank account information and mobile phone numbers and accounts. Under current credit card practices, we may be liable for use of funds on our platform with fraudulent credit card data, even if the associated financial

 

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institution approved the credit card transaction, and may be subject to fines or other sanctions including the termination of our payment processing relationships. If we are unable to detect or are delayed in detecting the actions of successful perpetrators of fraud then such customers may be able to effectively gamble risk-free, and may be able to withdraw and be paid any resulting winnings before we have been able to detect the fraud. In such cases we are unlikely to be able to recover the proceeds.

Acts of fraud may involve various tactics, including collusion. Successful exploitation of our systems could have negative effects on our product offerings, services and customer experience and could harm our reputation. Failure to discover such acts or schemes in a timely manner could result in harm to our operations. In addition, negative publicity related to such schemes could have an adverse effect on our reputation, potentially causing a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. In the event of the occurrence of any such issues with our existing platform or product offerings, substantial engineering and marketing resources and management attention may be diverted from other projects to correct these issues, which may delay other projects and the achievement of our strategic objectives.

In addition, any misappropriation of, or access to, customers’ or other proprietary information or other breach of our information security could result in legal claims or legal proceedings, including regulatory investigations and actions, or liability for failure to comply with privacy and information security laws, including for failure to protect personal information or for misusing personal information, which could disrupt our operations, force us to modify our business practices, damage our reputation and expose us to claims from our customers, regulators, employees and other persons, any of which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Other potential sources of financial loss to our business may include attempts in contravention of our terms and conditions to exploit incentives or bonuses or comps in conjunction with certain casino game design features or arbitrage sports bets in order to obtain positive expectation for the customer as well as attempts by individual customers to register multiple accounts in order to claim or receive incentives or bonuses or comps multiple times or to disguise collusive betting patterns in order to evade betting limits or to exploit profitable arbitrage betting opportunities. Similar activities might be undertaken by syndicates acting in concert.

Despite measures that we have taken to detect and reduce the occurrence of fraudulent or other malicious activity on our platform, we cannot guarantee that any of our measures will be effective or will scale efficiently with our business. Our failure to adequately detect or prevent fraudulent transactions could result in substantial financial losses and harm our reputation or brand, result in litigation or regulatory action and lead to expenses that could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Even if we are successful in preventing or mitigating the effects of fraudulent transactions, doing so successfully may in some circumstances require placing severe restrictions on honest customers, which will in turn hamper the enjoyment of our customers and in turn the prospects and revenues of our business.

We rely on strategic relationships with land-based casinos, sports teams, event planners, local licensing partners and advertisers in order to be able to offer and market our products in certain jurisdictions. If we cannot maintain these relationships and establish additional relationships, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

In certain jurisdictions in which we operate, such as Belgium, it is necessary to obtain a land-based license in order to offer our online products. In addition, under some U.S. states’ gaming laws, online betting is limited to a finite number of retail operators, such as casinos, tribes or tracks, who own a “skin” or “skins” under that state’s law. A “skin” is a legally-authorized license from a state to offer online betting services provided by a casino. The “skin” provides a market access opportunity for mobile operators to operate in the jurisdiction pending licensure and other required approvals by the state’s regulator. The entities that control those “skins”, and the numbers of “skins” available, are typically determined by a state’s gaming laws. Super Group has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Digital Gaming Corporation Limited (“DGC”), which is the parent of

 

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Digital Gaming Corporation USA (“DGC USA”), which holds the exclusive license to use the Betway brand in the United States. On April 7, 2021, SGHC entered into a definitive agreement to acquire DGC, subject to certain regulatory approvals and customary closing conditions. DGC USA has secured market access in an initial 12 regulated or expected-to-be regulated states in the U.S. In most of the jurisdictions in which DGC USA offers sports betting and online casino gaming, it currently relies on a casino, tribe or track in order to get a “skin.” These “skins” are what allows DGC USA to gain access to jurisdictions where online operators are required to have a retail relationship. If we cannot establish, renew or manage our land-based international or U.S. relationships, they could terminate and we would not be allowed to operate in those jurisdictions until we enter into new relationships, which might not be possible if no other potential operators are available or wiling to partner with us, or could be at significantly higher cost. As a result, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

Some of our and DGC USA’s market access agreements provide for minimum guaranteed payments to the third party. If we are unable to generate sufficient revenue to offset the minimum guaranteed payments, this could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition. Certain of our and DGC USA’s market access agreements grant the market access partner rights to audit the financial calculations of payments under these agreements. Disputes with market access partners over terms could result in the payment of additional amounts or penalties by us or DGC USA, cancellation or non-renewal of the underlying agreement or litigation.

Participation in the sports betting industry exposes us to trading, liability management and pricing risks. We may experience lower than expected profitability and potentially significant losses as a result of a failure to determine accurately the odds in relation to any particular event and/or any failure of our sports risk management processes.

Our fixed-odds betting products involve betting where winnings are paid on the basis of the stake placed and the odds quoted. Odds are determined with the objective of providing an average return to the bookmaker over a large number of events and therefore, over the long term, our gross win percentage has remained reasonably in line with expectations. However, there can be significant variation in gross win percentage event-by-event and day-by-day. We have systems and controls that seek to reduce the risk of daily losses occurring on a gross-win basis, but there can be no assurance that these will be effective in reducing our exposure, and consequently our exposure to this risk in the future. This is particularly true in respect of parlay or accumulator wagers, where multiple individual wagers are combined into one to create the possibility of significant aggregate payouts. As a result, in the short term, there is less certainty of generating a positive gross win percentage, and we may experience (and we have from time to time experienced) significant losses with respect to individual events or betting outcomes, in particular if large individual bets are placed on an event or betting outcome or series of events or betting outcomes or if a number of parlay or accumulator wagers are successful. Odds compilers and risk managers are capable of human error, thus even allowing for the fact that a number of betting products are subject to capped pay-outs, significant volatility can occur. In some markets we rely on third-party odds compilers and risk managers and hence do not always have real-time oversight of their activities. In certain instances it is possible for customers to engage in positive expectation arbitrage betting which we might not always be able to detect. It is also possible for customers to exploit incentives or bonuses or comps for positive expectation for the customer and we might not always be able to detect or otherwise to prevent this even when we do detect it. In addition, it is possible that there may be such a high volume of trading during any particular period that even automated systems would be unable to address and eradicate all risks. Any significant losses on a gross-win basis could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, if a jurisdiction where we hold or wish to apply for a license imposes a high turnover tax for betting (as opposed to a gross-win tax), this too would impact profitability, particularly with high value/low margin bets, and likewise have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

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We may have difficulty accessing the services of banks, credit card issuers and payment processing services providers due to the nature of our business, which may make it difficult to sell our products and offerings.

Although financial institutions and payment processors are permitted to provide services to us and others in our industry, banks, credit card issuers and payment processing service providers may be hesitant to offer banking and payment processing services to real money gaming and online sports betting businesses. Consequently, businesses involved in our industry, including our own, may encounter difficulties in establishing and maintaining banking and payment processing relationships with a full scope of services and generating market rate interest. Similarly, our customers’ banks and/or credit card providers might decline to allow our customers to effect transactions with online gaming or sports betting businesses or might block such attempted transactions. If we are unable to maintain our bank accounts or our customers are unable to use their credit cards, bank accounts or e-wallets to make deposits and withdrawals from our platforms, it would be difficult for us to operate our business and increase our operating costs, and would pose additional operational, logistical and security challenges which could result in an inability to implement our business plan and harm our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

The requirements of being a public company, including compliance with the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and maintaining effective internal controls over financial reporting, may strain our resources and divert management’s attention, and the increases in legal, accounting and compliance expenses associated with being a public company may be greater than we anticipate.

As a result of the Business Combination we became a public company, and as such, we will incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company. We will be subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, and will be required to comply with the applicable requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, as well as the rules and regulations subsequently implemented by the SEC and the listing standards of the NYSE, including changes in corporate governance practices and the establishment and maintenance of effective disclosure and financial controls. Compliance with these rules and regulations can be burdensome. Our management and other personnel will need to devote a substantial amount of time to these compliance initiatives. Moreover, these rules and regulations will increase our historical legal and financial compliance costs and will make some activities more time-consuming and costly. For example, we expect that these rules and regulations may make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance than we obtained as a private company, and could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified members of our Board. In particular, we expect to incur significant expenses and devote substantial management effort toward ensuring compliance with the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which will increase beginning with the filing of our annual report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022. We may need to hire additional accounting and financial staff, and engage outside consultants, all with appropriate public company experience and technical accounting knowledge and maintain an internal audit function, which will increase our operating expenses. Moreover, we could incur additional compensation costs in the event that we decide to pay cash compensation to our directors, officers and employees closer to that of other public companies, which would increase our general and administrative expenses and could adversely affect our profitability. Furthermore, if we are unable to satisfy our obligations as a public company, we could be subject to the delisting of our common stock and warrants, fines, sanctions and other regulatory action and potentially civil litigation. We are evaluating these rules and regulations, and cannot predict or estimate the amount of additional costs we may incur or the timing of such costs.

 

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As a private company, we were not required to document and test internal controls over financial reporting nor was our management required to certify the effectiveness of internal controls or have our auditors opine on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Failure to maintain adequate financial, information technology and management processes and controls could result in material weaknesses which could lead to errors in our financial reporting, which could adversely affect our business as a public company.

We have historically not been required to document and test our internal controls over financial reporting, our management have not been required to certify the effectiveness of our internal controls and our auditors have not been required to opine on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. However, as a public company in the United States, we are required to document and test our internal controls over financial reporting and, beginning with the filing of our annual report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022, our management will be required to certify the effectiveness of our internal controls and we will become subject to the SEC’s auditor attestation requirements. We may not be able to complete our evaluation, testing and any required remediation in a timely fashion. In addition, our current controls and any new controls that we develop may become inadequate because of poor design and changes in our business, including increased complexity resulting from any international expansion. Any failure to implement and maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting could adversely affect the results of assessments by our independent registered public accounting firm and their attestation reports.

If we are unable to certify the effectiveness of our internal controls, or if our internal controls have a material weakness, we may not detect errors timeously, our consolidated financial statements could be misstated, and we could be subject to regulatory scrutiny and a loss of confidence by stakeholders, which could harm our business and adversely affect the market price of our shares.

We identified material weaknesses in connection with our internal control over financial reporting. Although we are taking steps to remediate these material weaknesses, there is no assurance we will be successful in doing so in a timely manner, or at all, and we may identify other material weaknesses.

In connection with the audits of our consolidated financial statements for fiscal years 2021, 2020 and 2019, our management and independent registered public accounting firm identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. For fiscal years 2020 and 2019 the material weaknesses related to (i) a lack of consistent application of IFRS reporting requirements across the enlarged business and (ii) the fact that policies and procedures with respect to the review, supervision and monitoring of our accounting and reporting functions were either not operating effectively and consistently for the full period across the entire business or were not designed appropriately and in place. For fiscal year 2021, the material weaknesses related to (i) the fact that policies and procedures with respect to the review, supervision and monitoring of our accounting and reporting functions were either not operating effectively and consistently for the full period across the entire business or were not designed appropriately and in place, and (ii) inadequate internal controls over the retention of records and timely application of records in management’s accounting assessments and conclusions.

We have commenced measures to remediate these material weaknesses, including hiring additional consultants and staff. Management are overseeing the implementation of improved processes and internal controls, building our financial management and reporting infrastructure. We continue to engage with third party specialists, as required, for complex accounting matters. Our management has concluded that the material weakness related to the lack of consistent application of IFRS reporting requirements across the enlarged business as described above has been remediated as of December 31, 2021.

We are currently not required to comply with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and are therefore not required to make an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. However, as a public company, we will be required to maintain internal control over financial reporting and to report any material weaknesses in such internal control. In addition, we will be required to furnish a report by our management on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, pursuant to Section 404 of the

 

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Sarbanes-Oxley Act, at the time we file our second annual report on Form 20-F with the SEC, which will be for the year ending December 31, 2022. Further, our independent registered public accounting firm is not required and has not been engaged to express, nor have they expressed, an opinion on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Had we and our independent registered public accounting firm performed an evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting in accordance with the provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, additional control deficiencies may have been identified by our management or independent registered public accounting firm, and such control deficiencies could have also represented one or more material weaknesses in addition to those previously identified.

Assessing our procedures to improve our internal control over financial reporting is an ongoing process. We can provide no assurance that our remediation efforts described herein will be successful and that we will not have material weaknesses in the future. Any material weaknesses we identify could result in an adverse reaction in the financial markets due to a loss of confidence in the reliability of our consolidated financial statements.

If our existing material weaknesses persist or we experience additional material weaknesses in the future or otherwise fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls in the future, we may not be able to accurately report our financial condition or results of operations, which may adversely affect investor confidence in us and, as a result, the value of our ordinary shares and our overall business.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we assess the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting annually and the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures annually. In particular, Section 404(a) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, or Section 404(a), will require us to perform system and process evaluation and testing of our internal control over financial reporting to allow management to report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, or Section 404(b), also requires our independent registered public accounting firm to attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. To date, we have been exempt from the requirement that our independent registered public accounting firm attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b). However, we will no longer be exempt from this requirement beginning with the filing of our annual report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022. When our independent registered public accounting firm is required to undertake an assessment of our internal control over financial reporting, the cost of our compliance with Section 404(b) will correspondingly increase. Our compliance with applicable provisions of Section 404 will require that we incur substantial accounting expense and expend significant management time on compliance-related issues as we implement additional corporate governance practices and comply with reporting requirements.

Furthermore, investor perceptions of our company may suffer if additional deficiencies are found in our internal control over financial reporting, and this could cause a decline in the market price of our shares and accordingly our overall business. Regardless of compliance with Section 404, our failure to remediate the material weaknesses which have been identified or any additional failure of our internal control over financial reporting could have a material adverse effect on our stated operating results and harm our reputation. If we are unable to implement these requirements effectively or efficiently, it could harm our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operation, cash flows or prospects and could result in an adverse opinion on our internal controls from our independent registered public accounting firm.

Our business includes significant international operations, and we are likely to be exposed to foreign currency transaction and translation risks. As a result, changes in the valuation of any major currency with which we conduct business in relation to other currencies could have positive or negative effects on our profitability and financial position.

Our global operations are likely to expose us to foreign currency transaction and translation risks. Currency transaction risk occurs in conjunction with purchases and sales of products and services that are made in currencies other than the local currency of the subsidiary involved, for example if the parent

 

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company pays, or transfers British pound sterling to a subsidiary in order to fund its expenses in local currencies. Currency translation risks occurs when the income statement and balance sheet of a foreign subsidiary is converted into currencies other than the local currency of the company involved, for example when the results of these subsidiaries are consolidated in the results of a parent company with a different reporting currency.

Due to our international operations, a significant portion of our business is denominated in foreign currencies. As a result, fluctuations in foreign currency and exchange rates may have an impact on our business, results of operations and financial position. Foreign currency exchange rates have fluctuated and may continue to fluctuate. Significant foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations may negatively impact our international revenue, which in turn affects our consolidated revenue. Currencies may be affected by internal factors, general economic conditions and external developments in other countries, all of which can have an adverse impact on a country’s currency. Currently, we are not party to any hedging transactions intended to reduce our exposure to exchange rate fluctuations. We may seek to enter into hedging transaction in the future, but we may be unable to enter into these transactions successfully, on acceptable terms or at all. We cannot predict whether we will incur foreign exchange losses in the future. Further, significant foreign exchange fluctuations resulting in a decline in the respective local currency may decrease the value of our foreign assets, as well as decrease our revenues and earnings from our foreign subsidiaries, which would reduce our profitability and adversely affect our financial position.

Our business and results of operations may be adversely affected by political, economic and social instability risks, currency restrictions and devaluation, and various local laws associated with doing business in countries in emerging economies, including in South America, Africa and Asia.

We derive a portion of our revenue from our transactions in countries categorized as emerging economies, including countries in South America, Africa and Asia, and we expect to continue to grow our operations in these regions. As such, our business is subject to the various political, social, economic, fiscal and monetary policies and factors that affect companies operating in emerging economies, which could have a significant effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. While certain emerging economies feature developed and sophisticated business sectors and financial and legal infrastructure at the core of their economy, they are also affected by socio-economic challenges such as high levels of unemployment, poverty and crime and large parts of the population, particularly in rural areas, do not have access to adequate education, health care, housing and other services, including water and electricity. Government policies aimed at alleviating and redressing the disadvantages suffered under previous governments of countries in the region may increase the costs and reduce the profitability of our business.

Our business model relies on an increase in internet penetration and digital literacy in emerging economies. Even though the main urban centers of many countries considered to be emerging economies typically offer reliable wired internet service, a substantial portion of the population are inhabitants of rural areas, which largely depend on mobile networks. Internet penetration in the markets in which we operate or may operate in the future may not reach the levels seen in more developed countries or other emerging markets for reasons that are beyond our control, including the lack of necessary network infrastructure or delayed implementation of performance improvements or security measures. The internet infrastructure in the markets in which we operate or may operate in the future may not be able to support continued growth in the number of customers, their frequency of use or their bandwidth requirements. Delays in telecommunication and infrastructure development or other technology shortfalls may also impede improvements in internet reliability. If telecommunications services are not sufficiently available to support the growth of the internet, response times could be slower, which would reduce internet usage and harm our platform. Internet penetration in our target markets amongst emerging economies may even stagnate or decline. In addition, digital illiteracy among many customers in emerging economies presents obstacles to e-commerce growth. If internet penetration and digital literacy do not increase in our current and future markets of operation in emerging economies, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects in emerging economies.

 

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It is difficult to predict the future political, social and economic direction of emerging economies in which we operate or the manner in which any future governments of such countries will attempt to address regional inequalities. It is also difficult to predict the impact that addressing these inequalities will have on our business. Furthermore, there has been regional, political and economic instability in emerging economies generally, which could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. While we believe that economic conditions in emerging economies will improve, poverty in emerging economies will decline and the purchasing power of customers in emerging economies will increase in the long term, there can be no assurance that these expected developments will materialize. The development of emerging economies, markets and levels of customer spending are influenced by many factors beyond our control, including customer perception of current and future economic conditions, acts of warfare and civil clashes, political uncertainty, employment levels, social and labor unrest due to economic and political factors, arbitrary interference with private ownership of rights in respect of land, inflation or deflation, real disposable income, poverty rates, wealth distribution, interest rates, taxation, currency exchange rates and weather conditions. An economic downturn, whether actual or perceived, currency volatility, a decrease in economic growth rates or an otherwise uncertain economic outlook in emerging economies could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects in the region.

Additionally, governments of the emerging economies in which we operate may impose or tighten foreign currency exchange control restrictions, taxes or limitations with regard to repatriation of earnings and investments from these countries. If exchange control restrictions, taxes or limitations are imposed or tightened, our ability to receive dividends or other payments from affected jurisdictions could be reduced, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, corporate, contract, property, insolvency, competition, securities and other laws and regulations in many of the emerging economies in which we operate have been, and continue to be, substantially revised. Therefore, the interpretation and procedural safeguards of the new legal and regulatory systems are in the process of being developed and defined, and existing laws and regulations may be applied inconsistently. Also, in some circumstances, it may not be possible to obtain the legal remedies provided for under these laws and regulations in a reasonably timely manner, if at all. Any of the foregoing factors could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects in the region.

Asian geopolitical and other risks are of significant importance to our business owing to the revenue that we receive from a third party in respect of licensing the use of our Betway brand to that party. A decline in such third-party operator’s financial performance, for any reason could have an adverse effect on our business. See “— Risks Related to Super Group’s Business — We license the Betway brand, for a fixed fee, for use by DGC USA in the United States and, for a fixed fee plus an additional fee equal to a percentage of Betway’s global brand marketing spend, to a third party for use in China and Thailand. A decline in such third- party operators’ financial performance or a termination of the brand licenses by such third parties could have an adverse effect on our business.”

Our business is dependent on certain large markets, the loss of which or slower growth in which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our business derives a large percentage of its revenues from a small number of markets. For example, 47% of our revenue for the year ended December 31, 2021 was derived from the Americas, of which a majority was derived from Canada. There can be no assurance that we would be able to recover or replace a significant reduction in revenue or growth thereof derived from one or more of these markets if that were to happen for any reason, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Economic downturns, reductions in discretionary consumer spending and political and market conditions beyond our control could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our business is particularly sensitive to reductions from time to time in discretionary consumer spending. Demand for entertainment and leisure activities, including gaming, can be affected by changes in the economy

 

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and consumer tastes, both of which are difficult to predict and beyond our control. Unfavorable changes in general economic conditions, including recessions, economic slowdowns, sustained high levels of unemployment, and rising prices or the perception by consumers of weak or weakening economic conditions, may reduce our customers’ disposable income or result in fewer individuals engaging in entertainment and leisure activities, such as sports betting and online casino gaming. As a result, we cannot ensure that demand for our offerings will remain constant. Economic recessions have had, and may continue to have, far reaching adverse consequences across many industries, including the global entertainment and gaming industries, which may adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. As a result of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently experiencing a global recession, and if recovery is slow or stalls, or we experience a further downturn as a result of a subsequent wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, we may experience a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects.

A significant geo-political development is unfolding in the Ukraine. Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, 2022, and since then Russian military activity has escalated rapidly. The United States and several NATO allies have imposed significant economic sanctions that are likely to cripple the Russian economy and currency, the Ruble. These events have created significant market volatility and growing economic uncertainty. Should the situation deteriorate further and military action lead to a protracted war, there would likely be a material adverse economic impact on Europe and therefore indirectly in the U.S., potentially slowing economic activity and possibly lessening the need for the Fed to remove monetary policy as aggressively as expected otherwise. The risk of Russian cyber-attacks may also create market volatility and economic uncertainty. It is believed that Russian cyber-attacks of the Ukrainian government infrastructure have already occurred, and cyber-attacks could potentially spread to a broader network of countries and networks. These events may have an adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and the value of our common stock.

In addition, changes in general market, economic and political conditions in domestic and foreign economies or financial markets, including fluctuation in stock markets resulting from, among other things, trends in the economy as a whole may reduce customers’ disposable income. Any one of these changes could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects.

Litigation and Regulatory Risks

The gaming laws of different jurisdictions vary in both nature and application, and may be subject to alternate interpretations. Jurisdictions may or may not incorporate regulatory frameworks that provide a clear basis for the licensed provision of our gaming products and services to their residents. As a consequence, legal and enforcement risk may be unclear or uncertain in a number of the jurisdictions in which we operate and from which we generate a significant portion of our revenue, and there is a risk that regulators or prosecutors in these territories may seek to take legal action against us even in jurisdictions in which we believe our offerings are lawful based on advice from local counsel. Furthermore, we have in the past faced claims from customers contesting the legal basis of our services in certain jurisdictions, and may face similar claims again in the future.

The gaming industry is highly regulated and we are required to maintain licenses and pay requisite gaming taxes and other fees in each jurisdiction from which we operate in order to continue our operations and remain compliant with our licenses. Aside from jurisdictions in which we operate by virtue of a locally awarded license, we also operate in other jurisdictions by virtue of relevant licenses awarded by other recognized regulatory authorities. Our reliance on such licenses is at times based on the lack of a local regulatory framework in that jurisdiction where our services are accessed and used by end users, or based on a specific legal position and interpretation of local legislation. Such interpretation, at times, includes, but is not limited to, a legal position based on EU law or supranational law. As gaming laws may be subject to alternate interpretations, including regarding their conformity with EU or supranational law, there is a risk that our interpretation would be contested by a governmental agency or regulator and our legal position ultimately rejected, which may result in administrative, civil or criminal prosecution or penalties. Furthermore, we have in the past faced, and continue to face, civil claims from customers contesting the legal basis of our services in certain jurisdictions, such as Austria, where we have, to date, settled some claims

 

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and are contesting others, and may continue to face similar claims again in future. This may materially adversely impact our profitability in such jurisdictions and/or our ability to carry on business in such jurisdictions and/or our ability to apply for or retain gaming licenses and/or could cause us to cease offering some or all of our offerings in the impacted jurisdictions and thereby have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects.

Failure to comply with legal or regulatory requirements in a particular regulated jurisdiction, or the failure to successfully obtain a license or permit in a particular regulated jurisdiction, could impact our ability to comply with licensing and regulatory requirements in other regulated jurisdictions, or could cause the rejection of license applications or cancellation of existing licenses in other regulated jurisdictions, or could cause financial institutions, online and mobile platforms, advertisers and distributors to stop providing services to us which we rely upon to receive payments from, or distribute amounts to, our customers, or otherwise to deliver and promote our offerings.

Compliance with the various regulations applicable to sports betting and real money casino gaming is costly and time-consuming. Regulatory authorities of the jurisdictions in which we operate, or seek to operate, our business have broad powers with respect to the regulation and licensing of sports betting and casino gaming operations and may revoke, suspend, condition or limit our sports betting or casino gaming licenses, impose substantial fines on us and take other actions, any one of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. These laws and regulations are dynamic and subject to potentially differing interpretations, and various legislative and regulatory bodies may expand current laws or regulations or enact new laws and regulations regarding these matters. As such, we engage local counsel to advise on compliance with applicable laws and regulations and we will strive to comply with all applicable laws and regulations relating to our business. It is possible, however, that these requirements may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another and may conflict with other rules. Non-compliance or alleged non-compliance with any such law or regulations could expose us to claims, proceedings, litigation, investigations and prosecutions by private parties and enforcement and regulatory authorities, as well as substantial fines, negative publicity, detention or incarceration of management or other personnel, and revocation, suspension, condition or limitation of our sports betting and gaming licenses, each of which may adversely affect our business.

Any sports betting or gaming license could be revoked, suspended or conditioned at any time. The loss of a license in one jurisdiction could trigger the loss of a license or affect our eligibility for such a license in another jurisdiction, and any such losses, or potential for such loss, could cause us to cease offering some or all of our offerings in the impacted jurisdictions. We may be unable to obtain or maintain all necessary registrations, licenses, permits or approvals, and could incur fines or experience delays related to the licensing process, which could adversely affect our operations. Our delay or failure to obtain or maintain licenses in any jurisdiction may prevent us from distributing our offerings, increasing our customer base and/or generating revenues. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain and maintain the licenses and related approvals necessary to conduct our sports betting and online casino gaming operations. Any failure to maintain or renew our existing licenses, registrations, permits or approvals could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

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Our growth prospects depend on the regulatory status of real-money gaming in various jurisdictions. Real-money gaming is an area of focus in several jurisdictions, and regulation may not occur in as many jurisdictions as we expect, or may occur at a slower pace than we anticipate. Additionally, even if additional jurisdictions regulate real-money gaming, this may be accompanied by legislative or regulatory restrictions and/or taxes that make it commercially unviable to operate in those jurisdictions, or the process of implementing regulations or securing the necessary licenses to operate in a particular jurisdiction may take longer than we anticipate, which could adversely affect our future results of operations and make it more difficult to meet our expectations for financial performance.

A number of jurisdictions in which we operate, or seek to operate, our business have regulated, or are currently considering regulating, real money gaming, and our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects are significantly dependent upon regulation of real money gaming. Our business plan is partially based upon the regulation of real money gaming in these jurisdictions; however, this regulation may not occur as we have anticipated. Additionally, if a large number of jurisdictions enact real money gaming legislation and we are unable to obtain, or are otherwise delayed in obtaining the necessary licenses to operate online sports betting or online casino gaming websites in those jurisdictions where such games are regulated, our future growth in online sports betting and online casino gaming could be impaired.

As we enter into new jurisdictions, governments may regulate real money gaming in a manner that is unfavorable to us. As a result, we may encounter legal, regulatory and political challenges that are difficult or impossible to foresee and which could result in an unforeseen adverse impact on planned revenues or costs associated with the new opportunity. For example, certain jurisdictions require us to have a relationship with a land-based, licensed casino for access to online sports betting and/or online casino gaming, which tends to increase our costs of revenue. Jurisdictions that have established government monopolies may limit opportunities for private sector participants like us. Governments in certain jurisdictions also impose substantial tax rates on online sports betting and gaming revenue, in addition to sales taxes in certain jurisdictions and an excise tax on the amount of each wager. As many relevant taxes apply to various measures of modified gross profit, tax rates that are higher than we expect will make it more costly and less desirable for us to launch in a given jurisdiction, while tax increases in any of our existing jurisdictions may adversely impact our profitability.

The Parliament of Canada recently passed legislation allowing provinces to regulate single-event wagering within their jurisdictions, although at this point it is unclear as to the approach which each province will take in such regard. Historically, provincially-regulated offerings were limited to parlay sports betting (which required bets to be made on multiple discrete events) offered by provincial Crown corporations. Sport-betting businesses, like our Betway brands, that operate outside of the provincially-regulated frameworks, have until now also offered single-event betting with limited competition from such Crown corporations, due to the general preference of customers to not be limited to parlay bets only. In addition, certain of our private operator competitors elected not to carry on meaningful sports-betting operations in Canada. However, as a consequence of the legislative change, the Crown corporations and many of our private operator competitors, as well as new market entrants (some of which are well-funded and involve major business interests) have announced their intentions to begin or expand sports betting operations in Canada. Independently, several Canadian provinces have been considering altering their approach to regulated online gaming (including both casino games and sports betting), to permit private operators like us to enter the provincially-regulated system. In particular, the Province of Ontario has moved ahead with its plans to permit provincially-regulated online gaming by private operators under a new regulatory framework. In Ontario, a new provincial commercial contracting party has been established and both it and the provincial regulator have created engagement and licensing mechanisms and have begun to register applicants. Both Spin and Betway have not yet gone live in Ontario, however we are pleased to note that we are in the final stages of the regulatory license process. Meanwhile, we continue to operate in Ontario under the knowledge of the regulator. Other Canadian provinces are expected to follow suit eventually. In the past, when other countries have introduced regulatory frameworks, our financial results have been impacted by, amongst other things, increased taxation and compliance costs, offset by improvements in other costs of doing business such as payment processing and product costs. In some cases the introduction of a

 

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restrictive regulatory regime has resulted in a decrease in the size of the market, whereas in others a liberal regulatory regime has led to an increase in the size of the market. Although it is possible that all of the above will expand the size of the total addressable market in Canada and/or improve the profitability of the Canadian market for us, at this point this cannot be said for certain and it is possible that parties like us that have pre-existing Ontario or Canadian operations may be at a disadvantage under these new frameworks unless we are prepared to agree to certain conditions. While we actively seek out regulated jurisdictions for the expansion of our business and therefore welcome the recently passed legislation and the proposed Ontario regulatory framework and intend to participate therein to the fullest extent possible, we cannot be certain about the future impacts of these changing circumstances on our business, operations or financial prospects. The Americas accounted for 47% of our business revenue in the year ended December 31, 2021, and Canada is our largest market in the Americas. To the extent that competition in these key markets is increased and we are unable to maintain our related business, it may have a material adverse effect on them. Therefore, even in cases in which a jurisdiction purports to license and regulate sports betting or gaming, the licensing and regulatory regimes can vary considerably in terms of their business-friendliness and at times may be intended to provide incumbent operators with advantages over new licensees. Therefore, some “liberalized” regulatory regimes are considerably more or less commercially attractive than others.

Our growth prospects in certain jurisdictions depend upon the ability of customers to deposit funds in order to participate in our gaming products. Payment providers in those jurisdictions may exercise independent judgment over whether our gaming operations comply with the requirements of local laws and regulations, and may also place independent limitations on businesses involved in the gaming industry as a whole based upon their own interpretations of regulatory or reputational risks. The inability to access sufficient payment processing resources has in the past and could in the future limit the growth of the business in those jurisdictions.

Our business depends in part on the ability of customers to deposit funds in order to utilize our betting and online casino gaming products. Payment providers in local jurisdictions provide this ability to our customers. These payment providers require us to comply with their operating rules as well as local laws and regulations. The payment providers set their operating rules and have discretion to interpret the rules and change them at any time. Changes to these rules, laws or regulations or how they are interpreted could have a significant impact on our business and financial results. These operating rules, laws and regulations vary from one jurisdiction to another and future legislative and regulatory action, court decisions or other governmental action, which may be affected by, among other things, political pressures, attitudes and climates, as well as personal biases, may have a material impact on our operations and financial results. Future legislative and regulatory action, and court decisions or other governmental action, may have a material impact on our planned sports betting and/or online casino gaming operations. Payment providers could view us, or the sports betting and/or online casino gaming industry in general, as high risk, despite our efforts to obtain all applicable licenses or approvals. The inability to access sufficient payment processing resources has in the past, and could in the future, limit the growth of our business which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects, as well as impact our reputation.

Our growth prospects and market potential will depend on our ability to obtain licenses to operate in a number of regulated jurisdictions and if we fail to obtain such licenses our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be impaired.

Our ability to grow our business will depend on our ability to obtain and maintain licenses to offer our product offerings in a large number of jurisdictions or in heavily populated jurisdictions. If we fail to obtain and maintain licenses in large jurisdictions or in a greater number of mid-market jurisdictions, this may prevent us from expanding the footprint of our product offerings, increasing our customer base and/or generating revenues. We cannot be certain that we will be able to obtain and maintain licenses and related approvals necessary to conduct our online sports betting and gaming operations. Any failure to obtain and maintain licenses, registrations, permits or approvals could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

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We are subject to risks relating to revenue received from customers located in countries that are sanctioned or that prohibit gaming activities, which could result in fines or other liabilities and could harm our business.

Our global operations require us to comply with laws and regulations imposed by governments around the world with jurisdiction over our operations. Some of our customers may be located in countries that are subject to sanction laws or that prohibit gaming activities. Although we have taken precautions to prevent our product offerings from being provided or accessed in such jurisdictions, including systems and processes for the detection of willful and fraudulent attempts by end-users to circumvent our precautions such as the use of virtual private networks and other technologies, we cannot assure you that such precautions are or will be fully effective and we could inadvertently or unwittingly provide access to our product offerings to persons located in sanctioned countries or countries that prohibit gaming activities. In addition, we have systems and controls in place that are intended to detect and resolve such violations; however, we cannot assure you that such systems and controls will be effective. If we are found to be in violation of any applicable sanctions or other laws and regulations, it could result in significant fines, prosecution or other liabilities and could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our failures to comply with the anti-corruption, anti-bribery, sanctions, anti-money laundering, privacy/personal information, responsible gaming, consumer protection and similar laws could result in legal penalties and fines, and/or negatively impact our reputation and results operations.

Doing business on a worldwide basis requires us to comply with anti-corruption laws and regulations imposed by governments around the world with jurisdiction over our operations, which may include the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”), the Prevention of Corruption (Bailiwick of Guernsey) Law, 2003 (as amended) (the “Guernsey Bribery Law”) and the U.K. Bribery Act 2010 (“U.K. Bribery Act”), as well as the laws of the other countries where we do business. These laws and regulations may restrict our operations, trade practices, investment decisions and partnering activities. The FCPA, the Guernsey Bribery Law, the U.K. Bribery Act and other applicable laws prohibit us and our officers, directors, employees and business partners acting on our behalf, including agents, from corruptly offering, promising, authorizing or providing anything of value to “foreign officials” for the purposes of influencing official decisions or obtaining or retaining business or otherwise obtaining favorable treatment. The U.K. Bribery Act also prohibits non-governmental “commercial” bribery and accepting bribes. We are subject to the jurisdiction of various governments and regulatory agencies around the world, which may bring our personnel and representatives into contact with “foreign officials” responsible for issuing or renewing permits, licenses or approvals or for enforcing other governmental regulations.

In addition, some of the international locations in which we operate lack a developed legal system and have elevated levels of corruption. Our international operations expose us to the risk of violating, or being accused of violating, anti-corruption laws and regulations. Our failure to successfully comply with these laws and regulations may expose us to reputational harm, as well as significant sanctions, including criminal fines, imprisonment, civil penalties, disgorgement of profits, injunctions and debarment from government contracts, as well as other remedial measures. Investigations of alleged violations can be expensive and disruptive. We are continuously developing and maintaining policies and procedures designed to comply with applicable anti- corruption laws and regulations. However, there can be no guarantee that our policies and procedures will effectively prevent violations by our employees or business partners acting on our behalf, and any such violation could adversely affect our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations.

Furthermore, we are required to comply with the various responsible gaming regulations of those jurisdictions where we are licensed and from which we offer gambling services. These regulations, which in some jurisdictions are constantly being scrutinized, altered and broadened by the various legislators and/or regulators, may restrict our operations and partnerships, lead to enforcement actions that may result in fines, penalties, prosecutions or other sanctions, and at times may heavily impact our operations in and revenue from a certain jurisdiction. Consumer protection legislation and regulations apply to us as well, both of those jurisdictions from which we offer our services and of those where our services are consumed by our customers. These laws and regulations may have an impact on the scope of our offering and limit it significantly.

 

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We have been the subject of governmental investigations and inquiries with respect to the operation of our businesses and we could be subject to future governmental investigations and inquiries, legal proceedings and enforcement actions. Any sanctions or costly regulatory settlements arising from governmental investigations, inquiries, proceedings or actions could adversely affect our business. Due to the nature of applicable regulatory frameworks, sanctions or enforcement or disciplinary actions in one jurisdiction may also have consequences in other jurisdictions, creating broader negative impacts on our business.

We have received formal and informal inquiries from time to time, from government authorities and regulators, including tax authorities and gaming regulators, regarding compliance with laws and other matters, and we may receive such inquiries in the future, particularly as we grow and expand our operations.

Violations of existing or future regulation, regulatory orders or consent decrees could subject us to substantial monetary fines, prosecutions and other penalties that could negatively affect our financial condition and operations. This could include sanctions ranging from a warning to revocation of our licenses or the licenses of our executives or employees. In addition, it is possible that future orders issued by, or inquiries or enforcement actions initiated by, government or regulatory authorities could cause us to incur substantial costs, expose us to unanticipated liability or penalties, or require us to change our business practices in a manner adverse to our business.

Palpable (obvious) errors in the posting of sports wagering odds or event times may occasionally occur in the normal course of business, sometimes for large liabilities. While it is a worldwide standard business practice to void bets associated with palpable errors or to correct the odds, there is no guarantee that regulators will approve voiding palpable errors moving forward in every case.

We offer a huge spectrum of betting markets across dozens of sports, and the odds are set through a combination of algorithmic and manual odds making. Bet acceptance is also a combination of automatic and manual acceptance. In some cases, the odds offered on the website constitute an obvious error. Examples of such errors are inverted lines between teams, or odds that are significantly different from the true odds of the outcome in a way that all reasonable persons would agree is an error. It is commonplace virtually worldwide for operators to void bets associated with such palpable errors, and in most mature jurisdictions these bets can be voided without regulatory approval at operator discretion. In some jurisdictions, it is unclear long term if regulators will consistently approve voids or re-setting odds to correct odds on such bets. In some cases, we require regulatory approval to void palpable errors ahead of time. If regulators were to not allow voiding of bets associated with large obvious errors in odds making, we could be subject to covering significant liabilities.

We follow the industry practice of restricting and managing sports betting limits at the individual customer level based on individual customer profiles and risk level to the enterprise; however there is no guarantee that countries or states will allow operators such as us to limit on the individual customer level.

Similar to a credit card company managing individual risk on the customer level through credit limits, it is customary for sports betting operators to manage customer betting limits at the individual level to manage enterprise risk levels. We believe that this practice is beneficial overall, because if it were not possible, betting options would be restricted globally and limits available to customers would be much lower to insulate overall risk due to the existence of a very small segment of highly sophisticated syndicates and algorithmic bettors, or bettors looking to take advantage of site errors and omissions. We believe that virtually all operators balance taking reasonable action from all customers against the risk of individual customers significantly harming the business viability. We cannot assure you that all jurisdictions and regulators will always allow operators to execute limits at the individual customer level, or at their sole discretion.

 

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We evaluate the expected profitability of customers at the individual customer level based on individual customer profiles and behaviors and attempt to responsibly incentivize and/or encourage (or discourage, as the case may be) and reward customers accordingly; however there is no guarantee that countries or states will allow operators such as us to continue to do so or that our efforts to do so are currently or will in the future be profitable.

We collect and evaluate data regarding the behavior and activity of our customers on our websites and in our apps. This data is used to determine the expected profitability of each customer so that we can in turn recommend appropriate games and wagers to customers (based on our understanding of their preferences) and so that we can (subject to responsible gaming regulations and/or best practice, as the case may be) offer incentives or bonuses or comps in a manner that attempts to responsibly optimize the confluence of customer enjoyment and our profitability. Such incentives or bonuses or comps may be subject to terms and conditions that are customized per individual customer, including specific wagering requirements and/or game or wager limitations.

We believe that this practice is beneficial overall, because if it were not possible, our products, incentives, bonuses and comps would be restricted globally and such benefits available to customers would be much lower to insulate overall risk due to the existence of a very small segment of highly sophisticated syndicates and individuals looking to take advantage of such benefits for profit. We believe that virtually all operators balance taking reasonable action from all customers against the risk of individual customers significantly harming the business viability. We cannot assure you that all jurisdictions and regulators will always allow operators to collect the data that we do or to evaluate customers in the way that we do or to offer or promote products, incentives, bonuses and comps in the individualized manner that we do. There have been in the past and may also in the future be situations where we are restricted to offering uniform products, incentives, bonuses and comps equally to all customers regardless of expected profitability of such offers and/or where we are restricted in the manner in which such benefits and offers may be promoted and/or where we are restricted in the manner in or frequency with which such benefits and offers may be made available to customers.

We also cannot assure you that our methodologies and algorithms for determining how to interact, incentivize and/or encourage (or discourage, as the case may be) and reward customers are accurate or profitable now, or that they will be so in the future. If our methodologies and algorithms contain errors or omissions or otherwise incorrectly interact, incentivize, encourage, discourage or reward customers then we may suffer financial losses. In particular, customers seeking to exploit such errors or omissions may profit disproportionately from such situations and we may not detect such instances and/or may not be able to mitigate the resulting losses even if we do detect such situations.

Furthermore, despite our belief in the importance of responsible gaming and despite our efforts to ensure that our interactions, incentives, encouragements, discouragements or rewards do not encourage irresponsible or problem gaming, we cannot assure you that we will succeed in this regard. Failures in this regard may result in fines, sanctions, license conditions or forfeiture in one or more jurisdictions which in turn may result in damage to our reputation, prospects and financial results.

In some jurisdictions our key executives, certain employees or other individuals related to the business, including significant shareholders, will be subject to licensing or compliance requirements. Failure by such individuals to obtain the necessary licenses or comply with individual regulatory obligations, could cause the business to be non-compliant with its obligations, or imperil its ability to obtain or maintain licenses necessary for the conduct of the business. In some cases, the remedy to such situation may require the removal of a key executive or employee or significant shareholder and the mandatory redemption or transfer of such person’s equity securities, which could have an adverse effect on the overall market for our securities.

As part of obtaining our gaming licenses, the responsible gaming authority will generally determine suitability of certain directors, officers and employees and, in some instances, significant shareholders. The criteria used by gaming authorities to make determinations as to who requires a finding of suitability or the

 

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suitability of an applicant to conduct gaming operations varies among jurisdictions, but generally requires extensive and detailed application disclosures followed by a thorough investigation. Gaming authorities typically have broad discretion in determining whether an applicant should be found suitable to conduct operations within a given jurisdiction. If any gaming authority with jurisdiction over our business were to find an applicable officer, director, employee or significant shareholder of ours unsuitable for licensing or unsuitable to continue having a relationship with us, we would be required to sever our relationship with that person. Furthermore, such gaming authorities may require us to terminate the employment of any person who refuses to file required applications. Either result could have a material adverse effect on our business, operations and prospects.

Additionally, a gaming regulatory body may refuse to issue or renew a gaming license or restrict or condition the same, based on the past or present activities of SGHC, or our current or former directors, officers, employees, shareholders or third parties with whom we have relationships, which could adversely affect our operations or financial condition. If additional gaming regulations are adopted in a jurisdiction in which we operate, such regulations could impose restrictions or costs that could have a significant adverse effect on us.

From time to time, various proposals are introduced in the legislatures of some of the jurisdictions in which we have existing or planned operations that, if enacted, could adversely affect our directors, officers, key employees, or other aspects of the Company’s operations. To date, we have obtained all governmental licenses, findings of suitability, registrations, permits and approvals necessary (or advisable based upon the advice of local counsel) for our operations. However, we can give no assurance that any additional licenses, permits and approvals that may be required will be given or that existing ones will be renewed or will not be revoked. Renewal is subject to, among other things, continued satisfaction of suitability requirements of our directors, officers, key employees and shareholders. Any failure to renew or maintain our licenses or to receive new licenses when necessary would have an adverse effect on us.

Any change in existing laws and regulations, or their interpretation or enforcement, or the regulatory climate applicable to our products and offerings, could adversely impact our ability to operate some or all of our business as currently conducted or as we seek to operate in the future, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are generally subject to laws and regulations relating to sports betting and online casino gaming in the jurisdictions in which we conduct our business or in some circumstances, of those jurisdictions in which we offer or make available our services, as well as the general laws and regulations that apply to all e-commerce businesses, such as those related to privacy and personal information, tax, anti-money laundering, competition and consumer protection. These laws and regulations vary from one jurisdiction to another and future legislative, regulatory and enforcement action, court decisions or other governmental action, which may be affected by, among other things, political pressures and changes in government leadership or legislative or governmental priorities, may have an adverse impact on our operations and financial results. In particular, some jurisdictions have introduced regulations attempting to restrict or prohibit online gaming or the marketing thereof, while others have taken the position that online gaming should be licensed and regulated and have adopted or are in the process of considering legislation and regulations to enable online gaming in their jurisdictions. Additionally, some jurisdictions in which we may operate could presently be unregulated or partially regulated and therefore more susceptible to the enactment or change of laws and regulations. Some jurisdictions do not have laws that grant us rights in the data we collect. Any enactment of laws in these jurisdictions would require a change in how we conduct business in such jurisdictions.

We have foreign licenses and operate under those licenses in a number of jurisdictions. In addition, we have entered into a definitive agreement to acquire DGC, subject to certain regulatory approvals and customary closing conditions. DGC’s subsidiary DGC USA has secured market access in an initial 12 regulated or expected-to-be regulated states in the U.S. Any of our licenses in foreign jurisdictions or U.S. states could be revoked, suspended or conditioned at any time. Our license applications may also be denied or conditioned. The loss or denial of a license in one jurisdiction could trigger the loss or denial of a license or affect our eligibility

 

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for such a license in another jurisdiction, and any of such losses or denials, or potential for such loss of denial, could cause us to cease offering some or all of our offerings in the impacted jurisdictions. As laws and regulations change, we may need to obtain and maintain licenses or registrations in additional jurisdictions. In addition, once licensed, we may be subject to various ongoing requirements, including supervision by the respective governmental agency of certain transfers of ownership and acquisitions.

In May 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992 (“PASPA”) as unconstitutional. This decision has the effect of lifting federal restrictions on sports betting and thus allows U.S. states to determine by themselves the legality of sports betting. Since the repeal of PASPA, several states have legalized online sports betting. To the extent new real money gaming or sports betting jurisdictions are established or expanded, we cannot guarantee that we will be successful in penetrating such new jurisdictions or expanding our business or customer base in line with the growth of existing jurisdictions. If we are unable to effectively develop and operate directly or indirectly within these new jurisdictions or if our competitors are able to successfully penetrate geographic jurisdictions that we cannot access or where we face other restrictions, there could be a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition. Our failure to obtain or maintain the necessary regulatory approvals and licenses in jurisdictions, whether individually or collectively, could have a material adverse effect on our business. To expand into new jurisdictions, we may need to be licensed and obtain approvals of our product offerings. This is a time-consuming process that can be extremely costly. Any delays in obtaining or difficulty in maintaining regulatory approvals or licenses needed for expansion within existing jurisdictions or into new jurisdictions can negatively affect our opportunities for growth, including the growth of our customer base, or delay our ability to recognize revenue from our offerings in any such jurisdictions.

The Parliament of Canada recently passed legislation allowing provinces to regulate single-event wagering within their jurisdictions, although at this point it is unclear as to the approach which each province will take in such regard. Historically, provincially-regulated offerings were limited to parlay sports betting (which required bets to be made on multiple discrete events) offered by provincial Crown corporations. Sport-betting businesses, like our Betway brands, that operate outside of the provincially-regulated frameworks, have until now also offered single-event betting with limited competition from such Crown corporations, due to the general preference of customers to not be limited to parlay bets only. In addition, certain of our private operator competitors elected not to carry on meaningful sports-betting operations in Canada. However, as a consequence of the legislative change, the Crown corporations and many of our private operator competitors, as well as new market entrants (some of which are well-funded and involve major business interests) have announced their intentions to begin or expand sports betting operations in Canada. Independently, several Canadian provinces have been considering altering their approach to regulated online gaming (including both casino games and sports betting), to permit private operators like us to enter the provincially-regulated system. In particular, the Province of Ontario has moved ahead with its plans to permit provincially-regulated online gaming by private operators under a new regulatory framework. In Ontario, a new provincial commercial contracting party has been established and both it and the provincial regulator have created engagement and licensing mechanisms and have begun to register applicants with a ‘go-live’ date of April 4, 2022. In addition, information on standards, eligibility and other key elements have been published. Other Canadian provinces are expected to follow suit eventually. In the past, when other countries have introduced regulatory frameworks, our financial results have been impacted by, amongst other things, increased taxation and compliance costs, offset by improvements in other costs of doing business such as payment processing and product costs. In some cases the introduction of a restrictive regulatory regime has resulted in a decrease in the size of the market, whereas in others a liberal regulatory regime has led to an increase in the size of the market. Although it is possible that all of the above will expand the size of the total addressable market in Canada and/or improve the profitability of the Canadian market for us, at this point this cannot be said for certain and it is possible that parties like us that have pre-existing Ontario or Canadian operations may be at a disadvantage under these new frameworks unless we are prepared to agree to certain conditions. While we actively seek out regulated jurisdictions for the expansion of our business and therefore welcome the recently passed legislation and the proposed Ontario regulatory framework and intend to participate therein to the fullest extent possible, we cannot be certain about the future impacts of these changing circumstances on our business, operations or financial prospects. The Americas

 

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accounted for 48% of our business revenue in the year ended December 31, 2021, and Canada is our largest market in the Americas. To the extent that competition in these key markets is increased and we are unable to maintain our related business, it may have a material adverse effect on them.

Future legislative and regulatory action, and court decisions or other governmental action, may have a material impact on our operations and financial results. Governmental authorities could view us as having violated applicable laws or regulations, despite our efforts to obtain and maintain all applicable licenses or approvals and despite, based upon advice of local counsel, our belief that we are acting lawfully. There is also a risk that civil and criminal proceedings, including class actions brought by or on behalf of prosecutors or public entities or incumbent providers, or private individuals, could be initiated against us, Internet service providers, credit card and other payment processors, advertisers and others involved in sports betting and online gaming industries. Such potential proceedings could involve substantial litigation expense, penalties, fines, seizure of assets, injunctions or other restrictions being imposed upon us or our business partners, while diverting the attention of key executives. Such proceedings could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects, as well as impact our reputation.

There can be no assurance that legally enforceable legislation will not be proposed and passed in jurisdictions relevant or potentially relevant to our business to prohibit, legislate or regulate various aspects of sports betting and online gaming industries and/or the marketing thereof (or that existing laws in those jurisdictions will not be interpreted negatively). Compliance with any such legislation may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, either as a result of our determination that a jurisdiction should be blocked, or because a local license or approval may be costly for us to obtain and/or such licenses or approvals may contain other commercially undesirable conditions or where our marketing strategy is prohibited or hindered.

Even where enabling legislation is passed, there can be no assurance that such legislation and accompanying regulations and interpretation thereof will be positive for our business, either at the outset or upon subsequent revision. In the past, there have been instances where business-friendly legislation and/or regulations have been enacted only for subsequent revisions or interpretations to follow with the effect of severely restricting our ability to do business profitably. Examples of this include changes to rules and regulations governing or restrictions placed on marketing, sponsorships, customer incentives, customer deposit mechanisms and limits, customer withdrawal mechanisms and limits, and customer loss and other limits that have in some instances been enacted or amended some time after initial enabling legislation and/or regulation, or subsequent increases to gaming and other taxes.

For example, with regards to the licenses that we hold for our operations in Great Britain, the Gambling Commission (“the GC”) regulates online gambling operators. Over time the GC has issued interpretations of and amendments to the regulations. Examples include the prohibition of customer reverse withdrawals, the prohibition of various casino game features, and the introduction of casino game speed of play limits that were all brought into effect on October 31, 2020. Furthermore, the Gambling Act 2005 (2005 c 19), which is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that was amended in 2014 and which governs gambling (including online gambling) in Great Britain, is currently under review, including potential restrictions on advertising and sponsorships, which may have an adverse impact on our ability to grow our business in the United Kingdom.

As another example, the Dirección General de Ordenación del Juego (“the DGOJ”) is the responsible regulator with regards to the license that we hold for our operations in Spain. Under Spanish law, the conduct of a gambling business includes explicit prescriptions such as default limits on the amounts that customers are allowed to deposit within defined periods into their wagering accounts. When we acquired our license to operate in Spain, the law allowed us to sponsor football (soccer) teams, which resulted in us sponsoring the La Liga teams Deportivo Alavés, Levante Unión Deportiva and Club Deportivo Leganes. However, with effect from the start of the 2020/21 La Liga football season, gambling trademarks or logos may no longer be incorporated into sports equipment (including football shirts) and nor may trademarks be used to identify sports facilities or incorporated into a team’s name. Accordingly it was not possible for our arrangements with the aforementioned teams to be extended. Similarly, when we acquired our license to operate in Spain, the law allowed us to advertise our products and offerings on television with relatively limited restrictions. However, with effect from September 1, 2021, television advertising

 

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for gambling and betting is restricted to the hours of 01:00 to 05:00. While we expect to be able to continue to grow our business in Spain by means of alternative marketing channels, these changes have had at least a temporary adverse impact on our ability to grow our business in Spain.

There can be no assurance that these or other jurisdictions where we hold licenses will not adopt additional or incremental changes to their laws or their regulations, or that we will foresee or otherwise be able to predict such changes or that we will be able to successfully mitigate them. Failure to successfully mitigate such changes could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Due to the nature of our business, we are subject to taxation in a number of jurisdictions and may in the future be subject to taxation in new jurisdictions, and changes in, or new interpretation of, tax laws, tax rulings or their application by tax authorities could result in additional tax liabilities and could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Our tax obligations are and will be varied and include U.S. federal and state taxes as well as national, state, provincial and other taxes around the world due to the nature of our business. The tax laws that will be applicable to our business are subject to interpretation, and significant judgment will be required in determining our worldwide provision for income taxes. In the course of our business, there will be many transactions and calculations where the ultimate tax determination is uncertain. For example, compliance with the 2017 United States Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“TCJA”) may require the collection of information not regularly produced within our Company, the use of estimates in our consolidated financial statements, and the exercise of significant judgment in accounting for its provisions. As regulations and guidance evolve with respect to the TCJA, and as we gather more information and perform more analysis, our results may differ from previous estimates and may adversely affect our consolidated financial statements.

The gaming industry represents a significant source of tax revenue to the jurisdictions in which we currently and in the future will operate. Companies in the gaming industry are currently subject to significant taxes and fees in addition to normal corporate income taxes, and such taxes and fees are subject to increase at any time. From time to time, various legislators and other government officials have proposed and adopted changes in tax laws, or in the administration or interpretation of such laws, affecting the gaming industry. In addition, any worsening of economic conditions and the large number of jurisdictions with significant current or projected budget deficits could intensify the efforts of governments to raise revenues through increases in gaming taxes and/or other taxes. It is not possible to determine with certainty the likelihood of changes in tax laws or in the administration or interpretation or enforcement of such laws. Any material increase, or the adoption of additional taxes or fees, could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Additionally, tax authorities may impose indirect taxes on Internet-related commercial activity based on existing statutes and regulations which, in some cases, were established prior to the advent of the Internet. Tax authorities may interpret laws originally enacted for mature industries and apply it to newer industries, such as ours. The application of such laws may be inconsistent from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Our in-jurisdiction activities may vary from period to period which could result in differences in nexus from period to period.

We are subject to periodic review and audit by domestic and foreign tax authorities. Tax authorities may disagree with certain positions that we have taken or that we will take, and any adverse outcome of such a review or audit could have a negative effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Although we believe that our tax provisions, positions and estimates are reasonable and appropriate, tax authorities may disagree with certain positions we have taken. In addition, economic and political pressures to increase tax revenue in various jurisdictions may make resolving tax disputes favorably more difficult.

 

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We operate in an industry and across jurisdictions which increase our tax risk profile, and subjects us to numerous pieces of anti-avoidance legislation which are generally complex, require detailed analysis, and which positions are often not certain due to the breadth of the anti-avoidance rules. In addition, the indirect tax treatment of the services we provide in certain countries is often unclear. As a result of these risks, we may have significant tax exposures that we have not accounted for, including in key markets, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Due to the international scope of our operations and the industry in which we operate, we are subject to tax laws and regulations, including numerous anti-avoidance legislation, which are complex and subject to varying interpretations, imposed by taxing authorities around the world. Furthermore, tax laws are dynamic and therefore subject to change as new laws are passed and new interpretations of existing laws are issued or applied. Our existing corporate structure and intercompany arrangements have been implemented in a manner which we consider to be in compliance with current prevailing tax laws. However, the tax treatment of our structure and of the offerings we provide in certain jurisdictions is often unclear and could be subject to material adjustment. For example, the taxing authorities in the jurisdictions in which we operate may interpret tax laws and regulations differently than we do and challenge tax positions that we have taken. This may result in differences in the treatment of revenues, deductions and/or credits or otherwise expose us to additional taxes, interest and/or penalties, including in key markets, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, future changes to tax laws and regulations could increase our tax obligations in jurisdictions where we do business or are deemed to do business for tax purposes, or require us to change the manner in which we conduct certain aspects of our business.

We are party to pending litigation and regulatory and tax audits in various jurisdictions and with various plaintiffs and we may be subject to future litigation and regulatory and tax audits in the operation of our business. An adverse outcome in one or more proceedings could adversely affect our business.

As a growing company with expanding operations, we in the past have been party to, and we may in the future increasingly face the risk of, claims, lawsuits, and other proceedings involving competition and antitrust, anti-money laundering, OFAC, gaming, intellectual property, privacy, consumer protection, accessibility claims, securities, tax, labor and employment, commercial disputes, services and other matters, including claims by customers. Litigation to defend us against claims by third parties, or to enforce any rights that we may have against third parties, may be necessary, which could result in substantial costs and diversion of our resources, causing an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Any litigation to which we are a party may result in an onerous or unfavorable judgment that may not be reversed upon appeal, or in payments of substantial monetary damages or fines, the posting of bonds requiring significant collateral, letters of credit or similar instruments, or we may decide to settle lawsuits on similarly unfavorable terms. These proceedings could also result in reputational harm, criminal sanctions, consent decrees or orders preventing us from offering certain products or requiring a change in our business practices in costly ways or requiring development of non-infringing or otherwise altered products or technologies. Litigation and other claims and regulatory proceedings against us could result in unexpected disciplinary actions, expenses and liabilities, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Intellectual Property and Data Privacy Risks

Failure to protect or enforce our intellectual property rights, the confidentiality of our trade secrets and confidential information, or the costs involved in protecting or enforcing our intellectual property rights and confidential information, could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We rely on trademark, copyright, trade secret, and domain-name-protection laws to protect our rights in intellectual property. However, third parties may knowingly or unknowingly infringe our rights in intellectual

 

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property, third parties may challenge intellectual property rights held by us, and pending and future trademark and patent applications may not be approved or courts/tribunals may not uphold our objections or claims. In addition, effective intellectual property protection may not be available in every country in which we operate or intend to operate our business. In any of these cases, we may be required to expend significant time and expense to prevent infringement or to enforce our rights. There can be no assurance that others will not offer products or services that are substantially similar to ours and compete with our business.

Circumstances outside our control could pose a threat to our intellectual property rights. Also, the efforts we have taken to protect our intellectual property rights may not be sufficient or effective. For example, it may not always have been possible or commercially desirable to obtain registered protection for our products, software, databases or other technology and, in such situations, we rely on laws governing protection of unregistered intellectual property rights, confidentiality and/or contractual exclusivity of and to underlying data and technology to prevent unauthorized use by third parties. As such, if we are unable to protect our proprietary offerings via relevant laws or contractual exclusivity, technology and features, competitors may copy them. In particular, the EU database right protection we enjoy in the EU does not apply outside the EU and, as such, we cannot be certain that we can rely on existing statutes, regulations and/or case law (including in the U.S.) to protect our unregistered intellectual property in the future or prevent third parties from making unauthorized uses of our data and other unregistered intellectual property. The position regarding the U.K. and the EU database right following Brexit also remains unclear. The loss of EU database right protection could adversely affect our business. Any significant impairment of our intellectual property rights could harm our business or our ability to compete. If we are unable to protect our proprietary offerings and features, competitors may copy them. Also, protecting our intellectual property rights is costly and time-consuming. Any unauthorized use of our intellectual property or disclosure of our confidential information or trade secrets could make it more expensive to do business, thereby harming our operating results. Furthermore, if we are unable to protect our intellectual property rights or prevent unauthorized use or appropriation by third parties, the value of our brand and other intangible assets may be diminished, and competitors may be able to more effectively mimic our offerings and service. Any of these events could harm our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Our collection, storage and use, including sharing and international transfers, of personal data are subject to applicable data protection and privacy laws, and any actual or perceived failure to comply with such laws may harm our reputation and business or expose us to fines, civil claims (including class actions), and other enforcement action. The protection of personal information is becoming increasingly regulated and changes in applicable laws may require changes to our policies, practices, procedures and personnel which may require material expenditures and harm our financial condition and results of operations.

We are, and will increasingly become as we seek to expand our business, subject to numerous domestic and foreign laws, regulations, rules and standards, as well as associated industry standards, policies and contractual or other obligations, relating to the collection, use, storage, safeguarding, retention, security, destruction, disclosure, transfer, and/or other processing of personal data (collectively, “Processing”) in the jurisdictions in which we operate (collectively, “Data Protection Requirements”). These Data Protection Requirements often vary significantly by jurisdiction. While we have taken steps to comply with Data Protection Requirements, we cannot assure you that our efforts to achieve and remain in compliance have been and/or will continue to be, fully successful. If we fail, or are perceived to have failed, to address or comply with any such Data Protection Requirements, this could result in enforcement actions against us that could include investigations, fines, penalties, audits and inspections, additional reporting requirements and/or oversight, temporary or permanent bans on all or some Processing of personal data or orders to destroy or not use personal data. Further, individuals or other relevant stakeholders could bring a variety of claims against us for our actual or perceived failure to comply with the Data Protection Requirements. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, or financial condition, and could lead to a loss of actual or prospective customers, collaborators or partners; result in an inability to Process personal data or to operate in certain jurisdictions; limit our ability to develop or commercialize current or prospective offerings or services; or require us to revise or restructure our operations.

 

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For example, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) applies to any Processing operations carried out in the context of the activities of an establishment in the EEA, as well as to any other Processing operations relating to the offering of goods or services to individuals in the EEA and/or the monitoring of individuals’ behavior in the EEA. Also, notwithstanding the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU, by operation of the so called ‘UK GDPR’ (i.e., the GDPR as it continues to form part of the law of the United Kingdom by virtue of section 3 of the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and as subsequently amended) (“UK GDPR”) the GDPR continues to apply in substantially equivalent form to Processing operations carried out in the context of the activities of an establishment in the United Kingdom and any other Processing relating to the offering of goods or services to individuals in the United Kingdom and/or monitoring of individuals’ behavior in the United Kingdom. Therefore, reference to the GDPR herein also refers to the UK GDPR in the context of the United Kingdom, unless the context requires otherwise. Furthermore, the GDPR provides that EEA Member States may introduce specific, supplementary requirements related to the Processing of “special categories of personal data”; as well as personal data related to criminal offences or convictions. In the United Kingdom, the UK Data Protection Act 2018 complements the UK GDPR in this regard. This fact may lead to greater divergence on the law that applies to the Processing of such personal data across the EEA and/or United Kingdom, which may increase our costs and overall compliance risk.

The GDPR and such supplementary requirements impose stringent data privacy and security requirements. In particular, the GDPR imposes several requirements relating to ensuring there is a lawful basis for Processing personal data, extends the rights of individuals to whom the personal data relates, materially expands the definition of what is expressly noted to constitute personal data, requires additional disclosures about how personal data is to be used, imposes limitations on retention of personal data, imposes strict rules on the transfer of personal data out of the EEA/UK to most third countries, creates mandatory data breach notification requirements in certain circumstances and establishes onerous new obligations on service providers, or processors, who Process personal data simply on behalf of others. It also significantly increased penalties for noncompliance.

Additionally, following the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union on January 31, 2020 and end of the post-Brexit transition period on December 31, 2020, as noted above, the United Kingdom has introduced the UK GDPR which currently makes the privacy regimes of the EEA and United Kingdom similar, though it is possible that either the European Union, and consequently those further states that make up the remainder of the EEA, or United Kingdom could elect to change their approach and create differences in legal requirements and regulation in this area. On June 28, 2021, the European Commission issued an adequacy decision under the GDPR which allows transfers (other than those carried out for the purposes of United Kingdom immigration control) of personal data from the EEA to the United Kingdom to continue without restriction for a period of four years ending June 27, 2025. After that period, the adequacy decision may be renewed, however, only if the United Kingdom continues to ensure an adequate level of data protection. During these four years, the European Commission will continue to monitor the legal situation in the United Kingdom and could intervene at any point if the United Kingdom deviates from the level of data protection in place at the time of issuance of the adequacy decision. If the adequacy decision is withdrawn or not renewed, transfers of personal data from the EEA to the United Kingdom will require a valid ‘transfer mechanism’ and we may be required to implement new processes and put new agreements in place (such as the then-current form of the European Commission-issued Standard Contractual Clauses), to enable transfers of personal data from the EEA to the United Kingdom to continue.

We are also subject to the Data Protection (Bailiwick of Guernsey) Law, 2017 (as amended) (the “Guernsey DP Law”), which largely follows GDPR and requires us to control and process personal data only for proper purposes and in accordance with statutory data protection principles, and the Data Protection Law of Colombia, which requires the consent of the customer to their data being transmitted outside of Colombia.

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or services globally. In particular, European data protection laws, such as the GDPR, generally prohibit the transfer of personal data from the EEA, United Kingdom and Switzerland to the United States, and most other countries, known as ‘third countries’, in respect of which the European Commission or other relevant regulatory body has not issued a so-called ‘adequacy decision’, unless the parties to the transfer have implemented specific safeguards to protect the transferred personal data. One of the primary safeguards used for transfers of personal data to the United States was the E.U.-U.S. Privacy Shield framework administered by the U.S. Department of Commerce. On July 16, 2020, the Court of Justice of the European Union, or CJEU, in a decision known as ‘Schrems II’, invalidated the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield, under which personal data could be transferred from the EEA and the United Kingdom to U.S. entities that had self-certified under the Privacy Shield. To align with the CJEU’s decision in respect of the E.U.-U.S. Privacy Shield, on September 8, 2020, the UK government similarly invalidated the use of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield as a mechanism for lawful personal data transfers from the United Kingdom to the United States under the UK GDPR and the Swiss Federal Data Protection and Information Commissioner announced that the Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield regime was also inadequate for the purposes of personal data transfers from Switzerland to the U.S. entities who had self-certified under the Swiss Privacy Shield. The CJEU Schrems II decision referenced above also cast doubt on the ability to use one of the primary alternatives to the E.U.-U.S. Privacy Shield and Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield, namely, the European Commission’s Standard Contractual Clauses, to lawfully transfer personal data to the United States and most other third countries. On June 4, 2021, the European Commission published new versions of the Standard Contractual Clauses. These must be used for all new transfers of personal data from the EEA to third countries starting September 27, 2021, and all existing transfers of personal data from the EEA to third countries relying on the existing versions of the Standard Contractual Clauses must be replaced by December 27, 2022. The implementation of the new Standard Contractual Clauses will necessitate significant contractual overhaul of our data transfer arrangements with partners, sub-processors and vendors. Use of both the existing and the new Standard Contractual Clauses must, following the Schrems II decision, now be assessed on a case-by-case basis taking into account the legal regime applicable in the destination country, in particular applicable surveillance laws and rights of individuals, and additional supplementary technical, organizational and/or contractual measures and/or contractual provisions may need to be put in place; however, the nature of these additional measures is currently uncertain. At present, there are few if any viable alternatives to the Privacy Shield and the Standard Contractual Clauses and there remains some uncertainty with respect to the nature and efficacy of such supplementary measures in ensuring an adequate level of protection of personal data. As such, our transfers of personal data to third countries may not comply with European data protection laws and may increase our exposure to the GDPR’s heightened sanctions for violations of its cross-border data transfer restrictions, including fines of up to 4% of annual global revenue or €20,000,000/£17,500,000, whichever is higher, and injunctions against transfers. As supervisory authorities issue further guidance on personal data export mechanisms, including circumstances where the Standard Contractual Clauses can and cannot be used, and/or start taking enforcement action, we could suffer additional costs, complaints and/or regulatory investigations or fines, and/or if we are otherwise unable to transfer personal data between and among countries and regions in which we operate and/or engage providers and/or otherwise transfer personal data, it could affect the manner in which we receive and/or provide services, the geographical location or segregation of our relevant systems and operations, and could adversely affect our financial results and generally increase compliance risk. Additionally, other countries outside of Europe have enacted or are considering enacting similar cross-border data transfer restrictions and laws requiring local data residency, which could increase the cost and complexity of operating our business.

In recent years, U.S. and European lawmakers and regulators have expressed concern over electronic marketing and the use of third-party cookies, web beacons and similar technology for online behavioral advertising. On June 20, 2019, the U.K.’s Information Commissioner (the “ICO”) published a report setting out its views on advertising technology, specifically the use of personal data in “real time bidding”, and the key privacy compliance challenges arising from it. In its report, which is a status update rather than formal guidance, several key deficiencies were noted and marked for formal regulatory action. However, in May 2020, the ICO paused its investigation into real time bidding and the advertising technology industry, as it sought to prioritize activities responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. The ICO’s investigation resumed in January 2021. We are

 

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likely to be required to expend further capital and other resources to ensure compliance with the findings of the ICO’s report on advertising technology, and any relevant changing laws and regulations. While we have numerous mitigation controls in place, advertisements produced by us may be erroneously served on websites that are not suitable for the advertising content of gambling (e.g., websites predominantly aimed at children). There is also a risk that gambling advertisements are viewed by people who do not want to view them, or who have taken measures not to receive them (for example, individuals on “self-exclusion” lists). In each case this may have adverse legal and reputational effects on our business.

In the EU, rules relating to electronic direct marketing are currently set out in the ePrivacy Directive, which is likely to be replaced by a new ePrivacy Regulation. While no official time frame has been given for the ePrivacy Regulation, there will be a transition period after the ePrivacy Regulation is agreed for compliance, and commentators consider it unlikely to come into force before 2023. The ePrivacy Regulation will be directly implemented into the laws of each of the EU Member States, without the need for further enactment. When implemented, the ePrivacy Regulation is expected to alter rules on third-party cookies, web beacons and similar technology for online behavioral advertising and to impose stricter requirements on companies using these tools. Regulation of cookies and web beacons may lead to broader restrictions on our online activities, including efforts to understand followers’ Internet usage and promote ourselves to them. The current draft of the ePrivacy Regulation significantly increases fining powers to the same levels as the GDPR. Given the delay in finalizing the ePrivacy Regulation, certain regulators have issued guidance (including ICO and French data protection regulators) on the requirement to seek strict opt-in, unbundled consent to use all nonessential cookies and similar technologies and the requirement to increase the standard of transparency relating to use of cookies and similar technologies. Our cookie consent management functionality and cookies notices may not meet the standards outlined in such guidance.

In the United States, the federal government, including Congress, the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Commerce, has announced that it is reviewing the need for greater regulation for the collection of information concerning consumer behavior on the internet, including regulation aimed at restricting certain targeted advertising practices. Furthermore, the Federal Trade Commission and many state attorneys general continue to enforce federal and state consumer protection laws against companies for online collection, use, dissemination, and security practices that appear to be unfair or deceptive. Numerous states have enacted or are in the process of enacting state level data privacy laws and regulations governing the collection, use, and processing of state residents’ personal data.

For example, the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) took effect on January 1, 2020. The CCPA establishes a new privacy framework for covered businesses such as ours and may require us to modify our data processing practices and policies and incur compliance related costs and expenses. The CCPA provides new and enhanced data privacy rights to California residents, such as affording consumers the right to access and delete their information and to opt out of certain sharing and sales of personal information. The law also prohibits covered businesses from discriminating against consumers (for example, charging more for services) for exercising any of their CCPA rights. The CCPA imposes severe statutory damages for certain violations of the law as well as a private right of action for certain data breaches that result in the loss of personal information. This private right of action is expected to increase the likelihood of, and risks associated with, data breach litigation. It remains unclear how various provisions of the CCPA will be interpreted and enforced. In November 2020, California voters passed the California Privacy Rights and Enforcement Act of 2020 (“CPRA”). The CPRA further expands the CCPA with additional data privacy compliance requirements that may impact our business, and establishes a regulatory agency dedicated to enforcing those requirements. The Stop Hacks and Improve Electronic Data Security Act, otherwise known as the SHIELD Act, is a New York State bill, the data protection portions of which became effective on March 23, 2020. The SHIELD Act requires companies to adopt reasonable safeguards to protect the security, confidentiality, and integrity of private information. A company should implement a data security program containing specific measures, including risk assessments, employee training, vendor contracts, and timely data disposal. Laws like the SHIELD Act, the CPRA and the CCPA may lead other states to pass comparable legislation, with potentially greater penalties, and more rigorous compliance

 

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requirements relevant to our business. For example, Virginia has enacted the Consumer Data Protection Act and Colorado has enacted the Colorado Privacy Act, each of which may impose obligations similar to or more stringent than those we may face under other data protection laws. Compliance with any newly enacted privacy and data security laws or regulations may be challenging and cost and time-intensive, and we may be required to put in place additional mechanisms to comply with applicable legal requirements.

Although we have implemented certain policies and procedures, and continue to review and improve such policies and procedures, that are designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws, rules and regulations, if our privacy or data security measures fail, or are perceived to have failed, to comply with applicable current or future laws and regulations, we may be subject to fines, litigation, regulatory investigations and penalties (including potential suspension or loss of licensure), enforcement notices requiring us to change the way we use personal data or our marketing practices or other liabilities such as compensation claims by individuals affected by a personal data breach, as well as negative publicity and a potential loss of business. Fines are significant in some countries (e.g., the GDPR introduced fines of up to countries (e.g., the GDPR introduced fines of up to €20,000,000/£17,500,000 or up to 4% of the total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year (whichever is higher)) as well as litigation, compensation claims by affected individuals (including class action type litigation where individuals suffer harm), regulatory investigations and enforcement notices requiring us to change the way we use personal data.

Our processing of cardholder data is subject, in addition to data protection and privacy laws, to strict industry standards and security procedures. Compliance with the requirements to process cardholder data can be onerous and may require the implementation of new procedures, policies and security measures or the amendment of existing ones which may require material expenditures and harm our financial condition and results of operations. Any actual or perceived failure to comply may result in the inability to process payments, monetary penalties and reputational damages which may require material expenditures and harm our financial condition and results of operations.

The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (“PCI DSS”) applies to the processing of cardholder data. PCI DSS consists of a set of policies and procedures intended to enhance the security of cardholder data during card transactions. PCI DSS was implemented by the five largest credit card brands—Visa, Mastercard, Discover, American Express, JCB. Compliance in this regard is important as SGHC does process cardholder data. Where there is actual or perceived non-compliance with PCI DSS, this may result in SGHC’s inability to process payments, monetary penalties and reputational damage. As part of PCI DSS compliance SGHC is required to undertake internal and external network vulnerability scans at least quarterly and after any significant change in the network and to carry out a formal risk assessment process at least annually and upon significant changes to the environment that identifies critical assets, threats, and vulnerabilities. Where such scans reveal any lack of compliance, the Company will take appropriate steps to ensure compliance in accordance with the relevant and applicable policies and procedures.

We will rely on licenses to use the intellectual property rights of third parties which are incorporated into our products and offerings. Failure to maintain, renew or expand existing licenses may require us to modify, limit or discontinue certain offerings, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We will rely on products, technologies and intellectual property that we license from third parties, for use in our offerings. A substantial portion of our offerings and services use intellectual property licensed from third parties. The future success of our business may depend, in part, on our ability to obtain, retain and/or expand licenses for popular technologies, data feeds, software platforms and games in a competitive market. We cannot assure that these third-party licenses, or support for such licensed products and technologies, will continue to be available to us on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. In the event that we cannot renew and/or expand existing licenses, we may be required to discontinue or limit our use of the products that include or incorporate the licensed intellectual property. We use data in respect of sporting feeds which we believe to be freely available

 

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in the public domain and/or which are made available to us at no charge. In the future, we may be forced to pay for usage of such data, including retrospectively, and third parties may assert rights to such data and/or such third parties may attempt to charge us for the right to use such data. In the event that this does happen, we cannot be certain that appropriate licenses will be available to us on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. In the event that we cannot agree on appropriate licenses, we may be required to discontinue or limit our use of the relevant data and, to the extent that certain of our offerings or products or components thereof are entirely reliant on such data, we may therefore be unable to continue to provide certain offerings or products or components thereof, in which case our business, our results of operations, our financial results and our prospects may suffer.

Some of our license agreements contain minimum guaranteed royalty payments to the third party. If we are unable to generate sufficient revenue to offset the minimum guaranteed royalty payments, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition. Certain of our license agreements grant the licensor rights to audit our use of their intellectual property as well as the financial calculations of royalty payments under these agreements. Disputes with licensors over uses or terms could result in the payment of additional royalties or penalties by us, cancellation or non-renewal of the underlying license or litigation.

The regulatory review process and licensing requirements also may preclude us from using technologies owned or developed by third parties if those parties are unwilling to subject themselves to regulatory review or do not meet regulatory requirements. Some gaming authorities require gaming manufacturers to obtain approval, licensure or other requirements before engaging in certain transactions, such as acquisitions, mergers, reorganizations, financings, stock offerings and share repurchases. Obtaining such approvals can be costly and time consuming, and we cannot assure that such approvals will be granted or that the approval process will not result in delays or disruptions to our strategic objectives.

We rely on information technology and other systems and platforms, and any failures, errors, defects or disruptions in our systems or platforms could diminish our brand and reputation, subject us to liability, disrupt our business, affect our ability to scale our technical infrastructure and adversely affect our operating results and growth prospects. Our games and other software applications and systems, and the third-party platforms upon which they are made available could contain undetected errors.

Our technology infrastructure is critical to the performance of our platform and offerings and to customer satisfaction. We devote significant resources to network and data security to protect our systems and data. However, our systems may not be adequately designed with the necessary reliability and redundancy to avoid performance delays or outages that could be harmful to our business. We cannot assure you that the measures we take to prevent or hinder cyber-attacks and protect our systems, data and customer information and to prevent outages, data or information loss, fraud and to prevent or detect security breaches, including a disaster recovery strategy for server and equipment failure and back-office systems and the use of third parties for certain cybersecurity services, will provide absolute security. We currently use and may in the future make additional use of “cloud” computing services which are a form of computing infrastructure provided by third parties such as Amazon and Microsoft and as such are substantially not within our control and are subject to outages that we would not be able to prevent and would have significant difficulty mitigating should they occur. We have experienced, and we may in the future experience, website disruptions, outages and other performance problems due to a variety of factors, including infrastructure changes, human or software errors and capacity constraints. Such disruptions have not had a material impact on us; however, future disruptions from unauthorized access to, fraudulent manipulation of, or tampering with our computer systems and technological infrastructure, or those of third parties, could result in a wide range of negative outcomes, each of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Additionally, our products may contain errors, bugs, flaws or corrupted data, and these defects may only become apparent after their launch and could result in a vulnerability that could compromise the security of our systems. If a particular product offering is unavailable when customers attempt to access it or navigation through

 

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our platforms is slower than they expect, customers may be unable to use our product offerings as desired and may be less likely to return to our platforms as often, if at all. Furthermore, programming errors, defects and data corruption could disrupt our operations, adversely affect the experience of our customers, harm our reputation, cause our customers to stop utilizing our platforms, divert our resources and delay market acceptance of our offerings, any of which could result in legal liability to us or harm our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

If our customer base and engagement continue to grow, and the amount and types of offerings continue to grow and evolve, we will need an increasing amount of technical infrastructure, including network capacity and computing power, to continue to satisfy our customers’ needs. Such infrastructure expansion may be complex, and unanticipated delays in completing these projects or availability of components may lead to increased project costs, operational inefficiencies, or interruptions in the delivery or degradation of the quality of our offerings. In addition, there may be issues related to this infrastructure that are not identified during the testing phases of design and implementation, which may only become evident after we have started to fully use the underlying equipment or software, that could further degrade the customer experience or increase our costs. As such, we could fail to continue to effectively scale and grow our technical infrastructure to accommodate increased demands. In addition, our business may be subject to interruptions, delays or failures resulting from adverse weather conditions, climate change, climate change-related events, other natural disasters, power loss, terrorism, cyber-attacks, public health emergencies (such as the coronavirus) or other catastrophic events.

If we do not continuously improve upon our systems and products and offerings then notwithstanding that the performance thereof might remain constant it might nonetheless also deteriorate when viewed relative to our competitors. This in turn might harm our reputation with our customers or reduce their enjoyment of our products and in turn harm our reputation, business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

We believe that if our customers have a negative experience with our offerings, or if our brand or reputation is negatively affected, customers may be less inclined to continue or resume utilizing our products or recommend our platform to other potential customers. As such, a failure or significant interruption in our service could harm our reputation, business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Despite our security measures, our information technology and infrastructure may be vulnerable to attacks by unauthorized third parties, hackers or breached due to employee error, malfeasance or other disruptions. Any such breach could compromise our networks and the information or data stored there could be accessed, publicly disclosed, lost, deleted, encrypted or stolen. Any such access, disclosure or other loss of information could result in legal claims or proceedings (including class action), liability under laws that protect the privacy of personal information, and regulatory penalties, disruption of our operations and the services we provide to customers, damage to our reputation, and a loss of confidence in our products and offerings, which could adversely affect our business.

The secure maintenance and transmission of customer information is a critical element of our operations. Our information technology and other systems that maintain and transmit customer information, or those of service providers, business partners or employee information may be compromised by a malicious third-party penetration of our network security, or that of a third-party service provider or business partner, or impacted by intentional or unintentional actions or inactions by our employees, or those of a third-party service provider or business partner. As a result, our customers’ information may be lost, disclosed, accessed or taken without consent. If any such access, disclosure or other loss of information should occur, then we would likely suffer attempts by the recipients of such data to divert our customers away from our products and would also suffer a substantial loss of trust and reputation with our customers and would likely lose a significant portion of their business as a result. We have experienced attempted cyber-attacks, attempts to breach our systems and other similar attempts in the past. For example, we have been and expect that we will continue to be subject to attempts to gain unauthorized access to or through our information systems, whether by our employees or third parties, including cyber-attacks by computer programmers and hackers who may develop and deploy viruses, worms or

 

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other malicious software programs. To date these attacks have not had a material impact on our operations or financial results, but we cannot provide assurance that they will not have a material impact in the future.

We rely on encryption and authentication technology licensed from third parties in an effort to securely transmit confidential and sensitive information, including credit card numbers. Advances in computer capabilities, new technological discoveries or other developments may result in the whole or partial failure of this technology to protect transaction data or other confidential and sensitive information from being breached or compromised. In addition, websites and/or externally exposed administrative systems are often attacked through compromised credentials, including those obtained through phishing and credential stuffing. Our security measures, and those of our third-party service providers, may not detect or prevent all attempts to breach our systems, denial-of-service attacks, viruses, malicious software, break-ins, phishing attacks, social engineering, security breaches or other attacks and similar disruptions that may jeopardize the security of information stored in or transmitted by our websites, networks and systems or that we or such third parties otherwise maintain, including payment card systems, which may subject us to fines or higher transaction fees or limit or terminate our access to certain payment methods. We and such third parties may not anticipate or prevent all types of attacks until after they have already been launched. Further, techniques used to obtain unauthorized access to or sabotage systems change frequently and may not be known until launched against us or our third-party service providers.

In addition, security breaches can also occur as a result of non-technical issues, including intentional or inadvertent breaches by our employees or by third parties. These risks may increase over time as the complexity and number of technical systems and applications we use also increases. Breaches of our security measures or those of our third-party service providers or cybersecurity incidents could result in unauthorized access to our sites, networks and systems; unauthorized access to and misappropriation of customer information, including customers’ personally identifiable information, or other confidential or proprietary information of ourselves or third parties; viruses, worms, spyware or other malware being served from our sites, networks or systems; deletion or modification of content or the display of unauthorized content on our sites; interruption, disruption or malfunction of operations; costs relating to breach remediation, deployment of additional personnel and protection technologies, response to governmental investigations and media inquiries and coverage; engagement of third-party experts and consultants; litigation, regulatory action and other potential liabilities. In the past, we have experienced social engineering, phishing, malware and similar attacks and threats of denial-of-service attacks, none of which to date has been material to our business; however, such attacks could in the future have a material adverse effect on our operations. If any of these breaches of security should occur and be material, our reputation and brand could be damaged, our business may suffer, we could be required to expend significant capital and other resources to alleviate problems caused by such breaches, and we could be exposed to a risk of loss, litigation or regulatory action and possible liability. We cannot guarantee that recovery protocols and backup systems will be sufficient to prevent data loss. Actual or anticipated attacks may cause us to incur increasing costs, including costs to deploy additional personnel and protection technologies, train employees and engage third-party experts and consultants.

In addition, any party who is able to illicitly obtain a customer’s password could access the customer’s transaction data or personal information, resulting in the perception that our systems are insecure. Any compromise or breach of our security measures, or those of our third-party service providers, could violate applicable privacy, data protection, data security, network and information systems security and other laws and cause significant legal and financial exposure, adverse publicity and a loss of confidence in our security measures, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. We continue to devote significant resources to protect against security breaches or we may need to in the future to address problems caused by breaches, including notifying affected subscribers and responding to any resulting litigation, which in turn, diverts resources from the growth and expansion of our business.

 

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Some of our software systems contain third-party open source software components, and failure to comply with the terms of the underlying open source software licenses could restrict our ability to provide our offerings.

Some open source licenses contain requirements that we make available source code for modifications or derivative works we create based upon the type of open source software we use, or grant other licenses to our intellectual property. If we combine our proprietary software with open source software in a certain manner, we could, under certain open source licenses, be required to release the source code of our proprietary software to the public. This would allow our competitors to create similar offerings with lower development effort and time and ultimately could result in a loss of our competitive advantages. Alternatively, to avoid the public release of the affected portions of our source code, we could be required to expend substantial time and resources to re-engineer some or all of our software.

Although we monitor our use of open source software to avoid subjecting our platform and our back-office and administrative and other systems to conditions we do not intend, the terms of many open source licenses have not been interpreted by U.S. or foreign courts, and there is a risk that these licenses could be construed in a way that could impose unanticipated conditions or restrictions on our ability to provide or distribute our platform. From time to time, there have been claims challenging the ownership of open source software against companies that incorporate open source software into their solutions. As a result, we could be subject to lawsuits by parties claiming ownership of what we believe to be open source software. Moreover, we cannot assure you that our processes for controlling our use of open source software in our software systems will be effective. If we are held to have breached or failed to fully comply with all the terms and conditions of an open source software license, we could face infringement or other liability, or be required to seek costly licenses from third parties to continue providing our offerings on terms that are not economically feasible, to re-engineer our systems, to discontinue or delay the provision of our offerings if re-engineering could not be accomplished on a timely basis or to make generally available, in source code form, our proprietary code, any of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

If Internet and other technology-based service providers experience service interruptions, our ability to conduct our business may be impaired and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

A substantial portion of our network infrastructure is provided by third parties, including Internet service providers and other technology-based service providers. We require technology-based service providers to implement cyber-attack-resilient systems and processes. However, if Internet service providers experience service interruptions, including because of cyber-attacks, or due to an event causing an unusually high volume of Internet use (such as a pandemic or public health emergency), communications over the Internet may be interrupted and impair our ability to conduct our business. Internet service providers and other technology-based service providers may in the future roll out upgraded or new mobile or other telecommunications services, such as 5G or 6G services, which may not be successful and thus may impact the ability of our customers to access our offerings in a timely fashion or at all. In addition, our ability to process e-commerce transactions depends on bank processing and credit card systems. To prepare for system problems, we continuously seek to strengthen and enhance our current facilities and the capabilities of our system infrastructure and support. Nevertheless, there can be no assurance that the Internet infrastructure or our own network systems will continue to be able to meet the demand placed on us by the continued growth of the Internet, the overall online gaming industry and our customers. Any difficulties these providers face, including the potential of certain network traffic receiving priority over other traffic (i.e., lack of net neutrality), may adversely affect our business, and we exercise little control over these providers, which increases our vulnerability to problems with the services they provide. Any system failure as a result of reliance on third parties, such as network, software or hardware failure, including as a result of cyber-attacks, which causes a loss of our customers’ property or personal information or a delay or interruption in our online services and products and e-commerce services, including our ability to handle existing or increased traffic, could result in a loss of anticipated revenue, interruptions to our offerings, cause us to incur

 

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significant legal, remediation and notification costs, degrade the customer experience and cause customers to lose confidence in our offerings, any of which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Risks Related to Ownership of Super Group’s Ordinary Shares

If the benefits of the Business Combination do not meet the expectations of investors or securities analysts, the market price of Super Group ordinary shares may decline.

Fluctuations in the price of Super Group ordinary shares could contribute to the loss of all or part of your investment. Prior to the Business Combination, there was not a public market for Super Group ordinary shares. Accordingly, the valuation ascribed to Super Group in the Business Combination may not be indicative of the price that will prevail in the trading market. If an active market for Super Group’s securities develops and continues, the trading price of Super Group ordinary shares could be volatile and subject to wide fluctuations in response to various factors, some of which are beyond Super Group’s control. Any of the factors listed below could have a material adverse effect on your investment in Super Group ordinary shares, and Super Group ordinary Shares may trade at prices significantly below the price you paid for them. In such circumstances, the trading price of Super Group ordinary shares may not recover and may experience a further decline.

Factors affecting the trading price of Super Group ordinary shares may include:

 

   

actual or anticipated fluctuations in Super Group’s quarterly financial results or the quarterly financial results of companies perceived to be similar to Super Group;

 

   

changes in the market’s expectations about Super Group’s operating results;

 

   

success of competitors;

 

   

Super Group’s operating results failing to meet the expectation of securities analysts or investors in a particular period;

 

   

changes in financial estimates and recommendations by securities analysts concerning Super Group or the industries in which Super Group operates in general;

 

   

operating and share price performance of other companies that investors deem comparable to the Company;

 

   

Super Group’s ability to market new and enhanced products on a timely basis;

 

   

changes in laws and regulations affecting Super Group’s business;

 

   

commencement of, or involvement in, litigation involving Super Group;

 

   

changes in Super Group’s capital structure, such as future issuances of securities or the incurrence of additional debt;

 

   

the volume of Super Group ordinary shares available for public sale;

 

   

any major change in Super Group’s board or management;

 

   

sales of substantial amounts of Super Group ordinary shares by Super Group’s directors, executive officers or significant shareholders or the perception that such sales could occur; and

 

   

general economic and political conditions such as recessions, interest rates, fuel prices, international currency fluctuations and acts of war or terrorism.

Broad market and industry factors may materially harm the market price of Super Group ordinary shares irrespective of Super Group’s operating performance. The stock market in general, and NYSE, have experienced

 

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price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of the particular companies affected. The trading prices and valuations of these stocks, and of Super Group ordinary shares, may not be predictable. A loss of investor confidence in the market for the stocks of other companies that investors perceive to be similar to Super Group could depress its share price, regardless of its business, prospects, financial conditions or results of operations. A decline in the market price of Super Group ordinary shares also could adversely affect Super Group’s ability to issue additional securities and its ability to obtain additional financing in the future.

The coverage of our business or our securities by securities or industry analysts or the absence thereof could adversely affect our securities and trading volume.

The trading market for our securities is influenced in part by the research and other reports that industry or securities analysts publish about us or our business or industry from time to time. We do not control these analysts nor the content and opinions included in their reports. As a former shell company, we may be slow to attract equity research coverage, and the analysts who publish information about our securities will have had relatively little experience with our company, which could affect their ability to accurately forecast our results and make it more likely that we fail to meet their estimates. If no or few analysts commence equity research coverage of us, the trading price and volume of our securities would likely be negatively impacted. If analysts do cover us and one or more of them downgrade our securities, or if they issue other unfavorable commentary about us or our industry or inaccurate research, our share price would likely decline. Furthermore, if one or more of these analysts cease coverage or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets. Any of the foregoing would likely cause our share price and trading volume to decline.

Because Super Group is incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey, you may face difficulties in protecting your interests, and your ability to protect your rights through the U.S. courts may be limited.

Super Group is a limited company incorporated under the laws of the Island of Guernsey. As a result, it may be difficult for investors to effect service of process within the United States upon Super Group’s directors or officers, or enforce judgments obtained in the United States courts against Super Group’s directors or officers.

We have been advised that there is doubt as to the enforceability in Guernsey of judgments of the United States courts of civil liabilities predicated solely upon the laws of the United States, including the federal securities laws.

As a result of all of the above, public shareholders may have more difficulty in protecting their interests in the face of actions taken by management, members of the board of directors or controlling shareholders than they would as public shareholders of a corporation incorporated in the United States.

It may be difficult to enforce a U.S. judgment against Super Group or its directors and officers outside the United States, or to assert U.S. securities law claims outside of the United States.

A majority of Super Group directors and executive officers are not residents of the United States, and the majority of Super Group’s assets and the assets of these persons are located outside the United States. As a result, it may be difficult or impossible for investors to effect service of process upon Super Group within the United States or other jurisdictions, including judgments predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States. Additionally, it may be difficult to assert U.S. securities law claims in actions originally instituted outside of the United States. Foreign courts may refuse to hear a U.S. securities law claim, because foreign courts may not be the most appropriate forum in which to bring such a claim. Even if a foreign court agrees to hear a claim, it may determine that the law of the jurisdiction in which the foreign court resides, and not U.S. law, is applicable to the claim. Further, if U.S. law is found to be applicable, the content of applicable U.S. law must be proved as a fact, which can be a time-consuming and costly process, and certain matters of procedure would still be governed by the law of the jurisdiction in which the foreign court resides. See “Description of Securities — Enforceability of Civil Liabilities.”

 

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As a company incorporated in the Island of Guernsey, we are permitted to adopt certain home country practices in relation to corporate governance matters that differ significantly from NYSE corporate governance listing standards; these practices may afford less protection to shareholders than they would enjoy if we complied fully with NYSE corporate governance listing standards.

We are a company incorporated in the Island of Guernsey, and our ordinary shares and public warrants are listed on the NYSE. NYSE market rules permit a foreign private issuer like us to follow the corporate governance practices of its home country. Certain corporate governance practices in the Island of Guernsey, which is our home country, may differ significantly from NYSE corporate governance listing standards.

Among others, we are not required to:

 

   

have a majority of the members of our board of directors who are independent;

 

   

hold regular meetings of our non-executive directors without the executive directors;

 

   

have a nominating and/or corporate governance committee composed of entirely independent directors;

 

   

have a compensation committee composed of entirely independent directors;

 

   

adopt a code of business conduct and ethics, which we intend to do; or

 

   

seek shareholder approval for the implementation of certain equity compensation plans and issuances of securities.

Provisions in our governing documents may inhibit a takeover of Super Group, which could limit the price investors might be willing to pay in the future for Super Group ordinary shares and could entrench management.

Our governing documents contain provisions that may discourage unsolicited takeover proposals that shareholders may consider to be in their best interests. Super Group may issue additional shares without shareholder approval and such additional shares could be utilized for a variety of corporate purposes, including future offerings to raise additional capital, acquisitions and employee benefit plans. The ability for Super Group to issue additional shares could render more difficult or discourage an attempt to obtain control of us by means of a proxy contest, tender offer, merger or otherwise that could involve the payment of a premium over prevailing market prices for Super Group ordinary shares.

If a U.S. Holder is treated as owning at least 10% of Super Group ordinary shares (by value or voting power), such U.S. Holder may be subject to adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences.

Each “Ten Percent Shareholder” (as defined below) in a non-U.S. corporation that is classified as a controlled foreign corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes (“CFC”), generally is required to include in income for U.S. federal tax purposes such Ten Percent Shareholder’s pro rata share of the CFC’s “Subpart F income,” “global intangible low-taxed income,” and “investment of earnings in U.S. property,” (in each case, as determined for U.S. federal income tax purposes) even if the CFC has made no distributions to its shareholders. Subpart F income generally includes dividends, interest, rents, royalties, gains from the sale of securities and income from certain transactions with related parties. In addition, a Ten Percent Shareholder that realizes gain from the sale or exchange of shares in a CFC may be required to classify a portion of such gain as dividend income rather than capital gain. An individual that is a Ten Percent Shareholder with respect to a CFC generally would not be allowed certain tax deductions or foreign tax credits that would be allowed to a Ten Percent Shareholder that is a U.S. corporation. Failure to comply with these reporting obligations may subject a Ten Percent Shareholder to significant monetary penalties and may prevent the statute of limitations with respect to such Ten Percent Shareholder’s U.S. federal income tax return for the year for which reporting was due from starting.

A non-U.S. corporation generally will be classified as a CFC for U.S. federal income tax purposes if Ten Percent Shareholders own, directly or indirectly, more than 50% of either the total combined voting power of all

 

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classes of stock of such corporation entitled to vote or of the total value of the stock of such corporation. A “Ten Percent Shareholder” is a United States person (as defined by the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”)) who owns or is considered to own 10% or more of the total combined voting power of all classes of stock of such corporation entitled to vote or 10% or more of the total value of all classes of stock of such corporation.

The determination of CFC status is complex and includes attribution rules, the application of which is not entirely certain. Because we may form or acquire one or more U.S. subsidiaries (including DGC USA), the application of those attribution rules may cause our non-U.S. subsidiaries to be treated as CFCs. We cannot provide any assurances that we will assist holders of Super Group ordinary shares in determining whether we or any non-U.S. subsidiaries are or will be treated as a CFC or whether any holder of Super Group ordinary shares is treated as a Ten Percent Shareholder with respect to any such CFC or furnish to any Ten Percent Shareholders information that may be necessary to comply with the aforementioned reporting and tax paying obligations.

Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisors with respect to the potential adverse U.S. tax consequences of becoming a Ten Percent Shareholder in a CFC. If we are classified as both a CFC and a PFIC (as defined below), we generally will not be treated as a PFIC with respect to those U.S. Holders that meet the definition of a Ten Percent Shareholder during the period in which we are a CFC.

If a Holder is treated as owning a significant percentage of Super Group equity (typically greater than 5%, but always subject to regulator discretion), the Holder may be required to undergo probity review and approval by one or more gaming regulators.

In order to operate in certain jurisdictions (including U.S. states), Super Group obtain the appropriate licensure as required under local legislation. Generally, each relevant group company and at times certain directors, officers, employees and material shareholders (typically those beneficially holding 5% or more of equity - but not limited to that threshold of holdings nor limited to solely holding equity), would be required to qualify as suitable for a license to be awarded. For directors, officers, employees, and material shareholders, suitability is generally considered by gaming authorities by weighing (i) financial stability, integrity and responsibility; and (ii) general history and background. Most gambling authorities have the authority to weigh additional factors and require any documentation or information they deem necessary. Directors, officers, employees, and material shareholders may be required to provide extensive disclosure regarding their background, assets, liabilities, employment history, and sources of income. The failure of Super Group officers, directors and material holders of its ordinary shares to submit to background checks and provide such disclosure could result in the imposition of penalties and could jeopardize the award of a contract to the Company or provide grounds for termination of an existing contract. Generally, any person who fails or refuses to apply for a finding of suitability or a license within the prescribed period after being advised by a competent authority that such person is required to do so may be found unsuitable or denied a license, as applicable. If any director, officer, employee or material shareholder is found unsuitable (including due to the failure to submit required documentation) by a competent regulator or authority, Super Group may deem it necessary, or be required, to sever its relationship with such person.

If Super Group or any of its subsidiaries is characterized as a passive foreign investment company for U.S. federal income tax purposes, U.S. Holders may suffer adverse tax consequences.

If Super Group or any of its subsidiaries is or becomes a “passive foreign investment company” (“PFIC”), within the meaning of Section 1297 of the U.S. Tax Code for any taxable year (or portion thereof) during which a U.S. Holder (as defined in “Material Tax Considerations”) holds Super Group ordinary shares or public warrants, certain adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences may apply to such U.S. Holder and such U.S. Holder might be subject to additional reporting requirements.

For U.S. federal income tax purposes, Super Group will be a PFIC for any taxable year in which (i) 75% or more of its gross income consists of passive income or (ii) 50% or more of the value of its assets (determined on

 

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the basis of a weighted quarterly average) consists of assets that produce, or are held for the production of, passive income (including cash). For purposes of these tests, passive income includes dividends, interest, gains from the sale or exchange of investment property and certain rents and royalties. For purposes of the above calculations, a non-U.S. corporation that directly or indirectly owns at least 25% by value of the shares of another corporation is treated as holding and receiving directly its proportionate share of assets and income of such corporation.

Based on the nature of our business and the valuation of our assets, including goodwill, we expect that Super Group will not be treated as a PFIC for its taxable year ending December 31, 2022. However, no assurances regarding our PFIC status can be provided for current or future taxable years. The determination of whether we are a PFIC is a fact-intensive determination made on an annual basis and the applicable law is subject to varying interpretation. In particular, the characterization of our assets as active or passive may depend in part on our current and intended future business plans, which are subject to change. In addition, for our current and future taxable years, the total value of our assets for PFIC testing purposes may be determined in part by reference to the market price of our ordinary shares from time to time, which may fluctuate considerably. Under the income test, our status as a PFIC depends on the composition of our income which will depend on a variety of factors that are subject to uncertainty, including the characterization of transactions we may enter into during 2022 and in the future and our corporate structure. Even if we determine that we are not a PFIC for a taxable year, there can be no assurance that the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) will agree with our conclusion and that the IRS would not successfully challenge our position. Accordingly, our U.S. counsel expresses no opinion with respect to our PFIC status for the current taxable year or any future taxable year.

Please see the section titled “Material Tax Considerations — Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules” for a more detailed discussion with respect to Super Group’s potential PFIC status. U.S. Holders (as defined in “Material Tax Considerations”) are urged to consult their tax advisors regarding the possible application of the PFIC rules to holders of the Super Group ordinary shares or public warrants.

Sales of our ordinary shares, or the perception of such sales, by us or the selling securityholders pursuant to this prospectus in the public market or otherwise could cause the market price for our ordinary shares to decline, even though the selling securityholders would still realize a profit on sales at lower prices. Resales of the securities offered by this prospectus may cause the market price of such securities to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well.

We have filed the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part in order to register the resale under the Securities Act of the ordinary shares and certain warrants held by certain securityholders, including the Founder Holders, SEAC, the Pre-Closing Holders and PJT Partners Holdings LP. We will not receive any of the proceeds from such sales, except with respect to amounts received by us upon exercise of warrants, which depends on the relative price of our ordinary shares and the extent to which such warrants are exercised for cash. If the warrants are out of the money, the warrant holders may not exercise their warrants.

The sale of our ordinary shares in the public market or otherwise, including sales pursuant to this prospectus, or the perception that such sales could occur, could harm the prevailing market price of our ordinary shares. These sales, or the possibility that these sales may occur, also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities in the future at a time and at a price that we deem appropriate. Resales of our ordinary shares may cause the market price of our securities to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well. In addition, the selling securityholders named in this prospectus hold a disproportionately large portion of our outstanding ordinary shares. For example, our two largest stockholders, Knutsson Limited and Chivers Limited, who beneficially own nearly 70% of our issued and outstanding ordinary shares in the aggregate, will be able to sell all of their securities held for so long as the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part is in effect. Even if the trading price of our ordinary shares falls to or significantly below the current trading price the selling securityholders may still have an incentive to sell and profit due to the nominal purchase prices paid by such selling securityholders, which are significantly lower than the purchase prices paid by the public

 

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securityholders. While such selling securityholders may experience a positive rate of return based on the current trading price of our ordinary shares, the public securityholders may not experience a similar rate of return on the securities they purchased due to differences in the purchase prices and the trading price at the time of such sales.

Additionally, a significant portion of Super Group’s ordinary shares are subject to a lock-up and restricted from immediate resale; however, upon expiration of their respective lock-up periods, the sale of shares of Super Group’s Ordinary Shares or the perception that such sales may occur, could cause the market price of Super Group’s Ordinary Shares to drop significantly.

The warrants may never be in the money, and may expire worthless.

The exercise price of the warrants is $11.50 per share. Whether the warrant holders exercise the warrants, and therefore the amount of cash proceeds that we would receive, is dependent upon the trading price of our ordinary shares. If the trading price for our ordinary shares is sustained at less than $11.50 per share, we believe holders of the warrants will be unlikely to exercise their warrants. There is no guarantee that the warrants will ever be in the money prior to their expiration, and as such, the warrants may expire worthless and we may never receive any proceeds from the exercise of the warrants.

Super Group may issue additional Super Group ordinary shares or other equity securities without your approval, which would dilute your ownership interests and may depress the market price of Super Group ordinary shares.

Super Group may issue additional Super Group ordinary shares or other equity securities in the future in connection with, among other things, future capital raising and transactions and future acquisitions, without your approval in many circumstances.

Super Group’s issuance of additional Super Group ordinary shares or other equity securities would have the following effects:

 

   

Super Group’s existing shareholders’ proportionate ownership interest in Super Group may decrease;

 

   

the amount of cash available per share, including for payment of dividends in the future, may decrease;

 

   

the relative voting strength of each previously outstanding Super Group ordinary share may be diminished; and

 

   

the market price of Super Group ordinary shares may decline.

We are a foreign private issuer within the meaning of the rules under the Exchange Act, and as such, we are exempt from certain provisions of the securities rules and regulations in the U.S. applicable to U.S. domestic public companies.

Because we qualify as a foreign private issuer under the Exchange Act, we are exempt from certain provisions of the securities rules and regulations in the U.S. that are applicable to U.S. domestic issuers, including: (i) the rules under the Exchange Act requiring the filing with the SEC of quarterly reports on Form 10-Q or current reports on Form 8-K; (ii) the sections of the Exchange Act regulating the solicitation of proxies, consents, or authorizations in respect of a security registered under the Exchange Act; (iii) the sections of the Exchange Act requiring insiders to file public reports of their stock ownership and trading activities and liability for insiders who profit from trades made in a short period of time; and (iv) the selective disclosure rules by issuers of material non-public information under Regulation FD.

We are required to file an annual report on Form 20-F within four months of the end of each fiscal year. Press releases relating to financial results and material events will also be furnished to the SEC on Form 6-K. However, the information we are required to file with or furnish to the SEC will be less extensive and less timely

 

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compared to that required to be filed with the SEC by U.S. domestic issuers. As a result, you may not be afforded the same protections or information that would be made available to you were you investing in a U.S. domestic issuer.

We may lose our foreign private issuer status in the future, which could result in significant additional cost and expense.

We are a “foreign private issuer,” as such term is defined in Rule 405 under the Securities Act; however, under Rule 405, the determination of foreign private issuer status is made annually on the last business day of an issuer’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, and, accordingly, the next determination will be made with respect to us on June 30, 2023.

In the future, we would lose our foreign private issuer status if a majority of our shareholders are U.S. residents or if a majority of our directors or management are U.S. citizens or residents, and we fail to meet additional requirements necessary to avoid loss of foreign private issuer status. Although we have elected to comply with certain U.S. regulatory provisions, our loss of foreign private issuer status would make such provisions mandatory. The regulatory and compliance costs to us under U.S. securities laws as a U.S. domestic issuer may be significantly higher. If we are not a foreign private issuer, we will be required to file periodic reports and registration statements on U.S. domestic issuer forms with the SEC, in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (U.S. GAAP), which are more detailed and extensive than the forms available to a foreign private issuer. For example, the annual report on Form 10-K requires domestic issuers to disclose executive compensation information on an individual basis with specific disclosure regarding the domestic compensation philosophy, objectives, annual total compensation (base salary, bonus and equity compensation) and potential payments in connection with change in control, retirement, death or disability, while the annual report on Form 20-F permits foreign private issuers to disclose compensation information on an aggregate basis. We will also have to mandatorily comply with U.S. federal proxy requirements, and our officers, directors and principal shareholders will become subject to the short-swing profit disclosure and recovery provisions of Section 16 of the Exchange Act. We may also be required to modify certain of our policies to comply with good governance practices associated with U.S. domestic issuers. Such conversion and modifications will involve additional costs. In addition, we may lose our ability to rely upon exemptions from certain corporate governance requirements on NYSE that are available to foreign private issuers.

General Risk Factors

The terms of future indebtedness may contain restrictions on our business and operations. Our inability to comply with the terms of any of our existing or future indebtedness may adversely affect our business.

The terms of our future indebtedness may contain covenants that could, among other things, restrict our business and operations, our ability to incur additional indebtedness, pay dividends or make other distributions or repurchase stock, make certain investments, create liens on certain of our corporate assets, enter into affiliate transactions, merge, consolidate or sell all or substantially all of our assets. If we breach any of these covenants, our lenders and holders of other indebtedness may be entitled to accelerate our debt obligations. Any default could require that we repay outstanding indebtedness prior to maturity or that a lender could enforce a lien on our assets, as well as limit our ability to obtain additional financing, which in turn may have a material adverse effect on our cash flow and liquidity.

 

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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains certain statements that are or may be forward-looking statements with respect to us, our industry and our business that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. All statements other than statements of historical factors contained in this prospectus, including statements regarding our future financial condition, results of operations and/or business achievements, including, without limitation, statements containing the words “believe,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “estimate,” “may,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “will,” “intend” and similar expressions are forward-looking statements. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events and trends that we believe may affect our financial condition, results of operations, business strategy and financial needs. Such forward-looking statements involve unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause our actual results, financial condition, performance or achievements, or industry results, to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause such a difference include, but are not limited to those described in the section of this prospectus titled “Risk Factors” and other factors disclosed in this prospectus.

You should refer to the section of this prospectus titled “Risk Factors” for a discussion of important factors that may cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by our forward-looking statements. As a result of these factors, we cannot assure you that the forward-looking statements in this prospectus will prove to be accurate. Furthermore, if our forward-looking statements prove to be inaccurate, the inaccuracy may be material. In light of the significant uncertainties in these forward-looking statements, you should not regard these statements as a representation or warranty by us or any other person that we will achieve our objectives and plans in any specified time frame or at all. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

In addition, statements that “we believe” and other similar statements reflect our belief and opinions on the relevant subject. These statements are based upon information available to us as of the date of this prospectus, and while we believe such information forms a reasonable basis for such statements, such information may be limited or incomplete, and our statements should not be read to indicate that we have conducted an exhaustive inquiry into, or review of, all potentially available relevant information. These statements are inherent uncertain and investors are cautioned not to unduly rely upon these statements.

You should read this prospectus and the documents that we reference in this prospectus and have filed as exhibits to the registration statement, of which this prospectus is a part, completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect. We qualify all of our forward-looking statements by these cautionary statements.

 

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PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Defined terms included below shall have the same meaning as terms defined and included elsewhere in this prospectus. Unless the context otherwise requires, the “Company” refers to SGHC Limited and its subsidiaries prior to the Closing.

Super Group is providing the following unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information to aid in the analysis of the financial aspects of the Business Combination.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position as of December 31, 2021 combines the historical balance sheet of SEAC with the historical consolidated statement of financial position of SGHC on a pro forma basis as if the Business Combination, summarized below, had been consummated as of that date. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of profit or loss for the year ended December 31, 2021 combines the historical statement of operations of SEAC with the unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of profit or loss of SGHC for such period on a pro forma basis as if the Business Combination had occurred as of January 1, 2021.

Super Group (SGHC) Limited’s financial information has been excluded from these pro formas due to the immaterial nature of its financial position and results of operations as of and for the year ended December 31, 2021.

This information should be read together with the historical financial statements of SGHC and related notes, SEAC’s historical financial statements and related notes, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and other financial information included elsewhere in this prospectus.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position as of December 31, 2021 has been prepared using the following:

 

   

SGHC’s historical unaudited consolidated statement of financial position as of December 31, 2021, as included in this prospectus.

 

   

SEAC’s unaudited condensed balance sheet as of December 31, 2021, which did not change materially from the unaudited balance sheet as of September 30, 2021 included in this prospectus.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of profit or loss for the year ended December 31, 2021 has been prepared using the following:

 

   

SGHC’s historical consolidated statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income for the year ended December 31, 2021, as included in this prospectus.

 

   

SEAC’s unaudited condensed statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2021, which did not change materially from the unaudited statement of operations for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 included in this prospectus.

Description of the Business Combination

On April 23, 2021, SEAC, SGHC, Merger Sub and Super Group entered into the Business Combination Agreement, which contains customary representations and warranties, covenants, closing conditions, termination provisions and other terms relating to the mergers and the other transactions contemplated thereby. Merger Sub is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Super Group. The key steps were:

 

  1.

SGHC shareholders (“Pre-Closing Holders”) exchanged all issued shares in SGHC for newly issued shares in Super Group at an agreed ratio. This ratio resulted in each individual SGHC shareholder maintaining the same ownership percentage in Super Group as each shareholder had in SGHC (“Pre-Closing Reorganization”).

 

  2.

SEAC merged with and into Merger Sub, with SEAC continuing as the surviving company and a wholly owned subsidiary of Super Group. Each shareholder and warrant holder of SEAC received the same number of shares and warrants in Super Group as each holder had in SEAC (“Merger”).

 

  3.

Aggregate cash consideration of $249.9 million was paid to certain of the Pre-Closing Holders in exchange for an agreed portion of their Super Group shares at a value of $10 per share.

 

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Accounting Treatment

As the first step in the Business Combination, Super Group undertook the Pre-Closing Reorganization which was accounted for as a capital reorganization whereby all issued and outstanding shares in SGHC were obtained by Super Group in exchange for shares in Super Group. This transaction was accounted for as a capital reorganization because Super Group did not meet the definition of a business under IFRS 3 (Business Combination) prior to the Pre-Closing Reorganization. Under a capital reorganization, the consolidated financial statements of Super Group reflect the net assets transferred at pre-combination predecessor book values. Following this first step, SGHC was a wholly owned subsidiary of Super Group.

As the second step of the Business Combination, Merger Sub and SEAC undertook to complete the Merger. As a result of the Merger, the existing shareholders of SEAC exchanged their shares for shares in the Company on a 1 for 1 basis. SEAC, as the continuing surviving company in the merger, is a wholly owned subsidiary of Super Group.

SEAC is not considered a business as defined by IFRS 3 (Business Combinations) given it consists predominately of cash in the Trust Account. Therefore, the Merger transaction was accounted for under IFRS 2 (Share-based Payment). Under this method of accounting, there is no acquisition accounting and no recognition of goodwill. SEAC was treated as the “acquired” company for financial reporting purposes. This determination was primarily based on the following assumptions:

 

   

SGHC Shareholders hold a majority of the voting power of the combined company;

 

   

SGHC’s operations comprise the ongoing operations of the combined company;

 

   

SGHC’s designees comprise a majority of the governing body of the combined company; and

 

   

SGHC’s senior management comprise the senior management of the combined company.

In accordance with IFRS 2, the difference in the fair value of the consideration (i.e. shares and warrants issued by the Company) for the acquisition of SEAC over the fair value of the identifiable net assets of SEAC represented a service for the listing of the Company and was recognized as a share-based payment expense. The consideration for the acquisition of SEAC was determined using the closing prices of SEAC’s publicly traded SEAC Class A Common Stock and the Public Warrants traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbols “SEAH” and “SEAH WS” in addition to the calculated fair value, using a Black Scholes valuation, of the warrants issued to the Sponsor and PJT Partners Holdings LP in a private placement simultaneously with the closing of the IPO as well as in connection with the closing of the partial exercise by Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC and PJT Partners LP (the “Underwriters”) of their over-allotment option, with each such warrant entitling the holder thereof to purchase one Class A Share at a price of $11.50 per share (“Private Placement Warrants” and, together with the Public Warrants, the “Warrants”), each as of January 27, 2022.

Finally, the repurchase of the Company’s shares from Pre-Closing Holders at $10 per share was treated as a reduction in share capital and cash for the Company.

Basis of Pro Forma Presentation

The historical financial statements of SGHC have been prepared in accordance with IFRS and in its presentation currency of Euros. The historical financial statements of SEAC have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP in its presentation currency of U.S. Dollars. The historical financial information of SEAC has been adjusted to give effect to the differences between U.S. GAAP and IFRS for the purposes of the unaudited condensed combined pro forma financial information (see Note 2 — IFRS Adjustments and Reclassifications). For purposes of having unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information, the historical balance sheet of SEAC has been translated into Euros at the rate on December 31, 2021 of $1.00 to €0.8832, and the historical statement of operations of SEAC has been translated into Euros using the average exchange rate for the period from January 1, 2021 through December 31, 2021 of $1.00 to €0.8456.

 

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The adjustments presented on the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information have been identified and presented to provide an understanding of the combined company upon consummation of the Business Combination for illustrative purposes.

The following unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information has been prepared in accordance with Article 11 of Regulation S-X as amended by the final rule, Release No. 33-10786 “Amendments to Financial Disclosures about Acquired and Disposed Businesses.” Release No. 33- 10786 replaces the existing pro forma adjustment criteria with simplified requirements to depict the accounting for the transaction (“Transaction Accounting Adjustments”) and present the reasonably estimable synergies and other transaction effects that have occurred or are reasonably expected to occur (“Management’s Adjustments”). No Management’s Adjustments have been identified by the Company and, therefore, only Transaction Accounting Adjustments are included in the following unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information is for illustrative purposes only. The financial results may have been different had the companies been combined for the referenced period. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information should not be relied on as being indicative of the historical results that would have been achieved had the companies been combined for the referenced period or the future results that the combined company will experience. SGHC, SEAC and the Company have not had any historical relationship prior to the Business Combination. Accordingly, no pro forma adjustments were required to eliminate activities between the companies.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined provision for income taxes does not necessarily reflect the amounts that would have resulted had the combined company filed consolidated income tax returns during the periods presented.

The following summarizes the number of Super Group ordinary shares outstanding following the Closing of the Business Combination:

 

Shareholders              
     Ownership in shares      % of ownership  

SEAC Public Stockholders

     20,225,691        4.13

Founders

     11,250,000        2.29

Sellers

     458,721,777        93.58
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     490,197,468        100

Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information

Set forth below is the unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position as of December 31, 2021 and the unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of statement of profit or loss for the year ended December 31, 2021, based on the historical financial statements of SGHC and SEAC (as adjusted below).

 

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UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

AS OF December 31, 2021

(in Euros thousands unless otherwise denoted)

 

                                Reflecting Actual Redemptions upon the
Closing of the Business Combination on
January 27, 2022
 
    SGHC
(Historical)
    SEAC
(Historical in
USD)
    SEAC
(Historical in
Euros) Note 1(a)
    IFRS Conversion
and Presentation
Alignment
    Notes   Transaction
accounting
adjustments
    Notes     Pro forma
combined
 

Assets

               

Non-Current Assets

               

Intangible assets, net

  172,954     $ —       —                   172,954  

Goodwill

    25,023       —         —                 25,023  

Property, plant and equipment

    12,498       —         —                 12,498  

Right-of-use lease asset

    14,541       —         —                 14,541  

Deferred tax asset

    24,108       —         —                 24,108  

Regulatory deposit

    8,594       —         —                 8,594  

Loans receivable

    25,516       —         —                 25,516  

Investments held in Trust Account

    —         450,132       397,557           (397,557     2(a)       —    

Financial assets

    1,686       —         —                 1,686  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Total Non-Current Assets

    284,920       450,132       397,557       —           (397,557       284,920  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Current Assets

               

Restricted cash

    60,296       —         —                 60,296  

Trade other receivables

    169,252       —         —         104     1(b)         169,356  

Prepaid expenses

    —         118       104       (104   1(b)         —    

Income tax receivables

    35,806       —         —                 35,806  

Cash and cash equivalents

    293,798       117       103           397,557       2(a)       209,858  
              (42,052     2(b)    
              (220,741     2(c)    
              (218,807     2(g)    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Total Current Assets

    559,152       235       207       —           (84,043       475,316  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Total Assets

  844,072     $ 450,367     397,764     —         (481,600     760,236  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity

               

Non-Current Liabilities

               

Lease liabilities

  10,896     $ —       —                   10,896  

Deferred tax liability

    9,248       —         —                 9,248  

Interest-bearing loans and borrowings

    764       —         —         397,440     1(c)     (397,440     2(e)       764  

Warrant Liabilities

    —         87,100       76,927               76,927  

Deferred underwriting fee payable

    —         15,750       13,910           (9,450     2(b)       —    
              (4,460     2(i)    

Provisions and other liabilities

    —         —         —             248,150       2(h)       248,150  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Total non-current liabilities

    20,908       102,850       90,837       397,440         (163,200       345,985  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

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UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION — (Continued)

AS OF December 31, 2021

(in Euros thousands unless otherwise denoted)

 

                                Reflecting Actual Redemptions upon the
Closing of the Business Combination on
January 27, 2022
 
    SGHC
(Historical)
    SEAC
(Historical in
USD)
    SEAC
(Historical in
Euros) Note 1(a)
    IFRS Conversion
and Presentation
Alignment
    Notes   Transaction
accounting
adjustments
    Notes     Pro forma
combined
 

Current Liabilities

               

Lease liabilities

    5,353       —         —                 5,353  

Deferred consideration

    13,200       —         —                 13,200  

Interest- bearing loans and borrowings

    3,008       —         —                 3,008  

Trade and other payables

    147,353       —         —         5,531     1(b)         152,884  

Accrued expenses

    —         4,963       4,383       (4,383   1(b)         —    

Customer liabilities

    51,959       —         —                 51,959  

Provisions

    47,715       —         —                 47,715  

Promissory note – related party

    —         1,300       1,148       (1,148   1(b)         —    

Income tax payables

    40,524       —         —                 40,524  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Total Current Liabilities

    309,112       6,263       5,531       —           —           314,643  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

    330,020       109,113       96,368       397,440         (163,200       660,628  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies

               

Class A ordinary shares subject to possible redemption, 45,000,000 shares at $10 per share redemption value

    —         450,000       397,440       (397,440   1(c)         —    

 

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UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION — (Continued)

AS OF December 31, 2021

(in Euros thousands unless otherwise denoted)

 

                                Reflecting Actual Redemptions upon the Closing
of the Business Combination on January 27,  2022
 
    SGHC
(Historical)
    SEAC (Historical
in USD)
    SEAC
(Historical in
Euros) 1(a)
    IFRS Conversion
and Presentation
Alignment
    Notes   Transaction
accounting
adjustments
    Notes   Pro forma
combined
 

Shareholders’ Equity

               

SGHC

               

Issued capital

    269,338       —         —             (269,338   2(c)  

Foreign exchange reserve

    (2,094     —         —             2,094     2(c)  

Accumulated profit

    246,808       —         —             (246,808   2(c)  

SEAC

               

Class A common stock

    —         —         —             1     2(d)  
              (1   2(e)  

Class B common stock

    —         1       1           (1   2(d)  

Additional paid-in capital

    —         —         —             —        

Accumulated deficit

    —         (108,747     (96,045         96,045     2(e)  

Super Group

               

Issued capital

    —         —         —             (13,715   2(b)     230,720  
              269,338     2(c)  
              (220,741   2(c)  
              397,441     2(e)  
              (96,045   2(e)  
              4,460     2(i)  
              108,789     2(f)  
              (218,807   2(g)  

Other reserves

    —         —         —             (248,150   2(h)     (248,150

Foreign exchange reserve

    —         —         —             (2,094   2(c)     (2,094

Accumulated deficit

    —         —         —             (18,887   2(b)     119,132  
              246,808     2(c)  
              (108,789   2(f)  

Total Shareholders’ Equity/(Deficit)

    514,052       (108,746     (96,044     —           (318,400       99,608  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity/(Deficit)

  844,072     $ 450,367     397,764     —         (481,600     760,236  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

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UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED STATEMENT OF PROFIT OR LOSS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2021

(in Euros thousands unless otherwise denoted)

 

                                Reflecting Actual Redemptions upon the
Closing of the Business Combination on
January 27, 2022
 
    SGHC
(Historical)
    SEAC (Historical
in USD)
    SEAC (Historical in
Euros) 1(aa)
    Presentation
Alignment
    Notes   Transaction
accounting
adjustments
    Notes     Pro forma combined  

Revenue

   1,320,658     $ —       —                   1,320,658  

Direct and marketing expenses

    (896,494     —         —                 (896,494

Other operating income

    8,042       —         —                 8,042  

General and administrative expenses

    (149,859     (7,281     (6,157             (156,016

Depreciation and amortization expense

    (83,560     —         —                 (83,560

Formation and operating costs

    —         —         —         —               —    

Transaction expenses

    —         —         —             (18,887     2(dd)       (18,887

Listing expenses

    —         —         —             (108,789     2(aa)       (108,789
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Profit/(Loss) from operations

    198,787       (7,281     (6,157     —           (127,676       64,954  

Other income and expenses:

               

Change in fair value of warrant liability

    —         (41,875     (35,410             (35,410

Transaction costs allocated to warrant liabilities

    —         —         —                 —    

Finance income

    1,312       —         —         55     1(bb)     (55     2(cc)       1,312  

Finance expense

    (6,370     —         —             5,046       2(bb)       (1,324

Gain on derivative contracts

    15,830       —         —                 15,830  

Gain on bargain purchase

    16,349       —         —                 16,349  

Interest earned on marketable securities held in Trust Account

    —         65       55       (55   1(bb)         —    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Profit/(loss) before taxation

    225,908       (49,091     (41,512     —           (122,685       61,711  

Income taxation

    9,970       —         —             —         2(ee)       9,970  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

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UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED

STATEMENT OF PROFIT OR LOSS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2021 — (Continued)

(in Euros thousands unless otherwise denoted)

 

                                Reflecting Actual Redemptions upon the
Closing of the Business Combination on
January 27, 2022
 
    SGHC
(Historical)
    SEAC (Historical
in USD)
    SEAC (Historical in
Euros) 1(aa)
    Presentation
Alignment
    Notes   Transaction
accounting
adjustments
    Notes   Pro forma combined  

Profit/(loss) for the year

  235,878     $ (49,091   (41,512   —         (122,685     71,681  

Weighted average shares outstanding of Class A common stock

    N/A       45,000,000       45,000,000               N/A  

Basic and diluted loss per share, Class A common stock

    N/A     $ (0.87   (0.74             N/A  

Weighted average shares outstanding of Class B common stock

    N/A       11,250,000       11,250,000               N/A  

Basic and diluted net loss per share, Class B common stock

    N/A     $ (0.87   (0.74             N/A  

Weighted average shares outstanding of common shares, basic and diluted

    55,497,173       N/A       N/A               N/A  

Earnings per share, basic and diluted

    4.25       N/A       N/A               N/A  

Weighted average shares outstanding of common shares, basic

    N/A       N/A       N/A           3     490,197,468  

Earnings per share, basic

    N/A       N/A       N/A             0.15  

Weighted average shares outstanding of common shares, diluted

    N/A       N/A       N/A           3     574,666,556  

Earnings per share, diluted

    N/A       N/A       N/A             0.12  

 

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NOTES TO UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

Note 1 — IFRS Adjustments and Reclassifications

The historical financial information of SEAC has been adjusted to give effect to the differences between U.S. GAAP and IFRS for the purposes of the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information.

The IFRS Adjustments and Reclassifications included in the unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position as of December 31, 2021 are as follows:

 

  (a)

The historical financial information of SEAC was prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP and presented in U.S. dollars. The historical balance sheet of SEAC was translated from U.S. dollars to Euro’s using the historical closing exchange rate, as of December 31, 2021, of $1.00 to €0.8832.

 

  (b)

Reflects the reclassification adjustments to align SEAC’s historical balance sheet with the presentation of SGHC’s financial statements.

 

  (c)

Reflects the U.S. GAAP to IFRS conversion adjustment related to the reclassification of SEAC’s Class A common stock subject to possible redemption into Non-Current Liabilities (Loans and borrowings).

The IFRS Adjustments and Reclassifications included in the unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of profit or loss for the year ended December 31, 2021 are as follows:

 

  (aa)

The historical financial information of SEAC was prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP and presented in U.S. dollars. The historical unaudited statement of operations of SEAC was translated from U.S. dollars to Euro’s using the average exchange rate for the period from January 1, 2021 through December 31, 2021 of $1.00 to €0.8456.

 

  (bb)

Reflects the reclassification adjustment to align SEAC’s historical statement of operations with the presentation of SGHC’s statement of profit or loss.

Note 2 — Transaction Accounting Adjustments to unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information

The Transaction Accounting Adjustments included in the unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position as of December 31, 2021 are as follows:

 

  (a)

Reflects the reclassification of €397.6 million in cash and marketable securities held in the Trust Account that became available to fund the Business Combination.

 

  (b)

Represents payment of estimated transaction costs of €42.1 million not yet incurred as of December 31, 2021 but expected to be incurred as a part of the Business Combination.

 

  (1)

Payment of deferred underwriters’ fees of €9.5 million. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position reflects these costs as a reduction of Cash and cash equivalents of €9.5 million with a corresponding decrease of €9.5 million to Deferred underwriting fee payable.

 

  (2)

Payment of incremental expenses attributable to equity issuance costs related to the Business Combination incurred through the Business Combination of €13.7 million. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position reflects these costs as a reduction of Cash and cash equivalents of €13.7 million with a corresponding decrease of €13.7 million to Issued capital.

 

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Table of Contents
  (3)

Payment of all other incremental expenses related to the Business Combination incurred through the Business Combination of €18.9 million. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position reflects these costs as a reduction of Cash and cash equivalents of €18.9 million with a corresponding increase of €18.9 million to Accumulated deficit.

 

  (c)

To reflect the recapitalization of SGHC through:

 

   

As a result of the Pre-Closing Reorganization, the equity of SGHC on the date of the Pre-Closing Reorganization is contributed to the Company, which consists of all the aggregate Issued capital, Foreign exchange reserve and Retained profit in SGHC to the Company of €269.3 million, €2.1 million and €246.8 million, respectively.

 

   

The issuance of 458,721,777 Super Group Ordinary Shares to SGHC Shareholders

 

   

The payment of €220.7 million in cash to SGHC shareholders for repurchases from Pre-Closing Holders

The cash paid to SGHC shareholders is determined in accordance with Section 2.2(c) of the Business Combination Agreement and represents the Available Distributable Cash remaining for repurchases from Pre-Closing Holders. The potential proportion of shares subject to repurchase has been agreed in separate Repurchase Agreements with individual SGHC shareholders.

 

  (d)

Reflects the one for one conversion of SEAC Class B Common stock to SEAC Class A Common Stock prior to the Merger.

 

  (e)

Reflects the Merger between SEAC and Merger Sub with SEAC as the surviving entity. The Merger reflects the surrender of all SEAC Class A Shares in exchange for the same number of Super Group Ordinary shares. SEAC warrant holders received Super Group Warrants on a one for one basis. Due to the fact that the equity is exchanged on a one for one basis there is no impact on the combined company financial information with the exception of the reclassification of the SEAC Class A Shares subject to redemption of €397.4 million from liabilities to equity. Immediately prior to the Merger, holders of SEAC Class A Shares were able to elect to redeem their shares for cash and as a result these shares are not reclassified but rather derecognized (see Note 2(g)). The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position reflects this reclassification as a decrease of Loans and borrowings of €397.4 million and a decrease in SEAC Class A Common Stock to nil with a corresponding increase to Super Group Issued Capital of €397.4 million. Further, this entry represents the elimination of the historical SEAC Accumulated deficit of €96.0 million.

 

  (f)

The Merger is accounted for under IFRS 2. The difference in the estimated fair value of equity instruments (i.e., shares and warrants issued by Super Group) over the fair value of identifiable net assets of SEAC represents a service for listing of the Super Group Shares and is accounted for as a share based payment expense in accordance with IFRS 2. The cost of the service, which is a non-cash and non-recurring expense, is estimated to be €108.8 million based on the calculation presented in the table below using SEAC market prices as of January 27, 2022 for both the Public Warrants to be automatically converted into Super Group Warrants and SEAC Class A Common Stock to be exchanged for Super Group Shares to be issued by Super Group. For the Private Placement Warrants to be automatically converted into Super Group Warrants, a preliminary valuation was performed as of January 27, 2022 for the purpose of determining the associated expense. The valuation applied a Black Scholes model, using key assumptions for volatility, risk-free rate and SEAC Class A Common Stock price. Any increase or decrease in volatility of 5%, leaving all other assumptions unchanged, would result in an increase in the fair value of the Private Placement Warrants of approximately €1.7 million or decrease in the fair value of the Private Placement Warrants of approximately €4.2 million, respectively.

 

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    Reflecting Actual Redemptions upon the Closing of the
Business Combination on January 27, 2022
 
            Shares                 in thousands      

Total Super Group Shares to be issued to SEAC stockholders

    31,475,691    

Market value per share at January 27, 2022

  $ 8.14    

Fair value of shares issued in USD

    $ 256,212  

Fair value of shares issued in EUR at the December 31, 2021 exchange rate

    226,287  

Super Group Warrants to be issued

   

—SEAC Private Placement Warrants

    11,000,000    

—SEAC Public Warrants

    22,500,000    

Total Super Group Warrants to be issued to SEAC Warrant holders

    33,500,000    

Fair value per Private Placement Warrant at January 27, 2022

  $ 1.45    

Market value per Public Warrant at January 27, 2022

  $ 1.63    

Fair value of warrants issued in USD

    $ 52,625  

Fair value of warrants issued in EUR at the December 31, 2021 exchange rate

    46,478  

Fair value of shares and warrants issued in consideration for combination in EUR

    272,765  

Net assets of SEAC at December 31, 2021 in EUR

      305,856  

Removal of Warrant Liabilities from net Assets

      76,927  

SEAC redemption payments

      (218,807
   

 

 

 

Net assets of SEAC acquired at December 31, 2021 in EUR12

    163,976  

Difference—being IFRS 2 charge for listing services in EUR

    108,789  

1 –The net assets of SEAC for the purposes of the IFRS 2 calculation represent the net assets of SEAC at December 31, 2021 excluding the Warrant Liabilities as those warrants are exchanged for Super Group Warrants and therefore do not represent a liability assumed but are included in the calculation of the consideration transferred.

2 –On the date of acquisition of January 27, 2022, due to changes in fair value of warrant liabilities and exchange rates movements, net assets were €148.4 million, thus equating to an IFRS 2 charge for listing services in EUR of €126.2 million on January 27, 2022.

 

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The net assets of SEAC in includes a reduction of cash totaling €218.8 million which represents the redemption of SEAC Class A Shares. See Note 2(g) directly below.

 

  (g)

Reflects the actual redemption of 24,774,309 SEAC Class A Shares for aggregate redemption payments of €218.8 million prior to the Business Combination. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position reflects this payment as a reduction to Cash and cash equivalents of €218.8 million with a corresponding decrease to Issued capital of €218.8 million.

 

  (h)

As described in Section 2.2(b) of the Business Combination Agreement, Pre-Closing Holders have a contingent right to receive up to 50,969,088 Earnout Shares. The Earnout Shares are issuable by Super Group to the Pre-Closing Holders subject to attainment of certain stock price hurdles over a five-year period from the Closing Date. In accordance with IAS 32 (Financial Instruments—Presentation), the arrangement has been assessed to determine whether the Earnout Shares represent a liability or an equity instrument. As the arrangement may result in Super Group issuing a variable number of shares in the future the Earnout Shares have, in accordance with the requirements of IAS 32, been recognized as a financial liability measured at fair value in the unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of financial position. The offsetting entry is made to Other Reserves as this is recorded in the same manner as a dividend since it is giving value to existing shareholders. A preliminary valuation assessment was performed for the purpose of determining an estimate of the financial liability using an option pricing model using key assumptions for: volatility; risk-free rate; and beginning Super Group share price (proxied using the SEAC Class A Share price). The preliminarily estimated valuation of the liability as of January 27, 2022 was approximately €248.2 million an increase or decrease in volatility of 5%, leaving all other assumptions unchanged, would result in an increase in the fair value of the Earnout Shares of approximately €18.7 million or decrease in the fair value of the Earnout Shares of approximately €22.3 million, respectively.

 

  (i)

Reflects the release of the remaining accrual balance for deferred underwriters’ fee payable with a corresponding increase to Issued capital.

The Transaction Accounting Adjustments included in the unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of profit or loss for the year ended December 31, 2021 are as follows:

 

  (aa)

Reflects an adjustment for the €108.8 million excess of the fair value of the shares issued over the value of the net assets acquired in the Business Combination.

 

  (bb)

Reflects the elimination of interest expense related to the debt for equity swap of eight individual loans completed on June 25, 2021. At the time of the swap, the debt consisted of €178.8 million of debt with an interest rate of 3-month LIBOR +5%, €23.2 million of debt with an interest rate of 6% and €1.0 million of debt with an interest rate of 2.0%, amounting to an aggregate principal balance of €203.0 million. Prior to the swap, the loan counterparties novated the loans to SGHC Shareholders in proportion to the ownership of each in SGHC. This swap of debt for equity with SGHC Shareholders is done in contemplation of the Business Combination. As the debts are no longer outstanding, the related interest expense on those loans previously recognized has been reversed.

 

  (cc)

Reflects the elimination of interest income related to the marketable securities held in the trust account.

 

  (dd)

Reflects the incremental expenses described previously in Note 2(b)(3), incurred in connection with the Business Combination and recorded against Accumulated deficit. These costs have been presented as Transaction expenses.

 

  (ee)

Due to the nature of the adjusting entries and the fact that most legal entities are domiciled in Guernsey, a territory with no income tax, there is no tax effect to any of the pro forma adjustments.

 

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Note 3 — Earnings per share

The calculation of weighted average shares outstanding for basic and diluted net loss per share assumes that SEAC’s initial public offering occurred as of January 1, 2021. In addition, as the Business Combination is being reflected as if it had occurred at the beginning of the period presented, the calculation of weighted average shares outstanding for basic and diluted net loss per share assumes that the shares have been outstanding for the entire period presented. This calculation is retroactively adjusted to eliminate the number of shares redeemed for the entire period.

The following tables summarize the number of basic and diluted weighted average shares outstanding for the year ended December 31, 2021:

 

     For the year ended
December 31, 2021
 
     Shares      € in thousands  

Pro forma profit

        71,681  

Basic weighted average shares outstanding

     490,197,468     

Basic earnings per share

   0.15     

Diluted weighted average shares outstanding

     574,666,556     

Diluted earnings per share

   0.12     

 

     For the year ended
December 31, 2021
 
     Shares  

Weighted average shares calculation, basic and diluted

  

Super Group Shares Outstanding

     490,197,468  
  

 

 

 

Basic weighted average shares outstanding

     490,197,468  

Warrants outstanding

     33,500,000  

Earnout shares

     50,969,088  
  

 

 

 

Diluted weighted average shares outstanding

     574,666,556  

Note 4 — Insignificant acquisitions

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of profit or loss for the year ended December 31, 2021 does not include the pre-acquisition results of Haber Investments, Red Interactive, Webhost, DigiProc, Partner Media, Buffalo Partners, Raichu, Raging River or Digiprocessing Mauritius as these were not considered significant for the purposes of presenting Article 11 pro forma information.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

All of the securities offered by the selling securityholders pursuant to this prospectus will be sold by the selling securityholders for their respective accounts. We will not receive any of the proceeds from such sales, except with respect to amounts that may be received by us upon exercise of warrants for cash, which will depend on the price of our ordinary shares. If the warrants are out of the money, the warrant holders are not likely to exercise their warrants. We will pay certain expenses associated with the registration of the securities covered by this prospectus, as described in the section titled “Plan of Distribution”.

We may receive up to an aggregate of $126,500,000 from the exercise of warrants for the ordinary shares being offered by the selling securityholders in this prospectus, assuming the exercise in full of all such warrants for cash at an exercise price of $11.50 per ordinary share for private placement warrants. There can be no assurance that the holders of warrants will elect to exercise any or all of their warrants. To the extent that warrants are exercised on a “cashless basis,” the amount of cash we would receive from the exercise of warrants will decrease. We intend to use the net proceeds from the exercise of such warrants for general corporate purposes. Our management will have broad discretion over the use of proceeds from the exercise of warrants.

 

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DIVIDEND POLICY

We have not paid any cash dividends on our ordinary shares to date. The Super Group Board intends to evaluate adopting a policy of paying cash dividends. In evaluating any dividend policy, the Super Group Board must consider Super Group’s financial condition and may consider results of operations, certain tax considerations, capital requirements, alternative uses for capital, industry standards and economic conditions. Whether Super Group adopts such a dividend policy and the frequency and amount of any dividends declared on the Super Group ordinary shares will be within the discretion of the Super Group.

 

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CAPITALIZATION

The table below sets forth our cash and our total capitalization (defined as total debt and shareholders’ equity) as of December 31, 2021:

 

   

on a historical basis for SGHC; and

 

   

on a pro forma basis to give effect to the Business Combination and related transactions.

You should read this table together with our consolidated financial statements and related notes including in this prospectus, as well as the sections of this prospectus titled “Summary Consolidated Historical and Other Financial Information,” “Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information” and “Managements Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the other financial information included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

     As of December 31, 2021  
     SGHC
Actual
     Pro Forma
Combined(1)
 
     (euros in thousands)
(unaudited)
 

Cash and cash equivalents

     €293,798        €209,858  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Restricted cash

     60,296        60,296  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Debt

     

Interest-bearing loans and borrowings

     3,772        3,772  

Lease liabilities

     16,249        16,249  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total debt

     20,021        20,021  

Equity

     

Issued capital

     269,338        230,720  

Other reserves

     —          (248,150

Foreign exchange reserve

     (2,094      (2,094

Retained profit

     246,808        119,132  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total equity

     514,052        99,608  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total capitalization

     €534,073        €119,629  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)

The pro forma information is presented for informational purposes only and is not necessarily indicative of what our financial position and results would have been had these transactions actually occurred at such date nor is it indicative of our future financial position or performance.

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

For purposes of this section, “Super Group Holding Company,” “Super Group,” “SGHC,” “we,” “our,” “us” and the “Company” refer to the Company and all of its subsidiaries prior to the consummation of the Business Combination, unless the context otherwise requires. Super Group (SGHC) Limited is the new combined company in connection with the Business Combination, in which shareholders of SGHC and SEAC exchanged their shares for shares in Super Group (SGHC) Limited.

The financial statements of Super Group (SGHC) Limited for the period from March 29, 2021 (inception) through December 31, 2021 are included in this prospectus. Results of operations of Super Group (SGHC) Limited have not been included in this section as they have been deemed immaterial.

The following discussion includes information that Super Group’s management believes is relevant to an assessment and understanding of Super Group’s consolidated results of operations and financial condition. Following the consummation of the Business Combination, Super Group and its wholly-owned subsidiaries became wholly-owned subsidiaries of the Company, and Super Group comprises the operations of the Company. References to Super Group or SGHC in the following discussion shall be synonymous with references to the Company following the Business Combination.

The discussion should be read together with the historical audited annual consolidated financial statements of Super Group and its subsidiaries, and the related notes thereto, included in this prospectus. The discussion and review should also be read together with the Company’s unaudited pro forma financial information for the year ended December 31, 2021. See “Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information.”

This discussion may contain forward-looking statements based upon current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties. Super Group’s actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including those discussed in the sections titled “Risk Factors” and “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Certain figures, such as interest rates and other percentages, included in this section have been rounded for ease of presentation. Percentage figures included in this section have not in all cases been calculated on the basis of such rounded figures but on the basis of such amounts prior to rounding. For this reason, percentage amounts in this section may vary slightly from those obtained by performing the same calculations using the figures in Super Group’s consolidated financial statements or in the associated text. Certain other amounts that appear in this section may similarly not sum due to rounding.

Overview

Super Group is a leading global online sports betting and gaming operator. Super Group’s mission is to responsibly provide first-class entertainment to the worldwide online betting and gaming community. Super Group’s strategy for achieving this is built around three key pillars:

 

  1.

Expanding its global footprint into as many regulated markets as possible in order to engage with as many customers as it can possibly reach;

 

  2.

Increasing awareness of its brands through strategic partnerships and coordinated sponsorship and marketing campaigns; and

 

  3.

Utilizing enhanced proprietary data to optimize the confluence of ethical corporate culture, responsible gaming values, value-for-money product offerings and customer-centric service delivery.

 

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SGHC Limited was incorporated in July 2020. On October 7, 2021, it became the ultimate holding company for a group of companies through a subsequent reorganization of entities with common ownership. Super Group (SGHC) Limited, the parent company of SGHC Limited effective immediately following the Closing, was incorporated on March 29, 2021. The first entity to form part of the reorganization was Pindus Holdings Limited (“Pindus”) and its subsidiaries. Pindus was incorporated on May 16, 2018, and subsequently acquired Kavachi Holdings Limited, the latter being the legal entity that houses the business known as Betway. Pindus is the acquiring entity for the purposes of this reorganization.

Fengari Holdings Limited (“Fengari”) was incorporated on July 26, 2019. On July 31, 2019, Fengari acquired City Views Limited (parent of the trading companies within that group) for a cash consideration, from which point Fengari was incorporated under SGHC. On October 7, 2020, Fengari became a subsidiary of Super Group as part of the reorganization.

Pelion Holdings Limited (“Pelion”) was incorporated as a holding company on April 1, 2020, and shortly thereafter, on May 4, 2020, acquired Lanester Investments Limited (parent of the trading companies within that group (“City Views”)) for a cash consideration. At the time of the incorporation of Pelion the ownership structure was identical to that of Super Group and Pelion was consequently incorporated under Super Group on October 7, 2020, as part of the reorganization. Fengari and Pelion and their subsidiaries are also collectively referred to as Spin.

On September 30, 2020, Pindus purchased 100% of the issued share capital of Yakira Limited (“Yakira”) and Gazelle Management Holdings Limited (“Gazelle”). Yakira and Gazelle and their subsidiaries are entities to which the Betway brand had been licensed for trading in a number of jurisdictions.

Following the conclusion of the reorganization and transactions stated above, Super Group now comprises Pindus, Yakira, Gazelle and Raging River Trading Proprietary Limited (“Raging River”) (collectively analogous with / known as Betway) and Fengari and Pelion (collectively analogous with / known as Spin).

As of the date of this prospectus, Super Group subsidiaries are licensed in 24 jurisdictions (not including DGC USA’s market access deals in the United States) and manage approximately 4,000 employees. Over the twelve months of 2021, on average, over 2.8 million customers per month have yielded in excess of €3.2 billion in wagers per month. During the period January 1, 2021 to December 31, 2021, total wagers amounted to €38 billion. Super Group’s business generated €1.26 billion ($1.48 billion) on a pro-forma consolidated basis of net gaming revenue between January 1, 2021 and December 31, 2021 in different geographic regions, including the Americas, Europe, Africa and the rest of the world, such regions accounting for approximately 47%, 11%, 17% and 25%, respectively, of Super Group’s total revenue in 2021.

On January 27, 2022 (the “Closing date”) Super Group completed the merger pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement (as it may be amended, supplemented or otherwise modified from time to time, the “Business Combination Agreement”) dated April 23, 2021, by and among itself SGHC, the Company, Sports Entertainment Acquisition Corp (“SEAC”), a New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) publicly traded special purpose acquisition company based in the United States, Super Group Holding Company Merger Sub, Inc (“Merger Sub”), a Delaware corporation and a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, which resulted in the public listing of the Group, described in this section and in note 24 to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Prior to the Closing date, SGHC shareholders (Pre-Closing Holders) exchanged all issued shares in SGHC for newly issued shares in the Company at an agreed ratio. This ratio resulted in each individual SGHC shareholder maintaining the same ownership percentage in the Company as each shareholder had in SGHC. The transaction was accounted for as a capital reorganization because the Company did not meet the definition of a business under IFRS 3 Business Combinations prior to the capital reorganization. Under a capital reorganization, the consolidated financial statements of the Company reflect the net assets transferred at pre-combination predecessor book values. Following the capital reorganization, SGHC is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company.

 

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On the Closing date, SEAC merged with and into Merger Sub, with SEAC as the surviving company continuing as a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company and at the effective time of the merger, each share of Class A common stock of SEAC was cancelled and extinguished and converted into the right to receive one ordinary share of no par value of the Company.

What Super Group Does

Super Group’s global online sports betting and casino gaming services are delivered to customers by way of two primary product offerings:

 

   

Betway, a single-brand premier online sports betting offering, and

 

   

Spin, a multi-brand online casino offering.

Betway is Super Group’s single-brand online sports betting offering with a global footprint derived from licenses to operate throughout Europe, the Americas and Africa. The brand is sports-led but also offers casino games. Betway seeks to continue to grow brand awareness, including through an expanding portfolio of partnerships and collaborations with sports teams and leagues worldwide. As of the date of this prospectus, Betway has more than 70 such arrangements and is actively negotiating for further expansion.

Spin is Super Group’s multi-brand online casino offering. Spin’s diverse portfolio of more than 20 casino brands is designed to be culturally relevant across the globe while aiming to offer a wide range of casino products. Spin is casino-led but some of its brands also offer sports betting products. Spin seeks to achieve growth through a broad range of targeted marketing channels in which SGHC believes an expansive brand portfolio to be a significant asset.

SGHC aims to further expand its global footprint through the acquisition of Digital Gaming Corporation Limited (“DGC”), which is the parent of Digital Gaming Corporation USA (“DGC USA”), which holds the exclusive license to use the Betway brand in the United States. On April 7, 2021, SGHC entered into a definitive agreement to acquire DGC, subject to certain regulatory approvals and customary closing conditions. This transaction is expected to close in the second half of 2022. DGC USA has already secured market access in up to an initial 12 regulated or expected-to-be regulated states in the United States and its acquisition will enable SGHC to penetrate and leverage its capabilities in these new markets. As of the date of this prospectus, the Betway brand (operated by licensee, DGC USA) is live in 6 US states, being Arizona, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Iowa and Colorado. DGC USA’s subsidiary, DGC VA, received its Temporary Permit to operate in the Commonwealth of Virginia in November 2021 and is expected to launch a Betway-branded sports betting offering in the Commonwealth in the second quarter of 2022. For the remaining 5 states, being Ohio, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Missouri, as a result of a combination of timing around the introduction of regulations and/or receipt of required licenses and approvals, there is currently no specific timeline for go-live. An agreement is also in place for the provision of an additional casino brand in Pennsylvania.

Following Betway’s global expansion, the Company has, in certain circumstances, licensed the brand to third parties in certain jurisdictions where licensees are in a better position to capture market opportunity while taking advantage of the global brand, in consideration for a license fee.

Business Combination, Reorganization and Public Company Costs

On April 23, 2021, SGHC entered into a Business Combination Agreement (the “Business Combination Agreement”) with Sports Entertainment Acquisition Corp., a Delaware corporation (“SEAC”), the Company, SGHC Merger Sub, Inc., and Sports Entertainment Acquisition Holdings LLC (the “Business Combination”). Pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, subject to the terms and conditions therein, prior to the closing of the Business Combination (the “Closing”), SGHC underwent a pre-closing reorganization (the “Reorganization”) wherein all existing shares of SGHC were exchanged their shares of SGHC for newly issued

 

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ordinary shares of the Company (“Super Group ordinary shares”). SGHC was deemed the accounting predecessor and the combined entity has become the successor registrant with the SEC, meaning that SGHC’s financial statements for previous periods are now disclosed in Super Group’s periodic reports filed with the SEC following the consummation of the Business Combination. This transaction closed on January 27, 2022 and is now effective.

While the legal acquirer in the Business Combination is the Company, for financial accounting and reporting purposes under IFRS, SGHC is the accounting acquirer. Under this method of accounting, SEAC is treated as the “acquired” company for financial reporting purposes. For accounting purposes, SGHC is deemed to be the accounting acquirer in the transaction and, consequently, the transaction has been treated as a recapitalization of SGHC. Accordingly, the consolidated assets, liabilities and results of operations of SGHC have become the historical financial statements of the Company, and SEAC’s assets, liabilities and results of operations have been consolidated with SGHC beginning on the acquisition date. Operations prior to the Business Combination will be presented as those of SGHC in future reports. The net assets of SEAC have been recognized at historical cost (which is expected to be consistent with carrying value), with no goodwill or other intangible assets recorded. See the section titled “Summary Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Financial Information.

Upon consummation of the Business Combination, the most significant change in SGHC’s future reported financial position and results of operations is the decrease in cash and cash equivalents (as compared to SGHC’s balance sheet at December 31, 2021) of €84.0 million after the redemptions. Total direct and incremental transaction costs of SEAC and SGHC are estimated at approximately €55.0 million and have been treated as a reduction of the cash proceeds and allocated between issued capital and transaction expenses. See the section titled “Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information.”

As a consequence of the Business Combination, the Company has become the successor to an SEC-registered and NYSE-listed company which requires the Company to hire additional personnel and implement procedures and processes to address public company regulatory requirements and customary practices. The Company expects to incur additional annual expenses as a public company for, among other things, directors’ and officers’ liability insurance, director fees and additional internal and external accounting, legal and administrative resources, including increased audit and legal fees.

Impact of COVID-19

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the novel coronavirus (“COVID-19”) outbreak to be a pandemic. Actions taken around the world to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 include restrictions on travel, cancellation of sporting events, quarantines in certain areas and forced closures for certain types of public places and businesses. COVID-19 and actions taken to mitigate its spread have had and are expected to continue to have an adverse impact on the economies and financial markets of many countries, including the geographical areas in which SGHC operates. COVID-19 and these actions have also had a significant impact on SGHC’s business, its suppliers and its customers. The direct impact on SGHC’s business, beyond disruptions in normal business operations, was driven by the suspension, postponement and cancellation of major sports seasons and events. While many sports have since restarted, some have been played on a reduced or uncertain schedule. In addition, with the explosion of first the Delta and then the Omicron variants around the world, the Company cannot be sure whether additional mitigation steps, including shutdowns and forced closures, will occur and limit the number of sports events in the coming months. The ultimate impact of COVID-19 on SGHC’s financial performance will depend on the length of time that such disruptions exist. Conversely, hard lockdowns, stay-at-home or shelter-in-place orders for the general populace in many jurisdictions accelerated the shift to online commerce, which management believes has benefitted the business in some areas. The extent to which the removal of such restrictions will have lasting effects on the business is not yet known and may take some time to become clear, particularly if subsequent waves of the pandemic lead to the reinstatement of similar restrictions in the future.

 

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As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve, the ultimate extent of the impact on SGHC’s businesses, operating results, cash flows, liquidity and financial condition will be primarily driven by the severity and duration of the pandemic, the pandemic’s impact on global economies and the timing, scope and effectiveness of federal, state and local governmental responses to the pandemic in the United States and national, provincial / state / regional and local responses elsewhere around the world. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in government authorities implementing numerous measures to try to contain the virus, such as travel bans and restrictions, quarantines, stay-at-home or shelter-in-place orders, and business shutdowns. These measures may adversely impact SGHC’s employees and operations and the operations of its business partners and may negatively impact SGHC’s business. SGHC’s revenues are dependent on interest in sporting events, which have been, and may be in the future, substantially limited during times of business shutdowns and the cancellation or reduction of physical participation in such activities.

Based on current trends, SGHC does not expect there to be a long-term negative financial impact from the COVID-19 pandemic. After an initial sharply negative impact (in online sports betting in particular, where the wholesale cancellation of sporting events led to a significant reduction of wagering during the months of March, April, May and June of 2020) the business recovered and has reverted to levels of growth not significantly different from that which management was expecting prior to the onset of the pandemic. Other than in jurisdictions where COVID-19-related restrictions were imposed on online gaming (such as the UK), the online casino business was not negatively impacted at the height of the pandemic but instead benefited from hard lockdowns which management believes resulted in more people looking online for entertainment. The effect of this dissipated somewhat as hard lockdowns ended but the online casino segment nonetheless remains robust in management’s view and growth has again returned to levels in line with pre-pandemic expectations. Notwithstanding this, the inherent unpredictability of the pandemic and how governments will respond to it mean that management cannot be certain as to whether or not these trends will persist and hence what the long-term effects of the pandemic will be. See the section titled “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Super Group’s Business — COVID-19 has affected our business and operations in a variety of ways. The pandemic restrictions may have affected our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects, including as a result of the reduction in the quantity of global sporting events, closures or restrictions on business operations of our suppliers, partners and sports organizations and a decrease in consumer spending, and it may continue to do so in the future. On the other hand, we cannot assure you that consumers will not decrease online gaming activities as pandemic restrictions are loosened. These cross-currents may have unknown and adverse effects that are impossible for us to predict.”

Comparability of Financial Information

For Years Ended December 31, 2019, December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2021

Owing to the effects of the Business Combination, SGHC’s future results of operations and financial position may not be comparable to historical results. Furthermore, SGHC’s financial years ending December 31, 2019, December 31, 2020, and December 31, 2021, all included one or more business acquisitions.

Fengari was deemed to have been acquired on July 26, 2019. Fengari acquired City Views on July 31, 2019. Pelion was deemed to have been acquired on April 1, 2020. Pelion acquired Lanester on May 4, 2020. Yakira and Gazelle were both acquired by Pindus on September 30, 2020. Pindus is the predecessor entity and its results will therefore be reflected in the financial statements prior to July 31, 2019. SGHC was formed on July 6, 2020.

During the year of 2021, SGHC Limited acquired additional businesses, which include mostly back-office and marketing services companies including Webhost Limited (“Webhost”), Partner Media Limited (“Partner Media”), and Buffalo Partners Limited (“Buffalo Partners”) were acquired on April 9, 2021. DigiProc Consolidated Limited (“Digiproc”) was acquired on April 14, 2021, Raichu Investments Proprietary Limited (“Raichu”) was acquired on April 19, 2021. Raging River was deemed to have been acquired by SGHC SA Proprietary Limited on January 11, 2021.

 

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On September 2, 2021, the Group purchased 100% of the outstanding shares of Smart Business Solutions S.A., a company in the process of applying for a gaming license.

On October 14, 2021, the Group purchased 100% of the outstanding shares of 11908120 Canada Inc. (doing business as TheSpike.gg), a company that provides marketing services.

On December 1, 2021, SGHC purchased 100% of the outstanding shares in Haber Investments Limited (‘Haber’), a company that provides back-office services which supports the operating entities within the Group and Red Interactive Limited (‘Red Interactive’), a company providing marketing services. The acquisitions were accounted for as business combinations under IFRS 3.

Based on these facts, the financial statements for SGHC Limited will consist of:

 

   

The period from January 1, 2019 to July 30, 2019 will include Pindus and its subsidiaries;

 

   

the period from July 31, 2019 to March 31, 2020 will include Pindus and its subsidiaries and Fengari and its subsidiaries;

 

   

the period from April 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020 will include Pindus and its subsidiaries, Fengari and its subsidiaries and Pelion and its subsidiaries;

 

   

for the period ended December 31, 2020 SGHC Limited will be included and its subsidiaries, including Pindus and its subsidiaries, (from October 1, 2020, inclusive of that date, the latter included Yakira and Gazelle which were both acquired by Pindus on September 30, 2020), Fengari and its subsidiaries and Pelion and its subsidiaries;

 

   

for the period ended December 31, 2021 SGHC Limited will be included and its subsidiaries, including Pindus and its subsidiaries, Fengari and its subsidiaries and Pelion and its subsidiaries;

 

   

for the period January 11, 2021 to December 31, 2021 SGHC Limited will be included and its newly acquired subsidiary Raging River Proprietary Limited;

 

   

for the period April 9, 2021 to December 31, 2021 SGHC Limited will be included and its newly acquired subsidiaries of Webhost, Partner Media, and Buffalo Partners, for the period April 19, 2021 to December 31, 2021 it will include the new subsidiary of Raichu Investments Proprietary Limited and its subsidiaries, and for the period April 14, 2021 to December 31, 2021 it will include the new subsidiary of DigiProc and its subsidiaries; and

 

   

for the period December 1, 2021 to December 31, 2021 SGHC Limited will be included and its newly acquired subsidiaries of Haber Investments Limited and Red Interactive Limited.

Accordingly, when considering the financial information that follows, the reader should bear in mind, particularly when comparing the Company’s performance in the year ended December 31, 2020, with its performance in the year ended December 31, 2020, with its performance in the year ended December 31, 2019, that only Pindus Holdings and its subsidiaries are included in all three years; that Fengari and its subsidiaries are included for the full year ended December 31, 2020 and 2021, but only a part of the year ended December 31, 2019; and that all of the other acquired entities and their subsidiaries are included only for varying parts of the year ended December 31, 2020 but for the full year ended December 31, 2021, notwithstanding that all entities were acquired as going concerns housing underlying businesses that had all been trading for several years prior to acquisition. The reader should also consider that during the year ending December 31, 2021 SGHC made several other acquisitions primarily for the provision of back office and marketing services to the Group, and as such the revenues generated within these entities are eliminated on consolidation within SGHC, with the exception of Raging River gaming operations. See “ — Key Components of Revenue and Expenses” later in this section.

Acquisition of Fengari

On October 7, 2020, SGHC entered into an agreement with the shareholders of Fengari, pursuant to which it acquired the entire issued share capital of Fengari, in consideration for the issue to the shareholders of Fengari of

 

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an aggregate of 13,638,493 ordinary shares of no par value each in SGHC, on the basis of one ordinary share for each share of Fengari sold. Immediately prior to the acquisition of Fengari by SGHC, the shareholders of Fengari were the same as the then shareholders of SGHC and held their shares in Fengari in the same proportions as they held their shares in SGHC. Accordingly, the shareholders of SGHC and their respective percentage ownership of SGHC were unchanged by the acquisition. The purpose of this transaction was to consolidate Fengari and its subsidiaries into the SGHC Group while retaining the ultimate beneficial ownership position of Fengari.

From March 12, 2020, the ownership structure and holdings percentages of Fengari were identical to those which were acquired by the Company on October 7, 2020. Prior to this, all shareholders were present in the ownership structure. This ownership structure was in place from the time of Fengari’s incorporation on July 26, 2019. Based on this high degree of commonality of ownership with the Company from incorporation and the acquisition of City Views by Fengari on July 31, 2019, management concluded that Fengari should be included in the SGHC financial statements from August 1, 2019, inclusive of that date.

Acquisition of Pelion

On October 7, 2020, SGHC entered into an agreement with the shareholders of Pelion, pursuant to which it acquired the entire issued share capital of Pelion in consideration for the issue to the shareholders of Pelion of an aggregate of 13,638,493 ordinary shares of no par value each in SGHC on the basis of one ordinary share for each share of Pelion sold. Immediately prior to the acquisition of Pelion by SGHC, the shareholders of Pelion were the same as the then shareholders of SGHC and held their shares in Pelion in the same proportions as they held their shares in SGHC. Accordingly, the shareholders of SGHC and their respective percentage ownership of SGHC were unchanged by the acquisition. The purpose of this transaction was to consolidate Pelion and its subsidiaries into the SGHC Group while retaining the ultimate beneficial ownership position of Pelion.

Pelion was incorporated as a holding company on April 1, 2020, and shortly thereafter, on May 4, 2020, acquired Lanester. At the time of incorporation of Pelion on April 1, 2020, the ownership structure and holdings percentages of Pelion were identical to those which were acquired by SGHC on October 7, 2020. The Company believes that the combination including Pelion with the Company should be deemed to have occurred on April 1, 2020, with acquisition by the Company of Lanester on May 4, 2020, accounted for as a business combination on that date.

Due to the scale of the businesses acquired in the years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2020, and the resulting impact of their consolidation with Pindus and Fengari on the financial results of SGHC during the year ended December 31, 2020, the comparative discussion of the financial results of SGHC for the year ended December 31, 2020, and of Pindus and Fengari for the year ended December 31, 2019, may be of limited use in assessing the performance of the business year-over-year.

Acquisition of Raging River

On January 11, 2021, Pindus, a subsidiary of SGHC entered into an option agreement with the shareholders of Raging River, pursuant to which it acquired the entire issued share capital of Raging River for cash consideration. The option period was for the period commencing on the date of the Agreement (January 11, 2021) and ending on December 31, 2025. Pindus exercised the option on April 8, 2021. Pindus nominated SGHC SA under option to purchase 100% of share capital in Raging River. On January 11, 2021, pursuant to the share transfer SGHC SA gained control of Raging River.

Other Acquisitions

On April 9, 2021, SGHC entered into an agreement to acquire Webhost, a company providing procurement services to SGHC; City Views a subsidiary of SGHC also entered into agreements to acquire Partner Media and Buffalo Partners, both companies providing marketing services to SGHC. On April 14, 2021 and April 19, 2021

 

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SGHC entered into agreements to acquire DigiProc and Raichu, with both entities providing back-office administrative services to SGHC. On December 1, 2021, SGHC entered into an agreement to acquire both Haber Investments Limited for the provision of back-office services and Red Interactive Limited for the provision of marketing services to the Group. These agreements were for cash consideration.

See also the section titled “ — Business Combination, Reorganization and Public Company Costs.”

Key Factors Affecting Operating Results

SGHC believes that its performance and future success depend on several factors that present significant opportunities for SGHC but also pose risks and challenges, including those discussed below and in the section titled “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Super Group’s Business.” SGHC’s financial position and results of operations depend to a significant extent on the following factors:

Ability to Acquire, Retain and Monetize Customers

SGHC’s ability to effectively market its offerings is critical to operational success. The Company undertakes a variety of marketing initiatives, include traditional marketing channels (such as television, print and radio), digital marketing (such as online display advertising, search engine marketing, social media and “affiliates” marketing, the latter being an industry term describing independent third-party marketing agencies which despite the word “affiliate” are not affiliated with the Company in the ordinary sense of the word) and retention marketing (including via email, text messages and social media). Traditional marketing channels are by their nature difficult to measure. Digital marketing is typically more measurable but somewhat more complex to undertake. Retention marketing is subject to customer consent which is not always granted or may be revoked. In all cases it is therefore difficult to extrapolate the Company’s past performance into the future and/or into new markets where SGHC has not previously marketed its products and offerings.

In all of its marketing channels SGHC makes widespread use of incentives, also called bonuses or comps, which are accounted for as a deduction in the calculation of its revenues. The Company attempts to evaluate its customers individually and in real-time using a wide range of data points and with reference to proprietary models of customer behavior and profitability. Customer behavior and competitive forces are constantly evolving and it is therefore difficult to extrapolate the Company’s past performance into the future and/or into new markets where it has not previously marketed its products and offerings.

SGHC’s ability to execute on its marketing plans are subject to regulatory constraints in each market and it is not unusual for marketing-related regulations to change from time to time. The Company therefore cannot be certain that historic marketing channels will be available to it in the future and/or whether it will be allowed to utilize the same incentivization mechanisms in the future.

While SGHC is continuing to assess the efficiency of its marketing activities, the Company’s knowledge obtained over its operating history and the relative novelty of the online casino and sports wagering industries in certain markets or geographic regions makes it difficult for the Company to predict when it will achieve its longer-term profitability objectives.

Industry Trends and Competitive Landscape

SGHC operates within the global entertainment, betting and gaming industries, which are comprised of diverse products and offerings that compete for consumers’ time and disposable income. As the Company prepares to enter new jurisdictions, it expects to face significant competition from other established industry players, some of which may have access to more resources and/or may have more experience in online casino and sports wagering in these jurisdictions. In existing jurisdictions the Company also expects to face significant competition from existing competitors and new entrants, while in both new and existing jurisdictions ancillary

 

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product categories such as daily fantasy sports, casual games and financial services (where products are evolving over time to include “gamification” features that often closely resemble gambling) will also increase competitive pressure.

Legalization, Regulation and Taxation

SGHC’s growth depends on expanding its activities in existing markets, as well as on successfully entering new markets and new geographies around the world. Management believes that incremental legalization and regulation of online casino and sports wagering, derived from governments’ desire to protect consumers and increase tax revenues, will create global opportunities for the Company to expand into newly regulated markets worldwide. For example, in the United States online sports wagering’s prospects were made possible after the United States Supreme Court repealed PASPA in May 2018, as unconstitutional, which had the effect of lifting federal restrictions on sports betting and thereby allowing states to determine the legality of such commercial activities. As another example, the Canadian Parliament recently passed legislation allowing provinces to regulate single-game wagering within each province. SGHC’s strategy is to monitor closely changes in regulations that enable expansion of existing markets or entry into new markets, and seize such opportunities in a financially prudent manner. The rate in which existing and new jurisdictions undergo regulatory changes, and online casinos and sports wagering markets expand (in the case of existing markets) or become legal (in the case of new ones), will impact the prospects and pace of SGHC’s growth, as it continues to expand its global footprint.

The process of securing the necessary licenses or partnerships to operate in a new jurisdiction may take longer than SGHC anticipates. In addition, legislative or regulatory changes or restrictions and gaming taxes may make it less attractive or more difficult for the Company to do business in a particular jurisdiction, and may impact the Company’s profitability in both positive and negative ways that make the overall net effect hard to predict. In the past, when countries have introduced regulatory frameworks, the Company’s financial results have been impacted by, amongst other things, increased taxation and compliance costs, offset by improvements in other costs of doing business such as payment processing and product costs. In some cases the introduction of a restrictive regulatory regime has resulted in a decrease in the size of the market, whereas in others a liberal regulatory regime has led to an increase in the size of the market. Further, certain jurisdictions require the Company to have a relationship with a land-based casino for online sports and/or casino wagering access, which tends to increase the Company’s costs of revenue. Countries and/or states that have established state-run monopolies may limit opportunities for private operators.

Countries and/or states impose tax rates on online casino and sports wagering, which may vary substantially between jurisdictions. In the United States, once DGC has been acquired, SGHC will also be subject to a federal excise tax of 0.25% on the amount of each sports wager placed. Some jurisdictions impose constraints on the amounts of money that customers are allowed to deposit and/or lose (“loss limits”), sometimes in absolute terms without reference to the means of individual customers. Some jurisdictions impose constraints on the nature and extent of the marketing that may be undertaken in relation to the Company’s products. Management believes that the jurisdictions that will create the most compelling levels of profitability for the Company are jurisdictions with both online casino and sports wagering at favorable tax rates, with customer loss limits at levels that relate responsibly to what customers can afford to gamble with, and with marketing regulations that enable the Company to engage meaningfully with its customers. Conversely, management expects that a minority of jurisdictions will set tax rates at unprofitable levels and/or will set customer loss limits at arbitrarily low levels and/or will impose onerous constraints on marketing, in which case the Company might not be able to profitably trade in such jurisdictions.

Managing Wagering Risk

The online casino gaming and online sports wagering businesses are characterized by an element of chance. Accordingly, SGHC employs theoretical win rates and probability distributions to estimate what a certain type of

 

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online casino wager or online sports wager, on average, will win or lose in the long run. Revenue is impacted by variations in the hold percentage (the ratio of Net Revenue over Accepted Purchases) with respect to the online casino and online sports wagering that SGHC offers to its customers. SGHC uses the hold percentage as an indicator of an online casino game’s or online sports wager’s performance against its expected outcome. Although each online casino wager or online sports wager generally performs within a defined statistical range of outcomes in the long run, actual outcomes may vary for any given period, particularly in the short term.

In the short term, for online casino wagering and online sports wagering, the element of chance may affect win rates (hold percentages); these win rates, particularly for online sports wagering, may also be affected in the short term by factors that are largely beyond the Company’s control, such as unanticipated event outcomes, a customer’s skill, experience and behavior, the mix of games played or wagers placed, the financial resources of customers, the volume of wagers placed and the amount of time spent gambling. Factors that are nominally within the Company’s control, such as the level of incentives or bonuses or comps given to customers, might not, for various reasons both within and beyond the Company’s control, be well-controlled and hence in turn might impact win rates. For online casino games, it is possible that a random number generator outcome or game will malfunction or is otherwise misprogrammed to pay out wins in excess of the game’s mathematical design and award errant prizes. For online sports wagering, it is possible that the Company’s platform erroneously posts odds or is otherwise misprogrammed to pay out odds that are highly favorable to bettors, and bettors place wagers before the odds are corrected. Additionally, odds compilers and risk managers are capable of human error, so even if the Company’s wagering products are subject to a capped payout, significant volatility can occur. Similarly, inadvertently over-incentivizing customers can convert a sports wager or casino game that would otherwise have been expected to be profitable for the Company into one with a positive expectation for the player.

A further factor particularly of relevance to some areas of SGHC’s sports betting business concerns the volatility inherent in certain types of wagers, particularly parlay or accumulator wagers, which are single wagers that link together two or more individual wagers and are dependent on all of those wagers winning together. It is not unusual for a large number of customers to back similar outcomes, and if a high proportion of those outcomes transpire then it is possible that in aggregate these customers will win large sums of money. This is an expected and normal feature of the business that the Company has in the past experienced and expects that it will do so again in the future.

As a result of the variability in these factors, the actual win rates on the Company’s online casino games and online sports wagers may differ from the theoretical win rates it has estimated and could result in the winnings of its online casino games or sports betting customers exceeding those anticipated. The variability of win rates (hold percentages) also has the potential to adversely affect the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations, prospects and cash flows. See “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Super Group’s Business — Our business depends on the success, including win or hold rates, of existing and future online betting and gaming products, which rely on a variety of factors and are not completely controlled by us.”

Technology and Products

Management believes that pragmatic and commercial product selection for purposes of speed-to-market and product-market fit is a key driver of the success of the business. The Company therefore evaluates each new market independently in order to determine whether the interests of the business would be best served by deploying the Company’s proprietary sports betting product or the original flagship bespoke-developed product or alternate third-party product. Such decisions are also influenced by numerous other factors, such as regulatory constraints and the amount of product customization required to meet such constraints, and the maturity of the market under consideration. Similar considerations are applied in the decision as to which casino games of the available products would be best suited for any particular new market.

Management believes that some of the growth of the Company has been achieved due to this approach but cannot be certain that this will be replicated in future. While the Company has derived much experience from the

 

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diverse requirements of the 24 jurisdictions in which it already holds licenses, there can be no certainty that such experience will be of any assistance in further new markets, or that the Company will be able to achieve suitable product-market fit in future new markets, either by way of customizing existing product or sourcing additional new products.

Regardless of the product or products selected, the Company will always seek to overlay its own proprietary technology with the intention of achieving competitive advantage. This is particularly true in the area of data and analytics, where the Company’s goal is to be able to evaluate all of its customers in granular detail in real-time so that it can in turn interact, intervene, incentivize and encourage (or discourage, as the case may be) behaviors that are both responsible for the customer and profitable for the Company.

Management believes that a meaningful part of the Company’s growth can be attributed to competitive advantage achieved in this way, but by the nature of such things cannot quantify this belief in any meaningful way and therefore cannot be certain that any such competitive advantage (if it exists) will persist into the future or be replicable in new markets or that competitors will not develop competing technologies (to the extent that they haven’t already done so) in order to substantially erode any such advantage that the Company might currently enjoy.

Seasonality

SGHC’s sport-focused Betway offerings trade in many major markets in both hemispheres and hence benefit from the year-round sporting calendar. Different sporting leagues and events are relatively more or less important in different markets and hence the business benefits from a natural degree of diversification. Sporting events of all sorts take place every day around the world in multiple time zones and, particularly with the advent of virtual sports and eSports, events are available for wagering 24/7/365.

Sports betting is however subject to seasonal fluctuations that may impact revenues and cash flows. Most major sporting leagues and events do not operate year-round and hence SGHC’s operations will be impacted by variations in the sporting calendar over the course of a year. In particular, certain sports leagues operate formats (playoffs, championships, cup finals, etc.) that naturally result in increased customer interest as the end of the season approaches for those sports. Similarly, certain sporting events only operate at specific times of the year (major horse races, major tennis tournaments, etc.) and certain other events only operate on a multi-year cycle (Olympics, FIFA World Cup, etc.).

These phenomena will naturally lead to increased revenues at such times of the year or in major international tournament years, and conversely will result in reduced revenues during off-season periods or in non-tournament years.

For example, Betway’s revenues are often impacted by the calendars of the major European and African football (soccer) leagues, international and Indian Premier League cricket, major American sports leagues, marquee horse racing events, major professional tennis tournaments and the FIFA World Cup. The Company naturally seeks to adapt marketing efforts accordingly, taking advantage of additional opportunities for profitable growth whenever they present while mitigating potentially negative effects on profits by adjusting marketing appropriately in off-season periods.

In contrast, the Spin portfolio of casino brands is largely unaffected by seasonality in aggregate as online casino gaming is largely an individual activity unaffected by external calendars. Management believes that there is however some evidence that seasonality effects may occur at the time of certain major national holidays and/or vacation periods and hence it may occur that SGHC’s revenues and cashflow might be adversely affected during times of year when customers are naturally more likely to engage with other non-gaming activities.

 

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Key Components of Revenue and Expenses

When considering the financial information that follows, the reader should bear in mind when comparing the Company’s performance in the year ended December 31, 2020, with its performance in the year ended December 31, 2019, that Pindus and its subsidiaries are included in full in both years; that Fengari and its subsidiaries are included for the full year ended December 31, 2021 as well as the year ended December 31, 2020, but only part of the year ended December 31, 2019; and that all of the other acquired entities and their subsidiaries are included only for varying parts of the year ended December 31, 2020 but for the full year ended December 31, 2021, notwithstanding that all entities were acquired as going concerns housing underlying businesses that had all been trading for several years already.

The acquisitions during the year ended December 31, 2021 were mainly for the provision of back office and marketing services and the revenues generated within these group of companies is eliminated on consolidation within SGHC, with the exception of Raging River which has gaming operations.

Monthly Active Customers

SGHC uses monthly active customers (“MAC”) as an important measure of its customer base. The Company defines MAC as the number of registered customer accounts that wager at the Company’s online casino games and/or sports betting offerings at least once during a particular month. This metric is calculated using internal company data and is not validated, audited or reviewed by an independent party. The size and growth of SGHC’s monthly active customers directly affects the Company’s revenue generated from its online casino games and sports betting offerings, as well as its operating expenses associated with the infrastructure and customer support that is necessary to service customers.

The following tables have been prepared on a pro forma consolidated comparable full-year basis, which is to say that they have been prepared as if all of the entities acquired by the Company during the course of 2019, 2020 and 2021 had instead been owned by the Company from January 1, 2019, and show SGHC’s pro forma average MAC over the average for the year of 2019, 2020 and 2021 and associated year-on-year growth rates. MAC numbers were significantly negatively impacted in the first 6 months of 2020 by the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly due to the cancellation of sporting events and resulting sharp reduction in sports betting activity between March and June 2020. Accordingly, the year-on-year growth rate shown below for 2021 as compared to 2020 is likely to be somewhat higher than that which would have been the case in the absence of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Average MAC for 12-month periods ending

 
     Value
millions
     Growth
millions
     %  

December 2019

     1.30        —          —    

December 2020

     2.11        0.81        62

December 2021

     2.74        0.62        29

SGHC intends to pursue MAC growth in current and potential markets but also particularly in regions such as the United States, where the Company aims to focus its efforts on expanding its global footprint.

Revenue

SGHC generates revenue through income earned from online gaming activities, comprising online casino games and sports betting, plus fees from brand licensing agreements. SGHC’s revenue from casino games and sports betting (“Net Gaming Revenue”) is the sum of amounts won from customers by the sportsbook and casino, less certain customer incentives, and adjusted for the fair market value of gains and losses on open betting positions. SGHC’s revenue is recognized net of adjustments for utilized customer incentives and VAT and GST in countries where these taxes are applicable. SGHC’s revenue is therefore calculated as revenue from casino

 

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games and sports betting plus fees from brand licensing agreements minus utilized customer incentives adjustments minus VAT minus GST.

Revenues generated from online casino games and sports betting are recognized at fair value, representing the amount staked by the customer adjusted for any customer incentives. They are subsequently remeasured when the transaction price is known and the amount payable is confirmed, at which point the movement is recorded as a gain or loss in SGHC’s consolidated financial statements. Such gains and losses arise from similar transactions and are therefore offset within revenue. Subsequent changes in these fair values are recorded in the Company’s consolidated financial statements, provided that it is probable that economic benefits will flow to SGHC and the revenue can be reliably measured.

SGHC recognizes net gaming revenue transactions at the point at which they are settled. Any open positions at period end are fair valued with the resulting gain or loss recorded in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. Customer liabilities related to these timing differences are accounted for as derivative financial instruments.

Revenue also includes brand licensing revenues generated by the provision of the Betway brand to other online gambling companies. Brand licensing revenues are recognized over time on a monthly basis in line with either the month in which the licensing revenue is generated or as agreed in fixed contractual terms. The majority of licensing revenue is generated from fixed fee per month contract terms with the remaining licensing revenue generated through contracts specifying a set percentage of Betway’s global brand marketing spend.

SGHC has two operating segments and reportable segments: Betway and Spin. The characteristic of these operating segments is that both engage in business activities from which it may recognize revenues and incur expenses and these segments can be disaggregated by various characteristics but mostly by brand.

SGHC’s sports betting revenue is mostly generated by Betway, which also generates some revenue from online casino. Online casino revenue is mainly generated by Spin (which consists of more than 20 separate brands collectively referred to as Spin), which also generates a small amount of revenue from sports betting. Revenue and costs are reasonably allocated between Betway and Spin based on how management views these groups for performance management and decision-making purposes.

Direct and Marketing Expenses

Marketing expenses are broken out into the following marketing channels: acquisition and retention marketing, search optimization and digital, “affiliates” marketing, and brand marketing or sponsorships. This item also includes compensation, commissions and benefits, event attendance, event sponsorships, association memberships, marketing subscriptions, and third-party consulting fees.

Direct expenses consist primarily of costs relating to fraud, and merchant and processing costs relating to customer deposits and withdrawals. The operating expense group also includes costs relating to royalties paid to content and product providers. Operating expenses also include taxes paid on gaming and sports betting activities in jurisdictions with a gaming tax regime and other operational irrecoverable value added taxes and withholding taxes. Also included are personnel costs, including executive salaries, bonuses and benefits as well as rental, rates and levies and certain office-related and travel expenses. Exchange rate adjustment and restatements are included under this item.

General and Administrative Expenses

General and administrative expenses include professional services (including legal, regulatory, audit and licensing-related), legal settlements and contingencies. Administrative expenses also include technology-related expenses relating to subscriptions, operational software, domain management and license costs. Expenses paid to outsource services providers are also included under this item.

 

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Depreciation and Amortization

Depreciation and amortization is provided on property and equipment over the estimated useful lives on a straight-line basis. Depreciation and amortization also include the amortization of intangible assets as well as right of use assets written off on a straight-line basis. Upon retirement or disposal, the cost of the asset disposed of and the related accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and any gain or loss is reflected in the loss from operations.

Finance Expense (Income)

Finance expenses consists primarily of interest paid in respect of loans payable.

Finance income consists primarily of interest received in respect of loans receivable.

Income Tax Expense

SGHC accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method whereby deferred income taxes are recognized for the tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial statement carrying amounts and the tax basis of the assets and liabilities. The provision for income taxes reflects income earned and taxed. Current income tax relating to items recognized directly in equity is recognized in equity and not in the consolidated statement of profit and loss.

Year Ended December 31, 2021 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2020

Pelion and Fengari together house the SGHC business and brands collectively known as Spin, while Pindus (including Raging River, Yakira and Gazelle) houses the business known as Betway.

Various operating and marketing companies were purchased during the year ended December 2021. See “— Comparability of Financial Information — For Years Ended December 31, 2019, December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2021.” The acquisitions were accounted for as business combinations in accordance with IFRS 3.

The revenue generated by these newly acquired outsource service and marketing entities is through contracted services provided to SGHC Group companies. This revenue eliminates on consolidation. Costs associated with these operating and marketing entities are allocated to each reporting segment using a direct cost allocation method.

 

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The following table sets forth SGHC’s historical consolidated results of operations for the annual periods indicated:

 

(Euro in thousands)    Super
Group
    Betway     Spin     Head Office
Costs
 

For the year ended December 31, 2021

        

Revenue

     1,320,658       687,752       632,906       —    

Direct and marketing expenses

     (896,494     (511,708     (381,223     (3,563

Other operating income

     8,042       5,090       587       2,365  

General and administrative expenses

     (149,859     (71,550     (57,678     (20,631

Depreciation and amortization expense

     (83,560     (49,528     (33,107     (925

Profit from operations

     198,787       60,056       161,485       (22,754

Finance income

     1,312       977       197       138  

Finance expense

     (6,370     (5,712     (514     (144

Gain on derivative contracts

     15,830       —         15,830       —    

Gain on bargain purchase

     16,349       11,500       4,849       —    

Profit before taxation

     225,908       66,821       181,847       (22,760

Income tax expense/(benefit)

     9,970       10,647       (429     (248
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Profit for the year

     235,878       77,468       181,418       (23,008
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
(Euro in thousands)    Super
Group
    Betway     Spin     Head Office
Costs
 

For the year ended December 31, 2020

        

Revenue

     908,019       394,525       513,494       —    

Direct and marketing expenses

     (612,689     (310,547     (302,058     (84

General and administrative expenses

     (114,538     (38,984     (71,082     (4,472

Depreciation and amortization expense

     (55,407     (24,602     (30,804     (1

Profit from operations

     125,385       20,392       109,550       (4,557

Finance income

     257       129       128       —    

Finance expense

     (10,991     (10,275     (716