UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 


 

 

AMENDMENT NO. 1
TO

FORM 10


 

 

GENERAL FORM FOR REGISTRATION OF SECURITIES

Pursuant to Section 12(b) or (g) of The Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

 

 

Video River Networks, Inc.

 

 

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its Charter)

 

 

 

Nevada

 

87-0627349

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

 

370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A

 

 

Torrance, California

 

90501

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number including area code: (1) 310-895-1839

 

 

COPIES TO :

Law Office Of Mary Shea

1701 Broadway, #334

Vancouver, WA 98663

541-450-9943

360-326-1821

 

 

Securities to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which

to be so registered

 

each class is to be registered

None

 

None

 

 

Securities to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

COMMON STOCK, Par Value $0.001

(Title of class)

 

PREFERRED STOCK, Par Value $0.001

(Title of class)


 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large Accelerated Filer

[  ]

Accelerated Filer

[  ]

Non-Accelerated Filer

[  ]

Smaller reporting company

[X]

   

Emerging growth company

[  ]

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [  ]

 

 

 

 

EXPLANATORY NOTE

 

We are filing this General Form for Registration of Securities on Form 10 to register our common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Common Stock”) and our preferred stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Preferred Stock”), pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Once this Registration Statement is deemed effective, we will be subject to the requirements of Regulation 13A under the Exchange Act, which will require us to file annual reports on Form 10-K; quarterly reports on Form 10-Q; and, current reports on Form 8-K, and we will be required to comply with all other obligations of the Exchange Act applicable to issuers filing registration statements pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act. Unless otherwise noted, references in this Registration Statement to the “Registrant”, the “Company”, “Video River” “we”, “our”, or “us” means Video River Networks, Inc.

 

On October 29, 2019, Video River Networks, Inc. sold one (1) Special 2019 series A preferred share (one preferred share is convertible 150,000,000 share of common stocks) of the company for Fifty Thousand and 00/100 ($50,000/00) Dollars, to Community Economic Development Capital LLC, (“CED Capital”) a California limited liability company CED. The Special preferred share controls 60% of the company’s total voting rights and thus, gave to CED Capital the controlling vote power to control and dominate the affairs of the company theretofor.  Upon the closing of the transaction, the business of CED Capital was merged into the Company and CED Capital became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. 

 

 

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

There are statements in this Registration Statement that are not historical facts. These “forward-looking statements” can be identified by use of terminology such as “believe,” “hope,” “may,” “anticipate,” “should,” “intend,” “plan,” “will,” “expect,” “estimate,” “project,” “positioned,” “strategy” and similar expressions. You should be aware that these forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that are beyond our control. For a discussion of these risks, you should read this entire Registration Statement carefully, especially the risks discussed under the section entitled “Risk Factors.” Although management believes that the assumptions underlying the forward looking statements included in this Registration Statement are reasonable, they do not guarantee our future performance, and actual results could differ from those contemplated by these forward looking statements. The assumptions used for purposes of the forward-looking statements specified in the following information represent estimates of future events and are subject to uncertainty as to possible changes in economic, legislative, industry, and other circumstances. As a result, the identification and interpretation of data and other information and their use in developing and selecting assumptions from and among reasonable alternatives require the exercise of judgment. To the extent that the assumed events do not occur, the outcome may vary substantially from anticipated or projected results, and, accordingly, no opinion is expressed on the achievability of those forward-looking statements. In light of these risks and uncertainties, there can be no assurance that the results and events contemplated by the forward-looking statements contained in this Registration Statement will in fact transpire. You are cautioned to not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of their dates. We do not undertake any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements.


 

 

 

TRADEMARKS, SERVICE MARKS AND TRADE NAMES

 

This Form 10 contains references to our trademarks, service marks and trade names and to trademarks, service marks and trade names belonging to other entities. Solely for convenience, trademarks, service marks and trade names referred to in this Form 10, including logos, artwork and other visual displays, may appear without the ® or TM symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that their respective owners will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, their rights thereto. Except as set forth in this Form 10, we do not intend our use or display of other companies’ trade names, service marks or trademarks or any artists’ or other individuals’ names to imply a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship of us by, any other companies or persons.

 

 


 

 

VIDEO RIVER NETWORKS, INC.

 

FORM 10

 

 TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

   

Page

Item 1.

Business

1

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

8

Item 2.

Financial Information

22

Item 3.

Properties

30

Item 4.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management

30

Item 5.

Directors and Executive Officers

31

Item 6.

Executive Compensation

32

Item 7.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

33

Item 8.

Legal Proceedings

33

Item 9.

Market Price of and Dividends on the Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matter

34

Item 10.

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

35

Item 11.

Description of Registrant’s Securities to be Registered

37

Item 12.

Indemnification of Directors and Officers

38

Item 13.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

39

Item 14.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

39

Item 15.

Financial Statements and Exhibits

40

 


 

 


 

ITEM 1

BUSINESS

 

When we use the terms “NIHK,” “we,” “us,” “our,” and “the company,” we mean Video River Networks, Inc., a Nevada corporation.

 

Corporate History

 

Video River Networks, Inc. (“NIHK,” “PubCo” or “Company”), previously known as Nighthawk Systems Inc., a Nevada corporation, used to be a provider of wireless and IP-based control solutions for the utility and hospitality industries. Since 2002, the Company’s Power Controls Division has used wireless technology to control both residential utility meters and remote, mission-critical devices. The Set Top Box Division, acquired in October 2007, enables hotels to provide in-room high definition television (“HDTV”) broadcasts, integrated with video-on-demand, and customized guest services information.

 

On August 14, 2009, the Company filed Form 15D, Suspension of Duty to Report, and as a result, the Company was not required to file any SEC forms since August 14, 2009.

 

On October 29, 2019, Video River Networks, Inc. sold one (1) Special 2019 series A preferred share (one preferred share is convertible 150,000,000 share of common stocks) of the company for an Fifty Thousand and 00/100 ($50,000/00) Dollars, to Community Economic Development Capital LLC, (“CED Capital”) a California limited liability company CED. The Special preferred share controls 60% of the company’s total voting rights and thus, gave to CED Capital the controlling vote power to control and dominate the affairs of the company theretofor.  Upon the closing of the transaction, the business of CED Capital was merged into the Company and CED Capital became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. 

 

Following the completion of above mentioned transactions, the Company pivoted its business model to become a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including, affordable housing, opportunity zones properties, medical real estate investments, hemp and cannabis farms, dispensaries facilities, CBD related commercial facilities, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services.  Because our principal is a California Real Estate Broker, NIHK aspires to qualify as a Real Estate Investment Trust in the near future and lead in providing real estate focused on hemp and medial-cannabis growth, to the public markets. 

 

Furthermore, we are now, an internally-managed real estate holding company focused on the acquisition, ownership and management of specialized industrial properties leased to experienced, state-licensed operators for their regulated state-licensed cannabis facilities. We plan to acquire our properties through sale-leaseback transactions and third-party purchases. We expect to lease our properties on a triple-net lease basis, where the tenant is responsible for all aspects of and costs related to the property and its operation during the lease term, including structural repairs, maintenance, taxes and insurance.

 

Following the change of control transaction listed above, the Company appointed Mr. Frank I Igwealor as President and CEO.  Our corporate office is located at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, California 90501. Our telephone number is (310) 895-1839

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had no W-2 employee, but three of our officers and directors provide all the services without pay until we formally enter into employment contract with them as full-time employees.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Business Overview

 

Our Business Objectives and Growth Strategies

 

Our principal business objective is to maximize stockholder returns through a combination of (1) distributions to our stockholders, (2) sustainable long-term growth in cash flows from increased rents, which we hope to pass on to stockholders in the form of increased distributions, and (3) potential long-term appreciation in the value of our properties from capital gains upon future sale.

 

The Company is engaged primarily in the ownership, operation, management, acquisition, development and redevelopment of predominantly multifamily housing and specialized industrial properties in the United States. Additionally, our specialized industrial property strategy is to acquire and own a portfolio of specialized industrial properties, including multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities leased to tenants holding the requisite state licenses to operate in the regulated medical-use cannabis industry. This strategy includes the following components:

 

 

Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Income.  We intend to primarily acquire multifamily housings, economic development real estates, hemp farms, CBD processing facilities and multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities leased licensed growers who will continue their cultivation operations after our acquisition of the property. We expect to hold acquired properties for investment and to generate stable and increasing rental income from leasing these properties to licensed growers.

 

 

Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Appreciation.  We intend to primarily lease our acquired properties under long-term, triple-net leases. However, from time to time, we may elect to sell one or more properties if we believe it to be in the best interests of our stockholders. Accordingly, we will seek to acquire properties that we believe also have potential for long-term appreciation in value.

 

 

Expanding into Additional States Permit Medical-Use Cannabis Cultivation and Production.  We intend to acquire properties in the United States, with a focus on states that permit cannabis cultivation for medical use.

 

 

Affordable Housing.  Our motto is: “acquiring distressed/troubled properties, securing generous government subsidies, empowering low-income families, and generating above-market returns to investors.”

 

Preserving Financial Flexibility on our Balance Sheet. We intend to focused on maintaining a conservative capital structure, in order to provide us flexibility in financing our growth initiatives.

 

As of December 31, 2019, we owned three investment properties in California, and we expect to continue to expand to other real estate asset classes including hemp and multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities.  We believe an intense focus on operations is necessary to realize consistent, sustained earnings growth. Ensuring tenants’ satisfaction, increasing rents as market conditions allow, maximizing rent collections, maintaining property occupancy at optimal levels, and controlling operating costs comprise our principal strategies to maximize property financial results. We believe a web-based property management and revenue management systems strengthen on-site operations and allow us to quickly adjust rental rates as local market conditions change. Lease terms are generally staggered based on vacancy exposure by property type so lease expirations are matched to each property's seasonal rental patterns. We generally offer leases ranging from twelve to fifteen months with individual property marketing plans structured to respond to local market conditions. In addition, we conduct ongoing customer service surveys to help ensure timely response to tenants' changing needs and a high level of satisfaction.

 

 


 

Our Affordable Housing Target Markets

 

Our multifamily affordable housing target market is focused on urban and suburban neighborhoods in California, Nevada and Maryland and other highly urbanized states.  We are also open to acquiring properties in opportunity zone multifamily properties that includes most urban neighborhoods of the United States, including underserved suburbs of major cities across the country.

 

Research Driven Approach to Investments  The Company believes that successful real estate investment decisions and portfolio growth begin with extensive regional economic research and local market knowledge. The Company continually assesses markets where the Company operates, as well as markets where the Company considers future investment opportunities by evaluating markets and focusing on the following strategic criteria:

   

Major metropolitan areas that have regional population in excess of one million;

 

   

Constraints on new supply driven by: (i) low availability of developable land sites where competing housing could be economically built; (ii) political growth barriers, such as protected land, urban growth boundaries, and potential lengthy and expensive development permit processes; and (iii) natural limitations to development, such as mountains or waterways;

 

   

Rental demand enhanced by affordability of rents relative to costs of for-sale housing; and

 

   

Housing demand based on job growth, proximity to jobs, high median incomes and the quality of life including related commuting factors.

 

Recognizing that all real estate markets are cyclical, the Company regularly evaluates the results of its regional economic, and local market research, and adjusts the geographic focus of its portfolio accordingly. The Company seeks to increase its portfolio allocation in markets projected to have the strongest local economies and to decrease allocations in markets projected to have declining economic conditions. Likewise, the Company also seeks to increase its portfolio allocation in markets that have attractive property valuations and to decrease allocations in markets that have inflated valuations and low relative yields.



 

Multifamily Property Operations – The Company intends to manage its multifamily properties by focusing on activities that may generate above-average rental growth, tenant retention/satisfaction and long-term asset appreciation.  The Company intends to achieve this by utilizing the strategies set forth below:

 

   

Property Management  Oversee delivery and quality of the housing provided to our tenants and manage the properties financial performance.

 

   

Capital Preservation – The Company's asset management services are responsible for the planning, budgeting and completion of major capital improvement projects at the Company’s multifamily properties.

 

   

Business Planning and Control – Comprehensive business plans are implemented in conjunction with significant investment decisions. These plans include benchmarks for future financial performance based on collaborative discussions between on-site managers, the operations leadership team, and senior management.

 

   

Development and Redevelopment – The Company focuses on acquiring and developing apartment multifamily properties in supply constrained markets, and redeveloping its existing multifamily properties to improve the financial and physical aspects of the Company’s multifamily properties.

 

 Our Specialized Industrial Properties Target Markets

 


 

The target market for our CBD processing facilities, hemp farms and licensed-medical cannabis facilities include states that permit cannabis cultivation for medical use. As of December 31, 2019, we owned zero specialized properties.  We plan to acquire specialized properties within states where medical-use cannabis has been legalized such as California, Arizona, Colorado, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New York and Pennsylvania. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, as of December 31, 2019, 33 states and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis for medical use.

 

Although these states have approved the medical use of cannabis, the applicable state and local laws and regulations vary widely. For example, most states' laws allow commercial production and sales through dispensaries and set forth rigorous licensing requirements; in other states the licensing rules are unclear. In some states, dispensaries are mandated to operate on a not-for-profit basis. Some states permit home cultivation activities. The states also differ on the form in which cannabis can be sold. For example, some states do not permit cannabis-infused products such as concentrates, edibles and topicals, while other states ban smoking cannabis.

 

In addition, we expect other factors will be important in the development and growth of the medical-use cannabis industry in the United States, including the timeframes for developing regulations and issuing licenses in states that recently passed laws allowing for medical-use cannabis, and continued legislative authorization of medical-use cannabis at the state level. Progress in the regulated medical-use cannabis industry, while encouraging, is not assured and any number of factors could slow or halt progress in this area.

 

We believe we are well positioned in our current markets and have the expertise to take advantage of new opportunities as they arise. These capabilities, combined with what we believe is a conservative financial structure, should allow us to concentrate our growth efforts toward selective opportunities to enhance our strategy of having a geographically diverse portfolio of assets which meet the requirements of our tenants.

 

We continue to operate in our core markets which we believe provides an advantage due to economies of scale. We believe, where possible, it is best to operate with a strong base of properties in order to benefit from the personnel allocation and the market strength associated with managing multiple properties in the same market. However, consistent with our goal of generating sustained earnings growth, we intend to selectively dispose of properties and redeploy capital for various strategic reasons, including if we determine a property cannot meet our long-term earnings growth expectations.

 

We try to maximize capital appreciation of our properties by investing in markets characterized by conditions favorable to multifamily property appreciation. These markets generally feature the following:

 

   

Strong economic growth leading to household formation and job growth, which in turn should support higher demand for our properties; and

An attractive quality of life, which may lead to higher demand and retention for our properties and allow us to more readily increase rents.

 

Subject to market conditions, we intend to continue to seek opportunities to develop new multifamily properties, and to redevelop, reposition and acquire existing multifamily properties. We also intend to evaluate our operating property and land development portfolio and plan to continue our practice of selective dispositions as market conditions warrant and opportunities arise.

 

We expect to maintain a strong balance sheet and preserve our financial flexibility by continuing to focus on our core fundamentals which currently are generating positive cash flows from operations, maintaining appropriate debt levels and leverage ratios, and controlling overhead costs. We intend to meet our near-term liquidity requirements through a combination of one or more of the following: cash flows generated from operations, draws on our unsecured credit facility or other short-term borrowing, proceeds from property dispositions, other unsecured borrowings, or secured mortgages.


 

 

Maintaining a Diversified Portfolio and Allocating Capital to Accretive Investment Opportunities.

 

We believe greater portfolio diversification, as defined by geographic concentration, location within a market (i.e., urban or suburban) and property quality (i.e., A or B), reduces the volatility of our same-store growth throughout the real estate cycle, appeals to a wider renter and investor audience and lessens the market risk associated with owning a homogenous portfolio.

 

We are focused on increasing our presence in markets with favorable job formation, high propensity to rent, low single-family home affordability, and a favorable demand/supply ratio for multifamily housing. Portfolio investment decisions consider internal analyses and third-party research.

 

Our operating focus is on balancing occupancy and rental rates to maximize our revenue while exercising tight cost control to generate the highest possible return to our shareholders.  Revenue is maximized by attracting qualified prospects to our properties, cost-effectively converting these prospects into new tenants and keeping our tenants satisfied so they will renew their leases upon expiration.  While we believe that it is our high-quality, well-located assets that bring our customers to us, it is the customer service and superior value provided by our on-site personnel that keeps them renting with us and recommending us to their friends.

 

We use technology to engage our tenants, stakeholder and customers in the way that they want to be engaged.  Many of our tenants would utilize our web-based tenant portal and app which allows them to sign and renew their leases, review their accounts and make payments, provide feedback and make service requests on-line or with mobile devices.

 

Market Opportunity

 

The Industrial Real Estate Sub-Market

 

The industrial real estate sub-market continues to perform well in this real estate cycle. According to CBRE Group, Inc., the U.S. industrial property vacancy rate declined to 4.3% in the fourth quarter of 2018, reflecting the 35th consecutive quarter of positive net absorption. Nearly 30.0 million square feet of industrial real estate were absorbed in 2018, which resulted in the highest net asking rents since CBRE Group, Inc. began tracking this metric in 1989.

 

We believe this supply/demand dynamic creates significant opportunity for owners of industrial facilities, particularly those focused on niche categories, as options are limited for tenants requiring specialized buildings. We intend to capitalize on this opportunity by purchasing specialized industrial real estate assets that are critical to the medical-use cannabis industry.

 

The Regulated Medical-Use Cannabis Industry

 

Overview

 

We believe that a convergence of changing public attitudes and increased legalization momentum in various states toward regulated medical-use cannabis creates an attractive opportunity to invest in the industrial real estate sector with a focus on regulated multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities. We also believe that the increased sophistication of the regulated medical-use cannabis industry and the development of strong business, operational and compliance practices have made the sector more attractive for investment. Increasingly, state-licensed, medical-use cannabis cultivation and processing facilities are becoming sophisticated business enterprises that use state-of-the-art technologies and well-honed business and operational processes to maximize product yield and revenues. Additionally, medical-use cannabis growers and dispensers have developed a growing portfolio of products into which they are able to incorporate legal medical-use cannabis in a safe and appealing manner.


 

 

In the United States, the development and growth of the regulated medical-use cannabis industry has generally been driven by state law and regulation, and accordingly, the market varies on a state-by-state basis. State laws that legalize and regulate medical-use cannabis allow patients to consume cannabis for medicinal reasons with a doctor's recommendation, subject to various requirements and limitations. States have authorized numerous medical conditions as qualifying conditions for treatment with medical-use cannabis, which vary significantly from state to state and may include, among others, treatment for cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDs, wasting syndrome, pain, nausea, seizures, muscle spasms, multiple sclerosis, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), migraines, arthritis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's, lupus, residual limb pain, spinal cord injuries, inflammatory bowel disease and terminal illness. As of December 31, 2019, 33 states, plus the District of Columbia, have passed laws allowing their citizens to use medical cannabis.

 

We believe that the following conditions, which are described in more detail below, create an attractive opportunity to invest in industrial real estate assets that support the regulated medical-use cannabis industry:

 

 

significant industry growth in recent years and expected continued growth;

 

 

a shift in public opinion and increasing momentum toward the legalization of medical-use cannabis under state law; and

 

 

limited access to capital by industry participants in light of risk perceived by financial institutions of violating federal laws and regulatory guidelines for offering banking services to cannabis-related businesses.

 

Industry Growth and Trends

 

According to Arcview Market Research, sales of state-legal cannabis in the United States grew to $8.6 billion in 2017, including $5.9 billion of medical-use cannabis sales, and are expected to reach $22.2 billion by 2022.

 

According to ProCon.org, a non-profit organization, as of May 2018, over 2.1 million people used or were registered to use state-legalized medical cannabis in the United States, taking data available from the 26 states and Washington, D.C. that had implemented their medical cannabis programs as of that date. As the industry continues to evolve, new ways to consume medical-use cannabis are being developed in order for patients to have the treatment needed for their condition in a safe and appealing manner. In addition to smoking and vaporizing of dried leaves, cannabis can be incorporated into a variety of edibles, pills, spray products, transdermal patches and topicals, including salves, ointments, lotions and sprays with low or high levels of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (“THC”), the principal psychoactive constituent of the cannabis plant.

 

As with any nascent but growing industry, operational and business practices evolve and become more sophisticated over time. We believe that the quality and experience of industry participants and the development of sound business, operational and compliance practices have strengthened significantly over time, increasing the attractiveness for investment in the regulated medical-use cannabis industry.


 

 

Shifting Public Attitudes and State Law and Legislative Activity

 

We believe that the growth of the regulated medical-use cannabis industry has been fueled, in part, by the rapidly changing public attitudes in the United States. A 2018 poll by Quinnipiac University found that 93% of Americans support patient access to medical-use cannabis, if recommended by a doctor.

 

As of December 31, 2019, 33 states, plus the District of Columbia, have passed laws allowing their citizens to use medical cannabis. The first state to permit the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes was California in 1996, upon adoption of the Compassionate Care Act. The law allowed doctors to recommend cannabis for serious medical conditions and patients were permitted to use, possess and grow cannabis themselves. Several other states adopted medical-use cannabis laws in 1998 and 1999, and the remaining medical-use cannabis states adopted their laws on various dates through 2018.

 

Following the approval of medical-use cannabis, state programs must be developed and businesses must be licensed before commencing cannabis sales. Some states have developed the necessary procedures and licensing requirements quickly, while other states have taken years to develop their programs for production and sales of cannabis. Even where regulatory frameworks for medical-use cannabis production and sales are in place, states tend to revise these rules over time. These revisions often impact sales, making it difficult to predict the potential of new markets. States may restrict the number of medical-use cannabis businesses permitted, restrict the method by which medical cannabis can be consumed, limit the medical conditions that are eligible for cannabis treatment or require registration of doctors and/or patients, each of which can limit growth of the medical-use cannabis industry in those states. Alternatively, states may relax their initial regulations relating to medical-use cannabis production and sales, which would likely accelerate growth of the medical-use cannabis industry in such states.

 

Access to Capital

 

To date, the status of state-licensed cannabis under federal law has significantly limited the ability of state-licensed industry participants to fully access the U.S. banking system and traditional financing sources. These limitations, when combined with the high costs of maintaining licensed and stringently regulated multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities (including meeting extensive zoning requirements), substantially increase the cost of production. While future changes in federal and state laws may ultimately open up financing options that have not been available to date in this industry, we believe that such changes, if they do occur, will take time, thereby creating an opportunity over the next few years to provide our sale-leaseback and other real estate solutions to state-licensed industry participants that have limited access to traditional financing sources.

 

Market Opportunity and Associated Risks

 

We focus on purchasing specialized industrial real estate assets for the regulated medical-use cannabis industry, with emphasis on properties that we believe also have potential for long-term appreciation in value. We believe that our sale-leaseback and other real estate solutions offer an attractive alternative to state-licensed medical-cannabis cultivators who have limited access to traditional financing alternatives. We have acquired and intend to continue to acquire multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities in states that permit medical-use cannabis cultivation.

 

Notwithstanding the foregoing market opportunity and trends, and despite legalization at the state level, we continue to believe that the current state of federal law creates significant uncertainty and potential risks associated with investing in multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities, including but not limited to potentially heightened risks related to the use of such facilities for adult-use cannabis operations, if a state passes such laws. For a more complete description of these risks, see the sections "Risks Related to Regulation" and "Business — Governmental Regulation" under Item 1A, "Risk Factors."


 

 

STRATEGY

Our Financing Strategy

 

As part of our plan to finance our activities, we utilize proceeds from debt and equity offerings and refinancing to extend maturities, pay down existing debt, fund development and redevelopment activities, and acquire rental properties.  We use mortgage with reasonable terms on all our acquisitions.

 

We intend to meet our long-term liquidity needs through cash flow from operations and the issuance of equity and debt securities, including common stock, preferred stock and long-term notes. Where possible, we also may issue limited partnership interests in our Operating Partnership to acquire properties from existing owners seeking a tax-deferred transaction. We expect to issue equity and debt securities at times when we believe that our stock price is at a level that allows for the reinvestment of offering proceeds in accretive property acquisitions. We may also issue common stock to permanently finance properties that were previously financed by debt securities. However, we cannot assure you that we will have access to the capital markets at times and on terms that are acceptable to us. Our ability to access the capital markets and to obtain other financing arrangements is also significantly limited by our focus on serving the medical-use cannabis industry. Our investment guidelines initially provide that our aggregate borrowings (secured and unsecured) will not exceed 50% of the cost of our tangible assets at the time of any new borrowing, subject to our board of directors' discretion.

 

We may file a shelf registration statement, which would subsequently be declared effective by the SEC, which may permit us, from time to time, to offer and sell common stock, preferred stock, warrants and other securities to the extent necessary or advisable to meet our liquidity needs.

 

Portfolio Management

 

Our portfolio management strategy involves the allocation of investment capital to enhance rent growth and increase long-term capital values through portfolio design, emphasizing land value as well as location and submarket. We target geographic diversification in our portfolio in order to reduce the volatility of our rental revenue and to reduce the risk of undue concentration in any particular market. Similarly, we seek price point diversification by owning multifamily properties that offer properties at rents below those asked by competitive new building supply.

 

Acquisitions and Dispositions

 

Acquisitions and developments may be financed from various sources of capital, which may include retained cash flow, issuance of additional equity and debt, sales of properties and joint venture arrangements.  In addition, the Company may acquire properties in transactions that include Operating Partnership (OP) Units as consideration for the acquired properties.  Such transactions may, in certain circumstances, enable the sellers to defer, in whole or in part, the recognition of taxable income or gain that might otherwise result from the sales. 

 

When evaluating potential acquisitions, we consider a wide variety of factors, including:

            • whether it is located in a high barrier-to-entry market;

            • population growth, cost of alternative housing, overall potential for economic growth and the tax and regulatory environment of the community in which the property is located;


 

            • geographic location, including proximity to jobs, entertainment, transportation, and our existing communities which can deliver significant economies of scale;

            • construction quality, condition and design of the property;

            • current and projected cash flow of the property and the ability to increase cash flow;

            • ability of the property’s projected cash flows to exceed our cost of capital;

            • potential for capital appreciation of the property;

            • ability to increase the value and profitability of the property through operations and redevelopment;

            • terms of resident leases, including the potential for rent increases;

            • occupancy and demand by tenants for properties of a similar type in the vicinity;

            • prospects for liquidity through sale, financing, or refinancing of the property; and

            • competition from existing multifamily communities and the potential for the construction of new multifamily properties in the area.

 

Our Acquisition Process and Underwriting Criteria

 

We identify property acquisition opportunities primarily through relationships developed over time by our officers with borrowers, joint venture partners, real estate investors and brokers. We are interested in acquiring the following types of properties:

          Class B or better properties with strong and stable cash flows in markets where we believe there exists opportunity for rental growth and further value creation;

          Class B or better properties that offer significant potential for capital appreciation through repositioning or rehabilitating the asset to drive rental growth;

          properties available at opportunistic prices providing an opportunity for a significant appreciation in value; and

          development of Class A properties in markets where we believe we can generate significant returns from the operation and if appropriate, sale of the development.

 

We regularly monitor our assets to increase the quality and performance of our portfolio. Factors we consider in deciding whether to dispose of a property include:

          current market price for an asset compared to projected economics for that asset;

          potential increases in new construction in the market area;

          areas with low job growth prospects;

          markets where we do not intend to establish a long-term concentration; and

          operating efficiencies.

 

Additionally, as part of our strategy, the Company may purchase properties at various stages of occupancy and completion and may acquire land parcels to hold and/or sell as well as options to buy more land in the future.  The Company may also seek to acquire properties by providing mezzanine financing/equity and/or purchasing defaulted or distressed debt that encumbers desirable properties.

 

The Company has done an extensive positioning planning of its portfolio into urban and highly walkable, close-in suburban communities.  The Company targets properties and primarily located in markets and submarkets it believes will remain attractive long-term because they are primarily located in the urban and high-density suburban areas noted above.

 

Environmental, Social and Governance (“ESG”)

 

We endeavor to provide a richly diverse work environment that employs the highest performers, cultivates the best ideas and creates the widest possible platform for success.  We are committed to elevating and supporting the core values of diversity and inclusion, “Total Well-Being” (which brings together physical, financial, career, social and community well-being into a cohesive whole), and environmental, social and governance (“ESG”), which includes sustainability and social responsibility, by actively engaging in these areas.  Each member of the executive team maintains an annual goal related to these core values, which is evaluated by the Company’s Board of Trustees.  Our goal is to create and sustain an inclusive environment where diversity will thrive, employees will want to work and tenants will want.  We are committed to providing our employees with encouragement, guidance, time and resources to learn and apply the skills required to succeed in their jobs.  We provide many classroom and on-line training courses to assist our employees in interacting with prospects and tenants as well as extensive training for our customer service specialists in maintaining our properties and improvements, equipment and appliances.  We actively promote from within and many senior corporate and property leaders have risen from entry level or junior positions.  We monitor our employees’ engagement by surveying them annually and find most employees say they are proud to work at the Company, value one another as colleagues, believe in our mission and values and feel their skills meet their job requirements.   


 

 

We have a commitment to sustainability and consider the environmental impacts of our business activities.  Sustainability and social responsibility are key drivers of our focus on creating the best properties for tenants operate, work and play.  We have a dedicated in-house team that initiates and applies sustainable practices in all aspects of our business, including investment activities, development, property operations and property management activities.  With its high density, multifamily housing is, by its nature, an environmentally friendly property type.  Our recent acquisition and development activities have been primarily concentrated in pedestrian-friendly urban and close-in suburban locations near public transportation.  When developing and renovating our properties, we strive to reduce energy and water consumption by investing in energy saving technology while positively impacting the experience of our tenants and the value of our assets.  We continue to implement a combination of irrigation, lighting, HVAC and renewable energy improvements at our properties that will reduce energy and water consumption.  For 2020, we continue to have an express company-wide goal  for Total Well-Being, which includes  enhanced ESG efforts.  Employees, including our executives, will have their performance against our various  Total Well - Being  goals evaluated as part of our annual performance review process.

 

Buyouts of Joint Venture Partners

 

From time to time, we acquire our joint venture partner's equity interest in projects and as a result, these properties are wholly-owned by us.

 

Risk Management

 

As of December 31, 2019, we owned three properties.  We embraced portfolio diversification at acquisitions as our main risk management strategy. We will continue to diversify the investment size and location of our portfolio of properties in order to manage our portfolio-level risk. Over the long term, we intend that no single property will exceed 25% of our total assets and that no single tenant will exceed 30% of our total assets.

 

We expect that single tenants will occupy our properties pursuant to triple-net lease arrangements in general and, therefore, the success of our investments will be materially dependent on the financial stability of these tenants. We expect the success of our future tenants, and their ability to make rent payments to us, to significantly depend on the projected growth and development of the applicable state market; as many of these state markets have a very limited history, and other state markets are still forming their regulations, issuing licenses and otherwise establishing the market framework, significant uncertainty exists as to whether these markets will develop in the way that we or our future tenants project.


 

 

We intend to evaluate the credit quality of our future tenants and any guarantors on an ongoing basis by reviewing, where available, the publicly filed financial reports, press releases and other publicly available industry information regarding our future tenants and any guarantors. In addition, we intend to monitor the payment history data for all of our future tenants and, in some instances, we monitor our future tenants by periodically conducting site visits and meeting with the tenants to discuss their operations. In many instances, we will generally not be entitled to financial results or other credit-related data from our future tenants. See the section "Risks Related to Our Business" under Item 1A, "Risk Factors."

 

Competition

 

The current market for properties that meet our investment objectives is limited. In addition, we believe finding properties that are appropriate for the specific use of allowing medical-use cannabis growers may be limited as more competitors enter the market, and as medical-use cannabis growers obtain greater access to alternative financing sources, including but not limited to equity and debt financing sources. We face significant competition from a diverse mix of market participants, including but not limited to, other companies with similar business models, independent investors, hedge funds and other real estate investors, hard money lenders, and cannabis operators themselves, all of whom may compete with us in our efforts to acquire real estate zoned for multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities. In some instances, we will be competing to acquire real estate with persons who have no interest in the cannabis industry, but have identified value in a piece of real estate that we may be interested in acquiring.

 

These competitors may prevent us from acquiring desirable properties or may cause an increase in the price we must pay for properties. Our competitors may have greater financial and operational resources than we do and may be willing to pay more for certain assets or may be willing to accept more risk than we believe can be prudently managed. In particular, larger companies may enjoy significant competitive advantages that result from, among other things, a lower cost of capital and enhanced operating efficiencies. Our competitors may also adopt transaction structures similar to ours, which would decrease our competitive advantage in offering flexible transaction terms. In addition, due to a number of factors, including but not limited to potential greater clarity of the laws and regulations governing medical-use cannabis by state and federal governments, the number of entities and the amount of funds competing for suitable investment properties may increase substantially, resulting in increased demand and increased prices paid for these properties. If we pay higher prices for properties, our profitability may decrease, and you may experience a lower return on our common stock. Increased competition for properties may also preclude us from acquiring those properties that would generate attractive returns to us.

 

Competitive Strengths in Affordable Housing

 

On affordable housing, all of the Company’s targeted properties are located in developed areas that include other properties.  The number of competitive properties in a particular area could have a material effect on the Company’s ability to lease units at its properties and on the rents charged.  The Company may be competing with other entities that have greater resources than the Company and whose managers have more experience than the Company’s managers.  In addition, other forms of rental properties provide alternatives to potential renters of our properties.  See Item 1A, Risk Factors ,for additional information with respect to competition.

 

We believe that, in general, we are well-positioned to compete effectively for tenants and investments. We believe our competitive advantages include:

 


 

          a fully integrated organization with property management, development, redevelopment, acquisition, marketing, sales and financing expertise;

          scalable operating and support systems, which include automated systems to meet the changing electronic needs of our residents and to effectively focus on our Internet marketing efforts;

          access to sources of capital;

          geographic diversification with a presence in markets across the country; and

          significant presence in many of our major markets that allows us to be a local operating expert.

 

Moving forward, we will continue to optimize lease management, improve expense control, increase resident retention efforts and align employee incentive plans with our bottom line performance. We believe this plan of operation, coupled with the portfolio’s strengths in targeting renters across a geographically diverse platform, should position us for continued operational upside.

 

The real estate business is cyclical. Real estate cycles are generally impacted by many factors, including availability of equity and debt capital, borrowing cost, rent levels, and asset values. Our strategy will result in a strong track record of creating both asset and entity value for the benefit of our shareholders and partners over these various real estate cycles. 

 

Governmental Regulation

 

Federal Laws Applicable to the Medical-Use Cannabis Industry

 

Cannabis is classified as a Schedule I controlled substance by the Drug Enforcement Agency ("DEA") and the U.S. Department of Justice ("DOJ") with no medical use, and therefore it is illegal to grow, possess and consume cannabis under federal law. The Controlled Substances Act of 1910 ("CSA") bans cannabis-related businesses; the possession, cultivation and production of cannabis-infused products; and the distribution of cannabis and products derived from it. Moreover, on two separate occasions the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the CSA trumps state law. That means that the federal government has the option of enforcing U.S. drug laws, creating a climate of legal uncertainty regarding the production and sale of medical-use cannabis.

 

Under the Obama administration, the DOJ previously issued memoranda, including the so-called “Cole Memo” on August 29, 2013, providing internal guidance to federal prosecutors concerning enforcement of federal cannabis prohibitions under the CSA. This guidance essentially characterized use of federal law enforcement resources to prosecute those complying with state laws allowing the use, manufacture and distribution of cannabis as an inefficient use of such federal resources when state laws and enforcement efforts are effective with respect to specific federal enforcement priorities under the CSA.

 

On January 4, 2018, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a written memorandum rescinding the Cole Memo and related internal guidance issued by the DOJ regarding federal law enforcement priorities involving cannabis (the “Sessions Memo”). The Sessions Memo instructs federal prosecutors that when determining which cannabis-related activities to prosecute under federal law with the DOJ’s finite resources, prosecutors should follow the well-established principles set forth in the U.S. Attorneys’ Manual governing all federal prosecutions. The Sessions Memo states that “these principles require federal prosecutors deciding which cases to prosecute to weigh all relevant considerations, including federal law enforcement priorities set by the Attorney General, the seriousness of the crime, the deterrent effect of criminal prosecution, and the cumulative impact of particular crimes on the community.” The Sessions Memo went on to state that given the DOJ’s well-established general principles, “previous nationwide guidance specific to marijuana is unnecessary and is rescinded, effective immediately.” It is unclear what impact the Sessions Memo will have on the medical-use cannabis industry, if any.

 


 

In addition, pursuant to the current omnibus spending bill previously approved by Congress, the DOJ is prohibited from using funds appropriated by Congress to prevent states from implementing their medical-use cannabis laws. A similar provision was also included in each prior Congressional omnibus spending bill since 2014. This provision, however, is currently set to expire on September 30, 2019, and there is no assurance that Congress will approve inclusion of a similar prohibition on DOJ spending in the appropriations bills for future years. In USA vs. McIntosh, the United States Circuit Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held that this provision prohibits the DOJ from spending funds from relevant appropriations acts to prosecute individuals who engage in conduct permitted by state medical-use cannabis laws and who strictly comply with such laws. However, the Ninth Circuit's opinion, which only applies in the states of Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii and Idaho, also held that persons who do not strictly comply with all state laws and regulations regarding the distribution, possession and cultivation of medical-use cannabis have engaged in conduct that is unauthorized, and in such instances the DOJ may prosecute those individuals.

 

Furthermore, while we target the acquisition of multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities, our leases do not prohibit cannabis cultivation for adult-use that is permissible under the state and local laws where our facilities are located. Consequently, certain of our future tenants cultivate adult-use cannabis now (or may in the future) in our multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities that are permitted by such state and local laws, which may in turn subject the tenant, us and our properties to greater and/or different federal legal and other risks than exclusively multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities, including not providing protection under the above Congressional spending provision.

 

Federal prosecutors have significant discretion and no assurance can be given that the federal prosecutor in each judicial district where we purchase a property will not choose to strictly enforce the federal laws governing cannabis production or distribution. Any change in the federal government's enforcement posture with respect to state-licensed cultivation of medical-use cannabis, including the enforcement postures of individual federal prosecutors in judicial districts where we purchase properties, would result in our inability to execute our business plan, and we would likely suffer significant losses with respect to our investment in multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities in the United States, which would adversely affect the trading price of our securities. Furthermore, following any such change in the federal government's enforcement position, we could be subject to criminal prosecution, which could lead to imprisonment and/or the imposition of penalties, fines, or forfeiture. See “Risk Factors – Risks Relating to Regulation.”

 

State Laws Applicable to the Medical-Use Cannabis Industry

 

In most states that have legalized medical-use cannabis in some form, the growing and/or dispensing of cannabis generally requires that the operator obtain one or more licenses in accordance with applicable state requirements. In addition, many states regulate various aspects of the growing and/or dispensing of medical-use cannabis. For example, New York limits the types of treatable medical conditions, requires registration of both patients and recommending physicians, limits the types of strains that can be grown, sets prices through the State Program Commissioner, requires that a registered pharmacist be on the premises of all dispensaries during hours of operation, and prohibits cannabis in flower form. Local governments in some cases also impose rules and regulations on the manner of operating cannabis businesses. As a result, applicable state and local laws and regulations vary widely. As a result of licensing requirements, if our future tenants default under their leases, we may not be able to find new tenants that have the requisite license to engage in the cultivation of medical cannabis on the properties.

 

Laws Applicable to Banking for Cannabis Industry

 


 

All banks are subject to federal law, whether the bank is a national bank or state-chartered bank. At a minimum, all banks maintain federal deposit insurance which requires adherence to federal law. Violation of federal law could subject a bank to loss of its charter. Financial transactions involving proceeds generated by cannabis-related conduct can form the basis for prosecution under the federal money laundering statutes, unlicensed money transmitter statutes and the Bank Secrecy Act. For example, under the Bank Secrecy Act, banks must report to the federal government any suspected illegal activity, which would include any transaction associated with a cannabis-related business. These reports must be filed even though the business is operating in compliance with applicable state and local laws. Therefore, financial institutions that conduct transactions with money generated by cannabis-related conduct could face criminal liability under the Bank Secrecy Act for, among other things, failing to identify or report financial transactions that involve the proceeds of cannabis-related violations of the CSA.

 

The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network ("FinCen") issued guidance in February 2014 which clarifies how financial institutions can provide services to cannabis-related businesses consistent with their obligations under the Bank Secrecy Act. Concurrently with the FinCen guidance, the DOJ issued supplemental guidance directing federal prosecutors to consider the federal enforcement priorities enumerated in the Cole Memo with respect to federal money laundering, unlicensed money transmitter and Bank Secrecy Act offenses based on cannabis-related violations of the CSA. The FinCen guidance sets forth extensive requirements for financial institutions to meet if they want to offer bank accounts to cannabis-related businesses, including close monitoring of businesses to determine that they meet all of the requirements established by the DOJ, including those enumerated in the Cole Memo. This is a level of scrutiny that is far beyond what is expected of any normal banking relationship.

 

As a result, many banks are hesitant to offer any banking services to cannabis-related businesses, including opening bank accounts. While we currently have a bank account, our inability to maintain that account or the lack of access to bank accounts or other banking services in the future, would make it difficult for us to operate our business, increase our operating costs, and pose additional operational, logistical and security challenges. Similarly, if our proposed tenants are unable to access banking services, they will not be able to enter into triple-net leasing arrangements with us, as our leases will require rent payments to be made by check or wire transfer.

 

Furthermore, it is unclear what impact the rescission of the Cole Memo will have, but federal prosecutors may increase enforcement activities against institutions or individuals that are conducting financial transactions related to cannabis activities. The increased uncertainty surrounding financial transactions related to cannabis activities may also result in financial institutions discontinuing services to the cannabis industry. See “Risk Factors – Risks Relating to Regulation.”

 

Agricultural Regulation

 

The medical-use cannabis properties that we acquire are used primarily for cultivation and production of medical-use cannabis and are subject to the laws, ordinances and regulations of state, local and federal governments, including laws, ordinances and regulations involving land use and usage, water rights, treatment methods, disturbance, the environment, and eminent domain.

 

Each governmental jurisdiction has its own distinct laws, ordinances and regulations governing the use of agricultural lands. Many such laws, ordinances and regulations seek to regulate water usage and water runoff because water can be in limited supply, as is the case in certain locations where our properties are located. In addition, runoff from rain or from irrigation is governed by laws, ordinances and regulations from state, local and federal governments. Additionally, if any of the water used on or running off from our properties flows to any rivers, streams, ponds, the ocean or other waters, there may be specific laws, ordinances and regulations governing the amount of pollutants, including sediments, nutrients and pesticides, that such water may contain.


 

 

We believe that our existing properties have, and other properties that we acquire in the future will have, sources of water, including wells and/or surface water that provide sufficient amounts of water necessary for the current operations at each location. However, should the need arise for additional water from wells and/or surface water sources, we may be required to obtain additional permits or approvals or to make other required notices prior to developing or using such water sources. Permits for drilling water wells or withdrawing surface water may be required by federal, state and local governmental entities pursuant to laws, ordinances, regulations or other requirements, and such permits may be difficult to obtain due to drought, the limited supply of available water within the districts of the states in which our properties are located or other reasons.

 

In addition to the regulation of water usage and water runoff, state, local and federal governments also seek to regulate the type, quantity and method of use of chemicals and materials for growing crops, including fertilizers, pesticides and nutrient rich materials. Such regulations could include restricting or preventing the use of such chemicals and materials near residential housing or near water sources. Further, some regulations have strictly forbidden or significantly limited the use of certain chemicals and materials. Licenses, permits and approvals must be obtained from governmental authorities requiring such licenses, permits and approvals before chemicals and materials can be used at grow facilities. Reports on the usage of such chemicals and materials must be submitted pursuant to applicable laws, ordinances, and regulations and the terms of the specific licenses, permits and approvals. Failure to comply with laws, ordinances and regulations, to obtain required licenses, permits and approvals or to comply with the terms of such licenses, permits and approvals could result in fines, penalties and/or imprisonment.

 

The use of land for agricultural purposes in certain jurisdictions is also subject to regulations governing the protection of endangered species. When agricultural lands border, or are in close proximity to, national parks, protected natural habitats or wetlands, the agricultural operations on such properties must comply with laws, ordinances and regulations related to the use of chemicals and materials and avoid disturbance of habitats, wetlands or other protected areas.

 

Because properties we intend to own may be used for growing medical-use cannabis, there may be other additional land use and zoning regulations at the state or local level that affect our properties that may not apply to other types of agricultural uses. For example, certain states in which our properties would be located require stringent security systems in place at grow facilities, and require stringent procedures for disposal of waste materials.  As an owner of agricultural lands, we may be liable or responsible for the actions or inactions of our future tenants with respect to these laws, regulations and ordinances.

 

Environmental Matters

 

Our properties and the operations thereon are subject to federal, state and local environmental laws, ordinances and regulations, including laws relating to water, air, solid wastes and hazardous substances. Our properties and the operations thereon are also subject to federal, state and local laws, ordinances, regulations and requirements related to the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act, as well as comparable state statutes relating to the health and safety of our employees and others working on our properties. Although we believe that we and our future tenants are in material compliance with these requirements, there can be no assurance that we will not incur significant costs, civil and criminal penalties and liabilities, including those relating to claims for damages to persons, property or the environment resulting from operations at our properties.

 

Real Estate Industry Regulation


 

 

Generally, the ownership and operation of real properties are subject to various laws, ordinances and regulations, including regulations relating to zoning, land use, water rights, wastewater, storm water runoff and lien sale rights and procedures. These laws, ordinances or regulations, such as the Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation Liability Act and its state analogs, or any changes to any such laws, ordinances or regulations, could result in or increase the potential liability for environmental conditions or circumstances existing, or created by tenants or others, on our properties. Laws related to upkeep, safety and taxation requirements may result in significant unanticipated expenditures, loss of our properties or other impairments to operations, any of which would adversely affect our cash flows from operating activities.

 

Our property management activities, to the extent we are required to engage in them due to lease defaults by tenants or vacancies on certain properties, will likely be subject to state real estate brokerage laws and regulations as determined by the particular real estate commission for each state.

 

Insurance

 

We carry comprehensive general liability coverage on our communities, with limits of liability customary within the multi-family properties industry to insure against liability claims and related defense costs. We are also insured, with limits of liability customary within the real estate industry, against the risk of direct physical damage in amounts necessary to reimburse us on a replacement cost basis for costs incurred to repair or rebuild each property, including loss of rental income during the reconstruction period.

 

Our primary lines of insurance coverage are property, general liability and workers’ compensation. We believe that our insurance coverages adequately insure our multifamily properties against the risk of loss attributable to fire, earthquake, hurricane, tornado, flood, terrorism and other perils, and adequately insure us against other risk. Our coverage includes deductibles, retentions and limits that are customary in the industry. We have established loss prevention, loss mitigation, claims handling and litigation management procedures to manage our exposure.

 

Seasonality

 

Our business has not been, and we do not expect it to become subject to, material seasonal fluctuations.

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had 3 non-W2 staff considered to be part of our management team.  Those three include our sole officer, Frank I Igwealor and Director, Patience Ogbozor. We have not experienced any work stoppages, and we consider our relations with our officers to be good.

 

Going Concern

 

We are dependent upon the receipt of capital investment and other financing to fund our ongoing operations and to execute our business plan. If continued funding and capital resources are unavailable at reasonable terms, we may not be able to implement our plan of operations. We may be required to obtain alternative or additional financing, from financial institutions or otherwise, in order to maintain and expand our existing operations. The failure by us to obtain such financing would have a material adverse effect upon our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. Our financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary should we be unable to continue as a going concern within one year after the date that the financial statements are issued. We may be required to cease operations which could result in our stockholders losing all or almost all of their investment.


 

 

Where You Can Find More Information

 

We have restarted filing annual, quarterly, and special reports, proxy statements, and other information with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Our SEC filings are available to the public over the Internet from the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov. You may also read and copy any document we file at the SEC’s public reference room in Washington, D.C. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information on the public reference room. You can also access these reports and other filings electronically on the SEC’s web site, www.sec.gov.

 

 


 

 

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

 

Certain factors may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. You should consider carefully the risks and uncertainties described below, in addition to other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks and uncertainties that we are unaware of, or that we currently believe are not material, may also become important factors that adversely affect our business. If any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition, results of operations, and future prospects could be materially and adversely affected. In that event, the trading price of our common stock could decline, and you could lose part or all of your investment.

 

For purposes of this section, the term "stockholders" means the holders of shares of Video River Networks, Inc.’s common stock. Set forth below are the risks that we believe are material to Video River Networks, Inc.’s stockholders. You should carefully consider the following factors in evaluating our Company, our properties and our business. 

 

Our business, operating results, cash flows and financial condition are subject to various risks and uncertainties, including, without limitation, those set forth below, any one of which could cause our actual operating results to vary materially from recent results or from our anticipated future results.

 

Risks Related to Our Business

 

We have a limited operating history, and may not be able to operate our business successfully or generate sufficient cash flow to sustain distributions to our stockholders.

 

We have a limited operating history. We currently own three investment properties. We are subject to many of the business risks and uncertainties associated with any new business enterprise. We cannot assure you that we will be able to operate our business successfully or profitably or find additional suitable investments. Our ability to provide attractive risk-adjusted returns to our stockholders over the long term is dependent on our ability both to generate sufficient cash flow to pay an attractive dividend and to achieve capital appreciation, and we cannot assure you we will do either. There can be no assurance that we will be able to continue to generate sufficient revenue from operations to pay our operating expenses and make distributions to stockholders. The results of our operations and the execution on our business plan depend on several factors, including the availability of additional opportunities for investment, the performance of our existing properties and tenants, the availability of adequate equity and debt financing, the federal and state regulatory environment relating to the medical-use cannabis industry, conditions in the financial markets and economic conditions.

 

 

Risks Related to Our Real Estate Investments and Operations

 

Our current real estate portfolio consists of three investment properties and will likely continue to be concentrated in a limited number of properties in the future, which subjects us to an increased risk of significant loss if any property declines in value or if we are unable to lease a property.

 

As at December 31, 2019, we currently own three investment properties. We have no tenant nor rental revenues for the year ended December 31, 2019.  Lease payment defaults by any of our future tenants or a significant decline in the value of any single property would materially adversely affect our business, financial position and results of operations, including our ability to make distributions to our stockholders. A lack of diversification may also increases the potential that a single underperforming investment could have a material adverse effect on our cash flows and the price we could realize from the sale of our properties. Any adverse change in the financial condition of any of our future tenants, including but not limited to the state medical-use cannabis markets not developing and growing in ways that we or our future tenants projected, or any adverse change in the political climate regarding medical-use cannabis where our properties are located, would subject us to a significant risk of loss.


 

 

In addition, failure by any our future tenants to comply with the terms of its lease agreement with us could require us to find another lessee for the applicable property. We may experience delays in enforcing our rights as landlord and may incur substantial costs in protecting our investment and re-leasing that property. Furthermore, we cannot assure you that we will be able to re-lease that property for the rent we currently receive, or at all, or that a lease termination would not result in our having to sell the property at a loss. The result of any of the foregoing risks could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

 

General real estate investment risks may adversely affect property income and values. 

 

Real estate investments are subject to a variety of risks. If the multifamily properties and other real estate investments do not generate sufficient income to meet operating expenses, including debt service and capital expenditures, cash flow and the ability to make distributions to NIHK's stockholders or the Operating Partnership's unitholders will be adversely affected. Income from the multifamily properties may be further adversely affected by, among other things, the following factors:

 

   

changes in the general or local economic climate, including layoffs, plant closings, industry slowdowns, relocations of significant local employers and other events negatively impacting local employment rates and wages and the local economy;

 

   

local economic conditions in which the multifamily properties are located, such as oversupply of housing or a reduction in demand for rental housing;

 

   

the attractiveness and desirability of our multifamily properties to tenants, including, without limitation, our technology offerings and our ability to identify and cost effectively implement new, relevant technologies, and to keep up with constantly changing consumer demand for the latest innovations;

 

   

inflationary environments in which the costs to operate and maintain multifamily properties increase at a rate greater than our ability to increase rents, or deflationary environments where we may be exposed to declining rents more quickly under our short-term leases;

 

   

competition from other available housing alternatives;

 

   

changes in rent control or stabilization laws or other laws regulating housing;

 

   

the Company’s ability to provide for adequate maintenance and insurance;

 

   

declines in the financial condition of our tenants, which may make it more difficult for us to collect rents from some tenants;

 

   

tenants' perceptions of the safety, convenience and attractiveness of our multifamily properties and the neighborhoods where they are located; and

 


 
   

changes in interest rates and availability of financing.


As leases at the multifamily properties expire, tenants may enter into new leases on terms that are less favorable to the Company. Income and real estate values also may be adversely affected by such factors as applicable laws, including, without limitation, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (the "Disabilities Act"), Fair Housing Amendment Act of 1988 (the "FHAA"), permanent and temporary rent control laws, rent stabilization laws, other laws regulating housing that may prevent the Company from raising rents to offset increased operating expenses, and tax laws.

 

Short-term leases expose us to the effects of declining market rents, and the Company may be unable to renew leases or relet units as leases expire. 

 

Substantially all of our apartment leases are for a term of one year or less. If the Company is unable to promptly renew the leases or relet the units, or if the rental rates upon renewal or reletting are significantly lower than expected rates, then the Company’s results of operations and financial condition will be adversely affected. With these short term leases, our rental revenues are impacted by declines in market rents more quickly than if our leases were for longer terms.

 

National and regional economic environments can negatively impact the Company’s liquidity and operating results. 

 

The Company's forecast for the national economy assumes growth of the gross domestic product of the national economy and the economies of the west coast states. In the event of a recession, the Company could incur reductions in rental rates, occupancy levels, property valuations and increases in operating costs such as advertising and turnover expenses. A recession may affect consumer confidence and spending and negatively impact the volume and pricing of real estate transactions, which could negatively affect the Company’s liquidity and its ability to vary its portfolio promptly in response to changes to the economy. Furthermore, if residents do not experience increases in their income, they may be unable or unwilling to pay rent increases, and delinquencies in rent payments and rent defaults may increase.

 

Rent control, or other changes in applicable laws, or noncompliance with applicable laws, could adversely affect the Company's operations or expose us to liability. 

 

The Company must own, operate, manage, acquire, develop and redevelop its properties in compliance with numerous federal, state and local laws and regulations, some of which may conflict with one another or be subject to limited judicial or regulatory interpretations. These laws and regulations may include zoning laws, building codes, rent control or stabilization laws, federal, state and local tax laws, landlord tenant laws, environmental laws, employment laws, immigration laws and other laws regulating housing or that are generally applicable to the Company's business and operations. Noncompliance with laws could expose the Company to liability. If the Company does not comply with any or all of these requirements, it may have to pay fines to government authorities or damage awards to private litigants, and/or may have to decrease rents in order to comply with such requirements. The Company does not know whether these requirements will change or whether new requirements will be imposed. Changes in, or noncompliance with, these regulatory requirements could require the Company to make significant unanticipated expenditures, which could have a material adverse effect on the Company's financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

In addition, rent control or rent stabilization laws and other regulatory restrictions may limit our ability to increase rents and pass through new or increased operating costs to our tenants. There has been a recent increase in municipalities, including those in which we own properties, considering or being urged by advocacy groups to consider rent control or rent stabilization laws and regulations or take other actions which could limit our ability to raise rents based solely on market conditions. These initiatives and any other future enactments of rent control or rent stabilization laws or other laws regulating multifamily housing, as well as any lawsuits against the Company arising from such rent control or other laws, may reduce rental revenues or increase operating costs. Such laws and regulations limit our ability to charge market rents, increase rents, evict tenants or recover increases in our operating expenses and could reduce the value of our multifamily properties or make it more difficult for us to dispose of properties in certain circumstances. Expenses associated with our investment in these multifamily properties, such as debt service, real estate taxes, insurance and maintenance costs, are generally not reduced when circumstances cause a reduction in rental income from the community. Furthermore, such regulations may negatively impact our ability to attract higher-paying tenants to such multifamily properties.


 

 

Acquisitions of multifamily properties involve various risks and uncertainties and may fail to meet expectations. 

 

The Company intends to continue to acquire apartment multifamily properties. However, there are risks that acquisitions will fail to meet the Company’s expectations. The Company’s estimates of future income, expenses and the costs of improvements or redevelopment that are necessary to allow the Company to market an acquired apartment community as originally intended may prove to be inaccurate. In addition, following an acquisition, the value and operational performance of an apartment community may be diminished if obsolescence or neighborhood changes occur before we are able to redevelop or sell the community. Also, in connection with such acquisitions, we may assume unknown liabilities, which could ultimately lead to material costs for us that we did not expect to incur. The Company expects to finance future acquisitions, in whole or in part, under various forms of secured or unsecured financing or through the issuance of partnership units by the Operating Partnership or related partnerships or joint ventures or additional equity by the Company. The use of equity financing, rather than debt, for future developments or acquisitions could dilute the interest of the Company’s existing stockholders. If the Company finances new acquisitions under existing lines of credit, there is a risk that, unless the Company obtains substitute financing, the Company may not be able to undertake additional borrowing for further acquisitions or developments or such borrowing may be not available on advantageous terms.

 

Development and redevelopment activities may be delayed, not completed, and/or not achieve expected results. 

 

The Company pursues development and redevelopment projects and these projects generally require various governmental and other approvals, which have no assurance of being received and/or the timing of which may be delayed from the Company’s expectations. The Company defines development projects as new multifamily properties that are being constructed or are newly constructed and are in a phase of lease-up and have not yet reached stabilized operations, and redevelopment projects as existing properties owned or recently acquired that have been targeted for additional investment by the Company with the expectation of increased financial returns through property improvement.

 

The Company’s development and redevelopment activities generally entail certain risks, including, among others:

   

funds may be expended and management's time devoted to projects that may not be completed on time or at all;

 

   

construction costs of a project may exceed original estimates possibly making the project economically unfeasible;

projects may be delayed due to, without limitation, adverse weather conditions, labor or material shortage, or environmental remediation;

 

   

occupancy rates and rents at a completed project may be less than anticipated;

 

   

expenses at completed development or redevelopment projects may be higher than anticipated, including, without limitation, due to costs of environmental remediation or increased costs for labor, materials and leasing;


 

 

   

we may be unable to obtain, or experience a delay in obtaining, necessary zoning, occupancy, or other required governmental or third party permits and authorizations, which could result in increased costs or delay or abandonment of opportunities;

 

   

we may be unable to obtain financing with favorable terms, or at all, for the proposed development or redevelopment of a community, which may cause us to delay or abandon an opportunity; and

 

   

we may incur liabilities to third parties during the development process, for example, in connection with managing existing improvements on the site prior to tenant terminations and demolition (such as commercial space) or in connection with providing services to third parties (such as the construction of shared infrastructure or other improvements.)



 

These risks may reduce the funds available for distribution to Essex’s stockholders and the Operating Partnership's unitholders. Further, the development and redevelopment of multifamily properties is also subject to the general risks associated with real estate investments. For further information regarding these risks, please see the risk factor above titled "General real estate investment risks may adversely affect property income and values."

 

Our apartment multifamily properties may be subject to unknown or contingent liabilities which could cause us to incur substantial costs. 

 

The properties that the Company owns or may acquire are or may be subject to unknown or contingent liabilities for which the Company may have no recourse, or only limited recourse, against the sellers. In general, the representations and warranties provided under the transaction agreements related to the sales of the properties may not survive the closing of the transactions. While the Company will seek to require the sellers to indemnify us with respect to breaches of representations and warranties that survive, such indemnification may be limited and subject to various materiality thresholds, a significant deductible or an aggregate cap on losses. As a result, there is no guarantee that we will recover any amounts with respect to losses due to breaches by the sellers of their representations and warranties. In addition, the total amount of costs and expenses that may be incurred with respect to liabilities associated with apartment multifamily properties may exceed our expectations, and we may experience other unanticipated adverse effects, all of which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The geographic concentration of the Company’s multifamily properties and fluctuations in local markets may adversely impact the Company’s financial condition and operating results. 

 

The geographic concentration of our properties could present risks if local property market performance falls below expectations. In general, factors that may adversely affect local market and economic conditions include, among others, the following:

 

   

the economic climate, which may be adversely impacted by a reduction in jobs or income levels, industry slowdowns, changing demographics and other factors;

 

   

local conditions, such as oversupply of, or reduced demand for, apartment homes;

 

   

declines in household formation or employment or lack of employment growth;

 

   

rent control or stabilization laws, or other laws regulating rental housing, which could prevent the Company from raising rents to offset increases in operating costs, or the inability or unwillingness of tenants to pay rent increases;

 

   

competition from other available apartments and other housing alternatives and changes in market rental rates;


 

 

   

economic conditions that could cause an increase in our operating expenses, including increases in property taxes, utilities and routine maintenance; and

 

   

regional specific acts of nature (e.g., earthquakes, fires, floods, etc.).

 

Because the Company’s multifamily properties are primarily located in Southern California, Northern California and the Seattle metropolitan area, the Company is exposed to greater economic concentration risks than if it owned a more geographically diverse portfolio. The Company is susceptible to adverse developments in California and Washington economic and regulatory environments, such as increases in real estate and other taxes, and increased costs of complying with governmental regulations. In addition, the State of California is generally regarded as more litigious and more highly regulated and taxed than many states, which may reduce demand for the Company’s properties. Any adverse developments in the economy or real estate markets in California or Washington, or any decrease in demand for the Company’s multifamily properties resulting from the California or Washington regulatory or business environments, could have an adverse effect on the Company’s business and results of operations.

 

Risks Related to Our Specialized Industrial Properties and Operations

 

Competition for the acquisition of properties suitable for the cultivation and production of medical-use cannabis may impede our ability to make acquisitions or increase the cost of these acquisitions, which could adversely affect our operating results and financial condition.

 

We compete for the acquisition of properties suitable for the cultivation and production of medical-use cannabis with other entities engaged in agricultural and real estate investment activities, including corporate agriculture companies, cultivators and producers of medical-use cannabis, private equity investors, and other real estate investors (including public and private REITs). We also compete as a provider of capital to medical-use cannabis operators with alternative financing sources to these companies, including both equity and debt financing alternatives. These competitors may prevent us from acquiring desirable properties, may cause an increase in the price we must pay for properties or may result in us having to lease our properties on less favorable terms than we expect. Our competitors may have greater financial and operational resources than we do and may be willing to pay more for certain assets or may be willing to accept more risk than we believe can be prudently managed. In particular, larger companies may enjoy significant competitive advantages that result from, among other things, a lower cost of capital and enhanced operating efficiencies. Our competitors may also adopt transaction structures similar to ours, which would decrease our competitive advantage in offering flexible transaction terms. In addition, due to a number of factors, including but not limited to potential greater clarity of the laws and regulations governing medical-use cannabis by state and federal governments, the number of entities and the amount of funds competing for suitable investment properties may increase, resulting in increased demand and increased prices paid for these properties. If we pay higher prices for properties or enter into leases for such properties on less favorable terms than we expect, our profitability and ability to generate cash flow and make distributions to our stockholders may decrease. Increased competition for properties may also preclude us from acquiring those properties that would generate attractive returns to us.

 

 Our growth will depend upon future acquisitions of multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities, and we may be unable to consummate acquisitions on advantageous terms.

 

Our growth strategy will be focused on the acquisition of specialized industrial real estate assets on favorable terms as opportunities arise. Our ability to acquire these real estate assets on favorable terms is subject to the following risks:

 


 
 

competition from other potential acquirers or increased availability of alternative debt and equity financing sources for tenants may significantly increase the purchase price of a desired property;

 

 

we may not successfully purchase and lease our properties to meet our expectations;

 

 

we may be unable to obtain the necessary equity or debt financing to consummate an acquisition on satisfactory terms or at all;

 

 

agreements for the acquisition of properties are typically subject to closing conditions, including satisfactory completion of due diligence investigations, and we may spend significant time and money and divert management attention on potential acquisitions that we do not consummate; and

 

 

we may acquire properties without any recourse, or with only limited recourse, for liabilities, whether known or unknown, against the former owners of the properties.

 

Our failure to consummate acquisition on advantageous terms without substantial expense or delay would impede our growth and negatively affect our results of operations and our ability to generate cash flow and make distributions to our stockholders.

 

There may only be a limited number of multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities operated by suitable tenants available for us to acquire, which could adversely affect the return on our common stock.

 

We target multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities for acquisition and leasing to licensed growers under triple-net lease agreements. We also target properties owned by growers that have been among the top candidates in the rigorous state licensing process and have been granted one or more licenses to operate multiple facilities. In light of the current regulatory landscape regarding medical-use cannabis, including but not limited to, the rigorous state licensing processes, limits on the number of licenses granted in certain states and in counties within such states, zoning regulations related to multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities, the inability of potential tenants to open bank accounts necessary to pay rent and other expenses and the ever-changing federal and state regulatory landscape, we may have only a limited number of multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities available to purchase that are operated by licensees that we believe would be suitable tenants. These tenants may also have increased access to alternative equity and debt financing sources over time, which may limit our ability to negotiate leasing arrangements that meet our investment criteria. Our inability to locate suitable investment properties and tenants would have a material adverse effect on our ability to generate cash flow and make distributions to our stockholders.

 

We may acquire our properties  "as-is," which increases the risk of an investment that requires us to remedy defects or costs without recourse to the prior owner.

 

We may acquire other real estate properties, "as is" with only limited representations and warranties from the property seller regarding matters affecting the condition, use and ownership of the property. There may also be environmental conditions associated with properties we acquire of which we are unaware despite our diligence efforts. In particular, multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities may present environmental concerns of which we are not currently aware. If environmental contamination exists on properties we acquire or develops after acquisition, we could become subject to liability for the contamination. As a result, if defects in the property (including any building on the property) or other matters adversely affecting the property are discovered, including but not limited to environmental matters, we may not be able to pursue a claim for any or all damages against the property seller. Such a situation could harm our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations.

 


 

We face significant risks associated with the development and redevelopment of properties that we acquire.

 

We may, from time to time, engage in development or redevelopment of properties that we acquire. Development and redevelopment activities entail risks that could adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations, including:

  

 

construction costs, which may exceed our original estimates due to increases in materials, labor or other costs, which could make the project less profitable;

 

 

permitting or construction delays, which may result in increased project costs, as well as deferred revenue;

 

 

unavailability of raw materials when needed, which may result in project delays, stoppages or interruptions, which could make the project less profitable;

 

 

claims for warranty, product liability and construction defects after a property has been built;

 

 

health and safety incidents and site accidents;

 

 

poor performance or nonperformance by, or disputes with, any of our contractors, subcontractors or other third parties on whom we rely;

 

 

unforeseen engineering, environmental or geological problems, which may result in delays or increased costs;

 

 

labor stoppages, slowdowns or interruptions;

 

 

liabilities, expenses or project delays, stoppages or interruptions as a result of challenges by third parties in legal proceedings; and

 

 

weather-related and geological interference, including landslides, earthquakes, floods, drought, wildfires and other events, which may result in delays or increased costs.

  

Failure to complete development or redevelopment activities on budget or on schedule may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations and the ability of our future tenants at such properties to make payments under their leases with us.

 

Liability for uninsured losses could adversely affect our financial condition.

 

While the terms of our leases with our future tenants would generally require property and casualty insurance, losses from disaster-type occurrences, such as earthquakes, floods and weather-related disasters, and other types of insurance, such as landlord's rental loss insurance, may be either uninsurable or not insurable on economically viable terms. Should an uninsured loss occur, we could lose our capital investment or anticipated profits and cash flows from one or more properties.

 

Contingent or unknown liabilities could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations.

 

We may in the future acquire properties, subject to liabilities and without any recourse, or with only limited recourse, with respect to unknown liabilities. As a result, if a claim were asserted against us based on ownership of any of these properties, we may have to pay substantial amounts to defend or settle the claim. If the magnitude of such unknown liabilities is high, individually or in the aggregate, our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected.

 

The assets we acquire may be subject to impairment charges.

 

We would periodically evaluate the real estate investments we acquire and other assets for impairment indicators. The judgment regarding the existence of impairment indicators is based upon factors such as market conditions, tenant performance and legal structure. For example, the termination of a lease by a tenant may lead to an impairment charge. If we determine that an impairment has occurred, we would be required to make an adjustment to the net carrying value of the asset which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations in the period in which the impairment charge is recorded.


 

 

Due to our involvement in the regulated medical-use cannabis industry, we may have a difficult time obtaining the various insurance policies that are desired to operate our business, which may expose us to additional risks and financial liabilities.

 

Insurance that is otherwise readily available, such as workers' compensation, general liability, and directors' and officers' insurance, could be more difficult for us to find and more expensive, because we lease our properties to companies in the regulated medical-use cannabis industry. There are no guarantees that we will be able to find such insurance in the future, or that the cost will be affordable to us. If we are forced to go without such insurance, it may prevent us from entering into certain business sectors, may inhibit our growth, and may expose us to additional risk and financial liabilities.

 

We may purchase properties subject to ground leases that expose us to the loss of such properties upon breach or termination of the ground leases.

 

A ground lease agreement permits a tenant to develop and/or operate a land parcel (property) during the lease period, after which the land parcel and all improvements revert back to the property owner. Under a ground lease, property improvements are owned by the property owner unless an exception is created and all relevant taxes incurred during the lease period are paid for by the tenant. Ground leases typically have a long duration generally ranging from 50 to 99 years with additional extension options. As a lessee under a ground lease, we would be exposed to the possibility of losing the property upon termination, or an earlier breach by us, of the ground lease, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, our ability to make distributions to our stockholders and the trading price of our common stock.

 

The occurrence of cyber incidents or cyber attacks could disrupt our operations, result in the loss of confidential information and/or damage our business relationships and reputation.

 

We rely on technology to run our business, and as such we are subject to risk from cyber incidents, including cyber attacks attempting to gain unauthorized access to our systems to disrupt operations, corrupt data or steal confidential information, and other electronic security breaches.  While we have implemented measures to help mitigate these threats, such measures cannot guarantee that we will be successful in preventing a cyber incident.  The occurrence of a cyber incident or cyber attack could disrupt our operations, compromise the confidential information of our employees or tenants, and/or damage our business relationships and reputation.

 

We cannot predict every event and circumstance that may affect our business, and therefore, the risks and uncertainties discussed herein may not be the only ones you should consider.

 

We are not aware of any other community development holding company that focuses on the acquisition, ownership and management of multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities. Therefore, we may encounter risks of which we are not aware at this time, which could have a material adverse impact on our business.

 

Risks Related to Regulation

 


 

Cannabis remains illegal under federal law, and therefore, strict enforcement of federal laws regarding cannabis would likely result in our inability and the inability of our future tenants to execute our respective business plans.

 

Cannabis is a Schedule I controlled substance under the CSA. Even in those jurisdictions in which the manufacture and use of cannabis has been legalized at the state level, the possession, use and cultivation all remain violations of federal law that are punishable by imprisonment, substantial fines and forfeiture. Moreover, individuals and entities may violate federal law if they intentionally aid and abet another in violating these federal controlled substance laws, or conspire with another to violate them. The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled in United States v. Oakland Cannabis Buyers' Coop. and Gonzales v. Raich that it is the federal government that has the right to regulate and criminalize the sale, possession and use of cannabis, even for medical purposes. We would likely be unable to execute our business plan if the federal government were to strictly enforce federal law regarding cannabis.

 

In January 2018, the DOJ rescinded certain memoranda, including the so-called “Cole Memo” issued on August 29, 2013 under the Obama Administration, which had characterized enforcement of federal cannabis prohibitions under the CSA to prosecute those complying with state regulatory systems allowing the use, manufacture and distribution of medical cannabis as an inefficient use of federal investigative and prosecutorial resources when state regulatory and enforcement efforts are effective with respect to enumerated federal enforcement priorities under the CSA. The impact of the DOJ's recent rescission of the Cole Memo and related memoranda is unclear, but may result in the DOJ increasing its enforcement actions against the regulated cannabis industry generally, including our future tenants and us.

 

Congress previously enacted an omnibus spending bill that includes a provision prohibiting the DOJ (which includes the DEA) from using funds appropriated by that bill to prevent states from implementing their medical-use cannabis laws. This provision, however, expires on September 30, 2019, and must be renewed by Congress. In USA vs. McIntosh, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held that this provision prohibits the DOJ from spending funds from relevant appropriations acts to prosecute individuals who engage in conduct permitted by state medical-use cannabis laws and who strictly comply with such laws. However, the Ninth Circuit's opinion, which only applies to the states of Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, and Idaho, also held that persons who do not strictly comply with all state laws and regulations regarding the distribution, possession and cultivation of medical-use cannabis have engaged in conduct that is unauthorized, and in such instances the DOJ may prosecute those individuals. Furthermore, while we target the acquisition of multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities, our leases do not prohibit cannabis cultivation for adult-use that is permissible under the state and local laws where our facilities are located, such as in California, Colorado, Massachusetts and Michigan. Consequently, certain of our future tenants currently (and additional tenants may in the future) cultivate adult-use cannabis in our multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities, as permitted by such state and local laws now or in the future, which may in turn subject the tenant, us and our properties to greater and/or different federal legal and other risks as compared to facilities where cannabis is cultivated exclusively for medical use, including not providing protection under the Congressional spending bill provision described above. 

 

Additionally, financial transactions involving proceeds generated by cannabis-related conduct can form the basis for prosecution under the federal money laundering statutes, unlicensed money transmitter statutes and the Bank Secrecy Act. The penalties for violation of these laws include imprisonment, substantial fines and forfeiture. Prior to the DOJ's rescission of the Cole Memo, supplemental guidance from the DOJ issued under the Obama administration directed federal prosecutors to consider the federal enforcement priorities enumerated in the Cole Memo when determining whether to charge institutions or individuals with any of the financial crimes described above based upon cannabis-related activity. With the rescission of the Cole Memo, there is increased uncertainty and added risk that federal law enforcement authorities could seek to pursue money laundering charges against entities or individuals engaged in supporting the cannabis industry.


 

 

Federal prosecutors have significant discretion and no assurance can be given that the federal prosecutor in each judicial district where we purchase a property will not choose to strictly enforce the federal laws governing cannabis production or distribution. Any change in the federal government's enforcement posture with respect to state-licensed cultivation of cannabis, including the enforcement postures of individual federal prosecutors in judicial districts where we purchase properties, would result in our inability to execute our business plan, and we would likely suffer significant losses with respect to our investment in cannabis facilities in the United States, which would adversely affect the trading price of our securities. Furthermore, following any such change in the federal government's enforcement position, we could be subject to criminal prosecution, which could lead to imprisonment and/or the imposition of penalties, fines, or forfeiture.

 

Certain of our future tenants engage in operations for the adult-use cannabis industry in addition to or in lieu of operations for the medical-use cannabis industry, and such tenants, we and our properties may be subject to additional risks associated with such adult-use cannabis operations.

 

We expect that leases that we enter into with future tenants at other properties we acquire will not, prohibit cannabis cultivation for adult-use that is permissible under state and local laws where our facilities are located and certain of our future tenants are currently engaged in operations for the adult-use cannabis industry, which may subject our future tenants, us and our properties to different and greater risks, including greater prosecution risk for aiding and abetting violation of the CSA and federal laws governing money laundering. For example, the prohibition in the current omnibus spending bill that prohibits the DOJ from using funds appropriated by Congress to prevent states from implementing their medical-use cannabis laws does not extend to adult-use cannabis laws. In addition, while we may purchase properties in states that only permit medical-use cannabis at the time of acquisition, such states may in the future authorize by state legislation or popular vote the legalization of adult-use cannabis, thus permitting our future tenants to engage in adult-use cannabis operations at our properties. For example, the voters of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts passed an initiative to legalize cannabis for adult-use in 2016, having previously voted to legalize medical-use cannabis in 2012. Massachusetts began issuing licenses to operators for the sale of adult-use cannabis in July 2018. Our existing leases at our Massachusetts properties do not prohibit our future tenants from conducting adult-use cannabis cultivation, processing or dispensing that is permissible under state and local laws. Similarly, the states of California and Colorado permit licensed adult-use cannabis cultivation, processing and dispensing, and our leases with tenants in California and Colorado allow for adult-use cannabis operations to be conducted at the properties in compliance with state and local laws. In addition, Michigan voters passed an initiative in November 2018 to legalize cannabis for adult-use.

 

New laws that are adverse to the business of our future tenants may be enacted, and current favorable national, state or local laws or enforcement guidelines relating to cultivation and production of cannabis may be modified or eliminated in the future.

 

We are targeting for acquisition properties that are owned by state-licensed cultivators and producers of cannabis. Relevant state or local laws may be amended or repealed, or new laws may be enacted in the future to eliminate existing laws permitting cultivation and production of cannabis. If our future tenants were forced to close their operations, we would need to replace those tenants with tenants who are not engaged in the cannabis industry, who may pay significantly lower rents. Moreover, any changes in state or local laws that reduce or eliminate the ability to cultivate and produce cannabis would likely result in a high vacancy rate for the kinds of properties that we seek to acquire, which would depress our lease rates and property values. In addition, we would realize an economic loss on any and all improvements made to properties that were specific to the cannabis industry.


 

 

Our ability to grow our business depends on state laws pertaining to the cannabis industry.

 

Continued development of the medical-use cannabis industry depends upon continued legislative authorization of cannabis at the state level. The status quo of, or progress in, the regulated medical-use cannabis industry is not assured and any number of factors could slow or halt further progress in this area. While there may be ample public support for legislative action permitting the manufacture and use of cannabis, numerous factors impact the legislative process. For example, many states that voted to legalize medical and/or adult-use cannabis have seen significant delays in the drafting and implementation of industry regulations and issuance of licenses. In addition, burdensome regulation at the state level could slow or stop further development of the medical-use cannabis industry, such as limiting the medical conditions for which medical cannabis can be recommended by physicians for treatment, restricting the form in which medical cannabis can be consumed, imposing significant registration requirements on physicians and patients or imposing significant taxes on the growth, processing and/or retail sales of cannabis, which could have the impact of dampening growth of the cannabis industry and making it difficult for cannabis businesses, including our future tenants, to operate profitably in those states. Any one of these factors could slow or halt additional legislative authorization of medical-use cannabis, which could harm our business prospects.

 

FDA regulation of medical-use cannabis and the possible registration of facilities where medical-use cannabis is grown could negatively affect the medical-use cannabis industry, which would directly affect our financial condition.

 

Should the federal government legalize cannabis for medical-use, it is possible that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") would seek to regulate it under the Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act of 1938. Additionally, the FDA may issue rules and regulations including certified good manufacturing practices, or cGMPs, related to the growth, cultivation, harvesting and processing of medical cannabis. Clinical trials may be needed to verify efficacy and safety. It is also possible that the FDA would require that facilities where medical-use cannabis is grown register with the FDA and comply with certain federally prescribed regulations. In the event that some or all of these regulations are imposed, we do not know what the impact would be on the medical-use cannabis industry, including what costs, requirements and possible prohibitions may be enforced. If we or our future tenants are unable to comply with the regulations or registration as prescribed by the FDA, we and or our future tenants may be unable to continue to operate their and our business in its current form or at all.

 

We and our future tenants may have difficulty accessing the service of banks, which may make it difficult to contract for real estate needs.

 

Financial transactions involving proceeds generated by cannabis-related conduct can form the basis for prosecution under the federal money laundering statutes, unlicensed money transmitter statute and the Bank Secrecy Act. Previous guidance issued by the FinCen, a division of the U.S. Department of the Treasury, clarifies how financial institutions can provide services to cannabis-related businesses consistent with their obligations under the Bank Secrecy Act. Prior to the DOJ’s announcement in January 2018 of the rescission of the Cole Memo and related memoranda, supplemental guidance from the DOJ directed federal prosecutors to consider the federal enforcement priorities enumerated in the Cole Memo when determining whether to charge institutions or individuals with any of the financial crimes described above based upon cannabis-related activity. It is unclear what impact the rescission of the Cole Memo will have, but federal prosecutors may increase enforcement activities against institutions or individuals that are conducting financial transactions related to cannabis activities. The increased uncertainty surrounding financial transactions related to cannabis activities may also result in financial institutions discontinuing services to the cannabis industry.


 

 

Consequently, those businesses involved in the regulated medical-use cannabis industry continue to encounter difficulty establishing banking relationships, which may increase over time. Our inability to maintain our current bank accounts would make it difficult for us to operate our business, increase our operating costs, and pose additional operational, logistical and security challenges and could result in our inability to implement our business plan.

 

The terms of our leases require that our future tenants make rental payments via check or wire transfer. The inability of our current and potential tenants to open accounts and continue using the services of banks will limit their ability to enter into triple-net lease arrangements with us or may result in their default under our lease agreements, either of which could materially harm our business and the trading price of our securities.

 

Owners of properties located in close proximity to our properties may assert claims against us regarding the use of the property as a medical cannabis cultivation and processing facility, which if successful, could materially and adversely affect our business.

 

Owners of properties located in close proximity to our properties may assert claims against us regarding the use of our properties for medical cannabis cultivation and processing, including assertions that the use of the property constitutes a nuisance that diminishes the market value of such owner's nearby property. Such property owners may also attempt to assert such a claim in federal court as a civil matter under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act. If a property owner were to assert such a claim against us, we may be required to devote significant resources and costs to defending ourselves against such a claim, and if a property owner were to be successful on such a claim, our future tenants may be unable to continue to operate their business in its current form at the property, which could materially adversely impact the tenant's business and the value of our property, our business and financial results and the trading price of our securities.

 

Laws and regulations affecting the regulated cannabis industry are constantly changing, which could materially adversely affect our proposed operations, and we cannot predict the impact that future regulations may have on us.

 

Local, state and federal cannabis laws and regulations are broad in scope and subject to evolving interpretations, which could require us to incur substantial costs associated with compliance or alter our business plan. In addition, violations of these laws, or allegations of such violations, could disrupt our business and result in a material adverse effect on our operations. It is also possible that regulations may be enacted in the future that will be directly applicable to our proposed business. We cannot predict the nature of any future laws, regulations, interpretations or applications, nor can we determine what effect additional governmental regulations or administrative policies and procedures, when and if promulgated, could have on our business.

 

Applicable state laws may prevent us from maximizing our potential income.

 

Depending on the laws of each particular state, we may not be able to fully realize our potential to generate profit. For example, some states have residency requirements for those directly involved in the medical-use cannabis industry, which may impede our ability to contract with cannabis businesses in those states. Furthermore, cities and counties are being given broad discretion to ban certain cannabis activities. Even if these activities are legal under state law, specific cities and counties may ban them.

 


 

Assets leased to cannabis businesses may be forfeited to the federal government.

 

Any assets used in conjunction with the violation of federal law are potentially subject to federal forfeiture, even in states where cannabis is legal. In July 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice issued a new policy directive regarding asset forfeiture, referred to as the "equitable sharing program." Under this new policy directive, federal authorities may adopt state and local forfeiture cases and prosecute them at the federal level, allowing for state and local agencies to keep up to 80% of any forfeiture revenue. This policy directive represents a reversal of the DOJ's policy under the Obama administration, and allows for forfeitures to proceed that are not in accord with the limitations imposed by state-specific forfeiture laws. This new policy directive may lead to increased use of asset forfeitures by local, state and federal enforcement agencies. If the federal government decides to initiate forfeiture proceedings against cannabis businesses, such as the multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities that we have acquired and intend to acquire, our investment in those properties may be lost.

 

We may have difficulty accessing bankruptcy courts.

 

As discussed above, the cannabis is illegal under federal law. Therefore, there is a compelling argument that the federal bankruptcy courts cannot provide relief for parties who engage in the cannabis or cannabis related businesses. Recent bankruptcy rulings have denied bankruptcies for dispensaries upon the justification that businesses cannot violate federal law and then claim the benefits of federal bankruptcy for the same activity and upon the justification that courts cannot ask a bankruptcy trustee to take possession of, and distribute cannabis assets as such action would violate the CSA. Therefore, we may not be able to seek the protection of the bankruptcy courts and this could materially affect our business or our ability to obtain credit.

 

The properties that we acquire are subject to extensive regulations, which may result in significant costs and materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations.

 

Our properties are and other properties that we expect to acquire will be subject to various local laws and regulatory requirements. Local property regulations, including restrictive covenants of record, may restrict the use of properties we acquire and may require us to obtain approval from local authorities with respect to the properties that we expect to acquire, including prior to acquiring a property or when developing or undertaking renovations. Among other things, these restrictions may relate to cultivation of medical-use cannabis, the use of water and the discharge of waste water, fire and safety, seismic conditions, asbestos-cleanup or hazardous material abatement requirements. We cannot assure you that existing regulatory policies will not materially and adversely affect us or the timing or cost of any future acquisitions, developments or renovations, or that additional regulations will not be adopted that would increase such delays or result in additional costs. Our failure to obtain such regulatory approvals could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations.

 

Compliance with environmental laws could materially increase our operating expenses.

 

There may be environmental conditions associated with properties we acquire of which we are unaware. If environmental contamination exists on properties we acquire, we could become subject to liability for the contamination. The presence of hazardous substances on a property may materially and adversely affect our ability to sell the property and we may incur substantial remediation costs. In addition, although we may require in our leases that tenants operate in compliance with all applicable laws and indemnify us against any environmental liabilities arising from a tenant's activities on the property, we could nonetheless be subject to liability by virtue of our ownership interest and we cannot be sure that our future tenants would satisfy their indemnification obligations to us. Such environmental liability exposure associated with properties we acquire could harm our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations.


 

 

Risks Related to Financing Our Business

 

Our growth depends on external sources of capital, which may not be available on favorable terms or at all. In addition, banks and other financial institutions may be reluctant to enter into lending transactions with us, including secured lending, because we acquire properties used in the cultivation and production of medical-use cannabis. If this source of funding is unavailable to us, our growth may be limited and our levered return on the properties we purchase may be lower.

 

We expect to acquire additional real estate assets, which we intend to finance primarily through newly issued equity or debt. We may not be in a position to take advantage of attractive investment opportunities for growth if we are unable, due to global or regional economic uncertainty, changes in the state or federal regulatory environment relating to the medical-use cannabis industry, our own operating or financial performance or otherwise, to access capital markets on a timely basis and on favorable terms or at all.

 

Our access to capital will depend upon a number of factors over which we have little or no control, including general market conditions and the market's perception of our current and potential future earnings. If general economic instability or downturn leads to an inability to borrow at attractive rates or at all, our ability to obtain capital to finance the purchase of real estate assets could be negatively impacted. In addition, banks and other financial institutions may be reluctant to enter into lending transactions with us, particularly secured lending, because we intend to acquire properties used in the cultivation and production of medical-use cannabis. If this source of funding is unavailable to us, our growth may be limited and our levered return on the properties we purchase may be lower.

 

If we are unable to obtain capital on terms and conditions that we find acceptable, we likely will have to reduce the number of properties we can purchase. In addition, our ability to refinance all or any debt we may incur in the future, on acceptable terms or at all, is subject to all of the above factors, and will also be affected by our future financial position, results of operations and cash flows, which additional factors are also subject to significant uncertainties, and therefore we may be unable to refinance any debt we may incur in the future, as it matures, on acceptable terms or at all. All of these events would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations.

 

Any future indebtedness reduces our cash available for distribution and may expose us to the risk of default.

 

Payments of principal and interest on our borrowings that we may incur in the future may leave us with insufficient cash resources to operate the properties that we expect to acquire. Our level of debt and the limitations imposed on us by debt agreements could have significant material and adverse consequences, including the following:

 

 

our cash flow may be insufficient to meet our required principal and interest payments;

 

 

we may be unable to borrow additional funds as needed or on favorable terms, or at all;

 

 

we may be unable to refinance our indebtedness at maturity or the refinancing terms may be less favorable than the terms of our original indebtedness;

 

 

to the extent we borrow debt that bears interest at variable rates, increases in interest rates could materially increase our interest expense;

 

 

we may be forced to dispose of one or more of the properties that we expect to acquire, possibly on disadvantageous terms;

 


 
 

we may default on our obligations or violate restrictive covenants, in which case the lenders may accelerate these debt obligations; and

 

 

our default under any loan with cross default provisions could result in a default on other indebtedness.

 

If any one of these events were to occur, our financial condition, results of operations, cash flow, and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Risks Related to Our Organization and Structure

 

We are dependent on our key personnel for our success.

 

We depend upon the efforts, experience, diligence, skill and network of business contacts of our senior management team, and our success will depend on their continued service. The departure of any of our executive officers or key personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business. If any of our key personnel were to cease their employment, our operating results could suffer. Further, we do not intend to maintain key person life insurance that would provide us with proceeds in the event of death or disability of any of our key personnel.

 

We believe our future success depends upon our senior management team's ability to hire and retain highly skilled managerial, operational and marketing personnel. Competition for such personnel is intense, and we cannot assure you that we will be successful in attracting and retaining such skilled personnel. If we lose or are unable to obtain the services of key personnel, our ability to implement our investment strategies could be delayed or hindered, and the value of our common stock may decline.

 

Furthermore, we may retain independent contractors to provide various services for us, including administrative services, transfer agent services and professional services. Such contractors have no fiduciary duty to us and may not perform as expected or desired.

 

Our senior management team would manage our portfolio subject to very broad investment guidelines.

 

Our senior management team will have broad discretion over our investments, and our stockholders will have no opportunity to evaluate the terms of transactions or other economic or financial data concerning our investments that are not described in periodic filings with the SEC. We will rely on the senior management team's ability to execute acquisitions and dispositions of multifamily properties, hemp farms, CBD processing and medical-use cannabis facilities, subject to the oversight and approval of our board of directors. Our senior management team will be authorized to pursue acquisitions and dispositions of real estate investments in accordance with very broad investment guidelines, subject to approval of our board of directors.

 

Our board of directors may change our investment objectives and strategies without stockholder consent.

 

Our board of directors determines our major policies, including with regard to financing, growth, debt capitalization and distributions. Our board of directors may amend or revise these and other policies without a vote of the stockholders. Our stockholders generally have a right to vote only on the following matters:

 

 

the election or removal of directors;

 

 

the amendment of our charter, except that our board of directors may amend our charter without stockholder approval to:

 


 
 

change our name;

 

 

change the name or other designation or the par value of any class or series of stock and the aggregate par value of our stock;

 

 

increase or decrease the aggregate number of shares of stock that we have the authority to issue;

 

 

increase or decrease the number of our shares of any class or series of stock that we have the authority to issue; and

 

 

effect certain reverse stock splits;

 

 

our liquidation and dissolution; and

 

 

our being a party to a merger, consolidation, sale or other disposition of all or substantially all of our assets or statutory share exchange.

 

All other matters are subject to the discretion of our board of directors.

 

Our authorized but unissued shares of common and preferred stock may prevent a change in our control.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation permits our board of directors to authorize us to issue additional shares of our authorized but unissued common or preferred stock. In addition, our board of directors may, without stockholder approval, amend our Articles of Incorporation to increase the aggregate number of our shares of stock or the number of shares of stock of any class or series that we have the authority to issue and classify or reclassify any unissued shares of common or preferred stock and set the terms of the classified or reclassified shares. As a result, our board of directors may establish a class or series of shares of common or preferred stock that could delay or prevent a transaction or a change in control that might involve a premium price for shares of our common stock or otherwise be in the best interest of our stockholders.

 

Severance agreements with our executive officers could be costly and prevent a change in our control.

 

The severance agreements that we entered into with our executive officers provide that, if their employment with us terminates under certain circumstances (including upon a change in our control), we may be required to pay them significant amounts of severance compensation, including accelerated vesting of equity awards, thereby making it costly to terminate their employment. Furthermore, these provisions could delay or prevent a transaction or a change in our control that might involve a premium paid for our common stock or otherwise be in the best interests of our stockholders.

 

Because of our holding company structure, we depend on our Operating Partnership and its subsidiaries for cash flow and we will be structurally subordinated in right of payment to the obligations of such operating subsidiary and its subsidiaries.

 

We are a holding company with no business operations of our own. Our only significant asset is and will be the general and limited partnership interests in our Operating Partnership. We conduct, and intend to conduct, all of our business operations through our Operating Partnership. Accordingly, our only source of cash to pay our obligations is distributions from our Operating Partnership and its subsidiaries of their net earnings and cash flows. We cannot assure our stockholders that our Operating Partnership or its subsidiaries will be able to, or be permitted to, make distributions to us that will enable us to make distributions to our stockholders from cash flows from operations. Each of our Operating Partnership's subsidiaries is or will be a distinct legal entity and, under certain circumstances, legal and contractual restrictions may limit our ability to obtain cash from such entities. In addition, because we are a holding company, your claims as stockholders will be structurally subordinated to all existing and future liabilities and obligations of our Operating Partnership and its subsidiaries. Therefore, in the event of our bankruptcy, liquidation or reorganization, our assets and those of our Operating Partnership and its subsidiaries will be able to satisfy your claims as stockholders only after all of our and our Operating Partnership's and its subsidiaries' liabilities and obligations have been paid in full. Furthermore, U.S. bankruptcy courts have generally refused to grant bankruptcy protections to cannabis businesses.


 

 

Our Operating Partnership may issue additional limited partnership interests to third parties without the consent of our stockholders, which would reduce our ownership percentage in our Operating Partnership and would have a dilutive effect on the amount of distributions made to us by our Operating Partnership and, therefore, the amount of distributions we can make to our stockholders.

 

We are the sole general partner of our Operating Partnership and own, directly or through a subsidiary, 100% of the outstanding partnership interests in our Operating Partnership. We may, in connection with our acquisition of properties or otherwise, cause our Operating Partnership to issue additional limited partnership interests to third parties. Such issuances would reduce our ownership percentage in our Operating Partnership and affect the amount of distributions made to us by our Operating Partnership and, therefore, the amount of distributions we can make to our stockholders. Because our stockholders will not directly own any interest in our Operating Partnership, our stockholders will not have any voting rights with respect to any such issuances or other partnership level activities of our Operating Partnership.

 

If we issue limited partnership interests in our Operating Partnership in exchange for property, the value placed on such partnership interests may not accurately reflect their market value, which may dilute your interest in us.

 

If we issue limited partnership interests in our Operating Partnership in exchange for property, the per unit value attributable to such interests will be determined based on negotiations with the property seller and, therefore, may not reflect the fair market value of such limited partnership interests if a public market for such limited partnership interests existed. If the value of such limited partnership interests is greater than the value of the related property, your interest in us may be diluted.

 

Our rights and the rights of our stockholders to take action against our directors and officers are limited, which could limit your recourse in the event of actions not in your best interests.

 

We intend to enter into indemnification agreements with each of our executive directors and officers that provide for indemnification to the maximum extent permitted by Nevada law.

 

 

We plan to continue to operate our business so that we are not required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act.

 

We intend to engage primarily in the business of investing in real estate and we have not and do not intend to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act. If our primary business were to change in a manner that would require us register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act, we would have to comply with substantial regulation under the Investment Company Act which could restrict the manner in which we operate and finance our business and could materially and adversely affect our business operations and results.

 

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

 

There currently is only a minimal public market for our common stock. Failure to develop or maintain a trading market could negatively affect the value of our common stock and make it difficult or impossible for you to sell your shares.


 

 

There currently is only a minimal public market for shares of our common stock and an active market may never develop. Our common stock is quoted on the OTC Pink Market operated by the OTC Market’s Group, Inc. under the symbol “NIHK”. We may not ever be able to satisfy the listing requirements for our common stock to be listed on any stock exchange, including the trading platforms of the NASDAQ Stock Market which are often more widely-traded and liquid markets. Some, but not all, of the factors which may delay or prevent the listing of our common stock on a more widely-traded and liquid market include the following: our stockholders’ equity may be insufficient; the market value of our outstanding securities may be too low; our net income from operations may be too low; our common stock may not be sufficiently widely held; we may not be able to secure market makers for our common stock; and we may fail to meet the rules and requirements mandated by, any of the several exchanges and markets to have our common stock listed.

 

Some of the factors that could negatively affect the share price or result in fluctuations in the price or trading volume of our common stock include:

 

 

our actual or projected operating results, financial condition, cash flows and liquidity or changes in business strategy or prospects;

 

 

changes in government policies, regulations or laws;

 

 

our ability to make acquisitions on preferable terms or at all;

 

 

the performance of our current properties and additional properties that we acquire;

 

 

equity issuances by us, or share resales by our stockholders, or the perception that such issuances or resales may occur;

 

 

actual or anticipated accounting problems;

 

 

publication of research reports about us, the real estate industry or the cannabis industry;

 

 

changes in market valuations of similar companies;

 

 

adverse market reaction to any increased indebtedness we may incur in the future;

 

 

interest rate changes;

 

 

additions to or departures of our senior management team;

 

 

speculation in the press or investment community or negative press in general;

 

our failure to meet, or the lowering of, our earnings estimates or those of any securities analysts;

 

 

 

refusal of securities clearing firms to accept deposits of our securities;

 

 

 

the realization of any of the other risk factors presented in this report;

 

 

actions by institutional stockholders;

 

 

price and volume fluctuations in the stock market generally; and

 

 

market and economic conditions generally, including the current state of the credit and capital markets and the market and economic conditions.

 

Market factors unrelated to our performance could also negatively impact the market price of our common stock. One of the factors that investors may consider in deciding whether to buy or sell our common stock.

 

The market price for our common stock is particularly volatile given our status as a relatively unknown company with a small and thinly traded public float, limited operating history and lack of profits which could lead to wide fluctuations in our share price. You may be unable to sell your common stock at or above your conversion price, which may result in substantial losses to you.

 

The market for our common stock is characterized by significant price volatility when compared to seasoned issuers, and we expect that our share price will continue to be more volatile than a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future. The volatility in our share price is attributable to a number of factors. First, as noted above, our common stock are sporadically and thinly traded. As a consequence of this lack of liquidity, the trading of relatively small quantities of shares by our shareholders may disproportionately influence the price of those shares in either direction. The price for our shares could, for example, decline precipitously in the event that a large number of our common stock are sold on the market without commensurate demand, as compared to a seasoned issuer which could better absorb those sales without adverse impact on its share price. Secondly, we are a speculative or “risky” investment due to our limited operating history and lack of profits to date, and uncertainty of future market acceptance for our potential products and services. As a consequence of this enhanced risk, more risk-adverse investors may, under the fear of losing all or most of their investment in the event of negative news or lack of progress, be more inclined to sell their shares on the market more quickly and at greater discounts than would be the case with the stock of a seasoned issuer. Many of these factors are beyond our control and may decrease the market price of our common stock, regardless of our operating performance. We cannot make any predictions or projections as to what the prevailing market price for our common stock will be at any time, including as to whether our common stock will sustain their current market prices, or as to what effect that the sale of shares or the availability of common stock for sale at any time will have on the prevailing market price.


 

 

The application of the “penny stock” rules could adversely affect the market price of our common stock and increase your transaction costs to sell those shares.

 

The SEC has adopted rule 3a51-1 which establishes the definition of a “penny stock,” for the purposes relevant to us, as any equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share or with an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. For any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, Rule 15g-9 requires:

 

 

that a broker or dealer approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, and

 

the broker or dealer receives from the investor a written agreement to the transaction, setting forth the identity and quantity of the penny stock to be purchased.

 

In order to approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, the broker or dealer must:

 

 

obtain financial information and investment experience objectives of the person, and

 

make a reasonable determination that the transactions in penny stocks are suitable for that person and the person has sufficient knowledge and experience in financial matters to be capable of evaluating the risks of transactions in penny stocks.

  

The broker or dealer must also deliver, prior to any transaction in a penny stock, a disclosure schedule prescribed by the SEC relating to the penny stock market, which, in highlight form:

 

 

sets forth the basis on which the broker or dealer made the suitability determination, and

 

that the broker or dealer received a signed, written agreement from the investor prior to the transaction.

 

Generally, brokers may be less willing to execute transactions in securities subject to the “penny stock” rules. This may make it more difficult for investors to dispose of our common stock and cause a decline in the market value of our stock.

 

The application of Rule 144 creates some investment risk to potential investors; for example, existing shareholders may be able to rely on Rule 144 to sell some of their holdings, driving down the price of the shares you purchased.

 


 

The SEC adopted amendments to Rule 144 which became effective on February 15, 2008 that apply to securities acquired both before and after that date. Under these amendments, a person who has beneficially owned restricted shares of our common stock for at least six months would be entitled to sell their securities provided that: (i) such person is not deemed to have been one of our affiliates at the time of, or at any time during the three months preceding a sale, (ii) we are subject to the Exchange Act periodic reporting requirements for at least 90 days before the sale and (iii) if the sale occurs prior to satisfaction of a one-year holding period, we provide current information at the time of sale.

 

Persons who have beneficially owned restricted shares of our common stock for at least six months but who are our affiliates at the time of, or at any time during the three months preceding a sale, would be subject to additional restrictions, by which such person would be entitled to sell within any three-month period only a number of securities that does not exceed the greater of either of the following:

 

 

1% of the total number of securities of the same class then outstanding (shares of common stock as of the date of this Report); or

 

the average weekly trading volume of such securities during the four calendar weeks preceding the filing of a notice on Form 144 with respect to the sale;

 

provided, in each case, that we are subject to the Exchange Act periodic reporting requirements for at least three months before the sale. Such sales by affiliates must also comply with the manner of sale, current public information and notice provisions of Rule 144.

 

Frank I Igwealor, our majority stockholder, director and executive officer, owns a large percentage of our voting stock, which allows him to exercise significant influence over matters subject to stockholder approval.

 

Frank I Igwealor, our majority stockholder, director and executive officer, will have substantial influence over the outcome of corporate actions requiring shareholder approval, including the election of directors, any merger, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets or any other significant corporate transaction. In particular, because our President, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary and a director, Mr. Igwealor, who controls 70% of our voting stock as of November 21, 2019, will be able to exert such influence. This shareholder may also delay or prevent a change of control or otherwise discourage a potential acquirer from attempting to obtain control of us, even if such a change of control would benefit our other shareholders. This significant concentration of stock and voting ownership may adversely affect the value of our common stock due to investors’ perception that conflicts of interest may exist or arise.

 

We do not intend to pay dividends on our common stock.

 

We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. We currently anticipate that we will retain all of our available cash, if any, for use as working capital and for other general corporate purposes. Any payment of future dividends will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend upon, among other things, our earnings, financial condition, capital requirements, level of indebtedness, statutory and contractual restrictions applying to the payment of dividends and other considerations that the Board of Directors deems relevant. Investors must rely on sales of their common stock after price appreciation, which may never occur, as the only way to realize a return on their investment. Investors seeking cash dividends should not purchase our common stock.

 

We may enter into acquisitions and take actions in connection with such transactions that could adversely affect our business and results of operations.

 


 

Our future growth rate depends in part on our selective acquisition of additional businesses and assets. We may be unable to identify suitable targets for acquisition or make further acquisitions at favorable prices. If we identify a suitable acquisition candidate, our ability to successfully complete the acquisition would depend on a variety of factors, and may include our ability to obtain financing on acceptable terms and requisite government approvals. In addition, any credit agreements or credit facilities that we may enter into in the future may restrict our ability to make certain acquisitions. In connection with future acquisitions, we could take certain actions that could adversely affect our business, including:

 

 

using a significant portion of our available cash;

 

issuing equity securities, which would dilute current stockholders’ percentage ownership;

 

incurring substantial debt;

 

incurring or assuming contingent liabilities, known or unknown;

 

incurring amortization expenses related to intangibles; and

 

incurring large accounting write-offs or impairments.

 

We may also enter into joint ventures, which involve certain unique risks, including, among others, risks relating to the lack of full control of the joint venture, potential disagreements with our joint venture partners about how to manage the joint venture, conflicting interests of the joint venture, requirement to fund the joint venture and its business not being profitable.

 

In addition, we cannot be certain that the due diligence investigation that we conduct with respect to any investment or acquisition opportunity will reveal or highlight all relevant facts that may be necessary or helpful in evaluating such investment opportunity. For example, instances of fraud, accounting irregularities and other deceptive practices can be difficult to detect. Executive officers, directors and employees may be named as defendants in litigation involving a company we are acquiring or have acquired. Even if we conduct extensive due diligence on a particular investment or acquisition, we may fail to uncover all material issues relating to such investment, including regarding controls and procedures of a particular target or the full scope of its contractual arrangements. We rely on our due diligence to identify potential liabilities in the businesses we acquire, including such things as potential or actual lawsuits, contractual obligations or liabilities imposed by government regulation. However, our due diligence process may not uncover these liabilities, and where we identify a potential liability, we may incorrectly believe that we can consummate the acquisition without subjecting ourselves to that liability. Therefore, it is possible that we could be subject to litigation in respect of these acquired businesses. If our due diligence fails to identify issues specific to an investment or acquisition, we may obtain a lower return from that transaction than the investment would return or otherwise subject ourselves to unexpected liabilities. We may also be forced to write-down or write-off assets, restructure our operations or incur impairment or other charges that could result in our reporting losses. Charges of this nature could contribute to negative market perceptions about us or our shares of common stock.

 

Social Media Presents Risks. 

 

The use of social media could cause us to suffer brand damage or unintended information disclosure. Negative posts or communications about us on a social networking website could damage our reputation. Further, employees or others may disclose non-public information regarding us or our business or otherwise make negative comments regarding us on social networking or other websites, which could adversely affect our business and results of operations. As social media evolves we will be presented with new risks and challenges.

 

 

ITEM 2.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 


 

The discussion of our financial condition and operating results should be read together with our accompanying audited consolidated financial statements included in this Registration Statement. 

 

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Forward Looking Statements

 

 

You should read the following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations together with our audited consolidated financial statements and notes to such financial statements included elsewhere in this Form 10.

 

The following discussion contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties regarding, among other things, (a) our projected sales, profitability, and cash flows, (b) our growth strategy, (c) anticipated trends in our industry, (d) our future financing plans, and (e) our anticipated needs for, and use of, working capital. They are generally identifiable by use of the words “may,” “will,” “should,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “plan,” “potential,” “project,” “continuing,” “ongoing,” “expects,” “management believes,” “we believe,” “we intend,” or the negative of these words or other variations on these words or comparable terminology. In light of these risks and uncertainties, there can be no assurance that the forward-looking statements contained in this filing will in fact occur. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

 

The forward-looking statements are not historical facts, but rather are based on current expectations, estimates, assumptions and projections about our industry, business and future financial results. The forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made, and, except to the extent required by federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which the statements are made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. Our actual results could differ materially from the results contemplated by these forward-looking statements due to a number of factors, including those discussed under “Item 1A. Risk Factors” and other sections in this Form 10.

 

Overview

 

Video River Networks, Inc. (“NIHK,” “PubCo” or “Company”), previously known as Nighthawk Systems Inc., a Nevada corporation, used to be a provider of wireless and IP-based control solutions for the utility and hospitality industries.  On October 29, 2019, Video River Networks, Inc. sold one (1) Special 2019 series A preferred share (one preferred share is convertible 150,000,000 share of common stocks) of the company for Fifty Thousand and 00/100 ($50,000/00) Dollars, price to Community Economic Development Capital LLC, (“CED Capital”) a California limited liability company CED. The Special preferred share controls 60% of the company’s total voting rights and thus, gave to CED Capital the controlling vote power to control and dominate the affairs of the company theretofor.  Upon the closing of the transaction, the business of CED Capital was merged into the Company and CED Capital became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. 

 

Following the completion of above mentioned transactions, the Company pivoted its business model to become a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including, affordable housing, opportunity zones properties, medical real estate investments, hemp and cannabis farms, dispensaries facilities, CBD related commercial facilities, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services. 

 

 


 

As the result of the combination and the change in business and operations of the Company, from provider of wireless and IP-based control solutions for the utility and hospitality industries to become a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including hemp and cannabis farms, dispensaries, CBD related commercial facilities, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services to the CBD and the legal cannabis industry, a discussion of the consolidated financial results of PubCo, under applicable accounting principles includes the historical financial results of CED Capital.

 

The following discussion highlights the Company’s consolidated results of operations and the principal factors that have affected our financial condition as well as our liquidity and capital resources for the periods described, and provides information that management believes is relevant for an assessment and understanding of the statements of financial condition and results of operations presented herein. You should read this discussion and analysis together with such financial statements and the related notes thereto.

 

Furthermore, we are now, an internally-managed real estate holding company focused on the acquisition, ownership and management of specialized industrial properties leased to experienced, state-licensed operators for their regulated state-licensed cannabis facilities. We plan to acquire our properties through sale-leaseback transactions and third-party purchases. We expect to lease our properties on a triple-net lease basis, where the tenant is responsible for all aspects of and costs related to the property and its operation during the lease term, including structural repairs, maintenance, taxes and insurance.

 

We plan to conduct our affordable housing business through a traditional umbrella partnership real estate holding company, in which our properties are owned by our Operating Partnership, directly or through subsidiaries. We shall be the sole general partner of our Operating Partnership and own, directly or through a subsidiary, 100% of the limited partnership interests in our Operating Partnership. Our property acquisitions would target all the states where medical-use marijuana has been legalized.  We believe that NIHK will become a leader in providing real estate focused on hemp and cannabis growth, to the public markets because our principal is a California Real Estate Broker.

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The following discussion and analysis are based on Video River Networks’ financial statements contained in this Current Report, which we have prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles.  Accompanying financial statements for CED Capital fiscal year 2019 include a summary of our significant accounting policies and should be read in conjunction with the discussion below. In the opinion of management, all material adjustments necessary to present fairly the results of operations for such periods have been included in these audited financial statements. All such adjustments are of a normal recurring nature.

 

Overview

 

We have two lines of real estate business: (1) promote and preserve affordable housing and economic development across urban neighborhoods in the United States; and (2) acquire hold and manage specialized assets including hemp and cannabis farms, dispensaries, CBD related commercial facilities, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services to the CBD and the legal cannabis industry.  To achieve our objectives, we plan to acquire, own, renovate, develop, redevelop, operate, dispose of, and manage specialized assets including hemp and cannabis farms, dispensaries, CBD related commercial facilities, industrial and commercial real estate, affordable housing and rental property and multi-family properties both on our own and through our investment management platform.  We focus primarily on commercial and multifamily properties located in urban and high-density suburban markets throughout the United States. Our real estate platform is internally managed with primarily focused on: (1) the acquisition, ownership and management of specialized industrial properties leased to experienced, state-licensed operators for their regulated state-licensed cannabis facilities; and (2) ownership, operation and development of multi-family affordable housing properties.


 

 

Our value is primarily derived from our ownership in income producing real estate assets as well as management's track record of producing attractive returns on its investments.  In addition to our income producing real estate, we engage in development, redevelopment and value add initiatives through which we enhance cash flows or reposition asset to increase value.

 

Our Specialty Real Estate Business Objectives and Growth Strategies

 

Our principal business objective is to maximize stockholder returns through a combination of (1) distributions to our stockholders, (2) sustainable long-term growth in cash flows from increased rents, which we hope to pass on to stockholders in the form of increased distributions, and (3) potential long-term appreciation in the value of our properties from capital gains upon future sale. Our primary strategy to achieve our business objective is to acquire and own a portfolio of specialized industrial properties, including medical-use cannabis facilities leased to tenants holding the requisite state licenses to operate in the regulated medical-use cannabis industry.

 

We believe an intense focus on operations is necessary to realize consistent, sustained earnings growth. Ensuring tenants’ satisfaction, increasing rents as market conditions allow, maximizing rent collections, maintaining property occupancy at optimal levels, and controlling operating costs comprise our principal strategies to maximize property financial results. We believe a web-based property management and revenue management systems strengthen on-site operations and allow us to quickly adjust rental rates as local market conditions change. Lease terms are generally staggered based on vacancy exposure by property type so lease expirations are matched to each property's seasonal rental patterns. We generally offer leases ranging from twelve to fifteen months with individual property marketing plans structured to respond to local market conditions. In addition, we conduct ongoing customer service surveys to help ensure timely response to tenants' changing needs and a high level of satisfaction.

 

Critical Accounting Policies, Estimates and New Accounting Pronouncements

 

Management's discussion and analysis of its financial condition and plan of operations is based upon our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.  The preparation of these financial statements requires that we make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities.  At each balance sheet date, management evaluates its estimates.  We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.  Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.  The estimates and critical accounting policies that are most important in fully understanding and evaluating our financial condition and results of operations include those stated in our financial statements and those listed below:

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As shown in the accompanying financial statements, we had zero cash flows from operations for the twelve months ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.  These conditions raise substantial doubt as to our ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary if we are unable to continue as a going concern.  Management intends to finance these deficits by making additional shareholder notes and seeking additional outside financing through either debt or sales of its Common Stock.


 

 

Recently Adopted Accounting Standards

 

Leases

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, "Leases" that requires for leases longer than one year, a lessee to recognize in the statement of financial condition a right·of·use asset, representing the right to use the underlying asset for the lease term, and a lease liability, representing the liability to make lease payments. The accounting update also requires that for finance leases, a lessee recognize interest expense on the lease liability, separately from the amortization of the right-of-use asset in the statements of earnings, while for operating leases, such amounts should be recognized as a combined expense. In addition, this accounting update requires expanded disclosures about the nature and terms of lease agreements. The Company has reviewed the new standard and does not expect it to have a material impact to the statement of financial condition or its net capital. The adoption of this guidance resulted in no significant impact to our results of operations or cash flows.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, which requires that five basic steps be followed to recognize revenue: (1) a legally enforceable contract that meets criteria standards as to composition and substance is identified; (2) performance obligations relating to provision of goods or services to the customer are identified; (3) the transaction price, with consideration given to any variable, noncash, or other relevant consideration, is determined; (4) the transaction price is allocated to the performance obligations; and (5) revenue is recognized when control of goods or services is transferred to the customer with consideration given, whether that control happens over time or not. Determination of criteria (3) and (4) are based on our management’s judgments regarding the fixed nature of the selling prices of the products and services delivered and the collectability of those amounts. The adoption of ASC 606 did not result in a change to the accounting for any of the in-scope revenue streams; as such, no cumulative effect adjustment was recorded.  During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company did recognized revenue of $0.00 and $0.00 respectively.

  

Income Taxes

 

The provision for income taxes is computed using the asset and liability method, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities, and for operating losses and tax credit carry-forwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the currently enacted tax rates that apply to taxable income in effect for the years in which those tax assets are expected to be realized or settled. We record a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that is believed more likely than not to be realized.

 

Loss Contingencies

 

Consistent with ASC 450-20-50-1C, if the Company determines that there is a reasonable possibility that a material loss may have been incurred, or is reasonably estimable, regardless of whether the Company accrued for such a loss (or any portion of that loss), the Company will confer with its legal counsel, consistent with ASC 450. If the material loss is determinable or reasonably estimable, the Company will record it in its accounts and as a liability on the balance sheet. If the Company determines that such an estimate cannot be made, the Company's policy is to disclose a demonstration of its attempt to estimate the loss or range of losses before concluding that an estimate cannot be made, and to disclose it in the notes to the financial statements under Contingent Liabilities.


 

 

Net Income (Loss) Per Common Share

 

Basic net loss per common share ("EPS") is computed by dividing loss available to common stockholders by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted earnings per share is computed by dividing net income by the weighted average shares outstanding, assuming all dilutive potential common shares were issued. Dilutive loss per share excludes all potential common shares if their effect is anti-dilutive.

 

Except for the October 29, 2019 transaction in which the company sold one (1) Special 2019 series A preferred share (one preferred share is convertible 150,000,000 share of common stocks) to CED Capital, no other potentially dilutive debt or equity instruments were issued or outstanding during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

We measure the cost of services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the fair value of the award. For employees and directors, the fair value of the award is measured on the grant date and for non-employees, the fair value of the award is generally re-measured on vesting dates and interim financial reporting dates until the service period is complete. The fair value amount is then recognized over the period during which services are required to be provided in exchange for the award, usually the vesting period. Stock-based compensation expense is recorded by us in the same expense classifications in the consolidated statements of operations, as if such amounts were paid in cash.

 

Related Party Transactions

 

We follow ASC subtopic 850-10, “Related Party Transactions,” for the identification of related parties and disclosure of related party transactions.

 

Pursuant to ASC 850-10-20, related parties include: a) affiliates of the Company; b) entities for which investments in their equity securities would be required, absent the election of the fair value option under the Fair Value Option Subsection of Section 825–10–15, to be accounted for by the equity method by the investing entity; c) trusts for the benefit of employees, such as pension and profit-sharing trusts that are managed by or under the trusteeship of management; d) principal owners of the Company; e) management of the Company; f) other parties with which the Company may deal if one party controls or can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the other to an extent that one of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests; and g) other parties that can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the transacting parties or that have an ownership interest in one of the transacting parties and can significantly influence the other to an extent that one or more of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests.

 

Material related party transactions are required to be disclosed in the financial statements, other than compensation arrangements, expense allowances, and other similar items in the ordinary course of business. However, disclosure of transactions that are eliminated in the preparation of or combined financial statements is not required in those statements. The disclosures shall include: a) the nature of the relationship(s) involved; b) a description of the transactions, including transactions to which no amounts or nominal amounts were ascribed, for each of the periods for which statements of operation are presented, and such other information deemed necessary to an understanding of the effects of the transactions on the financial statements; c) the dollar amounts of transactions for each of the periods for which statements of operations are presented and the effects of any change in the method of establishing the terms from that used in the preceding period; and d) amounts due from or to related parties as of the date of each balance sheet presented and, if not otherwise apparent, the terms and manner of settlement.


 

 

A related party is generally defined as (i) any person that holds 10% or more of our membership interests including such person's immediate families, (ii) our management, (iii) someone that directly or indirectly controls, is controlled by or is under common control with us, or (iv) anyone who can significantly influence our financial and operating decisions. A transaction is considered to be a related party transaction when there is a transfer of resources or obligations between related parties.  During the period under review, the Company recorded a loan of $1,459,971 to from company that is controlled by the Company’s majority stockholder.

 

Results of Operations

 

Comparison of Fiscal Years 2019 and 2018

 

We reported no revenue for the twelve months ended December 31, 2019, versus $0.00 for the same period in 2018. 

 

Our general and administrative expenses were $36,993.00 for the twelve months ended December 31, 2019, versus $0.00 for the same period in 2018.  We do not have enough information to recognize either revenue or expenses in 2018. 

 

Net loss was $36,993.00 for the twelve months ended December 31, 2019, versus $0.00 for the same period in 2018.  

    

Our financial statements are prepared using accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America applicable to a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business. We have limited ongoing business or income and for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018. We reported a net loss of $36,993.00 and $0.00 for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 respectively.  We also have accumulated deficit of $19,150,865 and $19,113,872 for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 respectively. These conditions raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements do not include any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that may result from the outcome of these uncertainties. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon our ability to raise additional debt or equity funding to meet our ongoing operating expenses and ultimately in merging with another entity with experienced management and profitable operations. No assurances can be given that we will be successful in achieving these objectives.

 

Real Estate Properties Owned

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we bought three single family residences (SFR) with a carrying amount of $1,459,971, in Los Angeles.  We financed the purchase with borrowing from our controlling shareholder.  We intend to rehabilitee these properties and deliver same to eligible homebuyers as part of our mission of promoting homeownership affordable housing.

 

We currently own three investment properties in Los Angeles California as at December 31, 2019.

Below is the schedule of our investment properties as at December 31, 2019 and 2018:


 

 

   

Cost basis

 
   

2019

 

2018

 
         

 

5125 Harold Way #307

$

         555,031

 

$       -

 

SFR - 4904 S Wilton Place 90062

 

         530,739

 

-

 

SFR - 831 E 94TH ST 90002

 

         367,128

 

-

 

 

$

   1,452,897

 

$       -

 

 

On April 23, 2019, the Company acquired land and building located at 4904 S Wilton Place, Los Angeles, CA 90062, to hold as investment property for $498,983.51.  The Company plans to improve the property and then sell it for profit.  As at 12/31/2019, the Company had spent about $31,755 on its rehabilitation and improvement.

 

On April 24, the Company acquired land and building located at 831 E 94th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90002, for $325,000.   The Company plans to improve the property and then sell it for profit.  As at 12/31/2019, the Company had spent about $42,128 on its rehabilitation and improvement processes.

 

On the same April 24, the Company acquired a Condominium unit located at 5125 Harold Way #307, Los Angeles, CA 90027, for $540,000.   The Company plans to improve the property and then sell it for profit.  As at 12/31/2019, the Company had spent about $15,031 on its rehabilitation and improvement processes.

 

Future financing of our operation depends largely on our controlling shareholder advancing most or all our operating budget.

 

We have not established significant operations and will be dependent upon obtaining financing to pursue any future extensive acquisitions and activities. For these reasons, our auditors stated in their report on our audited financial statements that they have substantial doubt that we will be able to continue as a going concern without further financing.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had $850 cash on hand.   We anticipate that our cash position is not sufficient to fund current operations.   We have limited lending relationships with commercial banks and are dependent upon the completion of one or more financings or equity-raises to fund our continuing operations.   We anticipate that we will seek additional capital through debt or equity financings.   While we are aggressively pursuing financing, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in our capital raising efforts.   Any additional equity financing may result in substantial dilution to our stockholders.

 

Our financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business for the foreseeable future. Since inception, we have generated minimal commission fee revenue and accumulated deficits.   In addition, we do not have sufficient working capital to meet current operating needs for the next 12 months, as described above.   All of these factors raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

Since 2019, all of our operations have been financed through advances from a company controlled by our president and CEO.  As of December 31, 2019, the company controlled by our president and CEO has loaned $1,459,971 to us, with no formal commitments or arrangements to advance or loan any additional funds to us in the future.  We have not yet achieved significant profitability. These conditions raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. We expect that our general and administrative expenses will continue to increase and, as a result, we will need to generate significant revenues to achieve significant profitability. We may never achieve significant profitability.


 

 

The revenues, if any, generated from our operations or acquisitions may not be sufficient to fund our operations or planned growth. We will require additional capital to continue to operate our business, and to further expand our business. Sources of additional capital through various financing transactions or arrangements with third parties may include equity or debt financing, bank loans or revolving credit facilities. We may not be successful in locating suitable financing transactions in the time period required or at all, and we may not obtain the capital we require by other means. Unless the Company can attract additional investment, the future of the Company operating as a going concern is in serious doubt.

 

We will now be obligated to file annual, quarterly and current reports with the SEC pursuant to the Exchange Act. In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“Sarbanes-Oxley”) and the rules subsequently implemented by the SEC and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board have imposed various requirements on public companies, including requiring changes in corporate governance practices. We expect these rules and regulations to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and to make some activities of ours more time- consuming and costly. In order to meet the needs to comply with the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act, we will need investment of capital.

 

Management has determined that additional capital will be required in the form of equity or debt securities. There is no assurance that management will be able to raise capital on terms acceptable to the Company. If we are unable to obtain sufficient amounts of additional capital, we may have to cease filing the required reports and cease operations completely. If we obtain additional funds by selling any of our equity securities or by issuing common stock to pay current or future obligations, the percentage ownership of our shareholders will be reduced, shareholders may experience additional dilution, or the equity securities may have rights preferences or privileges senior to the common stock.

 

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

As of December 31, 2019, we did not engage in any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined in Item 303(a)(4) of Regulation S-K promulgated by the SEC under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

Not applicable.

 

Plan of Operation for the Next Twelve (12) Months

 

As NIHK moves ahead to implement its business plan based on CED Capital platform, NIHK will begin to identify, acquire and internally-manage a real estate holdings focused of specialized industrial properties and CBD related real properties leased to experienced, state-licensed operators for their regulated state-licensed cannabis facilities.  We plan to acquire our properties through sale-leaseback transactions and third-party purchases. We expect to lease our properties on a triple-net lease basis, where the tenant is responsible for all aspects of and costs related to the property and its operation during the lease term, including structural repairs, maintenance, taxes and insurance.

 


 

We plan to conduct our affordable housing business through a traditional umbrella partnership real estate holding company, in which our properties are owned by our Operating Partnership, directly or through subsidiaries. We shall be the sole general partner of our Operating Partnership and own, directly or through a subsidiary, 100% of the limited partnership interests in our Operating Partnership. Our property acquisitions would target all the states where medical-use marijuana has been legalized.

 

NIHK through CED Capital, currently own three real properties in Los Angeles County.  The total cost of these properties as at December 31, 2019 is $1,459,971.  Because these properties are in varying stages of rehabilitation, it is expected that the eventual cost would increase far above $1,459,971 before the company could put the properties to productive use.

 

Using the real properties as collateral, we believe that we could always obtain the capital needed to complete the rehabilitation of these three properties.  Although there is no assurance that we would be able to put the three properties to good use such as renting them to tenants.  If we are unable to put them to productive use, we would be forced to sell them and use the money generated from the sales to pay off the loans used to acquire them. 

 

To effectively fund our business plan, we must raise additional capital.   But there can be no assurance that we will be able to raise the capital necessary to acquire, own or hold these specialized real properties.  Moreover, there can be no assurance that we will be able to raise the capital necessary to execute our business plan and also to acquire, own or hold specialized real properties.

 

Our operations will be conducted on five platforms comprising of: (1) specialized real properties; and (2) affordable housing real estate operation.  Within the next twelve months, we intend to use income generated from our three properties to hire employees that would help us to raise capital to build our company. 

 

We intend to implement the following tasks within the next twelve months:

 

  1. Month 1-3: Phase 1 (1-3 months in duration; complete rehabilitation of three properties and put them to good use)
    1. Identify 4 other properties to acquire
    2. Sign purchase agreement with the sellers of the 4 properties identified above;
    3. Acquire and consolidate the revenue from those four properties.
  2. Month 3-6 Phase 2 (1-3 months in duration; cost control, process improvements, admin & mngt.).
    1. Integrate acquired properties into NIHK’s model – consolidate the management of the properties including integration of their accounting and finance systems, synchronization of their operating systems, and harmonization of their human resources functions.
    2. Start Crowdfund Raise of $50 million and use the proceeds to effectuate our business plan.
    3. Complete and file quarterly reports and other required filings for the quarter
  3. Month 6-9:  Phase 3 (1-3 months in duration; $5 million in estimated fund receipt)
    1. Identify and acquire 4 specialized properties that are complementary/similar properties or assets in the target market
  4. Month 9-12: Phase 4  (1-3 months duration; use acquired businesses’ free cash flow for more acquisitions)
    1. Run the businesses efficiently, giving employees a conducive and friendly workplace and add value to investors and shareholders by identifying and reducing excesses and also identifying and executing growth strategies
    2. Acquire 4 more properties especially in regions where RE is at or below their book-value.  
  5. Operating expenses during the twelve months would be as follows:
    1. For the five months through December 31, 2020, we anticipate to incur general and other operating expenses of $238,000. 
    2. For the six months through July 31, 2021we anticipate to incur additional general and other operating expenses of $382,000. 

 

 

As noted above, the execution of our current plan of operations requires us to raise significant additional capital immediately. If we are successful in raising at least $620,000 in capital, we believe that the Company will have sufficient cash resources to fund its plan of operations for the next twelve months. If we are unable to do so, our ability to continue as a going concern will be in jeopardy, likely causing us to curtail and possibly cease operations.

 

We continually evaluate our plan of operations discussed above to determine the manner in which we can most effectively utilize our limited cash resources. The timing of completion of any aspect of our plan of operations is highly dependent upon the availability of cash to implement that aspect of the plan and other factors beyond our control. There is no assurance that we will successfully obtain the required capital or revenues, or, if obtained, that the amounts will be sufficient to fund our ongoing operations. The inability to secure additional capital would have a material adverse effect on us, including the possibility that we would have to sell or forego a portion or all of our assets or cease operations. If we discontinue our operations, we will not have sufficient funds to pay any amounts to our stockholders.

  

Because our working capital requirements depend upon numerous factors there can be no assurance that our current cash resources will be sufficient to fund our operations. At present, we have no committed external sources of capital, and do not expect any significant product revenues for the foreseeable future. Thus, we will require immediate additional financing to fund future operations. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be able to obtain funds on acceptable terms, if at all.

 

 

ITEM 3.

PROPERTIES.

 

We currently own three investment properties in Los Angeles California as at December 31, 2019.

Below is the schedule of our investment properties as at December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

   

Cost basis

 
   

2019

 

2018

 
         

 

5125 Harold Way #307

$

         555,031

 

$       -

 

SFR - 4904 S Wilton Place 90062

 

         530,739

 

-

 

SFR - 831 E 94TH ST 90002

 

         367,128

 

-

 

 

$

   1,452,897

 

$       -

 

 

On April 23, 2019, the Company acquired land and building located at 4904 S Wilton Place, Los Angeles, CA 90062, to hold as investment property for $498,983.51.  The Company plans to improve the property and then sell it for profit.  As at 12/31/2019, the Company had spent about $31,755 on its rehabilitation and improvement.

 

On April 24, the Company acquired land and building located at 831 E 94th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90002, for $325,000.   The Company plans to improve the property and then sell it for profit.  As at 12/31/2019, the Company had spent about $42,128 on its rehabilitation and improvement processes.

 


 

On the same April 24, the Company acquired a Condominium unit located at 5125 Harold Way #307, Los Angeles, CA 90027, for $540,000.   The Company plans to improve the property and then sell it for profit.  As at 12/31/2019, the Company had spent about $15,031 on its rehabilitation and improvement processes.

 

We do not own any commercial or industrial property as at the date of filing. 

 

Our principal business, executive and registered statutory office is located at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, CA 90501 and our telephone number is (310) 895-1839 and email contact is invest@cbdxfund.com. The space is a shared office space, which at the current time is suitable for the conduct of our business.

 

 

ITEM 4. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT.

 

The following table sets forth the beneficial ownership of shares of our common stock by (i) each person who is known to us to be the beneficial owner of more than 5% of our common stock; (ii) each director and named executive officer (defined above) individually; and (iii) all directors and executive officers as a group. Beneficial ownership of common stock has been determined for this purpose in accordance with Rules 13d-3 and 13d-5 of the Securities and Exchange Commission, under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These rules provide, among other things, that a person is deemed to be the beneficial owner of common stock if such person, directly or indirectly, has or shares voting power or investment power with respect to the common stock or has the right to acquire such ownership within sixty days after the date of this registration statement.

 

Title of Class

 

Name of Beneficial Owner

Amount and Nature

Percent of Class

Cumulative Voting

of Beneficial

Ownership

Power

           

Preferred stock

(a)

Frank I Igwealor

1

100%

60%

Common stock

(b)

Frank I Igwealor

30,769,230

18.11%

10%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock

(c)

Directors and officers as a group

30,769,230

18.11%

70%

 

NOTES:

(a)     The control share sold to CED Capital is convertible to 150 million shares of our Common stock. Same share reverted to Frank I Igwealor as part of the process of merging CED Capital into NIHK

 

(b)     Hire-on-Bonus paid to Mr. Igwealor upon his acceptance of the CEO position of the Company

 

(c)     As reported on 12/31/2008 and based on 169,922,436 shares of common stock outstanding as at December 31, 2019.

 

ITEM 5.

DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS.

 

The following table sets forth certain information regarding our current executive officers and directors as of December 31, 2019:


 

 

 

Name

 

Age*

 

Position within the Company

 

Term

Mr. Frank I Igwealor

 

48

 

Chairman, Director and Chief Executive and Financial Officer

 

October 2019 to present

Mr. Patience Ogbozor

 

34

 

Director

 

October 2019 to present

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Age as at December 31, 2019.

 

Term of Office

 

Each of our directors is appointed to hold office until the next annual meeting of our shareholders or until his respective successor is elected and qualified, or until she resigns or is removed in accordance with the provisions of the Nevada Statues.  Our officers are appointed by our board of directors and hold office until removed by the board of directors or until their resignation.

 

Background and Business Experience

 

The business experience during the past five years of the persons listed above as an Officer or Director of the Company either presently or during the year ended December 31, 2019 is as follows:

 

Frank Igwealor, CPA, CMA, JD, MBA, MSRM is a financial manager with broad technical and management experience in accounting, finance, and business advisory as a principal partner at Goldstein Franklin, Inc. since November 2011.  Mr. Igwealor is a Certified Financial Manager, Certified Management Accountant, and Certified Public Accountant.  Before Goldstein Franklin, Mr. Igwealor was the Sr. Vice President and CFO of Los Angeles Neighborhood Housing between May 2007 and October 2011. 

 

During the sixteen years prior to his joining Los Angeles Neighborhood Housing as the chief financial officer, Mr. Igwealor worked in various financial management, accounting, strategic planning, risk management, restructuring, recapitalization and turnaround capacities for various big and small businesses where he helped save or preserve about 252 American jobs that would have otherwise been lost through liquidations.

 

Mr. Igwealor’s business and professional experience include:

 

(a)     7/2007 to 10/2011 - SVP & CFO at Los Angeles Neighborhood Housing, Inc., one of Los Angeles largest affordable housing nonprofit agency.

(b)     11/2004 to 2015 – President and CEO of Igwealth Franklin, Inc., a Los Angeles private equity firm

(c)     03/2008 to present – Director at Poverty Solutions, Inc., a Los Angeles based nonprofit that designs and deploys programs that help low income families divest poverty through education, employment, and entrepreneurship.

(d)     11/2006 to 04/2007 – Assistant Controller at SDI Media Group, a Culver City, CA based translation and dubbing company.

(e)     03/2006 to 09/2006 – SEC Financial reporting analyst at OSI Systems, Inc., a Hawthorne CA based manufacturer.

(f)      11/2003 to 11/2004 – Financial Advisor at Morgan Stanley

 

Over the past 26 years in accounting and finance, Mr. Igwealor has always operated on the premise that a country’s most valuable asset is her human capital – and that job creation is the essential element to a true and sustainable economic and prosperity. 

 

During the past five years, Mr. Igwealor held the following directorships:


 

 

  1. Poverty Solutions, Inc.  – March 2008 to Present.
  2. Los Angeles Community Capital – April 2012 to Present.
  3. American Community Capital, LP.  – August 2013 to Present.
  4. Goldstein Franklin, Inc. – April 2012 to Present.

5.       Kid Castle Educational Corporation since October 2019

6.       GiveMePower Corporation since December 2019

 

Mr. Igwealor’s professional education includes (1) BA in Accounting from Union Institute & University; (2) BA in Economics from Union Institute & University; (3) MBA finance from California State University, Dominguez Hills; (4) Masters in Risk Management at New York University (in progress); and (5) Juris Doctor from Southwestern School of Law.

 

The company believes that someone with finance and accounting expertise as Mr. Igwealor would be invaluable to the company’s need of identifying the right acquisition candidates as well as performing due diligence on those targets.

 

 

Ms. Patience C. Ogbozor, Director: Ms. Ogbozor is the President and CEO of Cannabinoid Biosciences since November 2018.  Ms. Ogbozor is a Director of the Company. Ms. Ogbozor also serves as a director at Goldstein Franklin Inc., Kid Castle Educational Corporation, Video Rivers Networks, Inc. and Opportunity Zone Capital LLC. Prior to joining the company’s board, Ms. Ogbozor was with New Haven Pharmacy, Abuja, from 2013 to 2015. 

 

During the past five years, Ms. Ogbozor held the following directorships:

 

1.       Ms. Ogbozor has been serving as director Goldstein Franklin Inc. since June 1, 2015.

2.       Kid Castle Educational Corporation since October 2019

3.       GiveMePower Corporation since December 2019

4.       Opportunity Zone Capital LLC since February 18, 2020

 

All directors hold office until the next annual meeting of stockholders and the election and qualification of their successors.   Officers are elected annually by the board of directors and serve at the discretion of the board. 

 

Family Relationships

 

Except for Patience and Frank who have spousal relationship, none of our directors are related to any of our other directors and none have any pending legal claims or litigation against them.  

 

Compliance with Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act

 

Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act, as amended, will require our executive officers and directors and persons who own more than 10% of a registered class of our equity securities to file with the Securities and Exchange Commission initial statements of beneficial ownership, reports of changes in ownership and annual reports concerning their ownership of the our common stock and other equity securities, on Form 3, 4 and 5 respectively. Executive officers, directors and greater than 10% shareholders are required by the Securities and Exchange Commission regulations to furnish our company with copies of all Section 16(a) reports they file. Mr. Igwealor has filed all required reports under Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act.

 

Board Committee

 

The Company does not have a formal Audit Committee, Nominating Committee and Compensation Committee. As the Company’s business expands, the directors will evaluate the necessity of an Audit Committee.

 

Code of Ethics

 


 

We have adopted a corporate code of ethics. We believe our code of ethics is reasonably designed to deter wrongdoing and promote honest and ethical conduct; provide full, fair, accurate, timely and understandable disclosure in public reports; comply with applicable laws; ensure prompt internal reporting of code violations; and provide accountability for adherence to the code.  We adopted a Code of Ethics and Business Conduct which is applicable to our future employees and which also includes a Code of Ethics for our chief executive and principal financial officers and any persons performing similar functions. A code of ethics is a written standard designed to deter wrongdoing and to promote:

·

honest and ethical conduct,

·

full, fair, accurate, timely and understandable disclosure in regulatory filings and public statements,

·

compliance with applicable laws, rules and regulations,

·

the prompt reporting violation of the code, and

·

accountability for adherence to the code.

 

Our adopted a code of ethics applies to all our directors, officers and employees.   Our code of ethics is intended to comply with the requirements of Item 406 of Regulation S-K.

 

We will provide our code of ethics in print without charge to any stockholder who makes a written request to Frank I Igwealor, our President, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, at Video River Networks, Inc.,  370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, CA 90501.   Any waivers of the application, and any amendments to, our code of ethics must be made by our board of directors.   Any waivers of, and any amendments to, our code of ethics will be disclosed promptly on our Internet website.

 

 

ITEM 6.

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION.

 

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

 

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

 

As the Board of Directors does not have a Compensation Committee, the independent directors of the Board oversee the Company’s executive compensation program. We currently do not have independent directors on our Board.  Compensation for the CEO and the CFO is approved by the Independent Directors of the Board or the general Board. Compensation for other executive officers and senior management is determined by the CEO and CFO pursuant to the Board of Directors delegating to the CEO and CFO authority to do so.

 

Elements to Executive Compensation

 

The Company’s executive compensation program is designed to attract and retain executives responsible for the Company’s long-term success, to reward executives for achieving both financial and strategic company goals and to provide a compensation package that recognizes individual contributions as well as overall business results. The Company’s executive compensation program also takes into account the compensation practices of companies with whom Video River Networks, Inc. competes for executive talent.

 

The two components of the Company’s executive compensation program are base salary and annual discretionary bonuses. Overall compensation is intended to be competitive for comparable positions at peer companies.

 

Objectives. The objectives of the Company’s executive compensation policies are to attract and retain highly qualified executives by designing the total compensation package to motivate executives to provide excellent leadership and achieve Company goals; to align the interests of executives, employees, and stockholders by establishing cohesive management, financial, operation and marketing goals that reflect the Company’s strategic growth plan; and to provide executives with reasonable security, through retirement plan and annual discretionary bonuses that motivate them to continue employment with the Company and achieve goals that will make the Company thrive and remain competitive in the long-run.

 

Linkage between compensation programs and Company objective and values. We link executive compensation closely with the Company objectives, which we believe are dependent on the level of employee engagement, operational excellence, cost management and profitability achieved. Currently, the primary quantifiable measurement of operational excellence for the Company is the achievement of profitability, which is directly related to increasing annual revenue. Executives’ annual performance evaluations are based in part on their achievement of the aforementioned goals and in part on revenue targets that may be established by the Board of Directors at the beginning of each fiscal year. The Board of Directors has not set a specific revenue goal for the award of bonuses for fiscal 2008. The Company currently does not have a defined non-equity incentive plan in place for its named executives. Instead, the disinterested members of the Board of Directors determine if any annual discretionary bonuses should be awarded to named executives in conjunction with the named executives’ annual performance evaluations. As indicated in the table below, during the last three fiscal years, the Board of Directors has not elected to award any annual discretionary bonuses to any named executives.


 

 

The roles of various elements of compensation. Executive compensation includes base salary, annual discretionary bonuses awarded by the Board of Directors in conjunction with named executives’ annual performance evaluations and other annual compensation granted under the noncontributory defined benefit retirement plan. Collectively, the Board’s objective is to ensure a total pay package that is appropriate given the performance of both the Company and the individual named executive.

 

Governance practices concerning compensation. The Board of Directors has implemented a number of procedures that the Board follows to ensure good governance concerning compensation. These include setting CEO and CFO salaries, authorizing the CEO or the CFO to determine the salaries of presidents and vice presidents, including Mrs. Huang, President of Shanghai operations, establishing annual goals for the Company, reviewing proposals for stock incentive plans, exercising fiduciary responsibilities over retirement plans, overseeing management development and succession planning, and keeping adequate records of its activities.

 

Base Salary

 

Each executive’s base salary is initially determined with reference to competitive pay practices of peer companies (where such information is publicly available) and is dependent upon the executive’s level of responsibility and experience. The Board uses its discretion, rather than a formal weighting system, to evaluate these factors and to determine individual base salary levels. Thereafter, base salaries are reviewed periodically, and increases are made based on the Board of Director’s subjective assessment of individual performance, as well as the factors discussed above.

 

Annual Discretionary Bonuses

 

In future years we shall pay variable incentive compensation to our executives, however, due to our overall performance in 2019, our executive officers were not awarded bonuses.

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

The following table covers all compensation awarded to, earned by, or paid to the named executive officers.  The table sets forth information about the compensation paid or accrued by our chief executive officer, chief financial officer, and one other most highly compensated executive officer (our “named officers”) for the last three completed fiscal years:

 

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

 

 

 

Name and Principal Position

 

Year

 

Salary

($)

 

 

Bonus

($)

 

 

Stock

Awards

($)

 

 

Option

Awards

($)

 

 

Non-Equity

Incentive Plan

Compensation ($)

 

 

Nonqualified Deferred

Compensation

Earnings ($)

 

 

All Other

Compensation

($)

 

 

Total

($)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Frank I Igwealor

 

2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30,769

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(i)

 

 

30,769

 

Chair, CEO, CFO

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(ii)

 

 

 

 

 

2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(iii)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patience C Ogbozor, Director

 

2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(iv)

 

 

 

 

 

2018

 

 

   — 

 

 

 

— 

 

 

 

— 

 

 

 

— 

 

 

 

— 

 

 

 

— 

 

 

 

— 

 

(ii)

 

 

— 

 

 

 

2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(iii)

 

 

 


 

 

Notes:

 

(i)

A hire-on bonus of 30,769,230 shares issued to Mr. Igwealor

 

 

(ii)

The company did not record any officer compensation in 2018

 

 

(iii)

The company did not record any officer compensation in 2017

(iv)

Miss Ogbozor have not received any compensation from the company.

 

 

Stock Option Grants in the Last Fiscal Year; Exercises of Stock Options

 

There were no grants of stock options during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019. The Company has never granted any stock options.

 

 

 

ITEM 7.

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions

 

Our officers and directors are Mr. Igwealor, our chief executive officer and secretary, and Ms patience C Ogbozor, a Director are also directors of Goldstein Franklin Inc.

 

Except for the $1,459,971 zero interest loan from Los Angeles Community Capital, an entity controlled by Mr. Igwealor, to CED Capital, there were no related parties transactions during the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Loan From a Related Party

 

Loan – On April 2, 2019, CED Capital entered into a Loan agreement in the amount of $1,459,971 with Los Angeles Community Capital (the “Lender”), which is controlled by Frank I. Igwealor, Chief Executive Officer of the Company. The maturity date of the Loan is the earlier of April 1, 2024 or whenever any of the properties securing the loan is sold. The Loan bears interest at 0% per annum, however, upon the sale of any property purchased with the loan, the lender would receive a developer fee of 10% of sale price/amount of each property sold that was bought with the loan. 

 

Review, Approval and Ratification of Related Party Transactions

 

Given our small size and limited financial resources, we have not adopted formal policies and procedures for the review, approval or ratification of transactions, such as those described above, with our executive officer(s), Director(s) and significant stockholders. We intend to establish formal policies and procedures in the future, once we have sufficient resources and have appointed additional Directors, so that such transactions will be subject to the review, approval or ratification of our Board of Directors, or an appropriate committee thereof. On a moving forward basis, our Directors will continue to approve any related party transaction.


 

 

Director Independence

 

Our board of directors is currently composed of Mr. Igwealor, our chief executive officer and secretary, and Ms patience C Ogbozor, a Director.  Neither of them qualifies as an independent director in accordance with the published listing requirements of the NASDAQ Global Market. The NASDAQ independence definition includes a series of objective tests, such as that the director is not, and has not been for at least three years, one of our employees and that neither the director, nor any of his family members has engaged in various types of business dealings with us. In addition, our board of directors has not made a subjective determination as to each director that no relationships exist which, in the opinion of our board of directors, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director, though such subjective determination is required by the NASDAQ rules. Had our board of directors made these determinations, our board of directors would have reviewed and discussed information provided by the directors and us with regard to each director’s business and personal activities and relationships as they may relate to us and our management.

 

 

ITEM 8.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

 

From time to time we may be involved in litigation relating to claims arising out of the operation of our business in the normal course of business. Other than as described below, as of the date of this Registration Statement we are not aware of potential dispute or pending litigation and are not currently involved in a litigation proceeding or governmental actions the outcome of which in management’s opinion would be material to our financial condition or results of operations. An adverse result in these or other matters may have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results.

 

On February 20, 2019, Plaintiff Maria De Lourdes Perez filed a complaint against defendants City of Carson, Goldstein Franklin, Inc., Frank Igwealor, Healthy Foods Markets, LLC, Optimal Foods, LLC, and Blockchain Capital LLC.  The complaint alleged statutory liability pursuant to government code section 835, gross negligence, and premises liability for a trip-and-fall that occurred on April 11, 2018 at a property owned and controlled by Healthy Foods Markets, LLC. Defendants Goldstein Franklin, Inc., Frank Igwealor, Optimal Foods, LLC, and Blockchain Capital LLC. had answered the complaint and also requested a demurrer on the grounds that (1) Defendants are not a proper party in interest and there was a misjoinder of defendants.  Our attorney has advised that the complaint would not have an adverse impact on Mr. Igwealor or the Company because the scope of liability is restricted to healthy Food Markets, LLC.

 

As of December 31, 2019, except for the complaint listed above, there was no material proceeding to which any of our directors, officers, affiliates or stockholders is a party adverse to us.  During the past ten years, no present director, executive officer or person nominated to become a director or an executive officer of us:

 

(1) had a petition under the federal bankruptcy laws or any state insolvency law filed by or against, or a receiver, fiscal agent or similar officer appointed by a court for the business or property of such person, or any partnership in which he was a general partner at or within two years before the time of such filing, or any corporation or business association of which he was an executive officer at or within ten years before the time of such filing;

 

(2) was convicted in a criminal proceeding or subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);

 

(3) was subject to any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining him from or otherwise limiting his involvement in any of the following activities:

 

i. acting as a futures commission merchant, introducing broker, commodity trading advisor commodity pool operator, floor broker, leverage transaction merchant, any other person regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, or an associated person of any of the foregoing, or as an investment adviser, underwriter, broker or dealer in securities, or as an affiliated person, director or employee of any investment company, bank, savings and loan association or insurance company, or engaging in or continuing any conduct or practice in connection with such activity;


 

 

ii. engaging in any type of business practice; or

 

iii. engaging in any activity in connection with the purchase or sale of any security or commodity or in connection with any violation of federal or state securities laws or federal commodities laws; or

 

(4) was the subject of any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of an federal or state authority barring, suspending or otherwise limiting for more than 60 days the right of such person to engage in any activity described in paragraph (3) (i), above, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity; or

 

(5) was found by a court of competent jurisdiction (in a civil action), the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and for which the judgment has not been reversed, suspended or vacated.

 

 

ITEM 9.

MARKET PRICE OF AND DIVIDENDS ON THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

(a)     Market for Common Equity

Our common stock trades on the OTC market ("Pinksheet") under the symbol "NIHK". The high and low bid quotations for our common stock were as follows for the periods below (as reported by OTC Market Pink Sheet).

 

The market prices noted below were obtained from the OTC market and reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not represent actual transactions. For the periods indicated, the following table sets forth the high and low bid prices per share of common stock based on inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not represent actual transactions.

 

The quotations below reflect inter-dealer prices without retail markup, markdown, or commission, and may not represent actual transactions:

 

Six Months Ended on June 30, 2020

 

High Bid

 

 

Low Bid

 

st Quarter

 

 

0.0047

 

 

 

0.0015

 

nd Quarter

 

 

0.0040

 

 

 

0.0019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Fiscal Year Ended on December 31, 2019

 

High Bid

 

 

Low Bid

 

st Quarter

 

 

0.0010

 

 

 

0.0004

 

nd Quarter

 

 

0.0013

 

 

 

0.0004

 

rd Quarter

 

 

0.0080

 

 

 

0.0008

 

th Quarter

 

 

0.0100

 

 

 

0.0031

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal Year Ended on December 31, 2018

 

High Bid

 

 

Low Bid

 

st Quarter

 

 

0.0007

 

 

 

0.0007

 

nd Quarter

 

 

0.0017

 

 

 

0.0017

 

rd Quarter

 

 

     0.0009

 

 

 

0.0009

 

th Quarter

 

 

0.0008

 

 

 

0.0004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                   

 


 

 

 

(b)   Security Holders

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had 169,922,436 shares of our Common Stock, par value $.001.  The number of record holders of our common stock at December 31, 2019 was 164 according to our transfer agent. This figure excludes an indeterminate number of shareholders whose shares are held in "street" or "nominee" name.

 

(c)    Dividend Policy

 

There have been no cash dividends declared or paid on the Company’s common stock since the inception of the Company, and no cash dividends are contemplated in the foreseeable future. The Company may consider a potential dividend in the future in either common stock or the stock of future operating subsidiaries.

 

(d)     Transfer Agent and Registrar

 

The transfer agent for our capital stock is Issuer Direct Corporation, with an address of 1981 Murray Holladay Rd Suite 100, SLC UT 84117, with a telephone of 801-272-9294.

 

(e)      Penny Stock Regulations

 

The Securities and Exchange Commission has adopted regulations which generally define “penny stock” to be an equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share. Our Common Stock is currently within the definition of a penny stock and will be subject to rules that impose additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers who sell such securities to persons other than established customers and accredited investors (generally those with assets in excess of $1,000,000, or annual incomes exceeding $200,000 individually, or $300,000, together with their spouse). 

 

For transactions covered by these rules, the broker-dealer must make a special suitability determination for the purchase of such securities and have received the purchaser’s prior written consent to the transaction. Additionally, for any transaction, other than exempt transactions, involving a penny stock, the rules require the delivery, prior to the transaction, of a risk disclosure document mandated by the SEC relating to the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must disclose the commissions payable to both the broker-dealer and the registered representative, current quotations for the securities and, if the broker-dealer is the sole market-maker, the broker-dealer must disclose this fact and the broker-dealer’s presumed control over the market. Finally, monthly statements must be sent disclosing recent price information for the penny stock held in the account and information on the limited market in penny stocks. Consequently, the “penny stock” rules may restrict the ability of broker-dealers to sell our Common Stock and may affect the ability of investors to sell their Common Stock in the secondary market.

 

In addition to the “penny stock” rules promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) has adopted rules that require that in recommending an investment to a customer, a broker-dealer must have reasonable grounds for believing that the investment is suitable for that customer. Prior to recommending speculative low priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status, investment objectives and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, FINRA believes that there is a high probability that speculative low-priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. The FINRA requirements make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our Common Stock, which may limit the investors’ ability to buy and sell our stock.

 

(f)      Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

Currently, there is no equity compensation plan in place.  In November 2019, the Company created its “2019 INCENTIVE COMPENSATION PLAN,” which it plans to use to incentivize the hiring of top real estate talents to implement our business plan.  The plan is subject to Form S-8 statement and subsequent amendments heretofor, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 27, 2019. 


 

 

(g)     Purchases of Equity Securities by the Registrant and Affiliated Purchasers

 

We have not repurchased any shares of our common stock during the fiscal years ended December 31 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

 

ITEM 10.

RECENT SALES OF UNREGISTERED SECURITIES.

 

The following information represents securities sold by the Company within the past three years which were not registered under the Securities Act. Included are sales of reacquired securities, as well as new issues, securities issued in exchange for property, services, or other securities, and new securities resulting from the modification of outstanding securities.

 

On October 29, 2019, the company sold one (1) Special 2019 series A preferred share (one preferred share is convertible 150,000,000 share of common stocks) of the company for Fifty Thousand and 00/100 ($50,000/00) Dollars, to CED Capital. The Special preferred share controls 60% of the company’s total voting rights. The issuance of the preferred share to CED Capital gave to CED Capital, the controlling vote to control and dominate the affairs of the company going forward.  The purchase was made pursuant to the exemption from registration including, but not limited to, Section 506 of Reg. D and Section 4.1.

 

The securities described immediately above were issued to investors in reliance upon an exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as set forth in Section 4(2) under the Securities Act of 1933 and Rule 504, 505 or 506 of Regulation D promulgated thereunder relative to sales by an issuer not involving any public offering, to the extent an exemption from such registration was required. The purchaser of the securities described immediately above this paragraph represented to us in connection with their purchase that they were accredited investors and were acquiring the shares for investment purposes only and not for distribution, that they could bear the risks of the investment and could hold the securities for an indefinite period of time.

 

The purchasers received written disclosures that the securities had not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933 and that any resale must be made pursuant to a registration statement or an available exemption from such registration. Each participant in the offering or offerings described above was given access to full and complete information regarding us, together with the opportunity to meet with our officers and directors for purposes of asking questions and receiving answers in order to facilitate such participant's independent evaluation of the risks associated with the purchase of our securities.

 

On November 13, 2019, the Company paid to Mr. Frank I Igwealor (“Candidate”), a Sign-On Bonus of 30,769,230 shares of its common stocks.   The Parties agree that the Bonus would be vested upon Candidate’s acceptance of the job.  Candidate would have earned the bonus by accepting to be employed by the Company.  Fair Market Value. The fair market value of the stock awarded under the agreement was uncertain because the stock is currently trading on the pink sheet and is illiquid.  However, for accounting purposes, the Company used the par value of $0.001 to calculate recognition of employment expenses in the amount of $30,769 for the award.

 

 

ITEM 11.

DESCRIPTION OF REGISTRANT’S SECURITIES TO BE REGISTERED.

 

Common Stock

 

This Form 10 relates to our common stock, $0.001 par value per share (the “Common Stock”). We are authorized to issue 1,200,000,000 shares of Common Stock. We are also authorized to issue 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.001(the “Preferred Stock”). As of December 31, 2019, there were 169,922,436 shares of Common Stock and 1 shares of Preferred Stock outstanding.

 

The holders of our Common Stock have equal ratable rights to dividends from funds legally available therefore, when, as and if declared by our board of directors. Holders of Common Stock are also entitled to share ratably in all of our assets available for distribution to holders of Common Stock upon liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the affairs.


 

  

The holders of shares of our Common Stock do not have cumulative voting rights, which means that the holders of more than 50% of such outstanding shares, voting for the election of directors, can elect all of the directors to be elected, if they so choose and in such event, the holders of the remaining shares will not be able to elect any of our directors. The holders of 50% percent of the outstanding Common Stock constitute a quorum at any meeting of shareholders, and the vote by the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares or a majority of the shareholders at a meeting at which quorum exists are required to effect certain fundamental corporate changes, such as liquidation, merger or amendment of our articles of incorporation.

 

Preferred Stock

 

We have authority to issue 10,000,000 shares of “blank check” Preferred Stock. Our Board of Directors may issue the authorized Preferred Stock in one or more series and may fix the number of shares of each series of preferred stock. Our Board of Directors also has the authority to set the voting powers, designations, preferences and relative, participating, optional or other special rights of each series of Preferred Stock, including the dividend rights, dividend rate, terms of redemption, redemption price or prices, conversion and voting rights and liquidation preferences. Preferred Stock can be issued and its terms set by our Board of Directors without any further vote or action by our stockholders.

 

Series A Preferred Stock

 

As of December 31, 2019, there are 1 special Preferred Stock share issued and outstanding. The Preferred shares (i) vote on all matters with the holders of common stock as if each shares of Series A was converted into 150,000,000 shares of common stock; and, (ii) are convertible into shares of common stock, at any time in the discretion of the holders of the special preferred shares, at a ratio of 150,000,000 shares of common stock for each share of special preferred share.

 

ITEM 12.

INDEMNIFICATION OF DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS.

 

Under our Bylaws, every person who was or is a party to, or is threatened to be made a party to, or is involved in any action, suit, or proceeding, whether civil, criminal, administrative, or investigative, by reason of the fact that he, or a person of whom he is the legal representative, is or was a director or officer of the Company, or is or was serving at the request of the Company as a director or officer of another corporation, or as its representative in a partnership, joint venture, trust, or other enterprise, shall be indemnified and held harmless to the fullest extent legally permissible under the laws of the State of Nevada from time to time against all expenses, liability, and loss (including attorneys’ fees judgments, fines, and amounts paid or to be paid in settlement) reasonably incurred or suffered by him in connection therewith. Such right of indemnification shall be a contract right, which may be enforced in any manner desired by such person. The expenses of officers and directors incurred in defending a civil or criminal action, suit, or proceeding must be paid by the Company as they are incurred and in advance of the final disposition of the action, suit, or proceeding, upon receipt of an undertaking by or on behalf of the director or officer to repay the amount if it is ultimately determined by a court of competent jurisdiction that he is not entitled to be indemnified by the company. Such right of indemnification shall not be exclusive of any other right which such directors, officers, or representatives may have or hereafter acquire, and, without limiting the generality of such statement, they shall be entitled to their respective rights of indemnification under any bylaw, agreement, vote of shareholders, provision of law, or otherwise.

 

Without limiting the application of the foregoing, the Board of Directors may adopt bylaws from time to time with respect to indemnification, to provide at all times the fullest indemnification permitted by the laws of the State of Nevada, and may cause the Company to purchase and maintain insurance on behalf of any person who is or was a director or officer of the Company, or is or was serving at the request of the Company as a director or officer of another corporation, or as its representative in a partnership, joint venture, trust, or other enterprise against any liability asserted against such person and incurred in any such capacity or arising out of such status, whether or not the Company would have the power to indemnify such person. The indemnification provided shall continue as to a person who has ceased to be a director, officer, employee, or agent, and shall inure to the benefit of the heirs, executors and administrators of such person.


 

 

Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act of 1933 may be permitted to directors, officers or persons controlling the Company pursuant to the foregoing provisions, the Company has been informed that in the opinion of the SEC such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is therefore unenforceable.

 

We have not entered into any agreements with our directors and executive officers that require us to indemnify these persons against expenses, judgments, fines, settlements and other amounts actually and reasonably incurred (including expenses of a derivative action) in connection with any proceeding, whether actual or threatened, to which any such person may be made a party by reason of the fact that the person is or was a director or officer of our Company or any of our affiliated enterprises. We do not maintain any policy of directors’ and officers’ liability insurance that insures its directors and officers against the cost of defense, settlement or payment of a judgment under any circumstances.

 

ITEM 13.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA.

 

Our financial statements, notes thereto and the related independent registered accounting firm’s report are set forth immediately following the signature page to this registration statement beginning at page F-1 and are incorporated herein by reference.

 

ITEM 14.

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING

AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.

 

None.

 

 

ITEM 15.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND EXHIBITS.

 

(a) Financial Statements

 

The following financial statements are being filed as part of this Registration Statement:

 

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

   
     
   

Page

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

F-1

 

 

 

For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

F-2

Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

F-3

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Deficit

 

F-4

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

F-5

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

F-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

 

 

 


 

Dylan Floyd Accounting & Consulting

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

 

To the Shareholders and the Board of Directors

Video River Networks Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Video River Networks Inc. (the "Company") as of December 31, 2019, the related statements of operations, changes in stockholders' equity, in the period ended December 31, 2019, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the "financial statements"). The December 31, 2018 had not been audited and was included for comparative presentation purpose only. In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows in the period ended December 31,  2019, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company's financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) ("PCAOB") and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.


 

 

The Company's financial statements are prepared using the generally accepted accounting principles applicable to a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has an accumulated deficit of $19,150,865 for the year ended December 31, 2019. These factors as discussed in Note 2 of the financial statements raise substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern. Management's plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 2. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of these uncertainties.

 

 

Albert Garcia, CPA

Dylan Floyd Accounting & Consulting

 

We have served as the Company's auditor since 2020.

 

Newhall, California

May 28, 2020

 

 

 

 


 

VIDEO RIVER NETWORKS INC

BALANCE SHEETS

As of December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DECEMBER 31,

 

 

2019

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

$

                850

 

$

0

 

Marketable Securities

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

Total Current Assets

 

 

                850

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real Estate Holdings

 

 

1,452,897

 

$

0

 

Fixed Assets

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

       1,452,897

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Assets

 

$

       1,453,747

 

$

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts Payable

 

$

 

 

$

0

 

Loans – Related Parties

 

 

       1,459,971

 

 

 

 

Total Current Liabilities

 

 

1,459,971

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

 

 

1,459,971

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholders' Deficit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $.001 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized, 1 issued and outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock ($0.001 par value)

 

 

 

 

 

—  

 

200,000,000 shares authorized, no par 139,153,206 and 169,922,436 issued and outstanding on 12/31/2018 and 2019

 

 

169,922

 

 

139,153

 

Additional Paid-In Capital

 

 

18,974,719

 

 

18,974,719

 

Accumulated Deficit

 

 

     (19,150,865)

 

 

    (19,113,872)

 

Other Comprehensive Income/Loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Shareholders' Equity

 

 

          (6,224)

 

 

                  -  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Liabilities and Shareholders' Deficit

 

$

       1,453,747

 

$

                  -  

 

               

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these audited financial statements

 

 

 

 

 


 

VIDEO RIVER NETWORKS INC

 

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 
                 
         
   

DECEMBER 31,

   

2019

 

2018

   

 

   

REVENUE

 

$

                  -  

 

 

$

—  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COST OF SALES

 

 

                  -  

 

 

 

0

 

                 

GROSS PROFIT

 

 

                  -  

 

 

 

0

 

                 

EXPENSES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative expenses

 

 

36,993

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Expenses

 

 

36,993

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPERATING PROFIT/LOSS

 

 

           (36,993)

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE TAXES

 

 

      (36,993)

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TAXES

 

 

          0

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET INCOME (LOSS)

 

$

      (36,993)

 

 

$

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss) per Common Share: Basic and Diluted

 

$

(0.000189)

 

 

$

0.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding: Basic and Diluted

 

 

196,223,806

 

 

 

139,153,206

 

                 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these audited financial statements

 
                 
                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIDEO RIVER NETWORKS INC

 

STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT

 

Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

                       

 

             

Additional

       

 

   

Common

       

Paid-In

 

Accumulated

   

 

 

 

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