Annual Report (10-k)

Date : 09/28/2018 @ 5:54PM
Source : Edgar (US Regulatory)
Stock : Interlink Plus (PC) (ITRK)
Quote : 0.00408  0.0 (0.00%) @ 9:10PM

Annual Report (10-k)

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-K


[X]

ANNUAL REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2018

 

 

[  ]

TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT

 

 

 

For the transition period from _________ to ________

 

 

 

Commission file number : 000-55591


Interlink Plus, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada

47-3975872

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

 

4952 S Rainbow Blvd, Suite 326

Las Vegas, NV

89118

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)


Registrant’s telephone number: 702-824-7047


Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:

 

 

Title of each class

Name of each exchange on which registered

 

None

Not applicable


Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act:

 

 

Title of each class

 

Common Stock, par value $0.0001


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [ ] No [X]


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes [ ] No [X]


Indicate by checkmark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes [X] No [ ]


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X] No [ ]






Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [ ]


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.


Large accelerated filer [ ] Accelerated filer [ ] Non-accelerated filer [ ] Smaller reporting company [X]

Emerging growth company [X]


If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [  ]


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [ ] No [X]


State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter. $188,055


Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date. 67,373,008 common shares issued and outstanding as of September 24, 2018.


























ii




[ITRK10K2.GIF]



TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

PART I

1

 

 

Item 1. Business

1

Item 1A. Risk Factors

4

Item 2. Properties

13

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

13

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

13

 

 

PART II

13

 

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

13

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

15

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

15

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

17

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

17

Item 9. Changes In and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

18

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

18

Item 9B. Other Information

19

 

 

PART III

19

 

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

19

Item 11. Executive Compensation

23

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

24

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

24

Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services

24

 

 

PART IV

25

 

 

Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statements Schedules

25

 

 

SIGNATURES

26











iii




PART I


Item 1. Business


Company Overview


Our business is divided into two major segments: travel agency assistance services and convention services.


We are a start-up company that was formed on May 11, 2015. To the present, we have engaged in formation activities, raising capital, and commencing operations. We have signed services contract with multiple travel agents to assist with hotel room price quotation and negotiation and communicating with hotels to ensure that accurate reservations are made with Chinese clientele. Through June 30, 2018, we have generated revenue from our agreement with our clients. We earned $86,715 and $45,400 in revenues for the years ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively. We are also hopeful that we will engage in other contracts for the services outlined below.


We require additional capital necessary for us to grow our business. Our initial plans include: hiring necessary personnel, marketing our business, completing our website, purchasing equipment and software and further developing the service offering. Our business plan calls for capital of approximately $250,000 in the next twelve months. There is no assurance that we will be successful in these endeavors or that if we accomplish all of these steps we will be able to operate profitably. We intend to fulfill the service needs of our potential customers by utilizing resources and employees in the United States, but, as we grow, we believe we can reduce costs and increase margins by utilizing personnel in foreign countries, such as China, to fulfill the services on behalf of our customers.


Through our services, we believe that clients will be able to gain the advantage of maintaining their growth goals without the need to sacrifice precious resources to address standard business bottlenecks. Our goal is to allow firms to retain their entrepreneurial speed and agility, advantages they would otherwise sacrifice in dealing with logistics rather than the specific focus of the client’s business. We plan to allow clients to grow at a faster pace as they will be less constrained by large capital expenditures for people, training, equipment, or mistakes made from lack of experience in areas which are unrelated to the client’s specific business purpose.


Travel Agency Assistance


We provide services for overseas travel agents on hotel price quotation and negotiation, contract reviewing, detailed guests’ arrangements, hotel check-in assistance and tradeshow assistance. Overseas travel agents often encounter language barriers and time differences on office hours when dealing with U.S. based hotels and U.S. based conventions. We believe that our bilingual language services, flexible office hours, and reasonable fee structure will help our clients to increase accuracy and efficiency levels, and reduce costs.


Currently, we service 8 overseas and domestic travel agencies. These travel agencies work with exhibition service agents or travel groups in China to coordinate the travel plans of tour groups that plan on attending exhibitions in the U.S.  Depending on the event, these tour groups can range from 20 to over 700 people. It is vital for the travel agents and exhibition services agents to provide their clients - Chinese businesses who exhibit in the trade show, a seamless and worry-free trip.


Our role is to help the travel agencies communicate with hotels and convention staff timely and accurately, including finding and negotiating hotel rate, reviewing and updating contracts, submitting and revising guest lists, group check-in (pick up and sorting the room keys for different groups), communicating on bill differences, etc.  We currently have bilinguals that are fluent in English and Chinese. We plan to expand our staff of bilinguals to cater to other languages and countries other than China. Our main focus at the present time is to establish a presence in China and we intend to branch out to other Asian countries from there as resources permit.


In November 2016, we became a certified travel agency. Additionally, we became an affiliate partner with booking.com and the Expedia TAAP program. We hope these recent events will help us increase revenue in the future.



1



Convention Services


Our second business segment is catering to the individual exhibitors at the exhibitions. Exhibitors/ attendees often have temporary assistance needs at conventions and trade shows. We assist these clients on booth set up, tradeshow promotion material preparing, entourage interpreter and/or exhibitor booth personnel arrangements, including bilingual spokespersons, sales associates, narrators and demonstrators, hostesses/hosts, promoters and models.



We are also able to provide custom and pre-made booths, booth graphic design, and exhibit booth setup services to our clients. For clients looking for complete tradeshow exhibit booths, we provide turnkey solutions for sale. We offer top of the range Tablets, TV screens with stands, tables, and chairs, storage bins among others, to ensure that your tradeshow booth is highly inviting. We are able to work with clients on their required specifications and our staff is capable of delivery and assembly of attractive booth designs.


We have limited clients in this business segment. We plan to utilize our travel agency and exhibition service agent contacts to reach out to these exhibitors and establish direct connections for our exhibition services.  We may also work though these vital contacts as an extension of their services to these clientele.  Furthermore, because we have a U.S. presence, we plan to reach out to the U.S. exhibitions to offer our services to these clientele.


Management, Employees and Consulting


We currently do not compensate our officer and director, Duan Fu. We plan to compensate him when we have enough money to do so. His main function is to oversee the entire plan of the company and engage in the day to day operations. His expertise is in design and business management. We expect that he will be instrumental in our marketing and advertising efforts. He will purchase keywords on Google AdWords to drive traffic to our website, and also purchase email lists and send bulk email to small and medium sized businesses to generate interest. We do not anticipate that we will enter into an employment agreement with Mr. Duan or compensate him with significant cash in the twelve months. We plan to provide him around $2,000 in cash monthly if and when it is available. As of June 30, 2018, we have not compensated Mr. Fu, since we want to utilize our capital on business operations and growth.


We have a consulting agreement with Zixiao Chen. Ms. Chen was a prior officer and director. She assisted with our formation activities and resigned shortly after our incorporation, opting for a consultant capacity with our company. In her agreement, dated July 11, 2015, we initially compensated her monthly with 60,000 shares of our common stock or $3,000. On July 1, 2017, we entered into a new consulting agreement with Ms. Chen.  Her responsibilities include overseeing the business accounts, dealing with clients and expanding the company’s sales efforts. She will assist with creating timelines, data entry, plans and budgets for our clients. She will also establish the training program to train new employees on delivering the services, oversee and respond to concerns with our outsourced personnel. Her agreement provides her monthly compensation in the form of 300,000 shares of common stock or $3,000, payable at our discretion. After the initial year, we are required to compensate her in cash.


We have a consulting agreement with Desert Skyline Resources, LLC (“Desert Skyline”).  On July 15, 2017, we entered into an agreement with Desert Skyline to assist with business connections, marketing and business development.  All amounts owed have been paid.


We plan to hire a sales manager when funds are available. The sales manager will hire sales people for each geographical region. Sales staff will call leads generated from our marketing efforts, including mailing lists, and will engage in other sales techniques, like attending trade shows and networking. This sales manager will review and sign our service contracts with new customers. If we are able to raise the money, we plan to compensate our sales manager around $3,000 per month, plus commissions when available from sales. We anticipate hiring three members to our sales team when funds are available, hopefully within the next three months. Each sales staff member will make approximately $1,000 per month, plus commissions when available from sales.


We will also need to hire client account and customer service personnel. Ms. Chen will head the efforts of these personnel. They will assist her with working the accounts and service needs of our clients. We anticipate hiring one or two members to our accounts/service team when funds are available. Each member will make approximately $1,500-$2,000 per month.



2



Marketing and Sales


We expect that most of our clients will be reached via email and phone calls from our sales personnel. As explained above, as business grows and we raise enough funds, we plan to hire employees. We also plan to rent a physical office. We plan to spend approximately $5,000 per month on Google Adwords, Paper-per-click (PPC), search engine marketing (SEM), search engine optimization (SEO) and other forms of online marketing. We will spend approximately $3,000 per month on purchasing email lists and engaging in print advertising with trade magazines and journals. These will be the main focus objectives with our marketing and sales budget for the next twelve months.


Website Development


We developed our website where we provide detailed information regarding our client services and the ability for clients to provide feedback on the types of services they needs from us. We will continue to refine the site, as funds are available, to provide more features and tools as our business operations dictate.


Equipment and Software


In order to provide computers and software for our employees, we expect to spend around $50,000 in the next twelve months.


Legal and Accounting


Our primary priority will be to retain our reporting status with the SEC, which means that we will first ensure that we have sufficient capital to cover our legal and accounting expenses. We estimate that these expenses will be $30,000 in the next twelve months.


Offices


Currently, we have a mailbox address, but no office space. Our officer and consultants operate virtually. If the business grows and we successfully raise money, we plan to secure office space to conduct our operations. We estimate that we will need approximately 800 square feet of space and we estimate that it will cost us $1,000 - $1,500 per month in rent.


We will also have general and administrative expenses, including phone, utilities, insurance, business licenses and incidental expenses. These are estimated at approximately $5,000 for the next twelve months.


Our continuation in business after the expiration of one year and the employment of significant additional staff, will be dependent upon our achievement of profits from operations and/or obtaining capital from third party investors. Eventually, assuming our initial success in generating operating profits and raising capital from third party investors, management plans to expand the scope of our services and to begin to utilize foreign workers to fulfill our customer’s service needs.


Competition


Competition in all aspects of the outsourced services and business services industry is intense. We will compete against established outsourced business services companies with name familiarity and greater financial resources. We intend to use our relatively small size to our advantage by focusing on customer service and by deploying unique marketing strategies. A large part of our effort to compete against the other companies in our field will be directed to being recognized in this market of large players and, as a small company, to gain the trust of purchasing decision makers at our potential customers. In an effort to effectively compete, we will focus heavily on providing excellent service to our customers. We also intend to compete by running cutting edge marketing campaigns that use the internet and other technologies to educate the market about our services. Competitors may seek to duplicate the benefits of our services in ways that do not infringe on any benefits that our services offer. As a result we could find that our entire marketing plan and business model is undercut or made irrelevant by actions of other companies under which we have no control. We cannot promise that we can accomplish our marketing goals and as a result may experience negative impact upon our operating results.



3



Regulation


Federal, state and international laws and regulations impose a number of requirements and restrictions on our business. There are state and federal consumer protection laws that apply to our customer management services business, such as laws limiting telephonic sales or mandating special disclosures, and laws that apply to information that may be captured, used, shared and/or retained when sales are made and/or collections are attempted. State and federal laws also impose limits on credit account interest rates and fees, and their disclosure, as well as the time frame in which judicial actions may be initiated to enforce the collection of consumer accounts. There are numerous other federal, state, local and even international laws and regulations related to, among other things, privacy, identity theft, telephonic and electronic communications, sharing and use of consumer information that apply to our business and to our employees’ interactions and communications with others. For example, the Federal Trade Commission's Telemarketing Sales Rule applies a number of limitations and restrictions on our ability to make outbound calls on behalf of our clients and our ability to encourage customers to purchase higher value products and services on inbound calls. Similarly, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991, which among other things governs the use of certain automated calling technologies, applies to calls to customers. Many states also have telemarketing laws that may apply to our business, even if the call originates from outside the state. Additionally, some of the laws directed toward credit originators, such as the Truth in Lending Act and the Fair Credit Billing Act, can affect our operations because our receivables were originated through credit transactions. These laws, among others, may give consumers a legal cause of action against us or may limit our ability to recover amounts owed with respect to the receivables.


Federal and state regulators are empowered to examine and take enforcement actions for violations of these laws and regulations or for practices, policies or procedures they deem non-compliant, unfair, unsafe or unsound. Moreover, lawsuits may be brought by appropriate regulatory agencies, attorneys general and private parties for non-compliance with these laws and regulations. Accordingly, a failure to comply with the laws and regulations applicable to our business could have a material adverse effect on us.


New consumer protection and privacy protection laws or regulations are likely to impose additional requirements on the enforcement of and recovery on consumer credit card or installment accounts, telephonic sales, Internet communications and other portions of our business. We cannot ensure that some of the receivables were not established as a result of identity theft or unauthorized use of credit and, accordingly, we will not be able to recover the amount of these and other defaulted consumer receivables. As a purchaser of defaulted consumer receivables, we may acquire receivables subject to legitimate defenses on the part of the consumer. In general, our account purchase contracts allow us to return to the debt seller certain defaulted consumer receivables that may not be collectible, due to these and other circumstances. Upon return, the debt sellers are required to replace the receivables with similar receivables or repurchase the receivables. These provisions limit, to some extent, our potential losses on such accounts.


Employees


We currently have no employees other than our sole officer and director, Mr. Fu. Our officer serves us on a part time basis and is not compensated at this time. We also hired Ms. Zixiao Chen and Desert Skyline as our business consultants.


Item 1A. Risk Factors


The following risk factors could materially affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations. These risk factors and other information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K should be carefully considered in evaluating our business. They are provided for investors as permitted by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. It is not possible to identify or predict all such factors and, therefore, the following should not be considered to be a complete statement of all the uncertainties we face.






4



Risks Related to Our Financial Condition and Business


Because we have a limited operating history, you may not be able to accurately evaluate our operations.


We are a startup company. We have had limited operations to date and have generated limited revenues. Therefore, we have a limited operating history upon which to evaluate the merits of investing in our company. Potential investors should be aware of the difficulties normally encountered by new companies and the high rate of failure of such enterprises. The likelihood of success must be considered in light of the problems, expenses, difficulties, complications and delays encountered in connection with the operations that we plan to undertake.  These potential problems include, but are not limited to, unanticipated problems relating to the ability to generate sufficient cash flow to operate our business, and additional costs and expenses that may exceed current estimates. We expect to incur significant losses into the foreseeable future. We recognize that if the effectiveness of our business plan is not forthcoming, we will not be able to continue business operations. There is no history upon which to base any assumption as to the likelihood that we will prove successful, and it is doubtful that we will continue to generate operating revenues or ever achieve profitable operations.  If we are unsuccessful in addressing these risks, our business will most likely fail.


Our investors may lose their entire investment because our financial status creates a doubt whether we will continue as a going concern.


Our auditors, in their opinion provided for our fiscal year end June 30, 2018 audited financial statements and notes thereto, have stated that currently we do not have sufficient cash nor do we have a significant source of revenues to cover our operational costs and allow us to continue as a going concern. We seek to raise operating capital to implement our business plan in an offering of our common stock.  Our plan specifies a minimum amount of $250,000 in additional operating capital to operate for the next twelve months. However, there can be no assurance that the Company will be successful in raising this capital in a secondary offering of securities.


We are dependent on outside financing for continuation of our operations.


Because we have generated limited revenues and currently operate at a loss, we are completely dependent on the continued availability of financing in order to continue our business. There can be no assurance that financing sufficient to enable us to continue our operations will be available to us in the future.


We believe that our revenues will be highly dependent on a few industries and any decrease in demand for outsourced services in these industries would likely reduce our revenues and seriously harm our business.


We believe our major clients will be concentrated in the travel and convention industries. Increased competition, consolidation, a downturn, or a reversal of the trend toward outsourcing in any of these industries, would likely result in a decrease in the demand for our services or the cancellation or non-renewal of contracts. In addition, we believe we will be dependent in large part on the projected growth of these industries, which may not materialize. These industries have been cyclical and vulnerable to significant downturns in the past, and adverse developments in these industries could unfavorably affect our business.


We intend to serve markets that are highly competitive, and increased competition, our inability to compete successfully against current or future competitors, pricing pressures or inability to obtain market share could result in increased costs and reduced operating margins.


We will face significant competition from our potential clients’ in-house customer service groups and growing competition from other companies similar to ours, including those in the United States, China, Malaysia, the Philippines, India and elsewhere. We expect this competition to increase. These companies have greater financial, personnel and other resources, longer operating histories, more recognizable brand names and more established client relationships. Many of these companies will compete with us primarily on price and are often able to offer lower costs to potential clients. If we are unable to compete with in-house or outsource competitors, we may never be successful in establishing market share and we may go out of business.



5




Our contracts will provide for termination by our clients on short notice and in many cases without penalty. We also will not have exclusive arrangements with our clients or a minimum revenue commitment from our clients, which creates uncertainty about the volume of services we will provide and the amount of revenues we will generate from any of our clients.


We believe that our potential clients will terminate their relationship with us or significantly reduce their demand for our services due to a variety of factors, including factors that are unpredictable and outside of our control. The service industry in which we plan to operate does not have favorable long term contacts with exclusive relationships. We anticipate that our contracts will be terminable on short notice without penalty. The services we plan to provide to a client could be reduced for a variety of reasons, including our client's decision to move more customer management functions in-house, or to an affiliated outsourcing provider or one of our competitors, changing economic factors, internal financial challenges or political or public relations reasons. Any significant reduction in client demand for our service would harm our business, and negatively affect operating results.


We believe that we will often encounter a long sales and implementation cycle requiring significant negotiations by our sales force and a financial commitments by our clients, which they may be unwilling or unable to make.


We spend a lot of time and resources, and expect to continue to spend a lot of time and resources, to negotiate sales contracts with clients that may or may not lead to a sale of services. We believe that the sales and implementation of our proffered services will involve significant resource commitments by us and our potential clients. We anticipate expending substantial time and money addressing potential clients’ service and operational questions and assessing the feasibility of integrating our services. Decisions relating to outsourcing business processes generally involve the evaluation of the service by our potential clients’ senior management and a significant number of client personnel in various functional areas, each having specific and often conflicting requirements. We may expend significant resources, including funds and management time, during the sales cycle. Ultimately, the potential client may not engage our services or may cancel services before we have recovered the resources expended during the sales and implementation cycle. Unsuccessful or delayed sales and implementations may negatively impact our revenues and margins.


We may experience significant employee turnover rates and we may be unable to hire and retain enough sufficiently trained employees to support our operations, which could harm our business.


The outsourcing service industry is very labor intensive and our success depends on our ability to attract, hire and retain qualified employees. We will focus in particular on recruiting college-educated personnel with bilingual potential and compete for candidates with companies in our industry and in other industries. Our growth will require that we continually hire and train new personnel. The outsourcing service industry has traditionally experienced high employee turnover. A significant increase in the turnover rate among our employees would increase our recruiting and training costs and decrease operating efficiency and productivity, and could lead to a decline in demand for our services. If this were to occur, we would be unable to service our clients effectively and this would reduce our ability to continue our growth and operate profitably.


Our operations could suffer from telecommunications or technology downtime, disruptions or increased costs.


We will be highly dependent on our computer and telecommunications equipment and software systems. In the normal course of our business, we must record and process significant amounts of data quickly and accurately to access, maintain and expand the databases we use for our services. We will also be dependent on continuous availability of voice and electronic communication with customers. If we experience interruptions of our telecommunications network with our potential clients, we may experience data loss or a reduction in revenues. These disruptions could be the result of natural disasters, errors by our vendors, clients, or third parties, electronic or physical attacks by persons seeking to disrupt our operations, or the operations of our vendors, potential clients, or others. The temporary or permanent loss of equipment or systems through casualty or operating malfunction could reduce our revenues and harm our business.





6




We could cause disruptions to our clients' business from inadequate service and be liable therefore.


Our contracts will, in some cases, contain service level and performance requirements, including requirements relating to the timing and quality of responses to customer inquiries. The quality of services that we provide will be measured by quality assurance ratings, which are based in part on the results of customer satisfaction surveys and direct monitoring of interactions between our service providers and customers. Failure to meet service requirements of a potential client could disrupt the client's business and result in a reduction in revenues or a claim for substantial damages against us.


Risks Related to Legal Uncertainty


Compliance with changing regulation of corporate governance and public disclosure may result in additional expenses.


Changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure, including the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and new SEC regulations, are creating uncertainty for companies such as ours. These new or changed laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations in many cases due to their lack of specificity, and as a result, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance is provided by regulatory and governing bodies, which could result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and higher costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to disclosure and governance practices. We are committed to maintaining high standards of corporate governance and public disclosure. As a result, we intend to invest resources to comply with evolving laws, regulations and standards, and this investment may result in increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities. If our efforts to comply with new or changed laws, regulations and standards differ from the activities intended by regulatory or governing bodies due to ambiguities related to practice, our reputation may be harmed.


If we fail to comply with the new rules under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act related to accounting controls and procedures, or if material weaknesses or other deficiencies are discovered in our internal accounting procedures, our stock price could decline significantly.


We are exposed to potential risks from legislation requiring companies to evaluate internal controls under Section 404(a) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. As a smaller reporting company and emerging growth company, we will not be required to provide a report on the effectiveness of its internal controls over financial reporting until our second annual report, and we will be exempt from auditor attestation requirements concerning any such report so long as we are an emerging growth company or a smaller reporting company. We have not yet evaluated whether our internal control procedures are effective and therefore there is a greater likelihood of material weaknesses in our internal controls, which could lead to misstatements or omissions in our reported financial statements as compared to issuers that have conducted such evaluations.


If material weaknesses and deficiencies are detected, it could cause investors to lose confidence in our company and result in a decline in our stock price and consequently affect our financial condition. In addition, if we fail to achieve and maintain the adequacy of our internal controls, we may not be able to ensure that we can conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal controls over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Moreover, effective internal controls, particularly those related to revenue recognition, are necessary for us to produce reliable financial reports and are important to helping prevent financial fraud. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, our business and operating results could be harmed, investors could lose confidence in our reported financial information, and the trading price of our common stock could drop significantly. In addition, we cannot be certain that additional material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in our internal controls will not be discovered in the future.





7




Risks Associated with Management and Control Persons


If we fail to attract and retain qualified senior executive and key technical personnel, our business will not be able to expand.


We are dependent on the continued availability of Duan Fu and Zixiao Chen, and the availability of new employees to implement our business plans. The market for skilled employees is highly competitive, especially for employees in the service industry. Although we expect that our compensation programs will be intended to attract and retain the employees required for us to be successful, there can be no assurance that we will be able to retain the services of all our key employees or a sufficient number to execute our plans, nor can there be any assurance we will be able to continue to attract new employees as required.


Our personnel may voluntarily terminate their relationship with us at any time, and competition for qualified personnel is intense. The process of locating additional personnel with the combination of skills and attributes required to carry out our strategy could be lengthy, costly and disruptive.


If we lose the services of key personnel, or fail to replace the services of key personnel who depart, we could experience a severe negative effect on our financial results and stock price. In addition, there is intense competition for highly qualified bilingual and “people friendly” personnel in the locations where we principally operate. The loss of the services of any key personnel, marketing or other personnel or our failure to attract, integrate, motivate and retain additional key employees could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating and financial results and stock price.


Mr. Fu owns a significant percentage of the voting power of our stock and will be able to exercise significant influence over the composition of our Board of Directors, matters subject to stockholder approval and our operations.


As of the date of this filing, Duan Fu owns 53,000,000 shares of Interlink Plus common stock representing 78.66% of Interlink Plus. Additionally, Duan Fu owns 1,700,000 shares of Class “A” Convertible Preferred Stock which votes 100 shares of Common Stock each which decreases Duan Fu’s control to 66.10% control over all Common Stock voting matters. As a result of Duan Fu’s equity ownership interest, voting power and the contractual rights described above, he currently is in a position to influence, subject to our organizational documents and Nevada law, the composition of Interlink’s Board of Directors and the outcome of corporate actions requiring stockholder approval, such as mergers, business combinations and dispositions of assets, among other corporate transactions. In addition, this concentration of voting power could discourage others from initiating a potential merger, takeover or other change of control transaction that may otherwise be beneficial to Interlink, which could adversely affect the market price of Interlink’s securities.


Because our current sole officer and director devotes a limited amount of time to our company, he may not be able or willing to devote a sufficient amount of time to our business operations, causing our business to fail.


Duan Fu, our sole officer and director, currently devotes approximately 15-20 hours per week providing management services to us. While he presently possesses adequate time to attend to our interest, it is possible that the demands on him from other obligations could increase, with the result that he would no longer be able to devote sufficient time to the management of our business. The loss of Mr. Fu to our company could negatively impact our business development.


Our sole officer and director does not have any prior experience managing a public company.


Our sole executive officer and director does not have any experience managing a public company. Consequently, we may not be able to run our public company successfully. Our executive’s officer’s and director’s lack of experience of managing a public company could cause you to lose some or all of your investment.





8



Risks Related to Our Legal Status


As an “emerging growth company” under the JOBS Act, we are permitted to rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements.


We qualify as an “emerging growth company” under the JOBS Act. As a result, we are permitted to, and intend to, rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements. For so long as we are an emerging growth company, we will not be required to:


·

have an auditor report on our internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act;

·

comply with any requirement that may be adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor s report providing additional information about the audit and the financial statements (i.e., an auditor discussion and analysis);

·

submit certain executive compensation matters to shareholder advisory votes, such as say-on-pay and say-on-frequency; and

·

disclose certain executive compensation related items such as the correlation between executive compensation and performance and comparisons of the Chief Executive s compensation to median employee compensation.


In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act also provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In other words, an emerging growth company can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We have elected to take advantage of the benefits of this extended transition period. Our financial statements may therefore not be comparable to those of companies that comply with such new or revised accounting standards.


We will remain an “emerging growth company” for up to five years, or until the earliest of (i) the last day of the first fiscal year in which our total annual gross revenues exceed $1 billion, (ii) the date that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which would occur if the market value of our ordinary shares that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter or (iii) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the preceding three year period.


Even if we no longer qualify for the exemptions for an emerging growth company, we may still be, in certain circumstances, subject to scaled disclosure requirements as a smaller reporting company. For example, smaller reporting companies, like emerging growth companies, are not required to provide a compensation discussion and analysis under Item 402(b) of Regulation S-K or auditor attestation of internal controls over financial reporting.


Until such time, however, we cannot predict if investors will find our common stock less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock and our stock price may be more volatile.


Risks Related to Our Securities and the Over the Counter Market


Trading on the Pink Sheets may be volatile and sporadic, which could depress the market price of our common stock and make it difficult for our stockholders to resell their shares.


We are a fully reporting issuer with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Our common stock is quoted on the “Pink Sheets” as provided by OTC Markets under the ticker symbol “ITRK” (the “Pink Sheets”). Trading in stock quoted on the Pink Sheets, or any other over the counter venues, is often thin and characterized by wide fluctuations in trading prices, due to many factors that may have little to do with our operations or business prospects. This volatility could depress the market price of our common stock for reasons unrelated to operating performance. Moreover, the Pink Sheets is not a stock exchange, and trading of securities on the Pink Sheets is often more sporadic than the trading of securities listed on a quotation system like NASDAQ or a stock exchange like Amex. Accordingly, shareholders may have difficulty reselling any of their shares.



9




Our stock is a penny stock. Trading of our stock may be restricted by the SEC’s penny stock regulations and FINRA’s sales practice requirements, which may limit a stockholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock.


Our stock is a penny stock. The Securities and Exchange Commission has adopted Rule 15g-9 which generally defines “penny stock” to be any equity security that has a market price (as defined) less than $5.00 per share or an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. Our securities are covered by the penny stock rules, which impose additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers who sell to persons other than established customers and “accredited investors”. The term “accredited investor” refers generally to institutions with assets in excess of $5,000,000 or individuals with a net worth in excess of $1,000,000 or annual income exceeding $200,000 or $300,000 jointly with their spouse. The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document in a form prepared by the SEC which provides information about penny stocks and the nature and level of risks in the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction and monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account. The bid and offer quotations, and the broker-dealer and salesperson compensation information, must be given to the customer orally or in writing prior to effecting the transaction and must be given to the customer in writing before or with the customer’s confirmation. In addition, the penny stock rules require that prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from these rules, the broker-dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction. These disclosure requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity in the secondary market for the stock that is subject to these penny stock rules. Consequently, these penny stock rules may affect the ability of broker-dealers to trade our securities. We believe that the penny stock rules discourage investor interest in, and limit the marketability of, our common stock.


In addition to the “penny stock” rules promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority has adopted rules that require that in recommending an investment to a customer, a broker-dealer must have reasonable grounds for believing that the investment is suitable for that customer. Prior to recommending speculative low priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status, investment objectives and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority believes that there is a high probability that speculative low-priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’ requirements make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our common stock, which may limit your ability to buy and sell our stock.


Rule 144 sales in the future may have a depressive effect on our stock price as an increase in supply of shares for sale, with no corresponding increase in demand will cause prices to fall.


All of the outstanding shares of common stock held by the present officers, directors, and affiliate stockholders are “restricted securities” within the meaning of Rule 144 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. As restricted shares, these shares may be resold only pursuant to an effective registration statement or under the requirements of Rule 144 or other applicable exemptions from registration under the Act and as required under applicable state securities laws. Rule 144 provides in essence that a person who is an affiliate or officer or director who has held restricted securities for six months may, under certain conditions, sell every three months, in brokerage transactions, a number of shares that does not exceed the greater of 1.0% of a company’s outstanding common stock. There is no limit on the amount of restricted securities that may be sold by a non-affiliate after the owner has held the restricted securities for a period of six months if the company is a current reporting company under the 1934 Act. A sale under Rule 144 or under any other exemption from the Act, if available, or pursuant to subsequent registration of shares of common stock of present stockholders, may have a depressive effect upon the price of the common stock in any market that may develop.






10




FINRA sales practice requirements may also limit a stockholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock.


In addition to the “penny stock” rules described above, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) has adopted rules that require that in recommending an investment to a customer, a broker-dealer must have reasonable grounds for believing that the investment is suitable for that customer. Prior to recommending speculative low priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status, investment objectives and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, FINRA believes that there is a high probability that speculative low priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. FINRA requirements make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our common stock, which may limit your ability to buy and sell our stock and have an adverse effect on the market for our shares.


Failure to achieve and maintain effective internal controls in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results.


It may be time consuming, difficult and costly for us to develop and implement the additional internal controls, processes and reporting procedures required by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We may need to hire additional financial reporting, internal auditing and other finance staff in order to develop and implement appropriate additional internal controls, processes and reporting procedures.


If we fail to comply in a timely manner with the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act regarding internal control over financial reporting or to remedy any material weaknesses in our internal controls that we may identify, such failure could result in material misstatements in our financial statements, cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information and have a negative effect on the trading price of our common stock.


Pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and current SEC regulations, we are required to prepare assessments regarding internal controls over financial reporting and, furnish a report by our management on our internal control over financial reporting. We have begun the process of documenting and testing our internal control procedures in order to satisfy these requirements, which is likely to result in increased general and administrative expenses and may shift management time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities. While our management is expending significant resources in an effort to complete this important project, there can be no assurance that we will be able to achieve our objective on a timely basis. Failure to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment or complete our Section 404 certifications could have a material adverse effect on our stock price.


In addition, in connection with our on-going assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, we may discover “material weaknesses” in our internal controls as defined in standards established by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or the PCAOB. A material weakness is a significant deficiency, or combination of significant deficiencies, that results in more than a remote likelihood that a material misstatement of the annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected. The PCAOB defines “significant deficiency” as a deficiency that results in more than a remote likelihood that a misstatement of the financial statements that is more than inconsequential will not be prevented or detected.


In the event that a material weakness is identified, we will employ qualified personnel and adopt and implement policies and procedures to address any material weaknesses that we identify. However, the process of designing and implementing effective internal controls is a continuous effort that requires us to anticipate and react to changes in our business and the economic and regulatory environments and to expend significant resources to maintain a system of internal controls that is adequate to satisfy our reporting obligations as a public company. We cannot assure you that the measures we will take will remediate any material weaknesses that we may identify or that we will implement and maintain adequate controls over our financial process and reporting in the future.





11




Any failure to complete our assessment of our internal control over financial reporting, to remediate any material weaknesses that we may identify or to implement new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in their implementation, could harm our operating results, cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations or result in material misstatements in our financial statements. Any such failure could also adversely affect the results of the periodic management evaluations of our internal controls and, in the case of a failure to remediate any material weaknesses that we may identify, would adversely affect the annual auditor attestation reports regarding the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting that are required under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Inadequate internal controls could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a negative effect on the trading price of our common stock.


We do not intend to pay dividends.


We do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. We may not have sufficient funds to legally pay dividends. Even if funds are legally available to pay dividends, we may nevertheless decide in our sole discretion not to pay dividends. The declaration, payment and amount of any future dividends will be made at the discretion of the board of directors, and will depend upon, among other things, the results of our operations, cash flows and financial condition, operating and capital requirements, and other factors our board of directors may consider relevant. There is no assurance that we will pay any dividends in the future, and, if dividends are rapid, there is no assurance with respect to the amount of any such dividend.


Volatility in our common share price may subject us to securities litigation, thereby diverting our resources that may have a material effect on our profitability and results of operations.


As discussed in the preceding risk factors, the market for our common shares is characterized by significant price volatility when compared to seasoned issuers, and we expect that our share price will continue to be more volatile than a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future. In the past, plaintiffs have often initiated securities class action litigation against a company following periods of volatility in the market price of its securities. We may in the future be the target of similar litigation. Securities litigation could result in substantial costs and liabilities and could divert management’s attention and resources.


If we are unable to continue as a going concern, investors may face a complete loss of their investment.


The independent auditor’s report on our financial statements contains explanatory language that substantial doubt exists about our ability to continue as a going concern. The report states that we depend on the continued contributions of our executive officers to work effectively as a team, to execute our business strategy and to manage our business. The loss of key personnel, or their failure to work effectively, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. If we are unable to obtain sufficient financing in the near term or achieve profitability, then we would, in all likelihood, experience severe liquidity problems and may have to curtail our operations. If we curtail our operations, we may be placed into bankruptcy or undergo liquidation, the result of which will adversely affect the value of our common shares.


Compliance with changing regulation of corporate governance and public disclosure will result in additional expenses and pose challenges for our management team.


Changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure, including the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and SEC regulations, have created uncertainty for public companies and significantly increased the costs and risks associated with accessing the U.S. public markets. Our management team will need to devote significant time and financial resources to comply with both existing and evolving standards for public companies, which will lead to increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management time and attention from revenue generating activities to compliance activities.





12




Item 2. Properties


We currently do not own any real property or any office. All of our businesses is conducted virtually. Our principal executive office mailbox is located at 4952 S Rainbow Blvd, Suite 326, Las Vegas, NV 89118.


Item 3. Legal Proceedings


We are not a party to any pending legal proceeding. We are not aware of any pending legal proceeding to which any of our officers, directors, or any beneficial holders of 5% or more of our voting securities are adverse to us or have a material interest adverse to us.


Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures


Not applicable.



PART II


Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities


Market Information


Our common stock is quoted under the symbol “ITRK” on the OTCPink operated by OTC Markets Group, Inc.


There is currently no active trading market for our securities. There is no assurance that a regular trading market will develop, or if developed, that it will be sustained. Therefore, a shareholder may be unable to resell his securities in our company.


The following table sets forth the range of high and low bid quotations for our common stock for each of the periods indicated as reported by the OTCPink. These quotations reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.


Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2017

 

Quarter Ended

 

High $

 

Low $

June 30, 2017

 

0.04

 

0.01

March 31, 2017

 

0.24

 

0.01

December 31, 2016

 

0.30

 

0.13

September 30, 2016

 

n/a

 

n/a

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter Ended

 

High $

 

Low $

June 30, 2018

 

0.028

 

Low $

March 31, 2018

 

0.18

 

0.01

December 31, 2017

 

0.13

 

0.017

September 30, 2017

 

0.022

 

0.008






13



Penny Stock


The Securities Exchange Commission has adopted rules that regulate broker-dealer practices in connection with transactions in penny stocks. Penny stocks are generally equity securities with a price of less than $5.00, other than securities registered on certain national securities exchanges or quoted on the NASDAQ system, provided that current price and volume information with respect to transactions in such securities is provided by the exchange or system.  The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document prepared by the Commission, that: (a) contains a description of the nature and level of risk in the market for penny stocks in both public offerings and secondary trading;(b) contains a description of the broker's or dealer's duties to the customer and of the rights and remedies available to the customer with respect to a violation to such duties or other requirements of Securities' laws; (c) contains a brief, clear, narrative description of a dealer market, including bid and ask prices for penny stocks and the significance of the spread between the bid and ask  price;(d) contains a toll-free telephone number for inquiries on disciplinary actions;(e) defines significant terms in the disclosure document or in the conduct of trading in penny stocks; and;(f) contains such other information and is in such form, including language, type, size and format, as the Commission shall require by rule or regulation.


The broker-dealer also must provide, prior to effecting any transaction in a penny stock, the customer with; (a) bid and offer quotations for the penny stock;(b) the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction;(c) the number of shares to which such bid and ask prices apply, or other comparable information relating to the depth and liquidity of the market for such stock; and (d) a monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer's account.


In addition, the penny stock rules require that prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from those rules; the broker-dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser's written acknowledgment of the receipt of a risk disclosure statement, a written agreement to transactions involving penny stocks, and a signed and dated copy of a written suitability statement.


These disclosure requirements may have the effect of reducing the trading activity in the secondary market for our stock if it becomes subject to these penny stock rules. Therefore, because our common stock is subject to the penny stock rules, stockholders may have difficulty selling those securities.


Holders of Our Common Stock


As of September 24 2018, we had 67,373,008 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding, held by 35 shareholders of record, with others holding shares in street name.


Dividends


We have never paid cash dividends on our common stock and do not anticipate paying cash dividends in the foreseeable future. The payment of cash dividends on our common stock will depend on earnings, financial condition and other business and economic factors at such time as the board of directors may consider relevant. If we do not pay cash dividends, our common stock may be less valuable because a return on your investment will only occur if its stock price appreciates.


Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans


We have no equity compensation plans.


Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities


None.





14




Item 6. Selected Financial Data


A smaller reporting company is not required to provide the information required by this Item.


Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations


Forward-Looking Statements


Certain statements, other than purely historical information, including estimates, projections, statements relating to our business plans, objectives, and expected operating results, and the assumptions upon which those statements are based, are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These forward-looking statements generally are identified by the words “believes,” “project,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “intends,” “strategy,” “plan,” “may,” “will,” “would,” “will be,” “will continue,” “will likely result,” and similar expressions. We intend such forward-looking statements to be covered by the safe-harbor provisions for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, and are including this statement for purposes of complying with those safe-harbor provisions. Forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and assumptions that are subject to risks and uncertainties which may cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements. Our ability to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is inherently uncertain. Factors which could have a material adverse effect on our operations and future prospects on a consolidated basis include, but are not limited to: changes in economic conditions, legislative/regulatory changes, availability of capital, interest rates, competition, and generally accepted accounting principles. These risks and uncertainties should also be considered in evaluating forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements. We undertake no obligation to update or revise publicly any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Further information concerning our business, including additional factors that could materially affect our financial results, is included herein and in our other filings with the SEC.


Results of operations for the years ended June 30, 2018 and 2017


We generated $86,715 in revenues during the year ended June 30, 2018, as compared with $45,400 in revenues for the same period ended June 30, 2017. We expect to continue to achieve steadily increasing revenues within the coming months. However, as we are a start-up, we have limited operating history to rely upon and we cannot guarantee that our business plan will be successful.  To date, we only have 7 travel agencies as our main clients that we contracted to assist with hotel room price quotation and negotiation and communicating with hotels to ensure that accurate reservations are made with Chinese clientele. Our management is actively working to secure additional contracts to grow the business.


We incurred costs and operating expenses in the amount of $147,068 for the year ended June 30, 2018, compared with operating expenses and costs of $74,505 for the year ended June 30, 2017. Our costs and operating expenses for the year ended June 30, 2018 mainly consisted of professional fees and related party professional fees.  Our operating expenses for the year ended June 30, 2017 mainly consisted of professional fees and related party professional fees.


We anticipate our operating expenses will increase as we undertake our plan of operations, including increased costs associated with marketing, personnel, and other general and administrative expenses, along with increased professional fees associated with SEC compliance as our business grows more complex and more expensive to maintain.


We incurred other expenses of $52,823 for the year ended June 30, 2018, as compared with other expenses of $20,036 for the year ended June 30, 2017. Our other expenses for the year ended June 30, 2018 consisted of interest expense and loss on the settlement of debt. Our other expenses for the year ended June 30, 2017 consisted of interest expense and related party interest expense.




15



On June 15, 2018, we were able to obtain a demand note with an outside investor for $150,000, the proceeds of which were used to prepay two convertible promissory notes in the aggregate payoff amount of $142,117 as well as paying off an outstanding convertible promissory note in the principal amount of $7,000. As a result of this transaction, we were able to eliminate all of our outstanding convertible debt, except for 4 notes with an aggregate principal amount of approximately $19,000. However, given our cash needs, we may have to take on more convertible debt if more favorable financing is unavailable. If that is the case, we may have interest expense similar to or more than what we had experienced in 2018.


We incurred a net loss in the amount of $113,176 for the year ended June 30, 2018, as compared with a net loss in the amount of $49,141 for the year ended June 30, 2017. Our losses for each period are attributable to operating expenses together with a lack of significant revenues.


Liquidity and Capital Resources


As of June 30, 2018, we had $25,564 in current assets consisting of cash, accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and related party prepaid expenses. Our total current liabilities as of June 30, 2018 were $210,188. As a result, we have a working capital deficit of $184,624 as of June 30, 2018.


Operating activities used $136,947 in cash for the year ended June 30, 2018, as compared with $2,792 in cash provided for the year ended June 30, 2017. Our negative operating cash flow in 2018 was mainly the result of our net loss of $113,176, a decrease in customer deposits of $57,239 and a decrease in accounts payable related party, offset by a decrease in prepaid expenses of $51,241. We primarily relied on cash from loans to fund our operations during the period ended June 30, 2018.


Investing activities used $1,176 in cash for the year ended June 30, 2018, as compared with $2,000 for the year ended June 30, 2017. Our negative operating cash flow was from website costs.


Financing activities provided $137,417 in cash for the year ended June 30, 2018, as compared with $9,500 for the year ended June 30, 2017. Our positive operating cash flow in 2016 was mainly proceeds from related party notes payable and convertible debentures.


On June 15, 2018, we were able to obtain a demand note with an outside investor for $150,000, the proceeds of which were used to prepay two convertible promissory notes in the aggregate payoff amount of $142,117 as well as paying off an outstanding convertible promissory note in the principal amount of $7,000. As a result of this transaction, we were able to eliminate all of our outstanding convertible debt, except for 4 notes which have an aggregate principal amount of approximately $19,000. However, given our cash needs, we may have to take on more convertible debt if more favorable financing is unavailable.


There can be no assurance that we will be successful in raising additional funding. If we are not able to secure additional funding, the implementation of our business plan will be impaired. There can be no assurance that such additional financing will be available to us on acceptable terms or at all.


Our plan specifies a minimum amount of $250,000 in additional operating capital to operate for the next twelve months. If we are unable to raise $250,000 from this offering, our business will be in jeopardy and we could be formed to suspend our operations or go out of business. As such, there can be no assurance that this offering will be successful. You may lose your entire investment.


Off Balance Sheet Arrangements


As of June 30, 2018, there were no off balance sheet arrangements.


Going Concern


We have negative working capital and have not yet received significant revenues from sales of services. These factors have caused our accountants to express substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements do not include any adjustment that might be necessary if we are unable to continue as a going concern.



16



Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent on our generating cash from the sale of our common stock and/or obtaining debt financing and attaining future profitable operations. Management’s plans include selling our equity securities and obtaining debt financing to fund our capital requirement and ongoing operations; however, there can be no assurance we will be successful in these efforts.


Critical Accounting Policies


In December 2001, the SEC requested that all registrants list their most “critical accounting polices” in the Management Discussion and Analysis. The SEC indicated that a “critical accounting policy” is one which is both important to the portrayal of a company’s financial condition and results, and requires management’s most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain.


Our critical accounting policies are set forth in Note 2 to the financial statements.


Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements


We do not expect the adoption of recently issued accounting pronouncements to have a significant impact on our results of operations, financial position or cash flow.


Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk


A smaller reporting company is not required to provide the information required by this Item.


Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data


Index to Financial Statements


F-1

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

 

F-2

Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2018 and 2017;

 

 

F-3

Statements of Operations for the years ended June 30, 2018 and 2017;

 

 

F-4

Statements of Stockholders’ Deficit for the years ended June 30, 2018 and 2017;

 

 

F-5

Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended June 30, 2018 and 2017;

 

 

F-6

Notes to Financial Statements











17




[ITRK10K4.GIF]


REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM


To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of

Interlink Plus, Inc.


Opinion on the Financial Statements


We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Interlink Plus, Inc. (the “Company”) as of June 30, 2018 and June 30, 2017 and the related statements of operations, stockholders’ (deficit), and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended June 30, 2018, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of June 30, 2018 and June 30, 2017, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended June 30, 2018 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.


Basis for Opinion


These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management.  Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.


We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.


Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.


The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern.  As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company has negative working capital at June 30, 2018, has incurred recurring losses and recurring negative cash flow from operating activities, and has an accumulated deficit which raises substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern.  Management’s plans concerning these matters are also described in Note 2.  The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.


/s/ AMC Auditing

AMC Auditing

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2015

Las Vegas, Nevada

September 28, 2018



F-1




INTERLINK PLUS, INC.

BALANCE SHEETS

(audited)


 

 

June 30,

 

June 30,

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

  Cash

 

$

11,494

 

$

12,201

  Accounts receivable

 

 

3,118

 

 

11,121

  Prepaid expenses

 

 

7,452

 

 

58,693

  Prepaid expenses - related party

 

 

3,500

 

 

-

    Total current assets

 

 

25,564

 

 

82,015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Fixed assets, net

 

 

882

 

 

-

  Website, net

 

 

1,201

 

 

2,201

    Total other assets

 

 

2,083

 

 

2,201

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

27,647

 

$

84,216

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Accounts payable

 

$

18,186

 

$

15,891

  Accounts payable - related party

 

 

14,729

 

 

57,000

  Customer deposits

 

 

3,320

 

 

60,559

  Notes payable

 

 

150,000

 

 

-

  Notes payable - related party

 

 

-

 

 

6,000

  Accrued interest payable

 

 

4,953

 

 

1,521

  Accrued interest payable - related party

 

 

-

 

 

1,759

  Convertible debt, net

 

 

19,000

 

 

14,167

  Convertible debt - related party, net

 

 

-

 

 

4,000

    Total current liabilities

 

 

210,188

 

 

160,897

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Total liabilities

 

 

210,188

 

 

160,897

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders' equity (deficit):

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Series A Convertible Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value, 25,000,000 shares

    authorized, 2,700,000 and 2,700,000 shares issued and outstanding

    as of June 30, 2018 and June 30, 2017, respectively

 

 

270

 

 

270

  Common stock, $0.0001 par value, 475,000,000 shares

    authorized, 67,373,008 and 67,373,008 shares issued and outstanding

    as of June 30, 2018 and June 30, 2017, respectively

 

 

6,737

 

 

6,737

  Additional paid-in capital

 

 

70,179

 

 

62,862

  Retained deficit

 

 

(259,726)

 

 

(146,550)

    Total stockholders' equity (deficit)

 

 

(182,540)

 

 

(76,681)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity (deficit)

 

$

27,648

 

$

84,216



See accompanying notes to financial statements.



F-2




INTERLINK PLUS, INC.

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(audited)


 

 

For the

 

For the

 

 

year

 

year

 

 

ended

 

ended

 

 

June 30,

 

June 30,

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

$

86,715

 

$

45,400

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Costs and expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Cost of goods sold

 

 

-

 

 

5,816

  General and administrative

 

 

24,841

 

 

5,556

  Depreciation and amortization

 

 

1,294

 

 

778

  Professional fees

 

 

84,933

 

 

26,355

  Professional fees - related party

 

 

36,000

 

 

36,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Total costs and expenses

 

 

147,068

 

 

74,505

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating loss

 

 

(60,353)

 

 

(29,105)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income (expenses):

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Interest expense

 

 

(22,622)

 

 

(18,976)

  Interest expense - related party

 

 

-

 

 

(1,060)

  Loss of settlement of debt

 

 

(30,201)

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Total other expenses

 

 

(52,823)

 

 

(20,036)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(113,176)

 

$

(49,141)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss per common share - basic

 

$

(0.00)

 

$

(0.00)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss per common share - diluted

 

$

(0.00)

 

$

(0.00)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average number of common shares

  outstanding - basic

 

 

67,373,008

 

 

63,569,374

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average number of common shares

  outstanding - diluted

 

 

67,373,008

 

 

63,569,374






See accompanying notes to financial statements.



F-3




INTERLINK PLUS, INC.

STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)

(audited)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional

 

 

 

Stockholders'

 

Preferred Shares

 

Common Shares

 

Paid-In

 

Retained

 

Equity

 

Shares

 

Amount

 

Shares

 

Amount

 

Capital

 

Deficit

 

(Deficit)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, June 30, 2016

2,800,000

 

$  280

 

56,111,200

 

$  5,611

 

$  47,669

 

$  (97,409)

 

$  (43,849)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 15, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beneficial conversion feature for convertible debt

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

5,000

 

-

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 18, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beneficial conversion feature for convertible debt

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

5,000

 

-

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 9, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issuance of common stock for conversion of debt

-

 

-

 

1,261,808

 

126

 

6,183

 

-

 

6,309

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 8, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issuance of common stock for conversion of preferred stock

(100,000)

 

(10)

 

10,000,000

 

1,000

 

(990)

 

-

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

(49,141)

 

(49,141)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, June 30, 2017

2,700,000

 

$  270

 

67,373,008

 

$  6,737

 

$  62,862

 

$  (146,550)

 

$  (76,681)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 31, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beneficial conversion feature for convertible debt

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

6,950

 

-

 

6,950

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Donated capital

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

367

 

-

 

367

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

(113,176)

 

(113,176)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, June 30, 2018

2,700,000

 

$  270

 

67,373,008

 

$  6,737

 

$  70,179

 

$  (259,726)

 

$  (182,540)














See accompanying notes to financial statements.



F-4




INTERLINK PLUS, INC.

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(audited)


 

 

For the

 

For the

 

 

year

 

year

 

 

ended

 

ended

 

 

June 30,

 

June 30,

 

 

2018

 

2017

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

  Net loss

 

$

(113,176)

 

$

(49,141)

  Adjustments to reconcile to net loss to net cash used in

    operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Depreciation and amortization

 

 

1,294

 

 

778

      Amortization of debt discount

 

 

13,758

 

 

17,358

  Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

      (Increase) decrease in accounts receivable

 

 

8,003

 

 

(10,777)

      (Increase) decrease in prepaid expenses

 

 

51,241

 

 

(58,318)

      (Increase) decrease in prepaid expenses - related party

 

 

(3,500)

 

 

-

      Increase (decrease) in accounts payable

 

 

2,295

 

 

9,832

      Increase (decrease) in accounts payable - related party

 

 

(42,271)

 

 

30,000

      Increase in accrued interest payable - related party

 

 

3,486

 

 

1,548

      Increase (decrease) in accrued interest payable

 

 

(838)

 

 

953

      Increase (decrease) in customer deposits

 

 

(57,239)

 

 

60,559

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(136,947)

 

 

2,792

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Purchase fixed assets

 

 

(1,176)

 

 

(2,000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(1,176)

 

 

(2,000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Proceeds from notes payable

 

 

165,000

 

 

-

  Repayments to notes payable - related party

 

 

(15,000)

 

 

(500)

  Proceeds from convertible debt

 

 

102,000

 

 

10,000

  Repayments to convertible debt

 

 

(114,950)

 

 

-

  Donated capital

 

 

367

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

137,417

 

 

9,500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET CHANGE IN CASH

 

 

(706)

 

 

10,292

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH AT BEGINNING OF PERIOD

 

 

12,201

 

 

1,909

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH AT END OF PERIOD

 

$

11,495

 

$

12,201

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION:

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Interest paid

 

$

4,300

 

$

107

  Income taxes paid

 

$

-

 

$

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-cash investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Amortization of debt discount

 

$

13,758

 

$

17,358


See accompanying notes to financial statements.



F-5



INTERLINK PLUS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(AUDITED)


NOTE 1 - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES


Organization

The Company was incorporated on May 11, 2015 (Date of Inception) under the laws of the State of Nevada, as Interlink Plus, Inc.


Nature of operations

The Company will provide services for oversea travel agents on hotel price quotation and negotiation, contract reviewing, detailed guests’ arrangements, hotel check-in assistance, as well as tradeshow services to domestic and international businesses. Additionally, the Company is offering marketing materials and other products for the tradeshows.


Year end

The Company’s year end is June 30.


Cash and cash equivalents

For the purpose of the statements of cash flows, all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less are considered to be cash equivalents. The carrying value of these investments approximates fair value.


Accounts receivable

The allowance for uncollectible accounts receivables is determined principally on the basis of past collection experience as well as consideration of current economic conditions and changes in our customer collection trends. Since the inception of the Company through today, the Company has had no material bad debt write offs and believes its current policy is reasonable.


Fixed assets

The Company records all property and equipment at cost less accumulated depreciation. Improvements are capitalized while repairs and maintenance costs are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life of the assets or the lease term, whichever is shorter. Leasehold improvements include the cost of the Company’s internal development and construction department. Depreciation periods are as follows:


Computer equipment 3 years


Website

The Company capitalizes the costs associated with the development of the Company’s website pursuant to ASC Topic 350.  Other costs related to the maintenance of the website are expensed as incurred. Amortization is provided over the estimated useful lives of 3 years using the straight-line method for financial statement purposes. The Company plans to commence amortization upon completion and release of the Company’s fully operational website.


Revenue recognition

We recognize revenue when all of the following conditions are satisfied: (1) there is persuasive evidence of an arrangement; (2) the product or service has been provided to the customer; (3) the amount of fees to be paid by the customer is fixed or determinable; and (4) the collection of our fees is probable.


The Company will record revenue when it is realizable and earned and the services are completed as part of the service contract.


Advertising costs

Advertising costs are anticipated to be expensed as incurred; however there were no advertising costs included in general and administrative expenses for the years ended June 30, 2018 and 2017.



F-6



INTERLINK PLUS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(AUDITED)


NOTE 1 - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)


Fair value of financial instruments

Fair value estimates discussed herein are based upon certain market assumptions and pertinent information available to management as of June 30, 2018 and 2017. The respective carrying value of certain on-balance-sheet financial instruments approximated their fair values. These financial instruments include cash, prepaid expenses and accounts payable. Fair values were assumed to approximate carrying values for cash and payables because they are short term in nature and their carrying amounts approximate fair values or they are payable on demand.


Level 1: The preferred inputs to valuation efforts are “quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities,” with the caveat that the reporting entity must have access to that market.  Information at this level is based on direct observations of transactions involving the same assets and liabilities, not assumptions, and thus offers superior reliability. However, relatively few items, especially physical assets, actually trade in active markets.


Level 2: FASB acknowledged that active markets for identical assets and liabilities are relatively uncommon and, even when they do exist, they may be too thin to provide reliable information. To deal with this shortage of direct data, the board provided a second level of inputs that can be applied in three situations.


Level 3: If inputs from levels 1 and 2 are not available, FASB acknowledges that fair value measures of many assets and liabilities are less precise. The board describes Level 3 inputs as “unobservable,” and limits their use by saying they “shall be used to measure fair value to the extent that observable inputs are not available.” This category allows “for situations in which there is little, if any, market activity for the asset or liability at the measurement date”. Earlier in the standard, FASB explains that “observable inputs” are gathered from sources other than the reporting company and that they are expected to reflect assumptions made by market participants.


Stock-based compensation

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation based on the fair value of all option grants or stock issuances made to employees or directors on or after its implementation date (the beginning of fiscal 2006), as well as a portion of the fair value of each option and stock grant made to employees or directors prior to the implementation date that represents the unvested portion of these share-based awards as of such implementation date, to be recognized as an expense, as codified in ASC 718. The Company calculates stock option-based compensation by estimating the fair value of each option as of its date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. These amounts are expensed over the respective vesting periods of each award using the straight-line attribution method. Compensation expense is recognized only for those awards that are expected to vest, and as such, amounts have been reduced by estimated forfeitures. The Company has historically issued stock options and vested and non-vested stock grants to employees and outside directors whose only condition for vesting has been continued employment or service during the related vesting or restriction period. The estimated fair value of grants of stock options and warrants to nonemployees of the Company is charged to expense, if applicable, in the financial statements.


The Company accounts for equity instruments issued in exchange for the receipt of goods or services from other than employees in accordance with FASB ASC 505-50. Costs are measured at the estimated fair market value of the consideration received or the estimated fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The value of equity instruments issued for consideration other than employee services is determined on the earliest of a performance commitment or completion of performance by the provider of goods or services as defined by FASB ASC 505-50.






F-7



INTERLINK PLUS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(AUDITED)


NOTE 1 - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)


Earnings per share

The Company follows ASC Topic 260 to account for the earnings per share. Basic earning per common share (“EPS”) calculations are determined by dividing net income by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the year. Diluted earning per common share calculations are determined by dividing net income by the weighted average number of common shares and dilutive common share equivalents outstanding. During periods when common stock equivalents, if any, are anti-dilutive they are not considered in the computation.


Income taxes

The Company follows ASC Topic 740 for recording the provision for income taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are computed based upon the difference between the financial statement and income tax basis of assets and liabilities using the enacted marginal tax rate applicable when the related asset or liability is expected to be realized or settled. Deferred income tax expenses or benefits are based on the changes in the asset or liability each period. If available evidence suggests that it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized, a valuation allowance is required to reduce the deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. Future changes in such valuation allowance are included in the provision for deferred income taxes in the period of change.


Deferred income taxes may arise from temporary differences resulting from income and expense items reported for financial accounting and tax purposes in different periods. Deferred taxes are classified as current or non-current, depending on the classification of assets and liabilities to which they relate. Deferred taxes arising from temporary differences that are not related to an asset or liability are classified as current or non-current depending on the periods in which the temporary differences are expected to reverse.


The Company applies a more-likely-than-not recognition threshold for all tax uncertainties. ASC Topic 740 only allows the recognition of those tax benefits that have a greater than fifty percent likelihood of being sustained upon examination by the taxing authorities. As of June 30, 2018 and 2017, the Company reviewed its tax positions and determined there were no outstanding, or retroactive tax positions with less than a 50% likelihood of being sustained upon examination by the taxing authorities, therefore this standard has not had a material affect on the Company.


The Company does not anticipate any significant changes to its total unrecognized tax benefits within the next 12 months.


The Company classifies tax-related penalties and net interest as income tax expense. As of June 30, 2018 and 2017, no income tax expense has been incurred.


Use of estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ significantly from those estimates.


Recent pronouncements

The Company has evaluated the recent accounting pronouncements through September 2018 and believes that none of them will have a material effect on the company’s financial statements.





F-8



INTERLINK PLUS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(AUDITED)


NOTE 2 - GOING CONCERN


The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the recoverability of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. As noted above, the Company is in its early stages and, accordingly, has generated slight revenues from operations. Since its inception, the Company has been engaged substantially in financing activities and developing its business plan and incurring start up costs and expenses. As a result, the Company incurred accumulated net losses from Inception (May 11, 2015) through the period ended June 30, 2018 of ($259,069). In addition, the Company’s development activities since inception have been financially sustained through debt and equity financing.


The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent upon its ability to raise additional capital from the sale of common stock and, ultimately, the achievement of significant operating revenues. These financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts, or amounts and classification of liabilities that might result from this uncertainty.


NOTE 3 - PREPAID EXPENSES


As of June 30, 2018, the Company had prepaid transfer agent expenses totaling $375 and prepaid consulting fees of $3,500 to a related party.  The prepaid professional fees will be expensed on a straight-line basis over the remaining life of the service period.  During the year ended June 30, 2018, the Company incurred an additional $750 of prepaid transfer agent fees and amortized transfer agent expenses of $750.


Additionally, the Company had prepaid expense related to deposits at hotels totaling $7,077.  The prepaid expenses will be reclassified against revenue when our clients complete their stay at the hotel.


NOTE 4 - FIXED ASSETS


The following is a summary of fixed asset costs:


 

 

June 30,

 

June 30,

 

 

2018

 

2017

Fixed asset

 

$

1,176

 

$

--

Less: accumulated amortization

 

 

(294)

 

 

--

Fixed asset, net

 

$

882

 

$

--


Depreciation expense for the years ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, was $294 and $0, respectively.


NOTE 5 - WEBSITE


The following is a summary of website costs:


 

 

June 30,

2018

 

June 30,

2017

 

 

 

 

 

Website

 

$

3,500

 

$

1,500

Less: Accumulated amortization

 

 

(2,299)

 

 

(1,229)

Website, net

 

$

1,201

 

$

2,201


Amortization expense for the years ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 was $1,000 and $778, respectively.




F-9



INTERLINK PLUS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(AUDITED)


NOTE 6 - NOTES PAYABLE


On October 11, 2017, the Company executed a promissory note with an entity for $15,000. The unsecured note has a flat interest payment of $2,250 and is due in forty-five days of issuing the note or two business days after demand for payment. During the year ended June 30, 2018, the Company repaid the entire balance of principal and accrued interest.  As of June 30, 2018, the principal balance is $0 and accrued interest is $0.


On June 15, 2018, the Company executed a promissory note with an entity for $150,000.  The unsecured note bears interest at 10% per annum and is due in two business days after demand for payment. As of June 30, 2018, the principal balance is $150,000 and accrued interest is $658.


NOTE 7 -CONVERTIBLE DEBT


On December 23, 2015, the Company executed a promissory note with a related party for $5,000. The unsecured note bears interest at 10% per annum and is due upon demand. During July 2017, the terms of the loan were negotiated. The interest rate is 20% per annum starting August 1, 2017 and is convertible at a fixed conversion rate equal to $0.005 per share. The loan has a prepayment penalty. On December 22, 2017, the note was sold to an unrelated third party. On March 14, 2018, the note was sold to another unrelated third party. During the year ended June 30, 2018, this loan was paid in full and settled.


On February 26, 2016, the Company executed a promissory note with a related party for $1,000. The unsecured note bears interest at 10% per annum and is due upon demand.  During July 2017, the terms of the loan were negotiated. The interest rate is 20% per annum starting August 1, 2017 and is convertible at a fixed conversion rate equal to $0.005 per share. The loan is due on July 31, 2018. The loan has a prepayment penalty. On December 22, 2017, the note was sold to an unrelated third party. On March 14, 2018, the note was sold to another unrelated third party. During the year ended June 30, 2018, this loan was paid in full and settled.


On May 22, 2015, the Company executed a convertible promissory note with a related party for $4,000. The unsecured note bears interest at 10% per annum and is due on May 22, 2017. This note is convertible at $0.005 per share and can be converted on or before the maturity date of May 22, 2017. During July 2017, the partied agreed to extend the maturity date to July 31, 2018. On December 22, 2017, the note was sold to an unrelated third party.  On March 14, 2018, the note was sold to another unrelated third party.


On January 26, 2018, the Company executed a convertible promissory note for $65,000.  The unsecured note bears interest at 8% per annum and is due on October 30, 2018.  This note cannot be converted for the initial 180-day period and is convertible at discount of 39% of the market price based on the previous ten days of trading.  This note has prepayment penalties.  During the year ended June 30, 2018, this loan was paid in full and settled.


On March 5, 2018, the Company executed a convertible promissory note for $43,000.  The unsecured note bears interest at 8% per annum and is due on December 15, 2018.  This note cannot be converted for the initial 180-day period and is convertible at discount of 39% of the market price based on the previous ten days of trading.  This note has prepayment penalties.  During the year ended June 30, 2018, this loan was paid in full and settled.


On April 25, 2016, the Company executed a convertible promissory note with an entity for $5,000.  The unsecured note bears interest at 10% per annum and is due on April 25, 2017.  This note is convertible at $0.005 per share and can be converted on or before the maturity date of April 25, 2017.  During July 2017, the partied agreed to extend the maturity date to July 31, 2018.  On December 22, 2017, the note was sold to an unrelated third party.  On March 14, 2018, the note was sold to another unrelated third party.






F-10



INTERLINK PLUS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(AUDITED)


NOTE 7 -CONVERTIBLE DEBT (CONTINUED)


On July 15, 2016, the Company executed a convertible promissory note with an entity for $5,000. The unsecured note bears interest at 10% per annum and is due on July 15, 2017. This note is convertible at $0.005 per share and can be converted on or before the maturity date of July 15, 2017. During July 2017, the partied agreed to extend the maturity date to July 31, 2018. On December 22, 2017, the note was sold to an unrelated third party. On March 14, 2018, the note was sold to another unrelated third party.


On August 18, 2016, the Company executed a convertible promissory note with an entity for $5,000. The unsecured note bears interest at 10% per annum and is due on August 18, 2017. This note is convertible at $0.005 per share and can be converted on or before the maturity date of September 27, 2018. On December 22, 2017, the note was sold to an unrelated third party.  On March 14, 2018, the note was sold to another unrelated third party.


As of June 30, 2018, the balance of accrued interest was $4,295. The interest expense for the year ended June 30, 2018 was $22,622 including amortization of debt discount of $13,758.


NOTE 8 - STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY


The Company is authorized to issue 475,000,000 shares of its $0.0001 par value common stock and 25,000,000 shares of its $0.0001 par value preferred stock. The Series A convertible preferred stock have a liquidation preference of $0.10 per share, have super voting rights of 100 votes per share, and each share of Series A may be converted into 100 shares of common stock.


Common stock

On July 15, 2016, the Company recorded a beneficial conversion feature of $5,000 as part of the convertible debt.


On August 18, 2016, the Company recorded a beneficial conversion feature of $5,000 as part of the convertible debt.


On September 9, 2016, the Company issued 1,261,808 shares of common stock for the conversion of debt totaling $6,309.  Of the total, $6,000 was the principal and $309 was the accrued interest payable.


During November 2016, the Company issued 10,000,000 shares of common stock as part of a conversion of 100,000 shares of preferred stock.


During the year ended June 30, 2018, the Company recorded $6,950 to additional paid in capital for beneficial conversion feature on the convertible debt and $367 in donated capital.


Preferred stock

During November 2016, the Company issued 10,000,000 shares of common stock as part of a conversion of 100,000 shares of preferred stock.


NOTE 9 - WARRANTS AND OPTIONS


As of June 30, 2018 and 2017, there were no warrants or options outstanding to acquire any additional shares of common stock.






F-11



INTERLINK PLUS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(AUDITED)


NOTE 10 - INCOME TAXES


At June 30, 2018 and 2017, the Company had a federal operating loss carryforward of approximately $260,000 and $147,000 which begins to expire in 2035.


Components of net deferred tax assets, including a valuation allowance, are as follows at June 30, 2018 and 2017:


 

2018

 

2017

Deferred tax assets:

 

 

 

  Net operating loss carryforward

$

52,000

 

$

51,000

    Total deferred tax assets

 

52,000

 

 

51,000

Less: Valuation allowance

 

(52,000)

 

 

(51,000)

    Net deferred tax assets

$

--

 

$

--


The valuation allowance for deferred tax assets as of June 30, 2018 and 2017 was $52,000 and $51,000, respectively, which will begin to expire in 2035.  In assessing the recovery of the deferred tax assets, management considers whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income in the periods in which those temporary differences become deductible. Management considers the scheduled reversals of future deferred tax assets, projected future taxable income, and tax planning strategies in making this assessment. As a result, management determined it was more likely than not the deferred tax assets would not be realized as of June 30, 2018 and 2017 and maintained a full valuation allowance.


Reconciliation between the statutory rate and the effective tax rate is as follows at June 30, 2018 and 2017:


 

2018

 

2017

Federal statutory rate

(20.0)%

 

(35.0)%

State taxes, net of federal benefit

(0.00)%

 

(0.00)%

Change in valuation allowance

20.0%

 

35.0%

Effective tax rate

0.0%

 

0.0%


NOTE 11 - RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS


On July 11, 2015, the Company executed a consulting agreement for a period of three years with a former officer and director and current shareholder at a rate of $3,000 per month. During the years ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, the Company had professional fees - related party totaling $0 and $36,000, respectively. As of June 30, 2018 and 2017, the accounts payable - related party balance was $14,729 and $57,000, respectively. On July 1, 2017, the parties mutually agreed to terminate the agreement.


On July 1, 2017, the Company executed a consulting agreement Company owned and controlled with a former officer and director and current shareholder at a rate of $3,000 per month. The Company or entity may terminate with 30 days written notice. During the year ended June 30, 2018, the Company had professional fees - related party totaling $36,000. As of June 30, 2018, there was prepaid expense - related party of $3,500 and accounts payable - related party balance was $0.


NOTE 12 - SUBSEQUENT EVENTS


On September 24, 2018, the Company and one of its noteholders agreed to extend the maturity date of all of the loans to September 30, 2019.





F-12






Item 9. Changes In and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure


No events occurred requiring disclosure under Item 304 of Regulation S-K during the fiscal year June 30, 2018.


Item 9A. Controls and Procedures


Disclosure Controls and Procedures


As required by Rule 13a-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, we have carried out an evaluation of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this annual report, being June 30, 2018. This evaluation was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer.


Disclosure controls and procedures are controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed or submitted under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our company’s reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.


Based upon that evaluation, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were ineffective as of the end of the period covered by this annual report.


Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting


Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934). Management has assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2018 based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. As a result of this assessment, management concluded that, as of June 30, 2018, our internal control over financial reporting was not effective. Our management identified the following material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, which are indicative of many small companies with small staff: (i) inadequate segregation of duties and effective risk assessment; and (ii) insufficient written policies and procedures for accounting and financial reporting with respect to the requirements and application of both US GAAP and SEC guidelines.


We plan to take steps to enhance and improve the design of our internal control over financial reporting. During the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K, we have not been able to remediate the material weaknesses identified above. To remediate such weaknesses, we hope to implement the following changes during our fiscal year ending June 30, 2019: (i) appoint additional qualified personnel to address inadequate segregation of duties and ineffective risk management; and (ii) adopt sufficient written policies and procedures for accounting and financial reporting. The remediation efforts set out in (i) and (ii) are largely dependent upon our securing additional financing to cover the costs of implementing the changes required. If we are unsuccessful in securing such funds, remediation efforts may be adversely affected in a material manner.


This annual report does not include an attestation report of our registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by our registered public accounting firm pursuant to an exemption for non-accelerated filers set forth in Section 989G of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.


Remediation of Material Weakness


We are unable to remedy our controls related to the inadequate segregation of duties and ineffective risk management until we receive financing to hire additional employees. We are currently in the process of hiring an outsourced controller to improve the controls for accounting and financial reporting.



18





Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting


There were no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended June 30, 2018 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.


Limitations on the Effectiveness of Internal Controls


Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal control over financial reporting are or will be capable of preventing or detecting all errors or all fraud. Any control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system’s objectives will be met. The design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Further, because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that misstatements, due to error or fraud will not occur or that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty and that breakdowns may occur because of simple error or mistake. Controls can also be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of controls. The design of any system of controls is based in part on certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Projections of any evaluation of controls effectiveness to future periods are subject to risk.


Item 9B. Other Information


On September 24, 2018, we and Blue Sea Assets LLC entered into a Loan Extension Agreement. The agreement extends the maturity date until September 30, 2019 on four convertible promissory notes with the aggregate principal amount of $19,000.



PART III


Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance


Our current executive officer and director is as follows:


Name

 

Age

 

Position

 

Director Since

Duan Fu

 

35

 

Chief Executive Officer, Principal Executive Officer Chief Financial Officer, Principal Financial Officer, Principal Accounting Officer and Director

 

Since Inception


Duan Fu:


From November 2014 to the present, Mr. Fu has been the Executive Director and Partner of China Personal Interior Design Co., Ltd. From March 2013 to August 2014, he worked as operations director and partner of Time Capsule Cultural Communication Co., Ltd. From March 2012 to January 2013, he worked as Design Supervisor for Shenzhen Shancheng Yingfeng Trading Co. Ltd. From August 2010 to February 2012, he worked as Design Supervisor for JOMA (Shanghai) Ltd.


Mr. Fu does not hold and has not held over the past five years any other directorships in any company with a class of securities registered pursuant to Section 12 of the Exchange Act or subject to the requirements of Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act or any company registered as an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940.


We have chosen Mr. Fu as our director because he has nearly 15 years’ experience in management and advertising media.



19





Other Significant Employees


Other than our executive officer, we do not currently have any significant employees.


Term of Office


Our directors are appointed for a one-year term to hold office until the next annual general meeting of our shareholders or until removed from office in accordance with our bylaws. Our officers are appointed by our board of directors and hold office until removed by the board, subject to their respective employment agreements.


Family Relationships


There are no family relationships between or among the directors, executive officers or persons nominated or chosen by us to become directors or executive officers.


Notice of Control Person and Promoter


The Company had previously engaged the services of Zixiao Chen as a consultant to act as the Company’s primary contact and point person within the United States. The Company disclosed this engagement in the Registration Statement filed July 31, 2015 and Exhibit 10.1 filed concurrently therewith. Despite the fact that Ms. Chen is a consultant of the Company and works at the direction of the Company’s CEO, Duan Fu, Ms. Chen is deemed a control person and promoter of the Company. Ms. Chen is deemed a control person of the Company because her roles and duties include oversight over business accounts, ongoing dealings with the Company’s clients, establishing a training program for new employees within the Company, as well as oversight and response to concerns with the Company’s outsourced personnel. Similarly, Ms. Chen is deemed to be a promoter of the Company because she works to expand the Company’s sales efforts, she maintains contact with clients on an ongoing basis, and works with vendors on behalf of the company to assist in securing the business services of the vendors for the Company, which includes contact and involvement with the vendors on behalf of the company in an ongoing basis.


Ms. Chen has 5 years of sales and exhibiting experience at trade shows, conventions and local events. She has over ten years of experience working with companies of all sizes, and across a wide variety of industries including retail, wholesale and distribution, freight forwarding, casino gaming, etc. Ms. Chen has extensive knowledge in business operation and administration, with focus on strategic planning, financial management, sales and marketing, research, performance improvement, and strategic revenue enhancement planning.


Ms. Chen holds an MBA from the University of North Dakota and a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and Finance from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.


Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings


During the past 10 years, none of our current executive officers, nominees for directors, or current directors have been involved in any legal proceeding identified in Item 401(f) of Regulation S-K, including:


1.

Any petition under the Federal bankruptcy laws or any state insolvency law filed by or against, or a receiver, fiscal agent or similar officer was appointed by a court for the business or property of such person, or any partnership in which he or she was a general partner at or within two years before the time of such filing, or any corporation or business association of which he or she was an executive officer at or within two years before the time of such filing;


2.

Any conviction in a criminal proceeding or being named a subject of a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);


3.

Being subject to any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining him or her from, or otherwise limiting, the following activities:




20






i.

Acting as a futures commission merchant, introducing broker, commodity trading advisor, commodity pool operator, floor broker, leverage transaction merchant, any other person regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, or an associated person of any of the foregoing, or as an investment adviser, underwriter, broker or dealer in securities, or as an affiliated person, director or employee of any investment company, bank, savings and loan association or insurance company, or engaging in or continuing any conduct or practice in connection with such activity;


ii.

Engaging in any type of business practice; or


iii.

Engaging in any activity in connection with the purchase or sale of any security or commodity or in connection with any violation of Federal or State securities laws or Federal commodities laws;


4.

Being subject to any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any Federal or State authority barring, suspending or otherwise limiting for more than 60 days the right of such person to engage in any type of business regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, securities, investment, insurance or banking activities, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity;


5.

Being found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the SEC to have violated any Federal or State securities law, and the judgment in such civil action or finding by the Commission has not been subsequently reversed, suspended, or vacated;


6.

Being found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated any Federal commodities law, and the judgment in such civil action or finding by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission has not been subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated;


7.

Being subject to, or a party to, any Federal or State judicial or administrative order, judgment, decree, or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, relating to an alleged violation of:


i.

Any Federal or State securities or commodities law or regulation; or


ii.

Any law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies including, but not limited to, a temporary or permanent injunction, order of disgorgement or restitution, civil money penalty or temporary or permanent cease-and-desist order, or removal or prohibition order; or


iii.

Any law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; or


8.

Being subject to, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization (as defined in Section 3(a)(26) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(26))), any registered entity (as defined in Section 1(a)(29) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1(a)(29))), or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member.


During the past 5 years, none of our promoter or control person has been involved in any legal proceeding in any of the following:


1.

Any bankruptcy petition filed by or against any business of which such person was a general partner or executive officer either at the time of the bankruptcy or within two years prior to that time.


2.

Any conviction in a criminal proceeding or being subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses).





21






3.

Being subject to any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting his involvement in any type of business, securities or banking activities.


4.

Being found by a court of competent jurisdiction (in a civil action), the Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and the judgment has not been reversed, suspended, or vacated.


5.

Having any government agency, administrative agency, or administrative court impose an administrative finding, order, decree, or sanction against them as a result of their involvement in any type of business, securities, or banking activity.


6.

Being the subject of a pending administrative proceeding related to their involvement in any type of business, securities, or banking activity.


7.

Administrative proceedings related to their involvement in any type of business, securities, or banking activity.


Committees of the Board


Our Company currently does not have nominating, compensation or audit committees or committees performing similar functions nor does our company have a written nominating, compensation or audit committee charter. Our directors believe that it is not necessary to have such committees, at this time, because the functions of such committees can be adequately performed by the board of directors.


Our Company does not have any defined policy or procedural requirements for shareholders to submit recommendations or nominations for directors. The board of directors believes that, given the stage of our development, a specific nominating policy would be premature and of little assistance until our business operations develop to a more advanced level. Our Company does not currently have any specific or minimum criteria for the election of nominees to the board of directors and we do not have any specific process or procedure for evaluating such nominees. The board of directors will assess all candidates, whether submitted by management or shareholders, and make recommendations for election or appointment.


A shareholder who wishes to communicate with our board of directors may do so by directing a written request addressed to our CEO and director, Duan Fu, at the address appearing on the first page of this annual report.


Compliance with Section 16(a) Of the Exchange Act


Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act requires our directors and executive officers and persons who beneficially own more than ten percent of a registered class of the Company’s equity securities to file with the SEC initial reports of ownership and reports of changes in ownership of common stock and other equity securities of the Company. Officers, directors and greater than ten percent beneficial shareholders are required by SEC regulations to furnish us with copies of all Section 16(a) forms they file. To the best of our knowledge based solely on a review of Forms 3, 4, and 5 (and any amendments thereof) received by us during or with respect to the year ended June 30, 2018, the following persons have failed to file, on a timely basis, the identified reports required by Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act during fiscal year ended June 30, 2018:


Name and principal position

Number of

late reports

Transactions not

timely reported

Known failures to

file a required form

Duan Fu

CEO, CFO & Director

0

0

0

Zixiao Chen

10% shareholder

0

0

0





22






Code of Ethics


We do not have a code of ethics at the present time, but we intend to adopt one as soon as we add more executive staff and we have resources available.


Item 11. Executive Compensation


The table below summarizes all compensation awarded to, earned by, or paid to our former or current executive officers for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2018 and 2017.


SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

 

Name

and

principal

position

Year

Salary

($)

Bonus

($)

Stock

Awards

($)

Option

Awards

($)

Non-Equity

Incentive

Plan

Compensation

($)

Nonqualified

Deferred

Compensation

Earnings

($)

All Other

Compensation

($)

Total

($)

Duan Fu

CEO, CFO and Director

2018


2017

-


-

-


-

-


-

-


-

-


-

-


-

-


-

-


-


The table below summarizes all unexercised options, stock that has not vested, and equity incentive plan awards for each named executive officer as of June 30, 2018.


OUTSTANDING EQUITY AWARDS AT FISCAL YEAR-END

OPTION AWARDS

STOCK AWARDS

Name

Number of

Securities

Underlying

Unexercised

Options (#) Exercisable

Number of

Securities

Underlying

Unexercised

Options (#)

Unexercisable

Equity

Incentive

Plan Awards:

Number of

Securities

Underlying

Unexercised

Unearned

Options (#)

Option

Exercise

Price ($)

Option

Expiration

Date

Number

of Shares

or Units

of Stock

That Have

Not Vested

(#)

Market

Value of

Shares or Units

of Stock

That Have

Not Vested

($)

Equity

Incentive

Plan Awards:

Number of

Unearned

Shares, Units

or Other

Rights That

Have  Not

Vested (#)

Equity

Incentive

Plan

Awards:

Market or

Payout

Value of

Unearned

Shares,

Units or

Other

Rights That

Have Not

Vested (#)

Duan Fu

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-


Director Compensation


At the time of this filing, directors receive no remuneration for their services as directors of the Company, nor does the Company reimburse directors for expenses incurred in their service to the Board of Directors of the Company.







23






Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters


The following table sets forth, as of September 24, 2018 certain information as to shares of our common stock owned by (i) each person known by us to beneficially own more than 5% of our outstanding common stock, (ii) each of our directors, and (iii) all of our executive officers and directors as a group:


 

Common Stock

Series A Preferred Stock

Name and Address of Beneficial Owner

Number of

Shares Owned (1)

Percent of

Class (2)

Number of

Shares Owned (1)

Percent of

Class (2)

Duan Fu (3)

223,000,000

66%

1,000,000

63%

All Directors and Executive Officers as a Group

(1 person)

223,000,000

66%

1,000,000

63%

5% Holders

 

 

 

 

Zixiao Chen

4952 South Rainbow Blvd, Suite 326

Las Vegas, NV 89118 (4)

109,000,000

32%

1,000,000

37%


* Less than 1%


(1)

Unless otherwise indicated, each person or entity named in the table has sole voting power and investment power (or shares that power with that person’s spouse) with respect to all shares of voting stock listed as owned by that person or entity.


(2)

Pursuant to Rules 13d-3 and 13d-5 of the Exchange Act, beneficial ownership includes any shares as to which a shareholder has sole or shared voting power or investment power, and also any shares which the shareholder has the right to acquire within 60 days, including upon exercise of common shares purchase options or warrants. The percent of class is based on 67,373,008 shares of common stock and 2,700,000 shares of Series A Convertible Preferred Stock issued and outstanding as of September 24, 2018.


(3)

Includes 53,000,000 shares of common stock and 1,700,000 shares of Series A Convertible Preferred Stock that may convert into 170,000,000 shares of common stock.


(4)

Includes 9,000,000 shares of common stock and 1,000,000 shares of Series A Convertible Preferred Stock that may convert into 100,000,000 shares of common stock.


Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence


Except as provided in “Description of Business” and “Executive Compensation” set forth above, for the past two fiscal years there have not been, and there is not currently proposed, any transaction or series of similar transactions to which we were or will be a participant in which the amount involved exceeded or will exceed the lesser of $120,000 or one percent of the average of our total assets at year-end for the last two completed fiscal years, and in which any director, executive officer, holder of 5% or more of any class of our capital stock or any member of the immediate family of any of the foregoing persons had or will have a direct or indirect material interest.


Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services


Below is the table of audit fees billed by our auditors in connection with the audits of the Company’s annual financial statements for the years ended:


Financial Statements for

the Year Ended June 30

 

Audit Services

 

Audit Related Fees

 

Tax Fees

 

Other Fees

2017

 

$ 11,000

 

$ 0

 

$ 0

 

$ 0

2018

 

$ 14,523

 

$ 0

 

$ 0

 

$ 0



24






PART IV


Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statements Schedules


(a)

Financial Statements and Schedules


The following financial statements and schedules listed below are included in this Form 10-K.


Financial Statements (See Item 8)


(b)

Exhibits


Exhibit

Number

Description

3.1

Articles of Incorporation (previously filed July 31, 2015 with Form S-1 Registration Statement)

3.2

Amendment to the Articles of Incorporation (previously filed July 31, 2015 with Form S-1 Registration Statement)

3.3

Bylaws (previously filed July 31, 2015 with Form S-1 Registration Statement)

10.1

Professional Services Contract dated May 12, 2015 (previously filed July 31, 2015 with Form S-1 Registration Statement)

10.2

Convertible Promissory Note, dated May 22, 2015 (previously filed July 31, 2015 with Form S-1 Registration Statement)

10.3

Consulting Agreement dated July 11, 2015 (previously filed July 31, 2015 with Form S-1 Registration Statement)

10.4

Convertible Promissory Note, dated March 8, 2016 (previously filed October 13, 2016 with Form 10-K)

10.5

Convertible Promissory Note, dated April 25, 2016 (previously filed October 13, 2016 with Form 10-K)

10.6

Convertible Promissory Note, dated July 15, 2016 (previously filed October 13, 2016 with Form 10-K)

10.7

Convertible Promissory Note, dated August 18, 2016 (previously filed October 13, 2016 with Form 10-K)

10.8

Consulting Agreement, dated July 1, 2017 (previously filed October 13, 2017 with Form 10-K)

10.9

Consulting Agreement, dated July 15, 2017 (previously filed October 13, 2017 with Form 10-K)

10.10

Demand Promissory Note, dated October 11, 2017 (previously filed October 13, 2017 with Form 10-K)

10.11

Convertible Promissory Note, dated January 26, 2018 (previously filed February 1, 2018 with Form 8-K)

10.1 2

Securities Purchase Agreement, dated January 26, 2018 (previously filed February 1, 2018 with Form 8-K)

10.13

Convertible Promissory Note, dated March 5, 2018 (previously filed March 15, 2018 with Form 8-K)

10.14

Securities Purchase Agreement, dated March 5, 2018 (previously filed March 15, 2018 with Form 8-K)

10.15

Demand Note, dated June 15, 2018 (previously filed June 20, 2018 with Form 8-K)

31.1

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Securities Exchange Act Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a), as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

31.2

Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Securities Exchange Act Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a), as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

32.1

Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

101

The following materials from the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2018 formatted in Extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL).




25






SIGNATURES


In accordance with Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, the registrant caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.


Interlink Plus Inc.


By:

/s/ Duan Fu

 

Chief Executive Officer, Principal Executive Officer,

Chief Financial Officer, Principal Financial Officer,

Principal Accounting Officer and Director

 

 

 

September 28, 2018


In accordance with Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated:



By:

/s/ Duan Fu

 

Chief Executive Officer, Principal Executive Officer,

Chief Financial Officer, Principal Financial Officer,

Principal Accounting Officer and Director

 

 

 

September 28, 2018




























26


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