Quarterly Report (10-q)

Date : 11/02/2018 @ 8:59PM
Source : Edgar (US Regulatory)
Stock : Auburn National Bancorporation, Inc. (AUBN)
Quote : 38.08  0.0 (0.00%) @ 1:00AM

Quarterly Report (10-q)

Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

(Mark One)

[X]

Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2018

 

[  ]

Transition report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

For the transition period                      to                     

Commission File Number: 0-26486

 

 

Auburn National Bancorporation, Inc.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

 

 

   Delaware    63-0885779   
  

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

  

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

  

100 N. Gay Street

Auburn, Alabama 36830

(334) 821-9200

(Address and telephone number of principal executive offices)

(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes ☒                                               No ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).

Yes ☒                                               No ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large Accelerated filer ☐    Accelerated filer ☒    Non-accelerated filer ☐    Smaller reporting company ☐      Emerging growth company ☐  

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ☐ No ☒

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.

 

Class      Outstanding at November 1, 2018
Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share      3,643,868 shares

  

 


Table of Contents

AUBURN NATIONAL BANCORPORATION, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

INDEX

 

PART I.  FINANCIAL INFORMATION

     PAGE

 

Item 1

  Financial Statements     
      Consolidated Balance Sheets (Unaudited)
as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017
     3
      Consolidated Statements of Earnings (Unaudited)
for the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017
     4
      Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Unaudited)
for the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017
     5
      Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity (Unaudited)
for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017
     6
      Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Unaudited)
for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017
     7
                   Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)      8

Item 2

    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      29
      Table 1 – Explanation of Non-GAAP Financial Measures      47
      Table 2 – Selected Quarterly Financial Data      48
      Table 3 – Selected Financial Data      49
      Table 4 – Average Balances and Net Interest Income Analysis –
for the quarter ended September 30, 2018 and 2017
     50
      Table 5 – Average Balances and Net Interest Income Analysis –
for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017
     51
      Table 6 – Loan Portfolio Composition      52
      Table 7 – Allowance for Loan Losses and Nonperforming Assets      53
      Table 8 – Allocation of Allowance for Loan Losses      54
      Table 9 – CDs and Other Time Deposits of $100,000 or more      55

Item 3

    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk      56

Item 4

    Controls and Procedures      56

PART II.  OTHER INFORMATION

    
Item 1   Legal Proceedings      56

Item 1A

  Risk Factors      56
Item 2   Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds      56
Item 3   Defaults Upon Senior Securities      56
Item 4   Mine Safety Disclosures      56
Item 5   Other Information      56
Item 6   Exhibits      57


Table of Contents

PART 1. FINANCIAL INFORMATION    

ITEM 1.

 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

AUBURN NATIONAL BANCORPORATION, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

Consolidated Balance Sheets

(Unaudited)

 

(Dollars in thousands, except share data)    September 30,
2018
    December 31,
2017
 

 

 

Assets:

    

Cash and due from banks

   $         14,915     $         12,942    

Federal funds sold

     36,457       41,540    

Interest-bearing bank deposits

     15,790       51,046    

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

     67,162       105,528    

 

 

Securities available-for-sale

     243,336       257,697    

Loans held for sale

     1,548       1,922    

Loans, net of unearned income

     460,327       453,651    

Allowance for loan losses

     (4,785     (4,757)   

 

 

Loans, net

     455,542       448,894    

 

 

Premises and equipment, net

     13,638       13,791    

Bank-owned life insurance

     18,654       18,330    

Other assets

     9,071       7,219    

 

 

Total assets

   $ 808,951     $ 853,381    

 

 

Liabilities:

 

Deposits:

    

Noninterest-bearing

   $ 199,179     $ 193,917    

Interest-bearing

     520,127       563,742    

 

 

Total deposits

     719,306       757,659    

Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase

     1,888       2,658    

Long-term debt

     —         3,217    

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

     2,298       2,941    

 

 

Total liabilities

     723,492       766,475    

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

Preferred stock of $.01 par value; authorized 200,000 shares; no issued shares

     —         —       

Common stock of $.01 par value; authorized 8,500,000 shares; issued 3,957,135 shares

     39       39    

Additional paid-in capital

     3,779       3,771    

Retained earnings

     94,109       90,299    

Accumulated other comprehensive loss, net

     (5,833     (566)   

Less Treasury stock, at cost - 313,267 shares and 313,467 shares at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively

     (6,635     (6,637)   

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     85,459       86,906    

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 808,951     $ 853,381    

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements    

 

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AUBURN NATIONAL BANCORPORATION, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

Consolidated Statements of Earnings

(Unaudited)

 

     Quarter ended September 30,      Nine Months ended September 30,  
(In thousands, except share and per share data)    2018      2017      2018      2017  

 

 

Interest income:

           

Loans, including fees

   $ 5,511      $ 5,296      $ 16,049      $ 15,398   

Securities:

           

 Taxable

     974        1,071        3,063        3,204   

 Tax-exempt

     577        590        1,734        1,758   

Federal funds sold and interest-bearing bank deposits

     283        215        875        598   

 

 

 Total interest income

     7,345        7,172        21,721        20,958   

 

 

Interest expense:

           

Deposits

     920        872        2,637        2,600   

Short-term borrowings

     3        5        15        14   

Long-term debt

     —          34        46        93   

 

 

 Total interest expense

     923        911        2,698        2,707   

 

 

 Net interest income

     6,422        6,261        19,023        18,251   

Provision for loan losses

     —          —          —          100   

 

 

 Net interest income after provision for loan losses

     6,422        6,261        19,023        18,151   

 

 

Noninterest income:

           

Service charges on deposit accounts

     192        191        553        563   

Mortgage lending

     115        254        487        558   

Bank-owned life insurance

     110        112        324        329   

Other

     374        362        1,119        1,096   

Securities gains, net

     —          49        —          51   

 

 

 Total noninterest income

     791        968        2,483        2,597   

 

 

Noninterest expense:

           

Salaries and benefits

     2,673        2,516        7,959        7,289   

Net occupancy and equipment

     339        385        1,069        1,117   

Professional fees

     213        276        707        760   

FDIC and other regulatory assessments

     70        79        248        257   

Other

     1,455        969        3,495        2,935   

 

 

 Total noninterest expense

     4,750        4,225        13,478        12,358   

 

 

 Earnings before income taxes

     2,463        3,004        8,028        8,390   

Income tax expense

     488        868        1,594        2,369   

 

 

 Net earnings

   $ 1,975      $ 2,136      $ 6,434      $ 6,021   

 

 

Net earnings per share:

           

Basic and diluted

   $ 0.54      $ 0.59      $ 1.77      $ 1.65   

 

 

Weighted average shares outstanding:

           

Basic and diluted

         3,643,834            3,643,659            3,643,750            3,643,598   

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

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Table of Contents

AUBURN NATIONAL BANCORPORATION, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income

(Unaudited)

 

     Quarter ended September 30,      Nine Months ended September 30,  
(Dollars in thousands)    2018      2017      2018      2017  

 

 

Net earnings

   $           1,975       $           2,136       $           6,434       $           6,021   

Other comprehensive (loss) income, net of tax:

           

Unrealized net holding (loss) gain on securities

     (1,393)        171         (5,267)        882   

Reclassification adjustment for net gain on securities recognized in net earnings

     —           (31)        —          (32)  

 

 

Other comprehensive (loss) income

     (1,393)        140         (5,267)        850   

 

 

Comprehensive income

   $ 582       $ 2,276       $ 1,167       $ 6,871   

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

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AUBURN NATIONAL BANCORPORATION, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity

(Unaudited)

 

                            Accumulated              
                Additional           other              
            Common Stock             paid-in     Retained     comprehensive     Treasury        
(Dollars in thousands, except share data)   Shares     Amount     capital     earnings     income (loss)     stock     Total  

 

 

Balance, December 31, 2016

    3,957,135     $ 39     $           3,767     $           85,716     $ (708)       $          (6,637)     $           82,177   

Net earnings

    —                   —         —         6,021                 —         —         6,021   

Other comprehensive income

    —         —         —         —         850       —         850   

Cash dividends paid ($0.69 per share)

    —         —         —         (2,514)       —         —         (2,514)  

Sale of treasury stock (145 shares)

    —         —         4       —         —         —          

 

 

Balance, September 30, 2017

    3,957,135     $ 39     $ 3,771     $ 89,223     $ 142     $ (6,637   $ 86,538   

 

 

 

Balance, December 31, 2017

    3,957,135     $ 39     $ 3,771     $ 90,299     $ (566   $ (6,637   $ 86,906   

Net earnings

    —         —         —         6,434       —         —         6,434   

Other comprehensive loss

    —         —         —         —         (5,267     —         (5,267)  

Cash dividends paid ($0.72 per share)

    —         —         —         (2,624     —         —         (2,624)  

Sale of treasury stock (200 shares)

    —         —         8       —         —         2       10   

 

 

Balance, September 30, 2018

    3,957,135     $ 39     $ 3,779     $ 94,109     $ (5,833   $ (6,635   $ 85,459   

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

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AUBURN NATIONAL BANCORPORATION, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

 

         Nine Months ended September 30,      
(In thousands)    2018     2017  

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

    

Net earnings

   $ 6,434     $ 6,021   

Adjustments to reconcile net earnings to net cash provided by operating activities:

    

Provision for loan losses

     —         100   

Depreciation and amortization

     712       772   

Premium amortization and discount accretion, net

     1,572       1,612   

Net gain on securities available-for-sale

     —         (51)  

Net gain on sale of loans held for sale

     (244     (366)  

Decrease in MSR valuation allowance

     —         (1)  

Net gain on other real estate owned

     —         (11)  

Loans originated for sale

     (23,946     (21,957)  

Proceeds from sale of loans

     24,389       22,731   

Increase in cash surrender value of bank-owned life insurance

     (324     (329)  

Net (increase) decrease in other assets

     (143     382   

Net decrease in accrued expenses and other liabilities

     (633     (1,466)  

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     7,817       7,437   

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

    

Proceeds from sales of securities available-for-sale

     —         10,374   

Proceeds from prepayments and maturities of securities available-for-sale

     25,046       25,909   

Purchase of securities available-for-sale

     (19,290     (58,097)  

Increase in loans, net

     (8,138     (18,506)  

Net purchases of premises and equipment

     (170     (1,549)  

Increase in FHLB stock

     (20     (13)  

Proceeds from sale of other real estate owned

     1,353       60   

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (1,219     (41,822)  

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

    

Net increase in noninterest-bearing deposits

     5,262       2,862   

Net decrease in interest-bearing deposits

     (43,615     (9,357)  

Net (decrease) increase in federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase

     (770     207   

Repayments or retirement of long-term debt

     (3,217     —     

Dividends paid

     (2,624     (2,514)  

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

     (44,964     (8,802)  

 

 

Net change in cash and cash equivalents

     (38,366     (43,187)  

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

     105,528       121,277   

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

   $ 67,162     $ 78,090   

 

 

 

 

Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:

    

Cash paid during the period for:

    

Interest

   $       2,717     $       2,791   

Income taxes

     2,228       2,674   

Supplemental disclosure of non-cash transactions:

    

Real estate acquired through foreclosure

     1,490       —     

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

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Table of Contents

AUBURN NATIONAL BANCORPORATION, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

General

Auburn National Bancorporation, Inc. (the “Company”) provides a full range of banking services to individual and corporate customers in Lee County, Alabama and surrounding counties through its wholly owned subsidiary, AuburnBank (the “Bank”). The Company does not have any segments other than banking that are considered material.

Basis of Presentation and Use of Estimates

The unaudited consolidated financial statements in this report have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) for interim financial information. Accordingly, these financial statements do not include all of the information and footnotes required by U.S. GAAP for complete financial statements. The unaudited consolidated financial statements include, in the opinion of management, all adjustments necessary to present a fair statement of the financial position and the results of operations for all periods presented. All such adjustments are of a normal recurring nature. The results of operations in the interim statements are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations that the Company and its subsidiaries may achieve for future interim periods or the entire year. For further information, refer to the consolidated financial statements and footnotes included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017.

The unaudited consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. Auburn National Bancorporation Capital Trust I was an affiliate of the Company and was included in these unaudited consolidated financial statements pursuant to the equity method of accounting. On April 27, 2018, the Trust was dissolved. Significant intercompany transactions and accounts are eliminated in consolidation.

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities as of the balance sheet date and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Material estimates that are particularly susceptible to significant change in the near term include other-than-temporary impairment on investment securities, the determination of the allowance for loan losses, fair value of financial instruments, and the valuation of deferred tax assets and other real estate owned.

Subsequent Events

The Company has evaluated the effects of events and transactions through the date of this filing that have occurred subsequent to September 30, 2018. The Company does not believe there were any material subsequent events during this period that would have required further recognition or disclosure in the unaudited consolidated financial statements included in this report.

Accounting Developments

In the first nine months of 2018, the Company adopted new guidance related to the following Accounting Standards Updates (“Updates” or “ASUs”):

 

   

ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers ;

 

   

ASU 2016-01, Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities;

 

   

ASU 2016-15, Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments; and

 

   

ASU 2016-18, Restricted Cash

 

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Table of Contents

Information about these pronouncements is described in more detail below.

ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) , was developed as a joint project with the International Accounting Standards Board to remove inconsistencies in revenue requirements and provide a more robust framework for addressing revenue issues. The ASU’s core principle is that an entity should recognize revenue when it transfers promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which an entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-14, which deferred the effective date by one year (i.e., interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017). Early adoption is permitted, but not before the original effective date (i.e., interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016). The ASU may be adopted using either a modified retrospective method or a full retrospective method. The Company adopted the ASU during the first quarter of 2018, as required, using a modified retrospective approach. The majority of the Company’s revenue stream is generated from interest income on loans and deposits, which are outside the scope of Topic 606. The Company’s sources of income that fall within the scope of Topic 606 include service charges on deposits, investment services, interchange fees and gains and losses on sales of other real estate, all of which are presented as components of noninterest income. The Company has evaluated the effect of Topic 606 on these fee-based income streams and concluded that adoption of the standard did not materially impact its financial statements. The following is a summary of the implementation considerations for the revenue streams that fall within the scope of Topic 606:

 

   

Service charges on deposits, investment services, ATM and interchange fees – Fees from these services are either transaction-based, for which the performance obligations are satisfied when the individual transaction is processed, or set periodic service charges, for which the performance obligations are satisfied over the period the service is provided. Transaction-based fees are recognized at the time the transaction is processed, and periodic service charges are recognized over the service period. The adoption of Topic 606 had no impact on the Company’s revenue recognition practice for these services.

 

   

Gains on sales of other real estate – ASU 2014-09 creates Topic 610-20, under which a gain on sale should be recognized when a contract for sale exists and control of the asset has been transferred to the buyer. Topic 606 lists several criteria required to conclude that a contract for sale exists, including a determination that the institution will collect substantially all of the consideration to which it is entitled. This presents a key difference between the prior and new guidance related to the recognition of the gain when the institution finances the sale of the property. Rather than basing recognition on the amount of the buyer’s initial investment, which was the primary consideration under prior guidance, the analysis is now based on various factors including not only the loan to value, but also the credit quality of the borrower, the structure of the loan, and any other factors that may affect collectability. While these differences may affect the decision to recognize or defer gains on sales of other real estate in circumstances where the Company has financed the sale, the effects would not be material to its consolidated financial statements.

ASU 2016-01, Financial Instruments – Overall (Subtopic 825-10): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities , enhances the reporting model for financial instruments to provide users of financial statements with more decision-useful information. The ASU addresses certain aspects of recognition, measurement, presentation, and disclosure of financial instruments. Some of the amendments include the following: (1) Require equity investments (except those accounted for under the equity method of accounting or those that result in consolidation of the investee) to be measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income; (2) Simplify the impairment assessment of equity investments without readily determinable fair values by requiring a qualitative assessment to identify impairment; (3) Require public business entities to use the exit price notion when measuring the fair value of financial instruments for disclosure purposes; (4) Require an entity to present separately in other comprehensive income the portion of the total change in the fair value of a liability resulting from a change in the instrument-specific credit risk when the entity has elected to measure the liability at fair value; among others. For public business entities, the amendments of this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The adoption of this ASU on January 1, 2018 did not have a material impact on the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements. In accordance with (3) above, the Company measured the fair value of its loan portfolio as of September 30, 2018 using an exit price notion and will continue to do so going forward (see Note 7).

ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments , provides guidance on eight specific cash flow issues where current GAAP is either unclear or does not include specific guidance on classification in the statement of cash flows. The new guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017. The Company adopted ASU No. 2016-15 on January 1, 2018. ASU No. 2016-15 did not have a material impact on the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash, amends guidance on how the statement of cash flows presents the change during the period in the total of cash, cash equivalents, and amounts generally described as restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents. Under the new guidance, amounts generally described as restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents are included with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. The amendments in this Update do not provide a definition of restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents. The new guidance is effective for public business entities for annual and interim reporting periods in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017. The Company adopted ASU No. 2016-18 on January 1, 2018. ASU No. 2016-18 did not have a material impact on the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.

NOTE 2: BASIC AND DILUTED NET EARNINGS PER SHARE

Basic net earnings per share is computed by dividing net earnings by the weighted average common shares outstanding for the respective period. Diluted net earnings per share reflect the potential dilution that could occur upon exercise of securities or other rights for, or convertible into, shares of the Company’s common stock. At September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively, the Company had no such securities or rights issued or outstanding, and therefore, no dilutive effect to consider for the diluted net earnings per share calculation.

The basic and diluted net earnings per share computations for the respective periods are presented below.

 

     Quarter ended September 30,      Nine Months ended September 30,  
(In thousands, except share and per share data)    2018      2017      2018      2017  

 

 

Basic and diluted:

           

Net earnings

   $ 1,975      $ 2,136      $ 6,434      $ 6,021  

Weighted average common shares outstanding

         3,643,834            3,643,659            3,643,750            3,643,598  

 

 

Net earnings per share

   $ 0.54      $ 0.59      $ 1.77      $ 1.65  

 

 

NOTE 3: SECURITIES

At September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, all securities within the scope of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 320, Investments – Debt and Equity Securities, were classified as available-for-sale. The fair value and amortized cost for securities available-for-sale by contractual maturity at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, are presented below.

 

     1 year      1 to 5      5 to 10      After 10      Fair        Gross Unrealized        Amortized  
(Dollars in thousands)    or less      years      years      years      Value      Gains      Losses      Cost  

 

 

September 30, 2018

                       

Agency obligations (a)

   $ 9,453        19,445        21,591        —          50,489        —          1,899      $ 52,388  

Agency RMBS (a)

     —          —          8,893        113,147        122,040        46        5,230        127,224  

State and political subdivisions

     —          3,391        8,000        59,416        70,807        461        1,166        71,512  

 

 

 Total available-for-sale

   $ 9,453        22,836        38,484        172,563        243,336        507        8,295      $ 251,124  

 

 

December 31, 2017

                       

Agency obligations (a)

   $ —          29,253        23,809        —          53,062        79        904      $ 53,887  

Agency RMBS (a)

     —          —          11,201        121,871        133,072        330        1,639        134,381  

State and political subdivisions

     —          2,564        9,999        59,000        71,563        1,616        237        70,184  

 

 

 Total available-for-sale

   $         —          31,817        45,009        180,871        257,697        2,025        2,780      $ 258,452  

 

 

(a) Includes securities issued by U.S. government agencies or government sponsored entities.

Securities with aggregate fair values of $138.9 million and $149.4 million at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, were pledged to secure public deposits, securities sold under agreements to repurchase, Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) advances, and for other purposes required or permitted by law.

 

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Included in other assets on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets are non-marketable equity investments. The carrying amounts of non-marketable equity investments were $1.4 million at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively. Non-marketable equity investments include FHLB of Atlanta stock, Federal Reserve Bank, (“FRB”) stock, and stock in a privately held financial institution.

Gross Unrealized Losses and Fair Value

The fair values and gross unrealized losses on securities at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, segregated by those securities that have been in an unrealized loss position for less than 12 months and 12 months or longer, are presented below.

 

           Less than 12 Months                  12 Months or Longer            Total  
(Dollars in thousands)   

Fair

 

Value

    

Unrealized

 

Losses

    

Fair

 

Value

    

Unrealized

 

Losses

    

Fair

 

Value

    

Unrealized

 

Losses

 

 

 

September 30, 2018:

                 

Agency obligations

   $ 25,953        418        24,536        1,481      $ 50,489        1,899  

Agency RMBS

     51,338        1,622        65,789        3,608        117,127        5,230  

State and political subdivisions

     27,714        579        10,558        587        38,272        1,166  

 

 

Total

   $ 105,005               2,619               100,883               5,676      $ 205,888               8,295  

 

 

December 31, 2017:

                 

Agency obligations

   $ 14,381        99        20,353        805      $ 34,734        904  

Agency RMBS

     53,440        363        50,729        1,276        104,169        1,639  

State and political subdivisions

     2,009        22        10,155        215        12,164        237  

 

 

Total

   $       69,830        484        81,237        2,296      $       151,067        2,780  

 

 

For the securities in the previous table, the Company does not have the intent to sell and has determined it is not more likely than not that the Company will be required to sell the security before recovery of the amortized cost basis, which may be maturity. On a quarterly basis, the Company assesses each security for credit impairment. For debt securities, the Company evaluates, where necessary, whether credit impairment exists by comparing the present value of the expected cash flows to the securities’ amortized cost basis.

In determining whether a loss is temporary, the Company considers all relevant information including:

 

   

the length of time and the extent to which the fair value has been less than the amortized cost basis;

 

   

adverse conditions specifically related to the security, an industry, or a geographic area (for example, changes in the financial condition of the issuer of the security, or in the case of an asset-backed debt security, in the financial condition of the underlying loan obligors, including changes in technology or the discontinuance of a segment of the business that may affect the future earnings potential of the issuer or underlying loan obligors of the security or changes in the quality of the credit enhancement);

 

   

the historical and implied volatility of the fair value of the security;

 

   

the payment structure of the debt security and the likelihood of the issuer being able to make payments that increase in the future;

 

   

failure of the issuer of the security to make scheduled interest or principal payments;

 

   

any changes to the rating of the security by a rating agency; and

 

   

recoveries or additional declines in fair value subsequent to the balance sheet date.

 

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Agency obligations

The unrealized losses associated with agency obligations were primarily driven by changes in interest rates and not due to the credit quality of the securities. These securities were issued by U.S. government agencies or government-sponsored entities and did not have any credit losses given the explicit government guarantee or other government support.

Agency RMBS

The unrealized losses associated with agency residential mortgage-backed securities (“RMBS”) were primarily driven by changes in interest rates and not due to the credit quality of the securities. These securities were issued by U.S. government agencies or government-sponsored entities and did not have any credit losses given the explicit government guarantee or other government support.

Securities of U.S. states and political subdivisions

The unrealized losses associated with securities of U.S. states and political subdivisions were primarily driven by changes in interest rates and were not due to the credit quality of the securities. Some of these securities are guaranteed by a bond insurer, but management did not rely on the guarantee in making its investment decision. These securities will continue to be monitored as part of the Company’s quarterly impairment analysis, but are expected to perform even if the rating agencies reduce the credit rating of the bond insurers. As a result, the Company expects to recover the entire amortized cost basis of these securities.

The carrying values of the Company’s investment securities could decline in the future if the financial condition of an issuer deteriorates and the Company determines it is probable that it will not recover the entire amortized cost basis for the security. As a result, there is a risk that other-than-temporary impairment charges may occur in the future.

Other-Than-Temporarily Impaired Securities

Credit-impaired debt securities are debt securities where the Company has written down the amortized cost basis of a security for other-than-temporary impairment and the credit component of the loss is recognized in earnings. At September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Company had no credit-impaired debt securities and there were no additions or reductions in the credit loss component of credit-impaired debt securities during the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

Realized Gains and Losses

The following table presents the gross realized gains and losses on sales of securities.

 

         Quarter ended September 30,          Nine Months ended September 30,      
(Dollars in thousands)    2018      2017      2018      2017  

 

 

Gross realized gains

   $         —          49      $         —          51  

 

 

Realized gains, net

   $ —          49      $ —          51  

 

 

 

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NOTE 4: LOANS AND ALLOWANCE FOR LOAN LOSSES

 

(In thousands)   

September 30,

 

2018

   

December 31,

 

2017

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial

   $ 52,430     $ 59,086    

Construction and land development

     45,109       39,607    

Commercial real estate:

    

Owner occupied

     51,846       44,192    

Multi-family

     40,753       52,167    

Other

     157,551       142,674    

 

 

Total commercial real estate

     250,150       239,033    

Residential real estate:

    

Consumer mortgage

     57,143       59,540    

Investment property

     46,186       47,323    

 

 

Total residential real estate

     103,329       106,863    

Consumer installment

     9,942       9,588    

 

 

Total loans

     460,960       454,177    

Less: unearned income

     (633     (526)    

 

 

Loans, net of unearned income

   $     460,327     $     453,651    

 

 

Loans secured by real estate were approximately 86.5% of the Company’s total loan portfolio at September 30, 2018. At September 30, 2018, the Company’s geographic loan distribution was concentrated primarily in Lee County, Alabama, and surrounding areas.

In accordance with ASC 310, a portfolio segment is defined as the level at which an entity develops and documents a systematic method for determining its allowance for loan losses. As part of the Company’s quarterly assessment of the allowance, the loan portfolio is disaggregated into the following portfolio segments: commercial and industrial, construction and land development, commercial real estate, residential real estate, and consumer installment. Where appropriate, the Company’s loan portfolio segments are further disaggregated into classes. A class is generally determined based on the initial measurement attribute, risk characteristics of the loan, and an entity’s method for monitoring and determining credit risk.

The following describe the risk characteristics relevant to each of the portfolio segments and classes.

Commercial and industrial (“C&I”) — includes loans to finance business operations, equipment purchases, or other needs for small and medium-sized commercial customers. Also included in this category are loans to finance agricultural production. Generally, the primary source of repayment is the cash flow from business operations and activities of the borrower.

Construction and land development (“C&D”) — includes both loans and credit lines for the purpose of purchasing, carrying, and developing land into commercial developments or residential subdivisions. Also included are loans and credit lines for construction of residential, multi-family, and commercial buildings. Generally, the primary source of repayment is dependent upon the sale or refinance of the real estate collateral.

Commercial real estate (“CRE”) — includes loans disaggregated into three classes: (1) owner occupied, (2) multifamily and (3) other.

 

   

Owner occupied – includes loans secured by business facilities to finance business operations, equipment and owner-occupied facilities primarily for small and medium-sized commercial customers. Generally, the primary source of repayment is the cash flow from business operations and activities of the borrower, who owns the property.

 

   

Multi-family – primarily includes loans to finance income-producing multi-family properties. Loans in this class include loans for 5 or more unit residential property and apartments leased to residents. Generally, the primary source of repayment is dependent upon income generated from the real estate collateral. The underwriting of these loans takes into consideration the occupancy and rental rates, as well as the financial health of the borrower.

 

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Other – primarily includes loans to finance income-producing commercial properties that are not owner occupied. Loans in this class include loans for neighborhood retail centers, hotels, medical and professional offices, single retail stores, industrial buildings, and warehouses leased to local businesses. Generally, the primary source of repayment is dependent upon income generated from the real estate collateral. The underwriting of these loans takes into consideration the occupancy and rental rates, as well as the financial health of the borrower.

Residential real estate (“RRE”) — includes loans disaggregated into two classes: (1) consumer mortgage and (2) investment property.

 

   

Consumer mortgage – primarily includes first or second lien mortgages and home equity lines of credit to consumers that are secured by a primary residence or second home. These loans are underwritten in accordance with the Bank’s general loan policies and procedures which require, among other things, proper documentation of each borrower’s financial condition, satisfactory credit history, and property value.

 

   

Investment property – primarily includes loans to finance income-producing 1-4 family residential properties. Generally, the primary source of repayment is dependent upon income generated from leasing the property securing the loan. The underwriting of these loans takes into consideration the rental rates and property value, as well as the financial health of the borrower.

Consumer installment — includes loans to individuals both secured by personal property and unsecured. Loans include personal lines of credit, automobile loans, and other retail loans. These loans are underwritten in accordance with the Bank’s general loan policies and procedures which require, among other things, proper documentation of each borrower’s financial condition, satisfactory credit history, and, if applicable, property value.

 

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The following is a summary of current, accruing past due, and nonaccrual loans by portfolio segment and class as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017.

 

(In thousands)    Current     

Accruing

 

30-89 Days

 

Past Due

    

Accruing

 

Greater than

 

90 days

    

Total

 

Accruing

 

Loans

    

Non-

 

Accrual

        

Total

 

Loans

 

 

      

 

 

 

September 30, 2018:

                   

Commercial and industrial

   $ 52,420        10        —          52,430        —          $ 52,430   

Construction and land development

     44,832        241        —          45,073        36          45,109   

Commercial real estate:

                   

 Owner occupied

     51,846        —          —          51,846        —            51,846   

 Multi-family

     40,753        —          —          40,753        —            40,753   

 Other

     156,855        —          —          156,855        696          157,551   

 

 

  Total commercial real estate

     249,454        —          —          249,454        696          250,150   

Residential real estate:

                   

 Consumer mortgage

     56,889        60        —          56,949        194          57,143   

 Investment property

     46,060        126        —          46,186        —            46,186   

 

 

  Total residential real estate

     102,949        186        —          103,135        194          103,329   

Consumer installment

     9,917        17        —          9,934        8          9,942   

 

 

  Total

   $ 459,572        454        —          460,026        934        $ 460,960   

 

 

December 31, 2017:

                   

Commercial and industrial

   $ 59,047        8        —          59,055        31        $ 59,086  

Construction and land development

     39,607        —          —          39,607        —            39,607  

Commercial real estate:

                   

 Owner occupied

     44,192        —          —          44,192        —            44,192  

 Multi-family

     52,167        —          —          52,167        —            52,167  

 Other

     140,486        —          —          140,486        2,188          142,674  

 

 

  Total commercial real estate

     236,845        —          —          236,845        2,188          239,033  

Residential real estate:

                   

 Consumer mortgage

     58,195        746        —          58,941        599          59,540  

 Investment property

     46,871        312        —          47,183        140          47,323  

 

 

  Total residential real estate

     105,066        1,058        —          106,124        739          106,863  

Consumer installment

     9,517        57        —          9,574        14          9,588  

 

 

  Total

   $       450,082        1,123        —          451,205        2,972        $       454,177  

 

 

Allowance for Loan Losses

The Company assesses the adequacy of its allowance for loan losses prior to the end of each calendar quarter. The level of the allowance is based upon management’s evaluation of the loan portfolio, past loan loss experience, current asset quality trends, known and inherent risks in the portfolio, adverse situations that may affect a borrower’s ability to repay (including the timing of future payment), the estimated value of any underlying collateral, composition of the loan portfolio, economic conditions, industry and peer bank loan loss rates, and other pertinent factors, including regulatory recommendations. This evaluation is inherently subjective as it requires material estimates including the amounts and timing of future cash flows expected to be received on impaired loans that may be susceptible to significant change. Loans are charged off, in whole or in part, when management believes that the full collectability of the loan is unlikely. A loan may be partially charged-off after a “confirming event” has occurred, which serves to validate that full repayment pursuant to the terms of the loan is unlikely.

The Company deems loans impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable that the Company will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. Collection of all amounts due according to the contractual terms means that both the interest and principal payments of a loan will be collected as scheduled in the loan agreement.

 

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An impairment allowance is recognized if the fair value of the loan is less than the recorded investment in the loan. The impairment is recognized through the allowance. Loans that are impaired are recorded at the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, or if the loan is collateral dependent, the impairment measurement is based on the fair value of the collateral, less estimated disposal costs.

The level of allowance maintained is believed by management to be adequate to absorb probable losses inherent in the portfolio at the balance sheet date. The allowance is increased by provisions charged to expense and decreased by charge-offs, net of recoveries of amounts previously charged-off.

In assessing the adequacy of the allowance, the Company also considers the results of its ongoing internal and independent loan review processes. The Company’s loan review process assists in determining whether there are loans in the portfolio whose credit quality has weakened over time and evaluating the risk characteristics of the entire loan portfolio. The Company’s loan review process includes the judgment of management, the input from our independent loan reviewers, and reviews conducted by bank regulatory agencies as part of their examination process. The Company incorporates loan review results in the determination of whether or not it is probable that it will be able to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of a loan.

As part of the Company’s quarterly assessment of the allowance, management divides the loan portfolio into five segments: commercial and industrial, construction and land development, commercial real estate, residential real estate, and consumer installment. The Company analyzes each segment and estimates an allowance allocation for each loan segment.

The allocation of the allowance for loan losses begins with a process of estimating the probable losses inherent for each loan segment. The estimates for these loans are established by category and based on the Company’s internal system of credit risk ratings and historical loss data. The estimated loan loss allocation rate for the Company’s internal system of credit risk grades is based on its experience with similarly graded loans. For loan segments where the Company believes it does not have sufficient historical loss data, the Company may make adjustments based, in part, on loss rates of peer bank groups. At September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, and for the periods then ended, the Company adjusted its historical loss rates for the commercial real estate portfolio segment based, in part, on loss rates of peer bank groups.    

The estimated loan loss allocation for all five loan portfolio segments is then adjusted for management’s estimate of probable losses for several “qualitative and environmental” factors. The allocation for qualitative and environmental factors is particularly subjective and does not lend itself to exact mathematical calculation. This amount represents estimated probable inherent credit losses which exist, but have not yet been identified, as of the balance sheet date, and are based upon quarterly trend assessments in delinquent and nonaccrual loans, credit concentration changes, prevailing economic conditions, changes in lending personnel experience, changes in lending policies or procedures, and other factors. These qualitative and environmental factors are considered for each of the five loan segments and the allowance allocation, as determined by the processes noted above, is increased or decreased based on the incremental assessment of these factors.

The Company regularly re-evaluates its practices in determining the allowance for loan losses. Since the fourth quarter of 2016, the Company has increased its look-back period each quarter to incorporate the effects of at least one economic downturn in its loss history. The Company believes the extension of its look-back period is appropriate due to the risks inherent in the loan portfolio. Absent this extension, the early cycle periods in which the Company experienced significant losses would be excluded from the determination of the allowance for loan losses and its balance would decrease. For the quarter ended September 30, 2018, the Company increased its look-back period to 38 quarters to continue to include losses incurred by the Company beginning with the first quarter of 2009. The Company will likely continue to increase its look-back period to incorporate the effects of at least one economic downturn in its loss history. Other than expanding the look-back period each quarter, the Company has not made any material changes to its methodology that would impact the calculation of the allowance for loan losses or provision for loan losses for the periods included in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and statements of earnings.

 

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The following table details the changes in the allowance for loan losses by portfolio segment for the respective periods.

 

     September 30, 2018  
(In thousands)    Commercial and
industrial
    Construction
and land
development
    Commercial
real estate
    Residential
real estate
    Consumer
installment
    Total  

 

 

Quarter ended:

            

Beginning balance

   $ 600       787       2,197       1,017       149     $ 4,750    

Charge-offs

     —         —         —         (11     (7     (18)   

Recoveries

     13       —         —         19       21       53    

 

 

Net recoveries

     13       —         —         8       14       35    

Provision for loan losses

     (69     49       44       (28     4       —      

 

 

Ending balance

   $         544               836               2,241               997               167     $         4,785    

 

 

Nine months ended:

            

Beginning balance

   $ 653       734       2,126       1,071       173     $ 4,757    

Charge-offs

     (52     —         (39     (15     (9     (115)   

Recoveries

     59       —         —         52       32       143    

 

 

Net recoveries (charge-offs)

     7       —         (39     37       23       28    

Provision for loan losses

     (116     102       154       (111     (29     —      

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 544       836       2,241       997       167     $ 4,785    

 

 
     September 30, 2017  
(In thousands)    Commercial and
industrial
    Construction
and land
development
    Commercial
real estate
    Residential
real estate
    Consumer
installment
    Total  

 

 

Quarter ended:

            

Beginning balance

   $ 677       874       2,121       1,119       174     $ 4,965    

Charge-offs

     (449     —         —         (30     (10     (489)   

Recoveries

     39       133       —         20       2       194    

 

 

Net (charge-offs) recoveries

     (410     133       —         (10     (8     (295)   

Provision for loan losses

     237       (156     (60     (32     11       —      

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 504       851       2,061       1,077       177     $ 4,670    

 

 

Nine months ended:

            

Beginning balance

   $ 540       812       2,071       1,107       113     $ 4,643    

Charge-offs

     (449     —         —         (108     (16     (573)   

Recoveries

     45       347       —         97       11       500    

 

 

Net (charge-offs) recoveries

     (404     347       —         (11     (5     (73)   

Provision for loan losses

     368       (308     (10     (19     69       100    

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 504       851       2,061       1,077       177     $ 4,670    

 

 

 

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The following table presents an analysis of the allowance for loan losses and recorded investment in loans by portfolio segment and impairment methodology as of September 30, 2018 and 2017.    

 

     Collectively evaluated (1)      Individually evaluated (2)      Total  
     Allowance      Recorded      Allowance      Recorded      Allowance      Recorded  
     for loan      investment      for loan      investment      for loan      investment  
(In thousands)    losses      in loans      losses      in loans      losses      in loans  

 

 

September 30, 2018:

                 

Commercial and industrial

   $ 544        52,430        —          —          544        52,430  

Construction and land development

     836        45,109        —          —          836        45,109  

Commercial real estate

     2,241        249,292        —          858        2,241        250,150  

Residential real estate

     997        103,329        —          —          997        103,329  

Consumer installment

     167        9,942        —          —          167        9,942  

 

 

Total

   $         4,785        460,102        —          858        4,785        460,960  

 

 

September 30, 2017:

                 

Commercial and industrial

   $ 471        50,068        33        33        504        50,101  

Construction and land development

     851        47,455        —          —          851        47,455  

Commercial real estate

     2,045        229,700        16        2,680        2,061        232,380  

Residential real estate

     1,077        110,159        —          —          1,077        110,159  

Consumer installment

     177        9,877        —          —          177        9,877  

 

 

Total

   $ 4,621        447,259        49        2,713        4,670        449,972  

 

 

 

(1)

Represents loans collectively evaluated for impairment in accordance with ASC 450-20, Loss Contingencies (formerly FAS 5), and pursuant to amendments by ASU 2010-20 regarding allowance for non-impaired loans.

(2)

Represents loans individually evaluated for impairment in accordance with ASC 310-30, Receivables (formerly FAS 114), and pursuant to amendments by ASU 2010-20 regarding allowance for impaired loans.

Credit Quality Indicators

The credit quality of the loan portfolio is summarized no less frequently than quarterly using categories similar to the standard asset classification system used by the federal banking agencies. The following table presents credit quality indicators for the loan portfolio segments and classes. These categories are utilized to develop the associated allowance for loan losses using historical losses adjusted for qualitative and environmental factors and are defined as follows:

 

   

Pass – loans which are well protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor (or guarantors, if any) or by the fair value, less cost to acquire and sell, of any underlying collateral.

 

   

Special Mention – loans with potential weakness that may, if not reversed or corrected, weaken the credit or inadequately protect the Company’s position at some future date. These loans are not adversely classified and do not expose an institution to sufficient risk to warrant an adverse classification.

 

   

Substandard Accruing – loans that exhibit a well-defined weakness which presently jeopardizes debt repayment, even though they are currently performing. These loans are characterized by the distinct possibility that the Company may incur a loss in the future if these weaknesses are not corrected.

 

   

Nonaccrual – includes loans where management has determined that full payment of principal and interest is not expected.

 

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(In thousands)    Pass      Special
Mention
     Substandard
Accruing
     Nonaccrual      Total loans  

 

 

September 30, 2018:

              

Commercial and industrial

   $ 50,137        2,197        96        —        $ 52,430    

Construction and land development

     44,257        53        763        36        45,109    

Commercial real estate:

              

Owner occupied

     51,138        387        321        —          51,846    

Multi-family

     40,753        —          —          —          40,753    

Other

     155,490        988        377        696        157,551    

 

 

Total commercial real estate

     247,381        1,375        698        696        250,150    

Residential real estate:

              

Consumer mortgage

     51,236        2,439        3,274        194        57,143    

Investment property

     45,231        204        751        —          46,186    

 

 

Total residential real estate

     96,467        2,643        4,025        194        103,329    

Consumer installment

     9,786        79        69        8        9,942    

 

 

Total

   $ 448,028              6,347              5,651              934      $ 460,960    

 

 

December 31, 2017:

              

Commercial and industrial

   $ 58,842        94        119        31      $ 59,086    

Construction and land development

     39,049        90        468        —          39,607    

Commercial real estate:

              

Owner occupied

     43,615        240        337        —          44,192    

Multi-family

     52,167        —          —          —          52,167    

Other

     139,695        395        396        2,188        142,674    

 

 

Total commercial real estate

     235,477        635        733        2,188        239,033    

Residential real estate:

              

Consumer mortgage

     54,101        1,254        3,586        599        59,540    

Investment property

     46,463        53        667        140        47,323    

 

 

Total residential real estate

     100,564        1,307        4,253        739        106,863    

Consumer installment

     9,430        66        78        14        9,588    

 

 

Total

   $       443,362        2,192        5,651        2,972      $       454,177    

 

 

Impaired loans

The following tables present details related to the Company’s impaired loans. Loans that have been fully charged-off are not included in the following tables. The related allowance generally represents the following components that correspond to impaired loans:

 

   

Individually evaluated impaired loans equal to or greater than $500,000 secured by real estate (nonaccrual construction and land development, commercial real estate, and residential real estate loans).

 

   

Individually evaluated impaired loans equal to or greater than $250,000 not secured by real estate (nonaccrual commercial and industrial and consumer installment loans).

 

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The following tables set forth certain information regarding the Company’s impaired loans that were individually evaluated for impairment at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017.

 

     September 30, 2018  
(In thousands)    Unpaid principal
balance (1)
    

Charge-offs and
payments applied

(2)

     Recorded
investment (3)
           Related allowance  

 

      

 

 

 

With no allowance recorded:

 

Commercial real estate:

             

 Owner occupied

   $ 162        —           162        

 Other

     753        (57      696        

 

      

 Total commercial real estate

     915        (57      858        

 

      

 

 

 

 Total impaired loans

   $             915        (57      858      $          —    

 

      

 

 

 

 

(1)

Unpaid principal balance represents the contractual obligation due from the customer.

(2)

Charge-offs and payments applied represents cumulative charge-offs taken, as well as interest payments that have been applied against the outstanding principal balance subsequent to the loans being placed on nonaccrual status.

(3)

Recorded investment represents the unpaid principal balance less charge-offs and payments applied; it is shown before any related allowance for loan losses.

 

     December 31, 2017  
(In thousands)    Unpaid principal
balance (1)
     Charge-offs and
payments applied
(2)
     Recorded
investment (3)
           Related allowance  

 

      

 

 

 

With no allowance recorded:

 

Commercial real estate:

             

Other

   $ 3,630        (1,094      2,536        

 

      

Total commercial real estate

     3,630        (1,094      2,536        

 

      

Total

   $ 3,630        (1,094      2,536        

 

      

With allowance recorded:

 

Commercial and industrial

   $ 52        (21      31        $        31   

Commercial real estate:

             

Owner occupied

     175        —           175           11   

 

      

 

 

 

Total commercial real estate

     175        —           175           11   

 

      

 

 

 

Total

     227        (21      206           42   

 

      

 

 

 

Total impaired loans

   $ 3,857        (1,115      2,742        $        42   

 

      

 

 

 

 

(1)

Unpaid principal balance represents the contractual obligation due from the customer.

(2)

Charge-offs and payments applied represents cumulative charge-offs taken, as well as interest payments that have been applied against the outstanding principal balance subsequent to the loans being placed on nonaccrual status.

(3)

Recorded investment represents the unpaid principal balance less charge-offs and payments applied; it is shown before any related allowance for loan losses.

 

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The following table provides the average recorded investment in impaired loans and the amount of interest income recognized on impaired loans after impairment by portfolio segment and class during the respective periods.

 

         Quarter ended September 30, 2018              Nine months ended September 30, 2018      
     Average      Total interest      Average      Total interest  
     recorded      income      recorded      income  
(In thousands)    investment      recognized      investment      recognized  

 

 

Impaired loans:

 

Commercial and industrial

   $ —          —          12        —    

Commercial real estate:

           

Owner occupied

     164        2        168        7  

Other

     701        —          1,488        —    

 

 

Total commercial real estate

     865        2        1,656        7  

 

 

Total

   $ 865        2        1,668        7  

 

 
         Quarter ended September 30, 2017              Nine months ended September 30, 2017      
     Average      Total interest      Average      Total interest  
     recorded      income      recorded      income  
(In thousands)    investment      recognized      investment      recognized  

 

 

Impaired loans:

 

Commercial and industrial

   $ 126        —          55        —    

Construction and land development

     —          —          15        —    

Commercial real estate:

           

Owner occupied

     182        2        186        8  

Other

     2,148        —          1,971        —    

 

 

Total commercial real estate

     2,330        2        2,157        8  

 

 

Total

   $ 2,456        2        2,227        8  

 

 

Troubled Debt Restructurings

Impaired loans also include troubled debt restructurings (“TDRs”). In the normal course of business, management may grant concessions to borrowers that are experiencing financial difficulty. A concession may include, but is not limited to, delays in required payments of principal and interest for a specified period, reduction of the stated interest rate of the loan, reduction of accrued interest, extension of the maturity date, or reduction of the face amount or maturity amount of the debt. A concession has been granted when, as a result of the restructuring, the Bank does not expect to collect, where due, all amounts owed, including interest at the original stated rate. A concession may have also been granted if the debtor is not able to access funds elsewhere at a market rate for debt with similar risk characteristics as the restructured debt. In making the determination of whether a loan modification is a TDR, the Company considers the individual facts and circumstances surrounding each modification. As part of the credit approval process, the restructured loans are evaluated for adequate collateral protection in determining the appropriate accrual status at the time of restructure.

Similar to other impaired loans, TDRs are measured for impairment based on the present value of expected payments using the loan’s original effective interest rate as the discount rate, or the fair value of the collateral, less selling costs if the loan is collateral dependent. If the recorded investment in the loan exceeds the measure of fair value, impairment is recognized by establishing a valuation allowance as part of the allowance for loan losses or a charge-off to the allowance for loan losses. In periods subsequent to the modification, all TDRs are individually evaluated for possible impairment.

 

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The following is a summary of accruing and nonaccrual TDRs, which are included in the impaired loan totals, and the related allowance for loan losses, by portfolio segment and class as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017.

 

     TDRs  
(In thousands)    Accruing      Nonaccrual      Total             Related
Allowance
 

 

    

 

 

 

September 30, 2018

              

Commercial real estate:

              

Owner occupied

   $ 162        —          162           $ —     

Other

     —          696        696             —     

 

    

 

 

 

Total commercial real estate

     162        696        858             —     

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 162        696        858           $ —     

 

    

 

 

 

December 31, 2017

  

Commercial and industrial

   $ —          31        31           $ 31   

Commercial real estate:

              

Owner occupied

     175        —          175             11   

Other

     287        1,431        1,718             —     

 

    

 

 

 

Total commercial real estate

     462        1,431        1,893             11   

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $               462                      1,462                      1,924           $                 42   

 

    

 

 

 

The following table summarizes loans modified in a TDR during the respective periods both before and after their modification.

 

     Quarter ended September 30,      Nine Months ended September 30,  
            Pre-      Post -             Pre-      Post -  
            modification      modification             modification      modification  
     Number      outstanding      outstanding      Number      outstanding      outstanding  
     of      recorded      recorded      of      recorded      recorded  
(Dollars in thousands)    contracts      investment      investment      contracts      investment      investment  

 

 

2018:

 

              

Commercial real estate:

                 

Other

     1      $ 710        710        2      $ 1,447          1,447    

 

 

Total commercial real estate

     1        710        710        2        1,447          1,447    

 

 

Total

     1      $ 710        710        2      $ 1,447          1,447    

 

 

2017:

 

              

Commercial and industrial

     1      $ 34        34        1      $ 34          34    

Commercial real estate:

                 

Other

     —          —          —          1        1,275          1,266    

 

 

Total commercial real estate

     —          —          —          1        1,275          1,266    

 

 

Total

                     1      $                 34                        34                        2      $                 1,309          1,300    

 

 

The majority of the loans modified in a TDR during the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, included permitting delays in required payments of principal and/or interest or where the only concession granted by the Company was that the interest rate at renewal was considered to be less than a market rate.

 

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The following table summarizes the recorded investment in loans modified in a TDR within the previous 12 months for which there was a payment default (defined as 90 days or more past due) during the respective periods. During the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2017, there were no loans modified in a TDR within the previous 12 months for which there was a payment default (defined as 90 days or more past due).

 

                     Quarter ended September 30,                                           Nine Months ended September 30,                   
     Number of      Recorded      Number of      Recorded  
(Dollars in thousands)    Contracts      investment (1)      Contracts      investment (1)  

 

 

2018:

           

Commercial real estate:

           

 Other

     —        $ —          1      $ 1,259  

 

 

Total commercial real estate

     —          —          1        1,259  

 

 

Total

     —        $                 —          1      $                 1,259  

 

 

(1) Amount as of applicable month end during the respective period for which there was a payment default.     

NOTE 5: MORTGAGE SERVICING RIGHTS, NET    

Mortgage servicing rights (“MSRs”) are recognized based on the fair value of the servicing rights on the date the corresponding mortgage loans are sold. An estimate of the fair value of the Company’s MSRs is determined using assumptions that market participants would use in estimating future net servicing income, including estimates of prepayment speeds, discount rates, default rates, costs to service, escrow account earnings, contractual servicing fee income, ancillary income, and late fees. Subsequent to the date of transfer, the Company has elected to measure its MSRs under the amortization method. Under the amortization method, MSRs are amortized in proportion to, and over the period of, estimated net servicing income.

The Company has recorded MSRs related to loans sold without recourse to Fannie Mae. The Company generally sells conforming, fixed-rate, closed-end, residential mortgages to Fannie Mae. MSRs are included in other assets on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.

The Company evaluates MSRs for impairment on a quarterly basis. Impairment is determined by stratifying MSRs into groupings based on predominant risk characteristics, such as interest rate and loan type. If, by individual stratum, the carrying amount of the MSRs exceeds fair value, a valuation allowance is established. The valuation allowance is adjusted as the fair value changes. Changes in the valuation allowance are recognized in earnings as a component of mortgage lending income.

The following table details the changes in amortized MSRs and the related valuation allowance for the respective periods.

 

     Quarter ended September 30,     Nine Months ended September 30,  
(Dollars in thousands)    2018     2017     2018     2017  

 

 

MSRs, net:

        

Beginning balance

   $ 1,549     $ 1,762     $ 1,644     $ 1,952  

Additions, net

     61       72       175       165  

Amortization expense

     (115     (131     (324     (415

Decrease in valuation allowance

     —         —         —         1  

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 1,495     $ 1,703     $ 1,495     $ 1,703  

 

 

Valuation allowance included in MSRs, net:

 

   

Beginning of period

   $ —       $ —       $ —       $ 1  

End of period

     —         —         —         —    

 

 

Fair value of amortized MSRs:

        

Beginning of period

   $             2,659     $             2,520     $             2,528     $             2,678  

End of period

     2,615       2,441       2,615       2,441  

 

 

 

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NOTE 6: DERIVATIVE INSTRUMENTS

Financial derivatives are reported at fair value in other assets or other liabilities on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. The accounting for changes in the fair value of a derivative depends on whether it has been designated and qualifies as part of a hedging relationship. For derivatives not designated as part of a hedging relationship, the gain or loss is recognized in current earnings within other noninterest income on the accompanying consolidated statements of earnings. From time to time, the Company may enter into interest rate swaps (“swaps”) to facilitate customer transactions and meet their financing needs. Upon entering into these swaps, the Company enters into offsetting positions in order to minimize the risk to the Company. These swaps qualify as derivatives, but are not designated as hedging instruments.

Interest rate swap agreements involve the risk of dealing with counterparties and their ability to meet contractual terms. When the fair value of a derivative instrument is positive, this generally indicates that the counterparty or customer owes the Company, and results in credit risk to the Company. When the fair value of a derivative instrument is negative, the Company owes the customer or counterparty and therefore, has no credit risk.

The Company had no interest rate swap agreements at September 30, 2018. A summary of the Company’s interest rate swap agreements at December 31, 2017 is presented below.

 

                Other    
        Assets         
         Other    
        Liabilities         
 
                Estimated              Estimated      
(Dollars in thousands)    Notional              Fair Value                      Fair Value          

 

 

December 31, 2017:

        

Pay fixed / receive variable

   $ 3,617        —          52  

Pay variable / receive fixed

     3,617        52        —     

 

 

Total interest rate swap agreements

   $             7,234                52                52  

 

 

NOTE 7: FAIR VALUE

Fair Value Hierarchy

“Fair value” is defined by ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures , as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction occurring in the principal market (or most advantageous market in the absence of a principal market) for an asset or liability at the measurement date. GAAP establishes a fair value hierarchy for valuation inputs that gives the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. The fair value hierarchy is as follows:

 

   

Level 1—inputs to the valuation methodology are quoted prices, unadjusted, for identical assets or liabilities in active markets.

 

   

Level 2—inputs to the valuation methodology include quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active, or inputs that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

 

   

Level 3—inputs to the valuation methodology are unobservable and reflect the Company’s own assumptions about the inputs market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability.

Level changes in fair value measurements

Transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy are generally recognized at the end of each reporting period. The Company monitors the valuation techniques utilized for each category of financial assets and liabilities to ascertain when transfers between levels have been affected. The nature of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities generally is such that transfers in and out of any level are expected to be infrequent. For the nine months ended September 30, 2018, there were no transfers between levels and no changes in valuation techniques for the Company’s financial assets and liabilities.

 

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Assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis

Securities available-for-sale

Fair values of securities available for sale were primarily measured using Level 2 inputs. For these securities, the Company obtains pricing from third party pricing services. These third party pricing services consider observable data that may include broker/dealer quotes, market spreads, cash flows, benchmark yields, reported trades for similar securities, market consensus prepayment speeds, credit information, and the securities’ terms and conditions. On a quarterly basis, management reviews the pricing received from the third party pricing services for reasonableness given current market conditions. As part of its review, management may obtain non-binding third party broker quotes to validate the fair value measurements. In addition, management will periodically submit pricing provided by the third party pricing services to another independent valuation firm on a sample basis. This independent valuation firm will compare the price provided by the third party pricing service with its own price and will review the significant assumptions and valuation methodologies used with management.

Interest rate swap agreements

The carrying amount of interest rate swap agreements was included in other assets and accrued expenses and other liabilities on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. The Company had no interest rate swap agreements at September 30, 2018. The fair value measurements for our interest rate swap agreements were based on information obtained from a third party bank. This information is periodically tested by the Company and validated against other third party valuations. If needed, other third party market participants may be utilized to corroborate the fair value measurements for our interest rate swap agreements. The Company classified these derivative assets and liabilities within Level 2 of the valuation hierarchy. These swaps qualify as derivatives, but are not designated as hedging instruments.

The following table presents the balances of the assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, by caption, on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets by ASC 820 valuation hierarchy (as described above).

 

            Quoted Prices in      Significant         
            Active Markets      Other      Significant  
            for      Observable      Unobservable  
            Identical Assets      Inputs      Inputs  
(Dollars in thousands)    Amount      (Level 1)      (Level 2)      (Level 3)  

 

 

September 30, 2018:

           

Securities available-for-sale:

           

Agency obligations

   $ 50,489        —          50,489        —      

Agency RMBS

     122,040        —          122,040        —      

State and political subdivisions

     70,807        —          70,807        —      

 

 

Total securities available-for-sale

     243,336        —          243,336        —      

 

 

Total assets at fair value

   $ 243,336        —          243,336        —      

 

 

December 31, 2017:

           

Securities available-for-sale:

           

Agency obligations

   $ 53,062        —          53,062        —      

Agency RMBS

     133,072        —          133,072        —      

State and political subdivisions

     71,563        —          71,563        —      

 

 

Total securities available-for-sale

     257,697        —          257,697        —      

Other assets (1)

     52        —          52        —      

 

 

Total assets at fair value

   $         257,749        —                          257,749        —      

 

 

Other liabilities (1)

   $ 52        —          52        —      

 

 

Total liabilities at fair value

   $ 52                        —          52        —      

 

 

(1) Represents the fair value of interest rate swap agreements.

 

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Assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis

Loans held for sale

Loans held for sale are carried at the lower of cost or fair value. Fair values of loans held for sale are determined using quoted market secondary market prices for similar loans. Loans held for sale are classified within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.

Impaired Loans

Loans considered impaired under ASC 310-10-35, Receivables , are loans for which, based on current information and events, it is probable that the Company will be unable to collect all principal and interest payments due in accordance with the contractual terms of the loan agreement. Impaired loans can be measured based on the present value of expected payments using the loan’s original effective rate as the discount rate, the loan’s observable market price, or the fair value of the collateral less selling costs if the loan is collateral dependent.

The fair value of impaired loans was primarily measured based on the value of the collateral securing these loans. Impaired loans are classified within Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy. Collateral may be real estate and/or business assets including equipment, inventory, and/or accounts receivable. The Company determines the value of the collateral based on independent appraisals performed by qualified licensed appraisers. These appraisals may utilize a single valuation approach or a combination of approaches including comparable sales and the income approach. Appraised values are discounted for costs to sell and may be discounted further based on management’s historical knowledge, changes in market conditions from the date of the most recent appraisal, and/or management’s expertise and knowledge of the customer and the customer’s business. Such discounts by management are subjective and are typically significant unobservable inputs for determining fair value. Impaired loans are reviewed and evaluated on at least a quarterly basis for additional impairment and adjusted accordingly, based on the same factors discussed above.

Other real estate owned

Other real estate owned (“OREO”), consisting of properties obtained through foreclosure or in satisfaction of loans, are initially recorded at the lower of the loan’s carrying amount or the fair value of collateral less costs to sell upon transfer of the loans to other real estate. Subsequently, other real estate is carried at the lower of carrying value or fair value less costs to sell. Fair values are generally based on third party appraisals of the property and are classified within Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy. The appraisals are sometimes further discounted based on management’s historical knowledge, and/or changes in market conditions from the date of the most recent appraisal, and/or management’s expertise and knowledge of the customer and the customer’s business. Such discounts are typically significant unobservable inputs for determining fair value. In cases where the carrying amount exceeds the fair value, less costs to sell, a loss is recognized in noninterest expense.

Mortgage servicing rights, net

MSRs, net, included in other assets on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, are carried at the lower of cost or estimated fair value. MSRs do not trade in an active market with readily observable prices. To determine the fair value of MSRs, the Company engages an independent third party. The independent third party’s valuation model calculates the present value of estimated future net servicing income using assumptions that market participants would use in estimating future net servicing income, including estimates of prepayment speeds, discount rates, default rates, cost to service, escrow account earnings, contractual servicing fee income, ancillary income, and late fees. Periodically, the Company will review broker surveys and other market research to validate significant assumptions used in the model. The significant unobservable inputs include prepayment speeds or the constant prepayment rate (“CPR”) and the weighted average discount rate. Because the valuation of MSRs requires the use of significant unobservable inputs, all of the Company’s MSRs are classified within Level 3 of the valuation hierarchy.

 

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The following table presents the balances of the assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, by caption, on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and by FASB ASC 820 valuation hierarchy (as described above):

 

            Quoted Prices in                
            Active Markets      Other      Significant  
            for      Observable      Unobservable  
     Carrying      Identical Assets      Inputs      Inputs  
(Dollars in thousands)    Amount      (Level 1)      (Level 2)      (Level 3)  

 

 

September 30, 2018:

           

Loans held for sale

   $ 1,548        —          1,548        —     

Loans, net (1)

     858        —          —          858   

Other assets (2)

     1,632        —          —          1,632   

 

 

    Total assets at fair value

   $ 4,038        —          1,548        2,490   

 

 

December 31, 2017:

           

Loans held for sale

   $ 1,922        —          1,922        —     

Loans, net (1)

     2,700        —          —          2,700   

Other assets (2)

     1,644        —          —          1,644   

 

 

    Total assets at fair value

   $             6,266                        —                      1,922                    4,344   

 

 

 

(1)  

Loans considered impaired under ASC 310-10-35, Receivables . This amount reflects the recorded investment in impaired loans, net of any related allowance for loan losses.

 

(2)  

Represents MSRs, net and other real estate owned, both of which are carried at lower of cost or estimated fair value.

Quantitative Disclosures for Level 3 Fair Value Measurements

At September 30, 2018, the Company had no Level 3 assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis. For Level 3 assets measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis at September 30, 2018, the significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurements are presented below.

 

                        Weighted  
     Carrying                  Average  

(Dollars in thousands)                    

       Amount              Valuation Technique         

Significant Unobservable Input

         of Input      

Nonrecurring:

           

Impaired loans

   $ 858        Appraisal      Appraisal discounts (%)      52.4%    

Other real estate owned

     137        Appraisal      Appraisal discounts (%)      10.0%    

Mortgage servicing rights, net

     1,495        Discounted cash flow      Prepayment speed or CPR (%)      9.5%    
         Discount rate (%)      10.0%    

 

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

ASC 825, Financial Instruments , requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments, whether or not recognized on the face of the balance sheet, for which it is practicable to estimate that value. The assumptions used in the estimation of the fair value of the Company’s financial instruments are explained below. Where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on estimates using discounted cash flow analyses. Discounted cash flows can be significantly affected by the assumptions used, including the discount rate and estimates of future cash flows. The following fair value estimates cannot be substantiated by comparison to independent markets and should not be considered representative of the liquidation value of the Company’s financial instruments, but rather are a good-faith estimate of the fair value of financial instruments held by the Company. ASC 825 excludes certain financial instruments and all nonfinancial instruments from its disclosure requirements.

 

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The following methods and assumptions were used by the Company in estimating the fair value of its financial instruments:

Loans, net

Fair values for loans were calculated using discounted cash flows. The discount rates reflected current rates at which similar loans would be made for the same remaining maturities. Expected future cash flows were projected based on contractual cash flows, adjusted for estimated prepayments. In accordance with the prospective adoption of ASU No. 2016-01, the fair value of loans as of September 30, 2018 was measured using an exit price notion. The fair value of loans as of December 31, 2017 was measured using an entry price notion.

Loans held for sale

Fair values of loans held for sale are determined using quoted secondary market prices for similar loans.

Time Deposits

Fair values for time deposits were estimated using discounted cash flows. The discount rates were based on rates currently offered for deposits with similar remaining maturities.

Long-term debt

The carrying amount of the Company’s variable rate long-term debt approximates its fair value.

The carrying value, related estimated fair value, and placement in the fair value hierarchy of the Company’s financial instruments at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 are presented below. This table excludes financial instruments for which the carrying amount approximates fair value. Financial assets for which fair value approximates carrying value included cash and cash equivalents. Financial liabilities for which fair value approximates carrying value included noninterest-bearing demand deposits, interest-bearing demand deposits, and savings deposits. Fair value approximates carrying value in these financial liabilities due to these products having no stated maturity. Additionally, financial liabilities for which fair value approximates carrying value included overnight borrowings such as federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase.

 

                   Fair Value Hierarchy  
     Carrying      Estimated      Level 1      Level 2      Level 3  
(Dollars in thousands)    amount      fair value      inputs      inputs      Inputs  

 

 

September 30, 2018:

              

Financial Assets:

              

    Loans, net (1)

   $ 455,542      $ 452,124      $ —        $ —        $ 452,124   

    Loans held for sale

     1,548        1,594        —          1,594        —      

Financial Liabilities:

              

    Time Deposits

   $ 182,339      $ 182,485      $ —        $ 182,485      $ —      

 

 

December 31, 2017:

              

Financial Assets:

              

    Loans, net (1)

   $ 448,894      $ 447,468      $ —        $ —        $           447,468   

    Loans held for sale

     1,922        1,950        —          1,950        —      

Financial Liabilities:

              

    Time Deposits

   $             188,071      $             185,564      $               —        $             185,564      $ —      

    Long-term debt

     3,217        3,217        —          3,217        —      

 

 

(1) Represents loans, net of unearned income and the allowance for loan losses. In accordance with the prospective adoption of ASU No. 2016-01, the fair value of loans as of September 30, 2018 was measured using an exit price notion. The fair value of loans as of December 31, 2017 was measured using an entry price notion.

 

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ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

General

The following discussion and analysis is designed to provide a better understanding of various factors related to the results of operations and financial condition of the Company and the Bank. This discussion is intended to supplement and highlight information contained in the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and related notes for the quarters and nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, as well as the information contained in our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017 and our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q for the quarters ended March 31, 2018 and June 30, 2018.

Special Notice Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

Certain of the statements made in this discussion and analysis and elsewhere, including information incorporated herein by reference to other documents, are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of, and subject to, the protections of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, (the “Securities Act”) and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”).

Forward-looking statements include statements with respect to our beliefs, plans, objectives, goals, expectations, anticipations, assumptions, estimates, intentions and future performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may be beyond our control, and which may cause the actual results, performance, achievements, or financial condition of the Company to be materially different from future results, performance, achievements, or financial condition expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. You should not expect us to update any forward-looking statements.

All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be forward-looking statements. You can identify these forward-looking statements through our use of words such as “may,” “will,” “anticipate,” “assume,” “should,” “indicate,” “would,” “believe,” “contemplate,” “expect,” “estimate,” “continue,” “plan,” “point to,” “project,” “could,” “intend,” “target” and other similar words and expressions of the future. These forward-looking statements may not be realized due to a variety of factors, including, without limitation:

 

   

the effects of future economic, business, and market conditions and changes, domestic and foreign, including seasonality;

 

   

governmental monetary and fiscal policies;

 

   

legislative and regulatory changes, including changes in banking, securities, and tax laws, regulations and rules and their application by our regulators, including capital and liquidity requirements, and changes in the scope and cost of FDIC insurance;

 

   

changes in accounting policies, rules, and practices;

 

   

the risks of changes in interest rates on the levels, composition, and costs of deposits, loan demand, and the values and liquidity of loan collateral, securities, and interest sensitive assets and liabilities, and the risks and uncertainty of the amounts realizable;

 

   

changes in borrower credit risks and payment behaviors;

 

   

changes in the availability and cost of credit and capital in the financial markets, and the types of instruments that may be included as capital for regulatory purposes;

 

   

changes in the prices, values, and sales volumes of residential and commercial real estate;

 

   

the effects of competition from a wide variety of local, regional, national, and other providers of financial, investment, and insurance services, including the disruptive effects of financial technology and other competitors who are not subject to the same regulations as the Company and the Bank;

 

   

the failure of assumptions and estimates underlying the establishment of allowances for possible loan and other asset impairments, losses, valuations of assets and liabilities and other estimates;

 

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the risks of mergers, acquisitions and divestitures, including, without limitation, the related time and costs of implementing such transactions, integrating operations as part of these transactions and possible failures to achieve expected gains, revenue growth and/or expense savings from such transactions;

 

   

changes in our technology or products that may be more difficult, costly, or less effective than anticipated;

 

   

the effects of war, or other conflicts, acts of terrorism, or other catastrophic events that may affect general economic conditions;

 

   

cyber attacks and data breaches that may compromise our systems or customers’ information;

 

   

the failure of assumptions and estimates, as well as differences in, and changes to, economic, market, and credit conditions, including changes in borrowers’ credit risks and payment behaviors from those used in our loan portfolio stress tests and other evaluations;

 

   

the risk that our deferred tax assets, if any, could be reduced if estimates of future taxable income from our operations and tax planning strategies are less than currently estimated, and sales of our capital stock could trigger a reduction in the amount of net operating loss carry-forwards, if any, that we may be able to utilize for income tax purposes; and

 

   

other factors and information in this report and other filings that we make with the SEC under the Exchange Act, including our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017 and subsequent quarterly and current reports. See Part II, Item 1A. “RISK FACTORS”.

All written or oral forward-looking statements that are made by or attributable to us are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary notice. We have no obligation and do not undertake to update, revise or correct any of the forward-looking statements after the date of this report, or after the respective dates on which such statements otherwise are made.

Business

The Company was incorporated in 1990 under the laws of the State of Delaware and became a bank holding company after it acquired its Alabama predecessor, which was a bank holding company established in 1984. The Bank, the Company’s principal subsidiary, is an Alabama state-chartered bank that is a member of the Federal Reserve System and has operated continuously since 1907. Both the Company and the Bank are headquartered in Auburn, Alabama. The Bank conducts its business primarily in East Alabama, including Lee County and surrounding areas. The Bank operates 8 full-service branches in Auburn, Opelika, Notasulga, and Valley, Alabama. The Bank also operates loan production offices in Auburn and Phenix City, Alabama.

Summary of Results of Operations

 

     Quarter ended September 30,      Nine Months ended September 30,  
(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)    2018      2017      2018      2017  

 

 

Net interest income (a)

   $           6,575      $           6,565      $           19,484      $           19,156  

Less: tax-equivalent adjustment

     153        304        461        905  

 

 

Net interest income (GAAP)

     6,422        6,261        19,023        18,251  

Noninterest income

     791        968        2,483        2,597  

 

 

Total revenue

     7,213        7,229        21,506        20,848  

Provision for loan losses

     —          —          —          100  

Noninterest expense

     4,750        4,225        13,478        12,358  

Income tax expense

     488        868        1,594        2,369  

 

 

Net earnings

   $ 1,975      $ 2,136      $ 6,434      $ 6,021  

 

 

Basic and diluted earnings per share

   $ 0.54      $ 0.59      $ 1.77      $ 1.65  

 

 

(a) Tax-equivalent. See “Table 1 - Explanation of Non-GAAP Financial Measures.”

 

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Financial Summary

The Company’s net earnings were $6.4 million for the first nine months of 2018, compared to $6.0 million for the first nine months of 2017. Basic and diluted earnings per share were $1.77 per share for the first nine months of 2018, compared to $1.65 per share for the first nine months of 2017.

Net interest income (tax-equivalent) was $19.5 million for the first nine months of 2018, a 2% increase compared to $19.2 million for the first nine months of 2017. This increase was primarily due to loan growth and recent increases in short-term market interest rates. Average loans were up 4% to $452.6 million in the first nine months of 2018, compared to $436.7 million in the first nine months of 2017. The Company’s net interest margin (tax-equivalent) increased to 3.36% in the first nine months of 2018, compared to 3.26% for the first nine months of 2017 as yields on earning assets improved.

The Company recorded no provision for loan losses during the first nine months of 2018 and $0.1 million during the first nine months 2017. The provision for loan losses is based upon various estimates and judgements, including the absolute level of loans, loan growth, credit quality and the amount of net charge-offs.

Noninterest income was $2.5 million compared to $2.6 million for the first nine months of 2017. Noninterest expense was $13.5 million compared to $12.4 million for the first nine months of 2017. This increase in noninterest expense was primarily due to increases in salaries and benefits expense of $0.7 million and a $0.4 million loss during the period related to misappropriation of assets, for which we have filed a claim with our insurance provider.

Income tax expense was $1.6 million and $2.4 million for the first nine months of 2018 and 2017 reflecting an effective tax rate of 19.86% and 28.24%, respectively. The decrease in the effective tax rate was primarily due to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, signed into law December 22, 2017, which lowered the Company’s statutory federal tax rate from 34% to 21%.

The Company paid cash dividends of $0.72 per share in the first nine months of 2018, an increase of 4.3% from the same period of 2017. At September 30, 2018, the Bank’s regulatory capital ratios were well above the minimum amounts required to be “well capitalized” under current regulatory standards with a total risk-based capital ratio of 17.21%, a tier 1 leverage ratio of 11.01% and common equity tier 1 (“CET1”) of 16.31% at September 30, 2018.

In the third quarter of 2018, net earnings were $2.0 million, or $0.54 per share, compared to $2.1 million, or $0.59 per share, for the third quarter of 2017. Net interest income (tax-equivalent) was $6.6 million for the third quarter of 2018 and 2017. The Company recorded no provision for loan losses in the third quarter of 2018 and 2017. Noninterest income was $0.8 million in the third quarter of 2018 and $1.0 million for the third quarter of 2017. This decrease was primarily due to a decline in mortgage lending income. Noninterest expense was $4.8 million in the third quarter of 2018 compared to $4.2 million in the third quarter of 2017. This increase was mainly due to increases in salaries and benefits expense and a $0.4 million loss during the third quarter related to misappropriation of assets, for which we have filed a claim with our insurance provider. Income tax expense was $0.5 million for the third quarter of 2018, compared to $0.9 million in the third quarter of 2017. The Company’s effective tax rate for the third quarter of 2018 was 19.81%, compared to 28.89% in the third quarter of 2017. This decrease was due to the same factors described above.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The accounting and financial reporting policies of the Company conform with U.S. GAAP and with general practices within the banking industry. In connection with the application of those principles, we have made judgments and estimates which, in the case of the determination of our allowance for loan losses, our assessment of other-than-temporary impairment, recurring and non-recurring fair value measurements, the valuation of other real estate owned, and the valuation of deferred tax assets, were critical to the determination of our financial position and results of operations. Other policies also require subjective judgment and assumptions and may accordingly impact our financial position and results of operations.

 

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Allowance for Loan Losses

The Company assesses the adequacy of its allowance for loan losses prior to the end of each calendar quarter. The level of the allowance is based upon management’s evaluation of the loan portfolio, past loan loss experience, current asset quality trends, known and inherent risks in the portfolio, adverse situations that may affect a borrower’s ability to repay (including the timing of future payment), the estimated value of any underlying collateral, composition of the loan portfolio, economic conditions, industry and peer bank loan loss rates, and other pertinent factors, including regulatory recommendations. This evaluation is inherently subjective as it requires material estimates including the amounts and timing of future cash flows expected to be received on impaired loans that may be susceptible to significant change. Loans are charged off, in whole or in part, when management believes that the full collectability of the loan is unlikely. A loan may be partially charged-off after a “confirming event” has occurred, which serves to validate that full repayment pursuant to the terms of the loan is unlikely.

The Company deems loans impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable that the Company will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. Collection of all amounts due according to the contractual terms means that both the interest and principal payments of a loan will be collected as scheduled in the loan agreement.

An impairment allowance is recognized if the fair value of the loan is less than the recorded investment in the loan. The impairment is recognized through the allowance. Loans that are impaired are recorded at the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, or if the loan is collateral dependent, the impairment measurement is based on the fair value of the collateral, less estimated disposal costs.

The level of allowance maintained is believed by management to be adequate to absorb probable losses inherent in the portfolio at the balance sheet date. The allowance is increased by provisions charged to expense and decreased by charge-offs, net of recoveries of amounts previously charged-off.

In assessing the adequacy of the allowance, the Company also considers the results of its ongoing internal and independent loan review processes. The Company’s loan review process assists in determining whether there are loans in the portfolio whose credit quality has weakened over time and evaluating the risk characteristics of the entire loan portfolio. The Company’s loan review process includes the judgment of management, the input from our independent loan reviewers, and reviews that may have been conducted by bank regulatory agencies as part of their examination process. The Company incorporates loan review results in the determination of whether or not it is probable that it will be able to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of a loan.

As part of the Company’s quarterly assessment of the allowance, management divides the loan portfolio into five segments: commercial and industrial, construction and land development, commercial real estate, residential real estate, and consumer installment. The Company analyzes each segment and estimates an allowance allocation for each loan segment.

The allocation of the allowance for loan losses begins with a process of estimating the probable losses inherent for each loan segment. The estimates for these loans are established by category and based on the Company’s internal system of credit risk ratings and historical loss data. The estimated loan loss allocation rate for the Company’s internal system of credit risk grades is based on its experience with similarly graded loans. For loan segments where the Company believes it does not have sufficient historical loss data, the Company may make adjustments based, in part, on loss rates of peer bank groups. At September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, and for the periods then ended, the Company adjusted its historical loss rates for the commercial real estate portfolio segment based, in part, on loss rates of peer bank groups.

The estimated loan loss allocation for all five loan portfolio segments is then adjusted for management’s estimate of probable losses for several “qualitative and environmental” factors. The allocation for qualitative and environmental factors is particularly subjective and does not lend itself to exact mathematical calculation. This amount represents estimated probable inherent credit losses which exist, but have not yet been identified, as of the balance sheet date, and are based upon quarterly trend assessments in delinquent and nonaccrual loans, credit concentration changes, prevailing economic conditions, changes in lending personnel experience, changes in lending policies or procedures, and other influencing factors. These qualitative and environmental factors are considered for each of the five loan segments and the allowance allocation, as determined by the processes noted above, is increased or decreased based on the incremental assessment of these factors.

 

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The Company regularly re-evaluates its practices in determining the allowance for loan losses. Since the fourth quarter of 2016, the Company has increased its look-back period each quarter to incorporate the effects of at least one economic downturn in its loss history. The Company believes the extension of its look-back period is appropriate due to the risks inherent in the loan portfolio. Absent this extension, the early cycle periods in which the Company experienced significant losses would be excluded from the determination of the allowance for loan losses and its balance would decrease. For the quarter ended September 30, 2018, the Company increased its look-back period to 38 quarters to continue to include losses incurred by the Company beginning with the first quarter of 2009. The Company will likely continue to increase its look-back period to incorporate the effects of at least one economic downturn in its loss history. Other than expanding the look-back period each quarter, the Company has not made any material changes to its methodology that would impact the calculation of the allowance for loan losses or provision for loan losses for the periods included in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and statements of earnings.

Assessment for Other-Than-Temporary Impairment of Securities

On a quarterly basis, management makes an assessment to determine whether there have been events or economic circumstances to indicate that a security on which there is an unrealized loss is other-than-temporarily impaired. For debt securities with an unrealized loss, an other-than-temporary impairment write-down is triggered when (1) the Company has the intent to sell a debt security, (2) it is more likely than not that the Company will be required to sell the debt security before recovery of its amortized cost basis, or (3) the Company does not expect to recover the entire amortized cost basis of the debt security. If the Company has the intent to sell a debt security or if it is more likely than not that it will be required to sell the debt security before recovery, the other-than-temporary write-down is equal to the entire difference between the debt security’s amortized cost and its fair value. If the Company does not intend to sell the security or it is not more likely than not that it will be required to sell the security before recovery, the other-than-temporary impairment write-down is separated into the amount that is credit related (credit loss component) and the amount due to all other factors. The credit loss component is recognized in earnings and is the difference between the security’s amortized cost basis and the present value of its expected future cash flows. The remaining difference between the security’s fair value and the present value of future expected cash flows is due to factors that are not credit related and is recognized in other comprehensive income, net of applicable taxes.

Fair Value Determination

U.S. GAAP requires management to value and disclose certain of the Company’s assets and liabilities at fair value, including investments classified as available-for-sale and derivatives. ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures , which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accordance with U.S. GAAP and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. For more information regarding fair value measurements and disclosures, please refer to Note 7, Fair Value, of the consolidated financial statements that accompany this report.

Fair values are based on active market prices of identical assets or liabilities when available. Comparable assets or liabilities or a composite of comparable assets in active markets are used when identical assets or liabilities do not have readily available active market pricing. However, some of the Company’s assets or liabilities lack an available or comparable trading market characterized by frequent transactions between willing buyers and sellers. In these cases, fair value is estimated using pricing models that use discounted cash flows and other pricing techniques. Pricing models and their underlying assumptions are based upon management’s best estimates for appropriate discount rates, default rates, prepayments, market volatility, and other factors, taking into account current observable market data and experience.

These assumptions may have a significant effect on the reported fair values of assets and liabilities and the related income and expense. As such, the use of different models and assumptions, as well as changes in market conditions, could result in materially different net earnings and retained earnings results.

Other Real Estate Owned

OREO consists of properties obtained through foreclosure or in satisfaction of loans and is reported at the lower of cost or fair value of collateral, less estimated costs to sell at the date acquired, with any loss recognized as a charge-off through the allowance for loan losses. Additional OREO losses for subsequent valuation adjustments are determined on a specific property basis and are included as a component of other noninterest expense along with holding costs. Any gains or losses on disposal of OREO are also reflected in noninterest expense. Significant judgments and complex estimates are required in estimating the fair value of OREO, and the period of time within which such estimates can be considered current is significantly shortened during periods of market volatility. As a result, the net proceeds realized from sales transactions could differ significantly from appraisals, comparable sales, and other estimates used to determine the fair value of other OREO.

 

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Deferred Tax Asset Valuation

A valuation allowance is recognized for a deferred tax asset if, based on the weight of available evidence, it is more-likely-than-not that some portion or the entire deferred tax asset will not be realized. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income during the periods in which those temporary differences become deductible. Management considers the scheduled reversal of deferred tax liabilities, projected future taxable income, and tax planning strategies in making this assessment. Based upon the level of taxable income over the last three years and projections for future taxable income over the periods in which the deferred tax assets are deductible, management believes it is more likely than not that we will realize the benefits of these deductible differences at September 30, 2018. The amount of the deferred tax assets considered realizable, however, could be reduced if estimates of future taxable income are reduced.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Average Balance Sheet and Interest Rates

 

                                                                                   
     Nine Months ended September 30,  
     2018      2017  
     Average      Yield/      Average      Yield/  
(Dollars in thousands)    Balance      Rate      Balance      Rate  

 

  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loans and loans held for sale

     $ 453,881        4.73%        $ 437,707        4.70%  

Securities - taxable

     185,448        2.21%        198,842        2.15%  

Securities - tax-exempt

     71,219        4.12%        69,770        5.10%  

 

  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total securities

     256,667        2.74%        268,612        2.92%  

Federal funds sold

     30,092        1.75%        33,430        1.00%  

Interest bearing bank deposits

     35,729        1.80%        45,310        1.03%  

 

  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total interest-earning assets

     776,369        3.82%        785,059        3.72%  

 

  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Deposits:

           

NOW

     129,882        0.32%        125,968        0.19%  

Savings and money market

     222,013        0.38%        232,076        0.37%  

Time Deposits

     184,669        1.23%        200,690        1.18%  

 

  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total interest-bearing deposits

     536,564        0.66%        558,734        0.62%  

Short-term borrowings

     2,805        0.74%        3,626        0.52%  

Long-term debt

     1,367        4.47%        3,217        3.87%  

 

  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total interest-bearing liabilities

     540,736        0.67%        565,577        0.64%  

 

  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net interest income and margin (tax-equivalent)

     $ 19,484        3.36%        $ 19,156        3.26%  

 

  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net Interest Income and Margin

Net interest income (tax-equivalent) was $19.5 million for the first nine months of 2018 compared to $19.2 million for the first nine months of 2017. This increase was primarily due to improved yields on interest-earning assets and loan growth.

Expansion of our earning asset yields was primarily driven by loan growth and recent increases in short-term market interest rates, which positively impacted the yields on our short-term assets, including federal funds sold and interest bearing bank deposits. This expansion was partially offset by a decrease in the tax-equivalent yield on tax-exempt available-for-sale securities due to a reduction in the Company’s statutory federal tax rate from 34% to 21%.

The cost of total interest-bearing liabilities was largely unchanged in the first nine months of 2018 from the first nine months of 2017.

 

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The Company continues to deploy various asset liability management strategies to manage its risk to interest rate fluctuations. The Company’s net interest margin could experience pressure due to reduced earning asset yields during the extended period of low interest rates, increased competition for quality loan opportunities, and possible increases in our costs of funds, if the Federal Reserve continues its gradual increase in interest rates. The Company anticipates that this challenging, competitive environment will continue throughout 2018 and it is unclear what impact the reduction in corporate tax rates under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will have on the interest rates the Company is able to charge for loans or pay on deposits though it is believed it will increase competition.    However, the Company believes our net interest income should continue to increase in 2018 compared to 2017 primarily due to an increase in average loan balances.

Provision for Loan Losses

The provision for loan losses represents a charge to earnings necessary to provide an allowance for loan losses that management believes, based on its processes and estimates, should be adequate to provide for the probable losses on outstanding loans. The Company recorded no provision for loan losses for the first nine months of 2018 and $0.1 million for the first nine months of 2017. The provision for loan losses is based upon various factors, including the absolute level of loans, loan growth, the credit quality, and the amount of net charge-offs or recoveries.

Based upon its assessment of the loan portfolio, management adjusts the allowance for loan losses to an amount it believes should be appropriate to adequately cover its estimate of probable losses in the loan portfolio. The Company’s allowance for loan losses as a percentage of total loans was 1.04% at September 30, 2018, compared to 1.05% at December 31, 2017. While the policies and procedures used to estimate the allowance for loan losses, as well as the resulting provision for loan losses charged to operations, are considered adequate by management and are reviewed from time to time by our regulators, they are based on estimates and judgments and are therefore approximate and imprecise. Factors beyond our control (such as conditions in the local and national economy, local real estate markets, or industries) may have a material adverse effect on our asset quality and the adequacy of our allowance for loan losses resulting in significant increases in the provision for loan losses.

Noninterest Income

 

     Quarter ended September 30,      Nine Months ended September 30,  
(Dollars in thousands)    2018      2017      2018      2017  

 

 

Service charges on deposit accounts

   $         192      $         191      $         553      $         563    

Mortgage lending income

     115        254        487        558    

Bank-owned life insurance

     110        112        324        329    

Securities gains, net

     —          49        —          51    

Other

     374        362        1,119        1,096    

 

 

Total noninterest income

   $ 791      $ 968      $ 2,483      $ 2,597    

 

 

The Company’s income from mortgage lending was primarily attributable to the (1) origination and sale of new mortgage loans and (2) servicing of mortgage loans. Origination income, net, is comprised of gains or losses from the sale of the mortgage loans originated, origination fees, underwriting fees, and other fees associated with the origination of loans, which are netted against the commission expense associated with these originations. The Company’s normal practice is to originate mortgage loans for sale in the secondary market and to either sell or retain the associated MSRs when the loan is sold.

MSRs are recognized based on the fair value of the servicing right on the date the corresponding mortgage loan is sold. Subsequent to the date of transfer, the Company has elected to measure its MSRs under the amortization method. Servicing fee income is reported net of any related amortization expense.

MSRs are also evaluated for impairment on a quarterly basis. Impairment is determined by grouping MSRs by common predominant characteristics, such as interest rate and loan type. If the aggregate carrying amount of a particular group of MSRs exceeds the group’s aggregate fair value, a valuation allowance for that group is established. The valuation allowance is adjusted as the fair value changes. An increase in mortgage interest rates typically results in an increase in the fair value of the MSRs while a decrease in mortgage interest rates typically results in a decrease in the fair value of MSRs.

 

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The following table presents a breakdown of the Company’s mortgage lending income.

 

     Quarter ended September 30,      Nine Months ended September 30,  
(Dollars in thousands)    2018      2017      2018      2017  

 

 

Origination income

   $ 46      $ 190      $ 244      $ 366    

Servicing fees, net

     69        64        243        191    

Decrease in MSR valuation allowance

     —          —          —          1    

 

 

Total mortgage lending income

   $ 115      $ 254      $ 487      $ 558    

 

 

The decrease in mortgage lending income was due to a decrease in the volume of mortgage loans originated and sold as refinance activity declined. The decrease in origination income was partially offset by an increase in servicing fees, net as MSR amortization expense decreased.

Noninterest Expense

 

         Quarter ended September 30,              Nine Months ended September 30,      
(Dollars in thousands)    2018      2017      2018      2017  

 

 

Salaries and benefits

   $ 2,673      $ 2,516      $ 7,959      $ 7,289    

Net occupancy and equipment

     339        385        1,069        1,117    

Professional fees

     213        276        707        760    

FDIC and other regulatory assessments

     70        79        248        257    

Other

     1,455        969        3,495        2,935    

 

 

Total noninterest expense

   $ 4,750      $ 4,225      $ 13,478      $ 12,358    

 

 

The increase in noninterest expense was primarily due to routine annual increases in salaries and benefits expense and a $0.4 million loss during the period related to misappropriation of assets, for which we have filed a claim with our insurance provider.

Income Tax Expense

Income tax expense was $1.6 million and $2.4 million for the first nine months of 2018 and 2017 reflecting an effective tax rate of 19.86% and 28.24%, respectively. The decrease in the effective tax rate was primarily due to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, signed into law December 22, 2017, which lowered the Company’s statutory federal tax rate from 34% to 21%.

BALANCE SHEET ANALYSIS

Securities

Securities available-for-sale were $243.3 million at September 30, 2018 compared to $257.7 million at December 31, 2017. This decrease reflects a decrease in the fair value of securities available-for-sale of $7.0 million and a decrease in the amortized cost basis of securities available-for-sale of $7.3 million due to pay-downs and maturities. The decrease in the fair value of securities was primarily due to an increase in long-term interest rates. The average annualized tax-equivalent yields earned on total securities were 2.74% in 2018 and 2.92% in 2017.    This decrease in the tax-equivalent yields was primarily due to a decrease in the Company’s statutory federal tax rate from 34% to 21%.

 

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Loans

 

     2018     2017  
     Third     Second     First     Fourth     Third  
(In thousands)    Quarter     Quarter     Quarter     Quarter     Quarter  

 

 

Commercial and industrial

   $ 52,430       52,921       57,877       59,086       50,101   

Construction and land development

     45,109       42,675       35,910       39,607       47,455   

Commercial real estate

     250,150       246,129       234,345       239,033       232,380   

Residential real estate

     103,329       105,705       106,496       106,863       110,159   

Consumer installment

     9,942       9,824       9,685       9,588       9,877   

 

 

Total loans

     460,960       457,254       444,313       454,177       449,972   

Less: unearned income

     (633     (682     (509     (526     (594)  

 

 

Loans, net of unearned income

   $ 460,327       456,572       443,804       453,651       449,378   

 

 

Total loans, net of unearned income, were $460.3 million at September 30, 2018, compared to $453.7 million at December 31, 2017. The increase of $6.7 million was primarily due to increases in the construction and land development and commercial real estate portfolio segments, which was partially offset by pay-downs in the commercial and industrial and residential real estate loan portfolio segments. Four loan categories represented the majority of the loan portfolio at September 30, 2018: commercial real estate (54%), residential real estate (22%), construction and land development (10%) and commercial and industrial (11%). Approximately 21% of the Company’s commercial real estate loans were classified as owner-occupied at September 30, 2018.

Within the residential real estate portfolio segment, the Company had junior lien mortgages of approximately $12.0 million, or 3% of total loans, at September 30, 2018, compared to $12.6 million, or 3% of total loans, at December 31, 2017. For residential real estate mortgage loans with a consumer purpose, $0.6 million required interest-only payments at September 30, 2018, compared to $2.1 million at December 31, 2017. The Company’s residential real estate mortgage portfolio does not include any option ARM loans, subprime loans, or any material amount of other high-risk consumer mortgage products.

The average yield earned on loans and loans held for sale was 4.73% in the first nine months of 2018 and 4.70% in the first nine months of 2017.

The specific economic and credit risks associated with our loan portfolio include, but are not limited to, the effects of current economic conditions on our borrowers’ cash flows, real estate market sales volumes, valuations, availability and cost of financing properties, real estate industry concentrations, competitive pressures from a wide range of other lenders, deterioration in certain credits, interest rate fluctuations, reduced collateral values or non-existent collateral, title defects, inaccurate appraisals, financial deterioration of borrowers, fraud, and any violation of applicable laws and regulations.

The Company attempts to reduce these economic and credit risks through its loan-to-value guidelines for collateralized loans, investigating the creditworthiness of borrowers and monitoring borrowers’ financial position. Also, we have established and periodically review, lending policies and procedures. Banking regulations limit a bank’s credit exposure by prohibiting unsecured loan relationships that exceed 10% of its capital; or 20% of capital, if loans in excess of 10% of capital are fully secured. Under these regulations, we are prohibited from having secured loan relationships in excess of approximately $19.0 million. Furthermore, we have an internal limit for aggregate credit exposure (loans outstanding plus unfunded commitments) to a single borrower of $17.1 million. Our loan policy requires that the Loan Committee of the Board of Directors approve any loan relationships that exceed this internal limit. At September 30, 2018, the Bank had no relationships exceeding these limits.

 

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We periodically analyze our commercial loan portfolio to determine if a concentration of credit risk exists in any one or more industries. We use classification systems broadly accepted by the financial services industry in order to categorize our commercial borrowers. Loan concentrations to borrowers in the following classes exceeded 25% of the Bank’s total risk-based capital at September 30, 2018 (and related balances at December 31, 2017).

 

     September 30,      December 31,  
(In thousands)    2018      2017  

 

 

Lessors of 1 to 4 family residential properties

   $ 46,186      $ 47,323    

Multi-family residential properties

     40,753        52,167    

Shopping centers

     37,926        39,966    

Hotel/motel

     35,785        22,384    

Office buildings

     25,268        24,483    

 

 

Allowance for Loan Losses

The Company maintains the allowance for loan losses at a level that management believes appropriate to adequately cover the Company’s estimate of probable losses inherent in the loan portfolio. The allowance for loan losses was $4.8 million and $4.7 million at September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, which management believed to be adequate at each of the respective dates. The judgments and estimates associated with the determination of the allowance for loan losses are described under “Critical Accounting Policies.”

A summary of the changes in the allowance for loan losses and certain asset quality ratios for the third quarter of 2018 and the previous four quarters is presented below.

 

                                                                                                        
     2018     2017  
     Third     Second     First     Fourth     Third  
(Dollars in thousands)    Quarter     Quarter     Quarter     Quarter     Quarter  

 

 

Balance at beginning of period

   $ 4,750       4,732       4,757       4,670       4,965   

Charge-offs:

          

Commercial and industrial

     —         —         (52     —         (449)  

Commercial real estate

     —         (39     —         —         —     

Residential real estate

     (11     —         (4     —         (30)  

Consumer installment

     (7     —         (2     (23     (10)  

 

 

Total charge-offs

     (18     (39     (58     (23     (489)  

Recoveries

     53       57       33       510       194   

 

 

Net recoveries (charge-offs)

     35       18       (25     487       (295)  

Provision for loan losses

     —         —         —         (400     —     

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 4,785       4,750       4,732       4,757       4,670   

 

 

as a % of loans

     1.04     1.04       1.07       1.05       1.04   

as a % of nonperforming loans

     512     430       146       160       161   

Net (recoveries) charge-offs as % of average loans (a)

     (0.03 )%      (0.02     0.02       (0.43     0.27   

 

 

(a) Net (recoveries) charge-offs are annualized.

 

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As described under “Critical Accounting Policies,” management assesses the adequacy of the allowance prior to the end of each calendar quarter. The level of the allowance is based upon management’s evaluation of the loan portfolios, past loan loss experience, known and inherent risks in the portfolio, adverse situations that may affect the borrower’s ability to repay (including the timing of future payment), the estimated value of any underlying collateral, composition of the loan portfolio, economic conditions, industry and peer bank loan loss rates, and other pertinent factors. This evaluation is inherently subjective as it requires various material estimates and judgments, including the amounts and timing of future cash flows expected to be received on impaired loans that may be susceptible to significant change. The ratio of our allowance for loan losses to total loans outstanding was 1.04% at September 30, 2018, compared to 1.05% at December 31, 2017. In the future, the allowance to total loans outstanding ratio will increase or decrease to the extent the factors that influence our quarterly allowance assessment in their entirety either improve or weaken. In addition, our regulators, as an integral part of their examination process, will periodically review the Company’s allowance for loan losses, and may require the Company to make additional provisions to the allowance for loan losses based on their judgment about information available to them at the time of their examinations.

Nonperforming Assets

The Company had $1.1 million in nonperforming assets at September 30, 2018, compared to $3.0 million in nonperforming assets at December 31, 2017. The decrease in nonperforming assets was primarily due to the resolution of one nonperforming commercial real estate loan with a recorded investment of $1.3 million at December 31, 2017.

The table below provides information concerning total nonperforming assets and certain asset quality ratios for the third quarter of 2018 and the previous four quarters.

 

                                                                                                        
     2018      2017  
     Third     Second      First      Fourth      Third  
(Dollars in thousands)    Quarter     Quarter      Quarter      Quarter      Quarter  

 

 

Nonperforming assets:

             

Nonaccrual loans

   $ 934       1,104        3,239        2,972        2,902   

Other real estate owned

     137       137        —          —          103   

 

 

Total nonperforming assets

   $ 1,071       1,241        3,239        2,972        3,005   

 

 

as a % of loans and other real estate owned

     0.23     0.27        0.73        0.66        0.67   

as a % of total assets

     0.13     0.15        0.39        0.35        0.36   

Nonperforming loans as a % of total loans

     0.20     0.24        0.73        0.66        0.65   

Accruing loans 90 days or more past due

   $ —         —          —          —           

 

 

The table below provides information concerning the composition of nonaccrual loans for the third quarter of 2018 and the previous four quarters.

 

                                                                                                        
     2018      2017  
     Third      Second      First      Fourth      Third  
(In thousands)    Quarter      Quarter      Quarter      Quarter      Quarter  

 

 

Nonaccrual loans:

              

Commercial and industrial

   $ —          —          234        31        33   

Construction and land development

     36        36        —          —          —     

Commercial real estate

     696        710        2,463        2,188        2,500   

Residential real estate

     194        347        530        739        353   

Consumer installment

     8        11        12        14        16   

 

 

Total nonaccrual loans

   $ 934        1,104        3,239        2,972        2,902   

 

 

The Company discontinues the accrual of interest income when (1) there is a significant deterioration in the financial condition of the borrower and full repayment of principal and interest is not expected or (2) the principal or interest is 90 days or more past due, unless the loan is both well-secured and in the process of collection. At September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, the Company had $0.9 million and $3.0 million in loans on nonaccrual status.

 

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At September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 there were no loans 90 days or more past due and still accruing.

The table below provides information concerning the composition of other real estate owned for the third quarter of 2018 and the previous four quarters.

 

     2018      2017  
     Third      Second      First      Fourth      Third  
(In thousands)    Quarter      Quarter      Quarter      Quarter      Quarter  

 

 

Other real estate owned:

              

Residential

   $ 137        137        —          —          103  

 

 

Total other real estate owned

   $ 137        137        —          —          103  

 

 

Potential Problem Loans

Potential problem loans represent those loans with a well-defined weakness and where information about possible credit problems of a borrower has caused management to have serious doubts about the borrower’s ability to comply with present repayment terms. This definition is believed to be substantially consistent with the standards established by the FRB, the Company’s primary regulator, for loans classified as substandard, excluding nonaccrual loans. Potential problem loans, which are not included in nonperforming assets, amounted to $5.7 million, or 1.2% of total loans at September 30, 2018, and December 31, 2017, respectively.

The table below provides information concerning the composition of potential problem loans for the third quarter of 2018 and the previous four quarters.

 

                                                                                                        
     2018      2017  
     Third      Second      First      Fourth      Third  
(In thousands)    Quarter      Quarter      Quarter      Quarter      Quarter  

 

 

Potential problem loans:

              

Commercial and industrial

   $ 96        218        112        119        130   

Construction and land development

     763        657        450        468        273   

Commercial real estate

     698        710        725        733        767   

Residential real estate

     4,025        3,929        3,992        4,253        4,524   

Consumer installment

     69        51        70        78        96   

 

 

Total potential problem loans

   $ 5,651        5,565        5,349        5,651        5,790   

 

 

At September 30, 2018, approximately $0.1 million, or 1% of total potential problem loans were past due at least 30 days, but less than 90 days.

The following table is a summary of the Company’s performing loans that were past due at least 30 days, but less than 90 days, for the third quarter of 2018 and the previous four quarters.

 

                                                                                                        
     2018      2017  
     Third      Second      First      Fourth      Third  
(In thousands)    Quarter      Quarter      Quarter      Quarter      Quarter  

 

 

Performing loans past due 30 to 89 days:

              

Commercial and industrial

   $ 10        108        3        8        64   

Construction and land development

     241        138        253        —          175   

Residential real estate

     186        885        573        1,058        513   

Consumer installment

     17        7        9        57        33   

 

 

Total

   $ 454        1,138        838        1,123        785   

 

 

 

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Deposits

Total deposits were $719.3 million at September 30, 2018, compared to $757.7 million at December 31, 2017. Decreases of $43.6 million in interest-bearing deposits were partially offset by increases in noninterest-bearing deposits of $5.3 million during the first nine months of 2018. Of the $43.6 million decrease in interest-bearing deposits, $40.9 million was due to fluctuations in public depositor account balances. Noninterest-bearing deposits were $199.2 million, or 27.7% of total deposits, at September 30, 2018, compared to $193.9 million, or 25.6% of total deposits at December 31, 2017.

The average rate paid on total interest-bearing deposits was 0.67% in the first nine months of 2018 and 0.64% in the first nine months of 2017.

Other Borrowings

Other borrowings consist of short-term borrowings and long-term debt. Short-term borrowings generally consist of federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase with an original maturity less than one year. The Bank had available federal funds lines totaling $41.0 million with none outstanding at September 30, 2018, and at December 31, 2017, respectively. Securities sold under agreements to repurchase totaled $1.9 million at September 30, 2018 compared to $2.7 million at December 31, 2017.

The average rate paid on short-term borrowings was 0.74% in the first nine months of 2018 compared to 0.52% in the first nine months of 2017.

Long-term debt includes junior subordinated debentures related to trust preferred securities. The Company had $3.2 million in junior subordinated debentures related to trust preferred securities outstanding at December 31, 2017. On April 27, 2018, the Company formally redeemed all of the issued and outstanding junior subordinated debentures, including accrued and unpaid distributions, and the Trust formally redeemed all of the issued and outstanding trust preferred securities and common securities at par, including accrued and unpaid distributions. The junior subordinated debentures would have matured on December 31, 2033 and were redeemable since December 31, 2008.

The average rate paid on long-term debt was 4.50% in the first nine months of 2018 and 3.87% in the first nine months of 2017.

CAPITAL ADEQUACY

The Company’s consolidated stockholders’ equity was $85.5 million and $86.9 million as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively. The decrease from December 31, 2017 was primarily driven by an other comprehensive loss due to the change in unrealized losses on securities available-for-sale, net-of-tax, of $5.3 million and cash dividends paid of $2.6 million, which were partially offset by net earnings of $6.4 million.

On January 1, 2015, the Company and Bank became subject to the rules of the Basel III regulatory capital framework and related Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act changes. The new rules included the implementation of a new capital conservation buffer that is added to the minimum requirements for capital adequacy purposes. The capital conservation buffer is subject to a three year phase-in period that began on January 1, 2016 and will be fully phased-in on January 1, 2019 at 2.5%. The required phase-in capital conservation buffer during 2018 is 1.875%. A banking organization with a conservation buffer of less than the required amount will be subject to limitations on capital distributions, including dividend payments and certain discretionary bonus payments to executive officers. At September 30, 2018, the Bank’s ratio was sufficient to meet the fully phased-in conservation buffer.

The Bank’s tier 1 leverage ratio was 11.01%, CET1 risk-based capital ratio was 16.31%, tier 1 risk-based capital ratio was 16.31%, and total risk-based capital ratio was 17.21% at September 30, 2018. These ratios exceed the minimum regulatory capital percentages of 5.0% for tier 1 leverage ratio, 6.5% for CET1 risk-based capital ratio, 8.0% for tier 1 risk-based capital ratio, and 10.0% for total risk-based capital ratio to be considered “well capitalized.” The Bank’s capital conservation buffer was 9.21% at September 30, 2018.

 

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MARKET AND LIQUIDITY RISK MANAGEMENT

Management’s objective is to manage assets and liabilities to provide a satisfactory, consistent level of profitability within the framework of established liquidity, loan, investment, borrowing, and capital policies. The Bank’s Asset Liability Management Committee (“ALCO”) is charged with the responsibility of monitoring these policies, which are designed to ensure an acceptable asset/liability composition. Two critical areas of focus for ALCO are interest rate risk and liquidity risk management.

Interest Rate Risk Management

In the normal course of business, the Company is exposed to market risk arising from fluctuations in interest rates. ALCO measures and evaluates interest rate risk so that the Bank can meet customer demands for various types of loans and deposits. Measurements used to help manage interest rate sensitivity include an earnings simulation model and an economic value of equity (“EVE”) model.

Earnings simulation . Management believes that interest rate risk is best estimated by our earnings simulation modeling. Forecasted levels of earning assets, interest-bearing liabilities, and off-balance sheet financial instruments are combined with ALCO forecasts of market interest rates for the next 12 months and other factors in order to produce various earnings simulations and estimates. To help limit interest rate risk, we have guidelines for earnings at risk which seek to limit the variance of net interest income from gradual changes in interest rates. For changes up or down in rates from management’s flat interest rate forecast over the next 12 months, policy limits for net interest income variances are as follows:

 

   

+/- 20% for a gradual change of 400 basis points

   

+/- 15% for a gradual change of 300 basis points

   

+/- 10% for a gradual change of 200 basis points

   

+/- 5% for a gradual change of 100 basis points

At September 30, 2018, our earnings simulation model indicated that we were in compliance with the policy guidelines noted above.

Economic Value of Equity . EVE measures the extent that the estimated economic values of our assets, liabilities, and off-balance sheet items will change as a result of interest rate changes. Economic values are estimated by discounting expected cash flows from assets, liabilities, and off-balance sheet items, which establishes a base case EVE. In contrast with our earnings simulation model, which evaluates interest rate risk over a 12 month timeframe, EVE uses a terminal horizon which allows for the re-pricing of all assets, liabilities, and off-balance sheet items. Further, EVE is measured using values as of a point in time and does not reflect any actions that ALCO might take in responding to or anticipating changes in interest rates, or market and competitive conditions. To help limit interest rate risk, we have stated policy guidelines for an instantaneous basis point change in interest rates, such that our EVE should not decrease from our base case by more than the following:

 

   

45% for an instantaneous change of +/- 400 basis points

   

35% for an instantaneous change of +/- 300 basis points

   

25% for an instantaneous change of +/- 200 basis points

   

15% for an instantaneous change of +/- 100 basis points

At September 30, 2018, our EVE model indicated that we were in compliance with the policy guidelines noted above.

 

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Each of the above analyses may not, on its own, be an accurate indicator of how our net interest income will be affected by changes in interest rates. Income associated with interest-earning assets and costs associated with interest-bearing liabilities may not be affected uniformly by changes in interest rates. In addition, the magnitude and duration of changes in interest rates may have a significant impact on net interest income. For example, although certain assets and liabilities may have similar maturities or periods of repricing, they may react in different degrees to changes in market interest rates, and other economic and market factors, including market perceptions. Interest rates on certain types of assets and liabilities fluctuate in advance of changes in general market rates, while interest rates on other types of assets and liabilities may lag behind changes in general market rates. In addition, certain assets, such as adjustable rate mortgage loans, have features (generally referred to as “interest rate caps and floors”) which limit changes in interest rates. Prepayment and early withdrawal levels also could deviate significantly from those assumed in calculating the maturity of certain instruments. The ability of many borrowers to service their debts also may decrease during periods of rising interest rates or economic stress, which may differ across industries and economic sectors. ALCO reviews each of the above interest rate sensitivity analyses along with several different interest rate scenarios in seeking satisfactory, consistent levels of profitability within the framework of the Company’s established liquidity, loan, investment, borrowing, and capital policies.

The Company may also use derivative financial instruments to improve the balance between interest-sensitive assets and interest-sensitive liabilities, and as a tool to manage interest rate sensitivity while continuing to meet the credit and deposit needs of our customers. From time to time, the Company may enter into interest rate swaps to facilitate customer transactions and meet their financing needs. These interest rate swaps qualify as derivatives, but are not designated as hedging instruments. At September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Company had no derivative contracts designated as part of a hedging relationship to assist in managing its interest rate sensitivity.

Liquidity Risk Management

Liquidity is the Company’s ability to convert assets into cash equivalents in order to meet daily cash flow requirements, primarily for deposit withdrawals, loan demand and maturing obligations. Without proper management of its liquidity, the Company could experience higher costs of obtaining funds due to insufficient liquidity, while excessive liquidity can lead to a decline in earnings due to the cost of foregoing alternative higher-yielding investment opportunities.

Liquidity is managed at two levels. The first is the liquidity of the Company. The second is the liquidity of the Bank. The management of liquidity at both levels is essential, because the Company and the Bank are separate and distinct legal entities with different funding needs and sources, and each are subject to regulatory guidelines and requirements. The Company depends upon dividends from the Bank for liquidity to pay its operating expenses, debt obligations and dividends. The Bank’s payment of dividends depends on its earnings, liquidity, capital and the absence of any regulatory restrictions.

The primary source of funding and liquidity for the Company has been dividends received from the Bank. If needed, the Company could also issue common stock or other securities. Primary uses of funds by the Company include dividends paid to stockholders, stock repurchases, and interest payments on junior subordinated debentures issued by the Company in connection with trust preferred securities. On April 27, 2018, the Trust formally redeemed all of its issued and outstanding trust preferred securities at par, including accrued and unpaid distributions. The additional amount paid on April 27, 2018 for trust preferred securities not previously purchased by the Company was approximately $3.0 million, including accrued and unpaid distributions. All junior subordinated debentures related to the Trust were redeemed, including accrued and unpaid distributions, and retired as a result of the action. The Company now has no outstanding trust preferred securities or junior subordinated debentures, and the Trust has been dissolved.

Primary sources of funding for the Bank include customer deposits, other borrowings, repayment and maturity of securities, sales of securities, and the sale and repayment of loans. The Bank has access to federal funds lines from various banks and borrowings from the Federal Reserve discount window. In addition to these sources, the Bank may participate in the FHLB’s advance program to obtain funding for its growth. Advances include both fixed and variable terms and may be taken out with varying maturities. At September 30, 2018, the Bank had a remaining available line of credit with the FHLB of $239.5 million. At September 30, 2018, the Bank also had $41.0 million of available federal funds lines with none outstanding. Primary uses of funds include repayment of maturing obligations and growing the loan portfolio.

Management believes that the Company and the Bank have adequate sources of liquidity to meet all their respective known contractual obligations and unfunded commitments, including loan commitments and reasonable borrower, depositor, and creditor requirements over the next twelve months.

 

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Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements, Commitments, Contingencies and Contractual Obligations

At September 30, 2018, the Bank had outstanding standby letters of credit of $7.1 million and unfunded loan commitments outstanding of $61.1 million. Because these commitments generally have fixed expiration dates and many will expire without being drawn upon, the total commitment level does not necessarily represent future cash requirements. If needed to fund these outstanding commitments, the Bank could liquidate federal funds sold or a portion of securities available-for-sale, or draw on its available credit facilities.

Mortgage lending activities

Since 2009, we have primarily sold residential mortgage loans in the secondary market to Fannie Mae while retaining the servicing of these loans. The sale agreements for these residential mortgage loans with Fannie Mae and other investors include various representations and warranties regarding the origination and characteristics of the residential mortgage loans. Although the representations and warranties vary among investors, they typically cover ownership of the loan, validity of the lien securing the loan, the absence of delinquent taxes or liens against the property securing the loan, compliance with loan criteria set forth in the applicable agreement, compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws, among other matters.

As of September 30, 2018, the unpaid principal balance of residential mortgage loans, which we have originated and sold, but retained the servicing rights was $296.1 million. Although these loans are generally sold on a non-recourse basis, we may be obligated to repurchase residential mortgage loans or reimburse investors for losses incurred (make whole requests) if a loan review reveals a potential breach of seller representations and warranties. Upon receipt of a repurchase or make whole request, we work with investors to arrive at a mutually agreeable resolution. Repurchase and make whole requests are typically reviewed on an individual loan by loan basis to validate the claims made by the investor and to determine if a contractually required repurchase or make whole event has occurred. We seek to reduce and manage the risks of potential repurchases, make whole requests, or other claims by mortgage loan investors through our underwriting and quality assurance practices and by servicing mortgage loans to meet investor and secondary market standards.

The Company was required to repurchase $53 thousand in loans during the first nine months of 2018 as a result of representation and warranty provisions contained in the Company’s sale agreements with Fannie Mae, and had no pending repurchase requests at September 30, 2018.

We service all residential mortgage loans originated and sold by us to Fannie Mae. As servicer, our primary duties are to: (1) collect payments due from borrowers; (2) advance certain delinquent payments of principal and interest; (3) maintain and administer any hazard, title, or primary mortgage insurance policies relating to the mortgage loans; (4) maintain any required escrow accounts for payment of taxes and insurance and administer escrow payments; and (5) foreclose on defaulted mortgage loans or take other actions to mitigate the potential losses to investors consistent with the agreements governing our rights and duties as servicer.

The agreement under which we act as servicer generally specifies a standard of responsibility for actions taken by us in such capacity and provides protection against expenses and liabilities incurred by us when acting in compliance with the respective servicing agreements. However, if we commit a material breach of our obligations as servicer, we may be subject to termination if the breach is not cured within a specified period following notice. The standards governing servicing and the possible remedies for violations of such standards are determined by servicing guides issued by Fannie Mae as well as the contract provisions established between Fannie Mae and the Bank. Remedies could include repurchase of an affected loan.

Although repurchase and make whole requests related to representation and warranty provisions and servicing activities have been limited to date, it is possible that requests to repurchase mortgage loans or reimburse investors for losses incurred (make whole requests) may increase in frequency if investors more aggressively pursue all means of recovering losses on their purchased loans. As of September 30, 2018, we do not believe that this exposure is material due to the historical level of repurchase requests and loss trends, in addition to the fact that 99% of our residential mortgage loans serviced for Fannie Mae were current as of such date. We maintain ongoing communications with our investors and will continue to evaluate this exposure by monitoring the level and number of repurchase requests as well as the delinquency rates in our investor portfolios.

 

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Changes to Contractual Obligations

On April 27, 2018, the Trust formally redeemed all of its issued and outstanding trust preferred securities at par. The additional amount paid on April 27, 2018 for trust preferred securities not previously purchased by the Company was approximately $3.0 million, including accrued and unpaid distributions. All junior subordinated debentures related to the Trust were redeemed, including accrued and unpaid distributions, and retired as a result of the action.

The Company now has no outstanding trust preferred securities or junior subordinated debentures, and the Trust has been dissolved.

Effects of Inflation and Changing Prices

The Consolidated Financial Statements and related consolidated financial data presented herein have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP and practices within the banking industry which require the measurement of financial position and operating results in terms of historical dollars without considering the changes in the relative purchasing power of money over time due to inflation. Unlike most industrial companies, virtually all the assets and liabilities of a financial institution are monetary in nature. As a result, interest rates have a more significant impact on a financial institution’s performance than the effects of general levels of inflation.

CURRENT ACCOUNTING DEVELOPMENTS

The following ASUs have been issued by the FASB but are not yet effective.

 

   

ASU 2016-02, Leases;

 

   

ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments; and

 

   

ASU 2017-12, Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities.

Information about these pronouncements is described in more detail below.

ASU 2016-02, Leases, requires lessees to recognize the assets and liabilities that arise from leases on the balance sheet. A lessee should recognize in the statement of financial position a liability to make lease payments (the lease liability) and a right-of-use asset representing its right to use the underlying asset for lease term. In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-10 and 2018-11, which are designed to make targeted improvements to and clarifications regarding ASU 2016.02. The new guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018. The amendment should be applied at the beginning of the earliest period presented using a modified retrospective approach with earlier application permitted as of the beginning of an interim or annual reporting period. The Company is currently evaluating the impact this ASU will have on its consolidated financial statements.

ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326): – Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments , amends guidance on reporting credit losses for assets held at amortized cost basis and available for sale debt securities. For assets held at amortized cost basis, the new standard eliminates the probable initial recognition threshold in current GAAP and, instead, requires an entity to reflect its current estimate of all expected credit losses using a broader range of information regarding past events, current conditions and forecasts assessing the collectability of cash flows. The allowance for credit losses is a valuation account that is deducted from the amortized cost basis of the financial assets to present the net amount expected to be collected. For available for sale debt securities, credit losses should be measured in a manner similar to current GAAP, however the new standard will require that credit losses be presented as an allowance rather than as a write-down. The new guidance affects entities holding financial assets and net investment in leases that are not accounted for at fair value through net income. The amendments affect loans, debt securities, trade receivables, net investments in leases, off-balance sheet credit exposures, reinsurance receivables, and any other financial assets not excluded from the scope that have the contractual right to receive cash. For public business entities that are SEC filers, the new guidance is effective for annual and interim periods in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and early adoption is permitted beginning in 2019. The Company is currently evaluating the impact this ASU will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

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ASU 2017-12, Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities , improves the transparency and understandability of information conveyed to financial statement users about an entity’s risk management activities by better aligning the entity’s financial reporting for hedging relationships with those risk management activities and reduces the complexity of and simplifies the application of hedge accounting by preparers. For public entities, the guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods therein; however, early adoption by all entities is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating this ASU to determine whether its provisions will enhance the Company’s ability to employ risk management strategies, while improving the transparency and understanding of those strategies for financial statement users.

 

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Table 1 – Explanation of Non-GAAP Financial Measures

In addition to results presented in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), this quarterly report on Form 10-Q includes certain designated net interest income amounts presented on a tax-equivalent basis, a non-GAAP financial measure, including the presentation and calculation of the efficiency ratio.

The Company believes the presentation of net interest income on a tax-equivalent basis provides comparability of net interest income from both taxable and tax-exempt sources and facilitates comparability within the industry. Although the Company believes these non-GAAP financial measures enhance investors’ understanding of its business and performance, these non-GAAP financial measures should not be considered an alternative to GAAP. The reconciliations of these non-GAAP financial measures to their most directly comparable GAAP financial measures are presented below.

 

                                                                                                                            
     2018      2017  
     Third      Second      First      Fourth      Third  
(in thousands)    Quarter      Quarter      Quarter      Quarter      Quarter  

 

 

Net interest income (GAAP)

   $ 6,422        6,317        6,284        6,275        6,261  

Tax-equivalent adjustment

     153        152        156        300        304  

 

 

Net interest income (Tax-equivalent)

   $ 6,575        6,469        6,440        6,575        6,565  

 

 

 

     Nine Months ended September 30,  
(In thousands)    2018      2017  

 

 

Net interest income (GAAP)

   $             19,023                18,251  

Tax-equivalent adjustment

     461        905  

 

 

Net interest income (Tax-equivalent)

   $ 19,484        19,156  

 

 

 

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Table 2 - Selected Quarterly Financial Data

 

                                                                                                                            
     2018      2017  
     Third     Second      First