Quarterly Report (10-q)

Date : 08/07/2017 @ 4:41PM
Source : Edgar (US Regulatory)
Stock : Anavex Life Sciences Corp. (MM) (AVXL)
Quote : 4.84  0.17 (3.64%) @ 8:00PM

Quarterly Report (10-q)

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

☒  QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended: June 30, 2017

 

☐  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _____to _____

 

Commission File Number: 000-51652

 

  ANAVEX LIFE SCIENCES CORP.  

 

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

  Nevada     98-0608404  
(State or other jurisdiction of (IRS Employer
incorporation or organization) Identification No.)

 

  51 West 52 nd Street, 7 th Floor, New York, NY USA 10019  

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

  1-844-689-3939  

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

  N/A  


(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

☒  Yes   ☐  No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

☒  Yes   ☐  No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer   Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer (Do not check if a smaller reporting company) Smaller reporting company
Emerging growth company      

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act

☐  Yes   ☐  No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

☐  Yes   ☒  No

 

APPLICABLE ONLY TO CORPORATE ISSUERS:

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: 42,172,090 shares of common stock outstanding as of August 7, 2017.

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION F-1
ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS F-1
ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS. 3
ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISKS. 14
ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES. 15
PART II – OTHER INFORMATION 15
ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS. 15
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS. 15
ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS. 15
ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES. 15
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES 15
ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION. 15
ITEM 6. EXHIBITS. 16
SIGNATURES 17

 

ii  

 

 

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

ANAVEX LIFE SCIENCES CORP.

 

INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

June 30, 2017

 

( Unaudited )

 

F- 1

 

 

ANAVEX LIFE SCIENCES CORP.

INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

June 30, 2017 and September 30, 2016

 

    June 30,
2017 
    September 30,
2016
 
      (Unaudited)        
ASSETS                
Current                
Cash and cash equivalents   $ 24,793,424     $ 9,186,814  
Sales tax recoverable     8,216       79,347  
Prepaid expenses     52,694       180,124  
      24,854,334     9,446,285  
Deposits     52,396       52,396  
    $ 24,906,730   $ 9,498,681  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY                
Current                
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   $ 1,435,498     $ 3,119,993  
Deferred grant income     19,073       70,532  
      1,454,571     3,190,525  
                 
Commitments - Note 6                
                 
Capital stock                
Authorized:                
100,000,000 common shares, par value $0.001 per share                
Issued and outstanding:                
42,172,090 common shares (September 30, 2016 - 36,168,299)     42,173       36,169  
Additional paid-in capital     109,733,970       84,290,140  
Accumulated deficit     (86,323,984 )     (78,018,153 )
      23,452,159     6,308,156  
    $ 24,906,730   $ 9,498,681  

 

The Accompanying Notes are an Integral Part of these Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

 

F- 2

 

 

ANAVEX LIFE SCIENCES CORP.

INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

for the three and nine months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016

(Unaudited)

 

    Three months ended June 30,     Nine months ended June 30,  
    2017     2016     2017     2016  
Operating expenses                                
General and administrative   $ 1,405,026     $ 1,134,845     $ 3,647,224     $ 5,117,591  
Research and development     2,300,277       1,158,820       6,835,700       3,888,676  
                                 
Total operating expenses     (3,705,303 )     (2,293,665 )     (10,482,924 )     (9,006,267 )
                                 
Other income (expenses)                                
Grant income     69,146       47,767       121,116       113,701  
Research and development incentive income                 2,022,902       571,093  
Interest income, net     26,677       2,626       48,479       6,832  
Gain on settlement of accounts payable     75,204             75,204       151,402  
Financing related charges and adjustments           (8 )           (1,175 )
Foreign exchange gain (loss)     (65,932 )     8,924       (40,128 )     (37,637 )
                                 
Total other income, net     105,095       59,309       2,227,573       804,216  
Net loss before provision for income taxes     (3,600,208 )     (2,234,356 )     (8,255,351 )     (8,202,051 )
                                 
Income tax expense - current     (9,877 )     (6,000 )     (50,480 )     (23,615 )
                                 
Net loss and comprehensive loss   $ (3,610,085 )   $ (2,240,356 )   $ (8,305,831 )   $ (8,225,666 )
                                 
Loss per share                                
Basic and diluted   $ (0.09 )   $ (0.06 )   $ (0.21 )   $ (0.24 )
                                 
Weighted average number of shares outstanding                                
Basic and diluted     41,509,225       35,709,686       40,344,149       34,961,838  

 

The Accompanying Notes are an Integral Part of these Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

 

F- 3

 

 

ANAVEX LIFE SCIENCES CORP.

INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

for the nine months ended June 30, 2017

(Unaudited)

 

    2017     2016  
             
Cash Flows used in Operating Activities                
Net loss   $ (8,305,831 )   $ (8,225,666 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operations:                
Amortization and depreciation           746  
Accretion of debt discount           1,175  
Stock-based compensation     3,017,876       1,276,967  
Gain on settlement of accounts payable     (75,204 )     (151,402 )
Unrealized foreign exchange           2,649  
Changes in non-cash working capital balances related to operations:                
Sales tax recoverable     55,967       28,887  
Prepaid expenses and deposits     127,430       32,371  
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities     (1,594,127 )     (294,793 )
Deferred grant income     (51,459 )     (44,490 )
Net cash used in operating activities     (6,825,348 )     (7,373,556 )
                 
Cash Flows provided by Financing Activity                
Issuance of common shares, net of share issue costs     22,431,958       1,809,620  
Net cash provided by financing activity     22,431,958       1,809,620  
                 
Increase (decrease) in cash during the period     15,606,610       (5,563,936 )
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period     9,186,814       15,290,976  
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period   $ 24,793,424     $ 9,727,040  

 

The Accompanying Notes are an Integral Part of these Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

 

F- 4

 

 

ANAVEX LIFE SCIENCES CORP.

INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

For the nine months ended June 30, 2017

(Unaudited)

                               
      Common Stock                  
                      Additional                  
                      Paid-in       Accumulated          
      Shares       Par Value       Capital       Deficit       Total  
                                         
Balance, October 1, 2016     36,168,299     $ 36,169     $ 84,290,140     $ (78,018,153 )   $ 6,308,156  
Shares issued under purchase agreement                                        
Purchase shares     5,910,939       5,911       22,426,047             22,431,958  
Commitment shares     40,290       40       (40 )            
Shares issued upon exercise of warrants - cashless     52,562       53       (53 )            
Share based compensation                 3,017,876             3,017,876  
Net loss for the period                       (8,305,831 )     (8,305,831 )
Balance, June 30, 2017     42,172,090     $ 42,173     $ 109,733,970     $ (86,323,984 )   $ 23,452,159  

 

The Accompanying Notes are an Integral Part of these Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

 

F- 5

 

 

Anavex Life Sciences Corp.

Notes to the Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2017

( Unaudited )

 

Note 1 Business Description and Basis of Presentation

 

Business

 

Anavex Life Sciences Corp. (the “Company”) is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company engaged in the development of differentiated therapeutics for the treatment of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases including drug candidates to treat Alzheimer’s disease, other central nervous system (CNS) diseases, pain and various types of cancer. The Company’s lead compound ANAVEX 2-73 is being developed to treat Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and potentially other CNS diseases, including rare diseases, such as Rett syndrome.

 

Basis of Presentation

 

These interim condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared, without audit pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Accordingly, certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in the annual financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such rules and regulations. In the opinion of management, the disclosures are adequate to make the information presented not misleading.

 

These statements reflect all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, which in the opinion of management are necessary for fair presentation of the information contained herein. These interim condensed financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements included in its annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended September 30, 2016. The Company follows the same accounting policies in the preparation of interim reports.

 

Operating results for the nine months ended June 30, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending September 30, 2017.

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

The Company considers only those investments which are highly liquid, readily convertible to cash and that mature within three months from the date of purchase to be cash equivalents.

 

Research and Development Incentive Income

 

The Company participates, through its subsidiary in Australia, in the Australian government’s research and development incentive program. The research and development incentive program provides a refundable tax offset to eligible companies that engage in research and development activities in Australia. The Company recognizes as other income the amount received for qualified expenses, in the period they are received.

 

F- 6

 

 

Anavex Life Sciences Corp.

Notes to the Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2017

( Unaudited )

 

Note 1 Business Description and Basis of Presentation – cont’d

 

Basic and Diluted Loss per Share

 

Basic loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted loss per common share is computed similar to basic loss per common share except that the denominator is increased to include the weighted average number of all potentially dilutive securities convertible into shares of common stock that were outstanding during the period.

 

As of June 30, 2017, loss per share excludes 6,746,964 (September 30, 2016 – 6,008,309) potentially dilutive common shares related to outstanding options and warrants, as their effect was anti-dilutive.

 

Note 2 Recent Accounting Pronouncements

  

Recent Accounting Pronouncements Adopted During the Period

 

In June 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-12, Accounting for Share-Based Payments When the Terms of an Award Provide That a Performance Target Could Be Achieved after the Requisite Service Period (“ASU 2014-12”). ASU 2014-12 requires that a performance target that affects vesting, and that could be achieved after the requisite service period, be treated as a performance condition. As such, the performance target should not be reflected in estimating the grant date fair value of the award. This update further clarifies that compensation cost should be recognized in the period in which it becomes probable that the performance target will be achieved and should represent the compensation cost attributable to the period(s) for which the requisite service has already been rendered. The Company adopted this standard on October 1, 2016. The adoption of this standard did not have any effect on its financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

In August 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-15, Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern (“ASU 2014-15”). ASU 2014-15 explicitly requires management to assess an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern, and to provide related footnote disclosure in certain circumstances. The Company adopted this standard on October 1, 2016. The adoption of this standard did not have any effect on its financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

In April 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB), issued the Accounting Standards Update 2015-03, Interest - Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30) - Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs, that requires debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability to be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the debt liability rather than as an asset. Upon adoption, an entity must apply the new guidance retrospectively to all prior periods presented in the financial statements. The Company adopted this standard on October 1, 2016. The adoption of this standard did not have any effect on its financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

F- 7

 

 

Anavex Life Sciences Corp.

Notes to the Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2017

( Unaudited

 

Note 2 Recent Accounting Pronouncements – (cont’d)

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted

 

In May 2014, the FASB and the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) issued a converged standard on revenue recognition from contracts with customers, ASU 2014-09 (Topic 606 and IFRS 15). This standard will supersede nearly all existing revenue recognition guidance. ASU 2014-09 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017. The adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material impact for any period presented.

 

In November 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2015-17 “Income Taxes: Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes (“ASU 2015-17”). ASU 2015-17 eliminates the requirement to bifurcate deferred taxes between current and non-current on the balance sheet and requires that deferred tax liabilities and assets be classified as noncurrent on the balance sheet. ASU 2015-17 is effective for public entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, and for interim periods within those fiscal years. The amendments for ASU-2015-17 can be applied retrospectively or prospectively and early adoption is permitted. The adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material impact for any period presented.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-02, Leases (“ASU 2016-02”). The guidance would require lessees to recognize most leases on their balance sheets as lease liabilities with corresponding right –of use assets. The guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2018. The Company is currently evaluating the impact this guidance will have on its financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASC 2016-09, “ Compensation – Stock Compensation (Topic 718) – Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting ” (“ASU 2016-09”). These amendments are intended to simplify several aspects of the accounting for share-based payment transactions, including the income tax consequences, classification of awards as either equity or liabilities, and classification on the statement of cash flows. These amendments are effective for the Company on October 1, 2017. Early adoption is permitted. Entities have the option to apply the amendments on either a prospective basis or a modified retrospective basis. The Company is currently evaluating the impact this guidance will have on its financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230), Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (“ASU 2016-15”). ASU 2016-15 reduces the existing diversity in practice in financial reporting across all industries by clarifying certain existing principles in ASC 230, Statement of Cash Flows, (“ASC 230”) including providing additional guidance on how and what an entity should consider in determining the classification of certain cash flows. In addition, in November 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230), Restricted Cash (“ASU 2016-18”). ASU 2016-18 clarifies certain existing principles in ASC 230, including providing additional guidance related to transfers between cash and restricted cash and how entities present, in their statement of cash flows, the cash receipts and cash payments that directly affect the restricted cash accounts. These amendments are effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2017. Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of ASU 2016-15 and ASU 2016-18 will modify the Company’s current disclosures and reclassifications within the consolidated statement of cash flows but they are not expected to have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

F- 8

 

 

Anavex Life Sciences Corp.

Notes to the Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2017

( Unaudited )

 

Note 2 Recent Accounting Pronouncements – (cont’d)

 

In May 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2017-09, “Compensation–Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Scope of Modification Accounting,” clarifying when a change to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award must be accounted for as a modification. The new guidance requires modification accounting if the fair value, vesting condition or the classification of the award is not the same immediately before and after a change to the terms and conditions of the award. The new guidance is effective for the Company on a prospective basis beginning on October 1, 2018, with early adoption permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact this guidance will have on its financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Other than noted above, the Company does not expect the adoption of recently issued accounting pronouncements to have a significant impact on its results of operations, financial position or cash flow.

 

Note 3 Other Income

 

Deferred Grant Income

 

On June 19, 2015, the Company was awarded grant funding in the amount of $286,455. The grant has been received in exchange for a commitment to provide research and development for preclinical validation of Sigma-1 receptor agonism as potential treatment for Parkinson’s disease.

 

The grant income has been deferred and is being amortized to other income over the related commitment period as the related research and development expenditures are incurred. During the three and nine months ended June 30, 2017, the Company recognized $69,146 and $121,116, respectively (2016: $47,767 and $113,701) of this grant on its statement of operations within grant income.

 

Research and development tax incentive

 

During the three and nine months ended June 30, 2017, the Company received other income of $Nil and $2,022,902, respectively (2016: $Nil and $571,093, respectively) in respect of a research and development incentive program offered by the Australian government.

 

F- 9

 

 

Anavex Life Sciences Corp.

Notes to the Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2017

( Unaudited )

 

Note 4 Lincoln Park Purchase Agreement

 

On October 21, 2015, the Company entered into a $50,000,000 purchase agreement (the “2015 Purchase Agreement”) with Lincoln Park Capital Fund, LLC (“Lincoln Park”), pursuant to which the Company may sell and issue to Lincoln Park, and Lincoln Park is obligated to purchase, up to $50,000,000 in value of its shares of common stock from time to time over a 36-month period. In connection with the Purchase Agreement, the Company also entered into a registration rights agreement with Lincoln Park whereby the Company agreed to file registration statements with the Securities and Exchange Commission covering the shares of the Company’s common stock that may be issued to Lincoln Park under the Purchase Agreement.

 

The Company may direct Lincoln Park, at its sole discretion, and subject to certain conditions, to purchase up to 50,000 shares of common stock on any business day, provided that at least one business day has passed since the most recent purchase. The amount of a purchase may be increased under certain circumstances provided, however that Lincoln Park’s committed obligation under any single purchase shall not exceed $2,000,000. The purchase price of shares of common stock related to the future funding will be based on the then prevailing market prices of such shares at the time of sales as described in the 2015 Purchase Agreement.

 

In consideration for entering into the 2015 Purchase Agreement, the Company issued to Lincoln Park 179,598 shares of common stock as a commitment fee and agreed to issue up to 89,799 shares pro rata, when and if, Lincoln Park purchases at the Company’s discretion the $50,000,000 aggregate commitment.

 

During the nine months ended June 30, 2017, the Company issued to Lincoln Park an aggregate of 5,951,229 shares of common stock under the Purchase Agreement, including 5,910,939 shares of common stock for an aggregate purchase price of $22,431,958 and 40,290 commitment shares. At June 30, 2017, an amount of $26,210,241 remained available under the 2015 Purchase Agreement.

 

Note 5 Related Party Transactions

 

As at June 30, 2017, included in accounts payable and accrued liabilities was $41,195 (September 30, 2016: $59,264) owing to directors and officers of the Company for director fees and reimbursable expenses, and a former director and officer of the Company for unpaid fees.

 

Note 6 Commitments

 

a) Lease Commitment

 

The Company is committed to lease payments as follows:

 

Fiscal year ending September 30,        
2017     $ 28,047  
2018       112,189  
2019       56,094  
      $ 196,330  

 

F- 10

 

 

Anavex Life Sciences Corp.

Notes to the Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2017

( Unaudited )

 

Note 6 Commitments – (cont’d)

 

b) Litigation

 

The Company is subject to claims and legal proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of business. Such matters are inherently uncertain, and there can be no guarantee that the outcome of any such matter will be decided favorably to the Company or that the resolution of any such matter will not have a material adverse effect upon the Company’s consolidated financial statements. The Company does not believe that any of such pending claims and legal proceedings will have a material adverse effect on its consolidated financial statements.

 

c) Share Purchase Warrants

 

A summary of the status of Company’s outstanding share purchase warrants is presented below:

 

      Number of Shares     Weighted Average Exercise Price  
Balance, October 1, 2015       4,272,890     $ 2.11  
Exercised       (2,463,581 )   $ 1.67  
Balance, September 30, 2016       1,809,309     $ 2.70  
Exercised       (200,000 )   $ 3.00  
Balance,June 30, 2017       1,609,309     $ 2.66  

 

At June 30, 2017, the Company had share purchase warrants outstanding of 1,609,309, with a weighted average exercise price of $2.66 as follows:

 

Number     Exercise Price     Expiry Date
  1,262,180     $ 3.00     July 5, 2018
  30,000     $ 4.00     February 24, 2019
  277,127     $ 1.20     March 13, 2019
  1,252     $ 1.68     March 13, 2019
  31,250     $ 1.24     May 31, 2019
  7,500     $ 1.04     May 31, 2019
  1,609,309              

 

All of the warrants expiring on July 5, 2018 contain a contingent call provision whereby the Company may have the option to call for cancellation of all or any portion of the warrants for consideration equal to $0.001 per share, provided the quoted market price of the Company’s common stock exceeds $6.00 for a period of twenty consecutive trading days, subject to certain minimum volume restrictions and other restrictions as provided in the warrant agreements.

 

During the nine months ended June 30, 2017, 200,000 share purchase warrants were cashless exercised, resulting in the issuance of 52,562 shares of common stock.

 

F- 11

 

 

Anavex Life Sciences Corp.

Notes to the Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2017

( Unaudited )

 

Note 6 Commitments – (cont’d)

  

d) Stock–based Compensation Plan

 

2015 Stock Option Plan

 

On September 18, 2015, the Company’s board of directors approved a 2015 Omnibus Incentive Plan (the “2015 Plan”), which provides for the grant of stock options and restricted stock awards to directors, officers, employees and consultants of the Company.

 

The maximum number of our common shares reserved for issue under the plan is 6,050,553 shares subject to adjustment in the event of a change of the Company’s capitalization. As a result of the adoption of the 2015 Plan, no further option awards will be granted under any previously existing stock option plan. Stock option awards previously granted under previously existing stock option plans remain outstanding in accordance with their terms.

 

The 2015 Plan is administered by the board of directors, except that it may, in its discretion, delegate such responsibility to a committee of such board. The exercise price will be determined by the board of directors at the time of grant shall be at least equal to the fair market value on such date. If the grantee is a 10% stockholder on the grant date, then the exercise price shall not be less than 110% of fair market value of the Company’s shares of common stock on the grant date. Stock options may be granted under the 2015 Plan for an exercise period of up to ten years from the date of grant of the option or such lesser periods as may be determined by the board, subject to earlier termination in accordance with the terms of the 2015 Plan.

 

A summary of the status of Company’s outstanding stock purchase options is presented below:

 

      Number of Shares     Weighted Average
Exercise Price
    Weighted Average
Grant Date fair value
 
Outstanding at October 1, 2015       1,822,500     $ 2.00          
Granted       2,401,500     $ 5.22     $ 4.38  
Expired       (25,000 )   $ 14.68          
Outstanding at September 30, 2016       4,199,000     $ 3.76          
Granted       1,080,000     $ 5.55     $ 5.48  
Forfeited       (141,345 )   $ 4.02          
Outstanding at June 30, 2017       5,137,655     $ 4.13          
Exercisable at June 30, 2017       3,124,885     $ 2.89          
Exercisable at September 30, 2016       2,290,717     $ 2.41          

 

F- 12

 

 

Anavex Life Sciences Corp.

Notes to the Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2017

( Unaudited )

 

Note 6 Commitments – (cont’d)

 

d) Stock-based Compensation Plan – (cont’d)

 

At June 30, 2017, the following stock options were outstanding:

                       
Number of Shares           Aggregate   Remaining  
    Number   Exercise       Intrinsic   Contractual  
Total   Vested   Price   Expiry Date   Value   Life (yrs)  
  500,000     500,000   $ 1.60   July 5, 2023   $ 1,860,000     6.01  
  75,000     75,000   $ 1.20   May 7, 2024     309,000     6.85  
  125,000     93,750   $ 1.32   May 8, 2024     500,000     6.86  
  718,750     718,750   $ 0.92   April 2, 2025     3,162,500     7.76  
  29,167     29,167   $ 1.44   June 8, 2025     113,168     7.94  
  50,000     33,333   $ 1.76   June 15, 2025     178,000     7.96  
  273,542     177,500   $ 5.04   September 18, 2025     76,592     8.22  
  1,500     1,500   $ 5.64   September 30, 2025         8.25  
  31,250     18,230   $ 5.68   October 2, 2025         8.26  
  25,000     14,583   $ 8.98   October 16, 2025         8.30  
  1,500     1,500   $ 5.57   December 31, 2025         8.50  
  1,500     1,500   $ 4.90   March 31, 2026     630     8.75  
  1,500     1,500   $ 5.66   April 27, 2026         8.82  
  19,697     19,697   $ 4.09   May 18, 2026     24,227     8.88  
  1,500     1,500   $ 6.11   June 30, 2026         9.00  
  379,625     94,906   $ 6.26   July 5, 2026         9.01  
  861,429     215,357   $ 7.06   July 18, 2026         9.05  
  40,000     13,333   $ 3.06   September 7, 2026     90,400     9.19  
  1,006,696     1,006,696   $ 3.28   September 22, 2026     2,053,660     9.23  
  89,999     29,999   $ 3.63   October 3, 2026     152,098     9.26  
  15,000     3,750   $ 4.35   December 9, 2026     14,550     9.44  
  50,000       $ 5.39   February 7, 2027         9.61  
  40,000     6,666   $ 5.26   February 17, 2027     2,400     9.63  
  800,000     66,668   $ 5.92   May 12, 2027         9.86  
  5,137,655   3,124,885             $ 8,537,225        

 

The aggregate intrinsic value is calculated as the difference between the exercise price of the underlying awards and the quoted market price of the Company’s stock for the options that were in-the-money at June 30, 2017.

 

F- 13

 

 

Anavex Life Sciences Corp.

Notes to the Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2017

( Unaudited )

 

Note 6 Commitments – (cont’d)

 

d) Stock–based Compensation Plan – (cont’d)

 

The Company recognized stock based compensation expense of $1,159,716 and $3,017,876, respectively, during the three and nine months ended June 30, 2017 (2016: $230,239 and $666,967 respectively) in connection with the issuance and vesting of stock options in exchange for services, and $Nil and $Nil respectively (2016: $Nil and $610,000, respectively), in connection with the vesting of restricted stock in exchange for services. These amounts have been included in general and administrative expenses and research and development expenses on the Company’s statement of operations as follows:

 

  Three months ended June 30,   Nine months ended June 30,  
  2017   2016   2017   2016  
General and administrative $ 574,470   $ 127,473   $ 1,452,181   $ 715,991  
Research and development   585,246     102,766     1,565,695     560,976  
Total share based compensation $ 1,159,716   $ 230,239   $ 3,017,876   $ 1,276,967  

 

An amount of approximately $8,872,029 in stock based compensation is expected to be recorded over the remaining term of such options through March 31, 2020.

 

The fair value of each option award is estimated on the date of grant using the Black Scholes option pricing model based on the following weighted average assumptions:

 

  2017   2016  
Risk-free interest rate   1.98 %   1.67 %
Expected life of options (years)   6.82     6.63  
Annualized volatility   111.67 %   105.21 %
Dividend rate   0.00 %   0.00 %

 

The fair value of restricted stock compensation charges during the nine months ended June 30, 2016 was determined with reference to the quoted market price of the Company’s shares on the commitment date.

 

Note 7 Comparative Figures

 

Certain comparative figures have been reclassified to conform to the current year’s presentation.

 

F- 14

 

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q includes forward-looking statements. All statements other than statements of historical facts contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including statements regarding our anticipated future clinical and regulatory milestone events, future financial position, business strategy and plans and objectives of management for future operations, are forward-looking statements. The words “believe,” “may,” “estimate,” “continue,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “expect” and similar expressions, as they relate to us, are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements regarding the anticipated start dates, durations and completion dates of our ongoing and future clinical studies, statements regarding the anticipated designs of our future clinical studies, statements regarding our anticipated future regulatory submissions and statements regarding our anticipated future cash position. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events, including the responses we expect from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, (“FDA”), and other regulatory authorities and financial trends that we believe may affect our financial condition, results of operations, business strategy, preclinical and clinical trials, and financial needs. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks, uncertainties and assumptions including without limitation the risks described in “Risk Factors” in Part II, Item 1A of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. These risks are not exhaustive. Other sections of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q include additional factors which could adversely impact our business and financial performance. Moreover, we operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risk factors emerge from time to time and it is not possible for our management to predict all risk factors, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements. You should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. We cannot assure you that the events and circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements will be achieved or occur and actual results could differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. Except as required by applicable laws including the securities laws of the United States, we assume no obligation to update or supplement forward-looking statements.

 

As used in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” and “Anavex” mean Anavex Life Sciences Corp., unless the context clearly requires otherwise.

 

Our Current Business

 

Anavex Life Sciences Corp. (the “Company”) is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company engaged in the development of differentiated therapeutics for the treatment of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases including drug candidates to treat Alzheimer’s disease, other central nervous system (“CNS”) diseases, pain and various types of cancer. The Company’s lead compound ANAVEX TM 2-73 is being developed to treat Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and potentially other central nervous system diseases, including rare diseases, such as Rett syndrome.

 

In November 2016, a Phase 2a clinical trial going over 52 weeks was completed for ANAVEX TM 2-73 in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s patients. This open-label randomized trial met both primary and secondary endpoints, and was designed to assess the safety and exploratory efficacy of ANAVEX TM 2-73 in 32 patients. ANAVEX TM 2-73 targets sigma-1 and muscarinic receptors, which have been shown in preclinical studies to reduce stress levels in the brain believed to restore cellular homeostasis and to reverse the pathological hallmarks observed in Alzheimer’s disease. ANAVEX TM 2-73 showed no serious adverse events in a previously performed Phase 1 study. In preclinical studies, ANAVEX TM 2-73 demonstrated anti-amnesic and neuroprotective properties in various animal models including the transgenic mouse model Tg2576. In March 2016, we received approval from the Ethics Committee in Australia to extend the ongoing Phase 2a clinical trial, which had been requested by patients and their caregivers. The trial extension allows participants who completed 52 weeks in PART B to rollover into a new trial and continue taking ANAVEX TM 2-73 for an additional 104 weeks, providing an opportunity to gather extended safety data. The trial is independent of the Company’s planned larger Phase 2/3 double-blind, placebo-controlled study of ANAVEX TM 2-73 in Alzheimer’s disease.

 

3

 

 

In September 2016, the Company presented positive preclinical data for ANAVEX TM 2-73 in Parkinson’s disease, which demonstrated significant improvements on all measures: behavioral, histopathological, and neuroinflammatory endpoints. The study was funded by the Michael J Fox Foundation.

 

In February 2016, the Company presented positive preclinical data for ANAVEX TM 2-73 in Rett syndrome, a rare neurodevelopmental disease indication. The study was funded by the Rettsyndrome.org foundation. In January 2017, the Company was awarded a financial grant from the Rettsyndrome.org foundation of a minimum of $0.6 million to cover the majority of a planned U.S. multicenter Phase 2 clinical trial of ANAVEX TM 2-73 for the treatment of Rett syndrome. The Phase 2 trial is scheduled to begin in calendar 2017 and will be a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study of ANAVEX TM 2-73 in patients with Rett syndrome lasting up to 12 weeks. Primary and secondary endpoints include safety as well as Rett syndrome conditions such as cognitive impairment, motor impairment, behavioral symptoms and seizure activity.

 

We intend to identify and initiate discussions with potential commercial partners within the next 12 months. Further, we may acquire or develop new intellectual property and assign, license, or otherwise transfer our intellectual property to further our goals.

 

Our Pipeline

 

Our research and development pipeline includes one clinical drug candidate and several compounds in different stages of pre-clinical study.

 

Our proprietary SIGMACEPTOR™ Discovery Platform produced small molecule drug candidates with unique modes of action, based on our understanding of sigma receptors. Sigma receptors may be targets for therapeutics to combat many human diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease. When bound by the appropriate ligands, sigma receptors influence the functioning of multiple biochemical signals that are involved in the pathogenesis (origin or development) of disease.

 

Compounds that have been subjects of our research include the following:

 

ANAVEX TM 2-73

 

ANAVEX TM 2-73 may offer a disease-modifying approach in Alzheimer’s disease (“AD”) by using ligands that activate sigma-1 receptors.

 

In AD animal models, ANAVEX TM 2-73 has shown pharmacological, histological and behavioral evidence as a potential neuroprotective, anti-amnesic, anti-convulsive and anti-depressive therapeutic agent, due to its potent affinity to sigma-1 receptors and moderate affinities to M1-4 type muscarinic receptors. In addition, ANAVEX TM 2-73 has shown a potential dual mechanism which may impact both amyloid and tau pathology. In a transgenic AD animal model Tg2576, ANAVEX TM 2-73 induced a statistically significant neuroprotective effect against the development of oxidative stress in the mouse brain, as well as significantly increased the expression of functional and synaptic plasticity markers that is apparently amyloid-beta independent. It also significantly alleviated the learning and memory deficits developed over time in the animals, regardless of sex, both in terms of spatial working memory and long-term spatial reference memory.

 

Based on the results of pre-clinical testing, we initiated and completed a Phase 1 single ascending dose (“SAD”) clinical trial of ANAVEX TM 2-73 in 2011. In this Phase 1 SAD trial, the maximum tolerated single dose was defined per protocol as 55-60 mg. This dose is above the equivalent dose shown to have positive effects in mouse models of AD. There were no significant changes in laboratory or electrocardiogram parameters. ANAVEX TM 2-73 was well tolerated below the 55-60 mg dose with only mild adverse events in some subjects. Observed adverse events at doses above the maximum tolerated single dose included headache and dizziness, which were moderate in severity and reversible. These side effects are often seen with drugs that target CNS conditions, including AD.

 

4

 

 

The ANAVEX TM 2-73 Phase 1 SAD trial was conducted as a randomized, placebo-controlled study. Healthy male volunteers between the ages of 18 and 55 received single, ascending oral doses over the course of the trial. Study endpoints included safety and tolerability together with pharmacokinetic parameters. Pharmacokinetics includes the absorption and distribution of a drug, the rate at which a drug enters the blood and the duration of its effect, as well as chemical changes of the substance in the body. This study was conducted in Germany in collaboration with ABX-CRO, a clinical research organization and the Technical University of Dresden.

 

In December 2014, a Phase 2a clinical trial was initiated for ANAVEX 2-73 TM , which is being evaluated for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. The open-label randomized trial is designed to assess the safety and exploratory efficacy of ANAVEX TM 2-73 in 32 patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. ANAVEX TM 2-73 targets sigma-1 and muscarinic receptors, which have been shown in preclinical studies to reduce stress levels in the brain believed to restore cellular homeostasis and to reverse the pathological hallmarks observed in Alzheimer’s disease. ANAVEX TM 2-73 showed no serious adverse events in a previously performed Phase 1 study. In pre-clinical studies ANAVEX TM 2-73 demonstrated anti-amnesic and neuroprotective properties in various animal models including the transgenic mouse model Tg2576.

 

The Phase 2a study met both primary and secondary objectives of the study. The 31-week preliminary exploratory safety and efficacy data from the Phase 2a study of ANAVEX TM 2-73 in Alzheimer’s patients, with most also receiving donepezil, the current standard of care, demonstrated favorable safety, maximum tolerated dose, positive dose response, sustained efficacy response through 31 weeks for both cognitive and functional measures, as well as positive unexpected therapeutic response events. ANAVEX TM 2-73 continued to demonstrate a favorable adverse event profile through 31 weeks in a patient population of elderly Alzheimer’s patients with varying degrees of physical fragility. The most common side effects across all adverse events categories tended to be of mild severity grade 1, and were resolved with dose reductions that were anticipated within the adaptive design of the study protocol.

 

At 41 weeks, Alzheimer’s patients taking a daily oral dose of ANAVEX TM 2-73 in the exploratory, not yet dose optimized Phase 2a clinical trial, showed a stabilization of cognitive and functional measures. This data of stabilization is promising since Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive disease where current therapeutics are only able to temporarily slow the worsening of dementia symptoms and do not stop the disease from progressing. At 41 weeks, oral daily dosing between 10mg and 50mg, ANAVEX TM 2-73 was well tolerated, and no patients discontinued treatment due to adverse events. There were no clinically significant treatment-related adverse events, and no serious adverse events.

 

Pre-specified exploratory analyses included the cognitive (MMSE) and the functional (ADCS-ADL) changes from baseline. A continued stabilization of both cognitive (MMSE) and functional (ADCS-ADL) measures in patients treated with ANAVEX TM 2-73 was observed. This correlation was positive with all measured scores (MMSE, ADCS-ADL, Cogstate, HAM-D and EEG/ERP).

 

At 57 weeks, Alzheimer’s patients taking a daily oral dose between 10mg and 50mg, ANAVEX TM 2-73 was well tolerated. There were no clinically significant treatment-related adverse events and no serious adverse events. Despite non-optimized dosing of ANAVEX TM 2-73 throughout the 57-week study, continued significant improvements from baseline of cognitive, functional and behavioural scores in a group of patients were observed, respectively. This data will be analyzed using refined mathematical modeling methods in conjunction with the detailed pharmacokinetic (PK) information.

 

ANAVEX TM 2-73 data presented meets prerequisite information in order to progress into a Phase 2/3 placebo controlled study, which is currently in the preparation phase.

 

Preclinical data also validates ANAVEX TM 2-73 as a prospective platform drug for other neurodegenerative diseases beyond Alzheimer’s as well as neurodevelopmental diseases, more specifically, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, Rett syndrome, Angelman syndrome and Fragile X syndrome.

 

5

 

 

For Parkinson’s disease, data demonstrates significant improvements and restoration of function in a classic animal model of Parkinson’s disease. Significant improvements were seen on all measures tested: behavioral, histopathological, and neuroinflammatory endpoints.

 

For epilepsy, data demonstrates both significant and dose related improvement in the reduction of seizures, as well as significant synergy with each of three generations of epilepsy drugs currently on the market.

 

In Rett syndrome, a rare neurodevelopmental disease indication, administration of ANAVEX TM 2-73 resulted in both significant and dose related improvements in an array of behavioral paradigms in the MECP2 HET Rett syndrome disease model. In addition, in a further experiment sponsored by Rettsyndrome.org, ANAVEX TM 2-73 was evaluated in automatic visual response and respiration tests in 7-month old mice, an age at which advanced pathology is evident. Vehicle-treated MECP2 mice demonstrated fewer automatic visual responses than wild-type mice. Treatment with ANAVEX TM 2-73 for four weeks significantly increased the automatic visual response in the MECP2 Rett syndrome disease mouse.

 

The Company is currently in preparation for a Phase 2 clinical trial for the treatment of Rett syndrome.

 

In May 2017, the Company announced new preclinical data for ANAVEX TM 2-73 in the neurodevelopmental disorders Angelman syndrome and Fragile X syndrome. For Angelman syndrome, in a study sponsored by the Foundation for Angelman Syndrome, ANAVEX TM 2-73 was assessed in a mouse model for the development of audiogenic seizures.  The results indicated that ANAVEX TM 2-73 administration significantly reduced audiogenic-induced seizures. In Fragile X, in a recent study sponsored by Fraxa Research Foundation, data demonstrated that ANAVEX TM 2-73 restored hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression to normal levels. BDNF under-expression has been observed in many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative pathologies. BDNF signaling promotes maturation of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. ANAVEX TM 2-73 normalization of BDNF expression could be a contributing factor for the positive data observed in both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders.

 

Recent preclinical data presented also indicates that ANAVEX TM 2-73 demonstrates protective effects of the mitochondrial enzyme complexes I and IV during pathological conditions, which, if impaired, are believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases. The FDA has granted Orphan Drug Designation to ANAVEX 2-73 for the treatment of Rett syndrome and infantile spasms, in May 2016 and June 2016, respectively.

 

ANAVEX 3-71

 

ANAVEX 3-71, previously named AF710B is a preclinical drug candidate with a novel mechanism of action via sigma-1 receptor activation and M1 muscarinic allosteric modulation, which has been shown to enhance neuroprotection and cognition in Alzheimer’s disease. ANAVEX 3-71 is a CNS-penetrable mono-therapy that bridges treatment of both cognitive impairments with disease modifications. It is highly effective in very small doses against the major Alzheimer’s hallmarks in transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice, including cognitive deficits, amyloid and tau pathologies, and also has beneficial effects on inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunctions. ANAVEX 3-71 indicates extensive therapeutic advantages in Alzheimer’s and other protein-aggregation-related diseases given its ability to enhance neuroprotection and cognition via sigma-1 receptor activation and M1 muscarinic allosteric modulation.

 

A recent preclinical study examined the response of ANAVEX 3-71 in aged transgenic animal models, and showed a significant reduction in rate of cognitive deficit, amyloid beta pathology and inflammation with the administration of ANAVEX 3-71. In April 2016, the FDA granted Orphan Drug Designation to ANAVEX 3-71 for the treatment of Frontotemporal dementia.

 

In April 2017, new preclinical data was presented for ANAVEX 3-71 indicating that during pathological conditions, ANAVEX 3-71 demonstrated the formation of new synapses between neurons (synaptogenesis) without causing an abnormal increase in the number of astrocytes. In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, synaptogenesis is believed to be impaired. Additional preclinical data presented also indicates that in addition to reducing oxidative stress, ANAVEX 3-71 demonstrates protective effects of the mitochondrial enzyme complexes I and IV during pathological conditions, which, if impaired, are believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases.

 

6

 

 

ANAVEX 1-41

 

ANAVEX 1-41 is a sigma-1 agonist. Pre-clinical tests revealed significant neuroprotective benefits (i.e., protects nerve cells from degeneration or death) through the modulation of endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial and oxidative stress, which damages and destroys cells and is believed by some scientists to be a primary cause of AD. In addition, in animal models, ANAVEX 1-41 prevented the expression of caspase-3, an enzyme that plays a key role in apoptosis (programmed cell death) and loss of cells in the hippocampus, the part of the brain that regulates learning, emotion and memory. These activities involve both muscarinic and sigma-1 receptor systems through a novel mechanism of action.

 

Recent preclinical data presented also indicates that ANAVEX 1-41 demonstrates protective effects of the mitochondrial enzyme complexes I and IV during pathological conditions, which, if impaired, are believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases.

 

ANAVEX 1037

 

ANAVEX 1037 is designed for the treatment of prostate cancer. It is a low molecular weight, synthetic compound exhibiting high affinity for sigma-1 receptors at nanomolar levels and moderate affinity for sigma-2 receptors and sodium channels at micromolar levels. In advanced pre-clinical studies, this compound revealed antitumor potential with no toxic side effects. It has also been shown to selectively kill human cancer cells without affecting normal/healthy cells and also to significantly suppress tumor growth in immune-deficient mice models. Scientific publications describe sigma receptor ligands positively, highlighting the possibility that these ligands may stop tumor growth and induce selective cell death in various tumor cell lines. Sigma receptors are highly expressed in different tumor cell types. Binding by appropriate sigma-1 and/or sigma-2 ligands can induce selective apoptosis. In addition, through tumor cell membrane reorganization and interactions with ion channels, our drug candidates may play an important role in inhibiting the processes of metastasis (spreading of cancer cells from the original site to other parts of the body), angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels) and tumor cell proliferation.

 

ANAVEX 1066

 

ANAVEX 1066, a mixed sigma-1/sigma-2 ligand is designed for the potential treatment of neuropathic pain and visceral pain. ANAVEX 1066 was tested in two preclinical models of neuropathic and visceral pain that have been extensively validated in rats. In the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain, a single oral administration of ANAVEX 1066 dose dependently restored the nociceptive threshold in the affected paw to normal levels while leaving the contralateral healthy paw unchanged. Efficacy was rapid and remained significant for two hours. In a model of visceral pain, chronic colonic hypersensitivity was induced by injection of an inflammatory agent directly into the colon and a single oral administration of ANAVEX 1066 returned the nociceptive threshold to control levels in a dose-dependent manner. Companion studies in rats demonstrated the lack of any effects on normal gastrointestinal transit with ANAVEX 1066 and a favorable safety profile in a battery of behavioral measures.

 

Our compounds are in the pre-clinical and clinical testing stages of development, and there is no guarantee that the activity demonstrated in pre-clinical models will be shown in human testing.

 

7

 

 

Our Target Indications

 

We have developed compounds with potential application to two broad categories and several specific indications. The two categories are diseases of the central nervous system, and cancer. Specific indications include:

 

●  Alzheimer’s disease - In 2016, an estimated 5.4 million Americans were suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. The Alzheimer’s Association® reports that by 2025, 7.1 million Americans will be afflicted by the disease, a 30 percent increase from currently affected patients. Medications on the market today treat only the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and do not have the ability to stop its onset or its progression. There is an urgent and unmet need for both a disease modifying cure for Alzheimer’s disease as well as for better symptomatic treatments.
   
●  Parkinson’s disease – Parkinson’s disease is a progressive disease of the nervous system marked by tremors, muscular rigidity, and slow, imprecise movement. It is associated with degeneration of the basal ganglia of the brain and a deficiency of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Parkinson’s disease afflicts more than 10 million people worldwide, typically middle-aged and elderly people. The Parkinson’s disease market is set to expand from $2.1 billion in 2014 to $3.2 billion by 2021, according to business intelligence provider GBI Research.
   
●  Rett syndrome - Rett syndrome is a rare non-inherited genetic postnatal progressive neurodevelopmental disorder that occurs almost exclusively in girls and leads to severe impairments, affecting nearly every aspect of the child’s life: their ability to speak, walk, eat, and even breathe easily. Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene and strikes all racial and ethnic groups and occurs worldwide in approximately 1 in every 10,000-15,000 live female births.
   
 ● Depression - Depression is a major cause of morbidity worldwide according to the World Health Organization. Pharmaceutical treatment for depression is dominated by blockbuster brands, with the leading nine brands accounting for approximately 75% of total sales. However, the dominance of the leading brands is waning, largely due to the effects of patent expiration and generic competition.
   
 ● Epilepsy - Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. These seizures are transient signs and/or symptoms of abnormal, excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, epilepsy affects 2.2 million Americans. Today, epilepsy is often controlled, but not cured, with medication that is categorized as older traditional anti-epileptic drugs and second generation anti-epileptic drugs. Because epilepsy afflicts sufferers in different ways, there is a need for drugs used in combination with both traditional anti-epileptic drugs and second generation anti-epileptic drugs. GBI Research estimates that the epilepsy market will increase to $4.5 billion by 2019.
   
 ● Neuropathic Pain – We define neuralgia, or neuropathic pain, as pain that is not related to activation of pain receptor cells in any part of the body. Neuralgia is more difficult to treat than some other types of pain because it does not respond well to normal pain medications. Special medications have become more specific to neuralgia and typically fall under the category of membrane stabilizing drugs or antidepressants.
   
 ● Malignant Melanoma - Predominantly a skin cancer, malignant melanoma can also occur in melanocytes found in the bowel and the eye. Malignant melanoma accounts for 75% of all deaths associated with skin cancer. The treatment includes surgical removal of the tumor, adjuvant treatment, chemo and immunotherapy, or radiation therapy. According to IMS Health the worldwide malignant melanoma market is expected to grow to $4.4 billion by 2022.
   
●  Prostate Cancer – Specific to men, prostate cancer is a form of cancer that develops in the prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. The cancer cells may metastasize from the prostate to other parts of the body, particularly the bones and lymph nodes. Drug therapeutics for prostate cancer are expected to increase to nearly $18.6 billion in 2017 according to BCC Research.
   
●  Pancreatic Cancer - Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm of the pancreas. In the United States, approximately 45,000 new cases of pancreatic cancer will be diagnosed this year and approximately 38,000 patients will die as a result of their cancer. Sales predictions by GBI Research forecast that the market for the pharmaceutical treatment of pancreatic cancer in the United States and five largest European countries will increase to $2.9 billion by 2021.

 

8

 

 

Financial Highlights

 

We had cash of $24.8 million at June 30, 2017, compared to $9.2 million at September 30, 2016. The increase in cash is primarily a result of the sale of shares of common stock for aggregate proceeds of $22.4 million under a Purchase Agreement by and between the Company and Lincoln Park Capital Fund, LLC (“Lincoln Park”) dated October 21, 2015 (the “Purchase Agreement”). During the fiscal year to the end of our third quarter, we also received $2.0 million in other income from the Australian Tax Office, as part of a government sponsored research and development incentive program.

 

Operating expenses for the third quarter of fiscal 2017 were $3.7 million, compared to $2.3 million for the comparable quarter in fiscal 2016. The principal reason for the increase in operating costs was due to an increase in research and development costs, as a result of increased preclinical activities, as well as clinical preparatory activities and the ongoing Phase 2a clinical trial extension.

 

We expect our research and development expenses will continue to increase as we proceed into a Phase 2/3 clinical study for Alzheimer’s disease, a Phase 2 trial for Rett syndrome, a Phase 2 study in Parkinson’s disease and continue to advance other auxiliary research and development activities. We continue to target potential research partners to further advance our pipeline compounds.

 

Net loss for the third quarter of fiscal 2017 was $3.6 million, or $0.09 per share, as compared to $2.2 million, or $0.06 per share in the comparable quarter in fiscal 2016.

 

Results of Operations

 

Revenue

 

We have not earned any revenues since our inception on January 23, 2004. We do not anticipate earning any revenues until we can establish an alliance with other companies to develop, co-develop, license, acquire or market our products.

 

Three months ended June 30, 2017 compared to three months ended June 30, 2016

 

Operating Expenses

 

Our operating expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2017 were $3.7 million which represents an increase of $1.4 million from the comparable quarter in fiscal 2016. The increase in operating costs was primarily attributable to an increase in research and development expenses of $1.1 million, primarily as a result of an increase in preclinical programs on ANAVEX TM 2-73 for additional indications, as well as clinical trial preparatory activities, and an expanded research and development team.

 

There was also an increase in general and administrative expenses of $0.3 million, which is mostly related to an increase in salaries and wages, as a result of an increase in staff.

 

Other income (expenses)

 

The net amount of other income for the quarter ended June 30, 2017 was $0.1 million as compared to $0.06 million for the comparable quarter ended June 30, 2016. The largest reason for the increase in other income was a gain in respect of a negotiated settlement of accounts payable.

 

9

 

 

Nine months ended June 30, 2017 compared to nine months ended June 30, 2016

 

Operating Expenses

 

Our operating expenses for the nine months ended June 30, 2017 were $10.5 million which represents an increase of $1.5 million from the comparable period in fiscal 2016. The increase in operating costs was primarily attributable to an increase in research and development expenses of $2.9 million, attributable to expanded preclinical programs, clinical preparatory activities and an expanded research and development team. The increase in research and development expenses was substantially offset by a decrease in general and administrative expenses related to one-time charges incurred in the comparable period and increased legal fees in the comparable period as a result of financing and related activities in that period.

 

Other income (expenses)

 

The net amount of other income for the nine months ended June 30, 2017 was $2.2 million as compared to $0.8 million for the nine months ended June 30, 2016. The largest reason for the increase in other income was the receipt of $2.0 million in other income as part of a research and development incentive program offered by the Australian Tax Office, which was granted in connection with eligible expenditures from our clinical trials in Australia.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Working Capital

 

    June 30, 2017     September 30, 2016  
Current Assets   $ 24,854,334     $ 9,446,285  
Current Liabilities     1,454,571       3,190,525  
Working Capital   $ 23,399,763     $ 6,255,760  


 

At June 30, 2017, we had $24.8 million in cash, an increase of $15.6 million from September 30, 2016. The principal reason for this increase is the $22.4 million in cash received from the issuance of shares of common stock under the Purchase Agreement. In our second quarter, we also received approximately $2.0 million in other income as part of a research and development incentive program offered by the Australian Tax Office. We intend to use the majority of our capital resources to complete the next clinical trials for ANAVEX TM 2-73, and to perform work necessary to prepare for further clinical development.

 

Cash Flows

 

    Nine months ended June 30,  
    2017     2016  
Cash flows used in operating activities   $ (6,825,348 )   $ (7,373,556 )
Cash flows from financing activities     22,431,958       1,809,620  
Increase (decrease) in cash during the period   $ 15,606,610     $ (5,563,936 )

 

Cash flow used in operating activities

 

Cash used in operating activities for the nine-month period ended June 30, 2017 was $6.8 million, compared to $7.4 million during the nine-month period ended June 30, 2016. The principal reason for this decrease in cash used from operating activities in the current period is the receipt of $2.0 million in research and development incentive income during our second quarter, compared to $0.6 million in the comparable nine-month period.

 

Cash flow provided by financing activities

 

Cash provided by financing activities for the period ended June 30, 2017 was $22.4 million, attributable to cash received from the issuance of 5,951,229 common shares at various market prices under the Purchase Agreement.

 

In the comparable period ended June 30, 2016, cash provided by financing activities amounted to $1.8 million, mostly attributable to cash received pursuant to the exercise of outstanding share purchase warrants, and cash received from the issuance of common shares under a purchase agreement with Lincoln Park dated July 5, 2013, which is no longer in effect.

 

10

 

 

Other Financing

 

On October 21, 2015, we entered into the Purchase Agreement) with Lincoln Park, pursuant to which Lincoln Park committed to purchase up to $50.0 million of our common stock. Concurrently with the execution of the Purchase Agreement, we issued 179,598 shares of our common stock to Lincoln Park as a fee for its commitment to purchase shares of our common stock under the Purchase Agreement. The shares that may be sold pursuant to the Purchase Agreement may be sold by us to Lincoln Park at our discretion from time to time over a 36-month period ending September 6, 2019, the date the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) declared effective the related registration statement. As of June 30, 2017, an amount of $26.2 million remained available under the Purchase Agreement.

 

We may direct Lincoln Park, at our sole discretion, and subject to certain conditions, to purchase up to 50,000 shares of our common stock on any business day, provided that at least one business day has passed since the most recent purchase. The amount of a purchase may be increased under certain circumstances provided, however that Lincoln Park’s committed obligation under any single purchase shall not exceed $2.0 million. The purchase price of shares of common stock related to the financing are based on the then prevailing market prices of such shares at the time of sales, as described in the Purchase Agreement.

 

Other than our rights related to the Lincoln Park financing, there can be no assurance that additional financing will be available to us when needed or, if available, that it can be obtained on commercially reasonable terms. If we are not able to obtain the additional financing on a timely basis, if and when it is needed, we will be forced to delay or scale down some or all of our research and development activities or perhaps even cease the operation of our business.

 

We expect that we will be able to continue to fund our operations through the next 12 months using existing cash on hand, the sale of shares of common stock under the Purchase Agreement, and through other equity financing in the future. If we raise additional financing by issuing equity securities, our existing stockholders’ ownership will be diluted. Obtaining commercial loans, assuming those loans would be available, will increase our liabilities and future cash commitments.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that are material to our stockholders.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

The following table summarizes our contractual obligations as of June 30, 2017, excluding amounts related to uncertain tax positions, funding commitments, contingent development, and regulatory and commercial milestone payments:

 

Contractual Obligations   Payments Due by Period  
    Total     Less
than 1
year
    1-3 years     4 - 5
years
    After 5
years
 
Long-Term Debt                    
Capital Lease Obligations                    
Operating Leases   $ 196,330     $ 112,189     $ 84,141              
Unconditional Purchase Obligations                              
Other Long-Term Obligations                              
Total Contractual Cash Obligations   $ 196,330     $ 112,189     $ 84,141              

 

11

 

 

Application of Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our financial statements and accompanying notes are prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. Preparing financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses. These estimates and assumptions are affected by management’s application of accounting policies. We believe that understanding the basis and nature of the estimates and assumptions involved with the following aspects of our financial statements is critical to an understanding of our financial statements.

 

We base our assumptions and estimates on historical experience and other sources that we believe to be reasonable at the time. Actual results may vary from our estimates due to changes in circumstances, weather, politics, global economics, mechanical problems, general business conditions and other factors. Our significant estimates are related to the valuation of warrants and options.

 

There are accounting policies that we believe are significant to the presentation of our financial statements. The most significant of these accounting policies relates to the accounting for our research and development expenses and stock-based compensation expense and derivative liabilities.

 

Research and Development Expenses

 

Research and developments costs are expensed as incurred. These expenses are comprised of the costs of our proprietary research and development efforts, including salaries, facilities costs, overhead costs and other related expenses as well as costs incurred in connection with third-party collaboration efforts. Milestone payments made by us to third parties are expensed when the specific milestone has been achieved.

 

In addition, we incur expenses in respect of the acquisition of intellectual property relating to patents and trademarks. The probability of success and length of time to developing commercial applications of the drugs subject to the acquired patents and trademarks is difficult to determine and numerous risks and uncertainties exist with respect to the timely completion of the development projects. There is no assurance the acquired patents and trademarks will ever be successfully commercialized. Due to these risks and uncertainties, we expense the acquisition of patents and trademarks.

 

Stock-based Compensation

 

We account for all stock-based payments and awards under the fair value based method.

 

Stock-based payments to non-employees are measured at the fair value of the consideration received, or the fair value of the equity instruments issued, or liabilities incurred, whichever is more reliably measurable. The fair value of stock-based payments to non-employees is periodically re-measured until the counterparty performance is complete, and any change therein is recognized over the vesting period of the award and in the same manner as if we had paid cash instead of paying with or using equity based instruments. The cost of the stock-based payments to non-employees that are fully vested and non-forfeitable as at the grant date is measured and recognized at that date, unless there is a contractual term for services in which case such compensation would be amortized over the contractual term.

 

We account for the granting of share purchase options to employees using the fair value method whereby all awards to employees will be recorded at fair value on the date of the grant. The fair value of all share purchase options are expensed over their vesting period with a corresponding increase to additional capital surplus. Upon exercise of share purchase options, the consideration paid by the option holder, together with the amount previously recognized in additional capital surplus, is recorded as an increase to share capital.

 

We use the Black-Scholes option valuation model to calculate the fair value of share purchase options at the date of the grant. Option pricing models require the input of highly subjective assumptions, including the expected price volatility. Changes in assumptions can materially affect the fair value estimate and therefore the Black-Scholes model does not necessarily provide a reliable single measure of the fair value of our share purchase options.

 

12

 

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In June 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-12, Accounting for Share-Based Payments When the Terms of an Award Provide That a Performance Target Could Be Achieved after the Requisite Service Period (“ASU 2014-12”). ASU 2014-12 requires that a performance target that affects vesting, and that could be achieved after the requisite service period, be treated as a performance condition. As such, the performance target should not be reflected in estimating the grant date fair value of the award. This update further clarifies that compensation cost should be recognized in the period in which it becomes probable that the performance target will be achieved and should represent the compensation cost attributable to the period(s) for which the requisite service has already been rendered. The Company adopted this standard on October 1, 2016. The adoption of this standard did not have any effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

In August 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-15, Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern (“ASU 2014-15”). ASU 2014-15 explicitly requires management to assess an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern, and to provide related footnote disclosure in certain circumstances. The Company adopted this standard on October 1, 2016. The adoption of this standard did not have any effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

In April 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB), issued the Accounting Standards Update 2015-03, Interest - Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30) - Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs, that requires debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability to be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the debt liability rather than as an asset. Upon adoption, an entity must apply the new guidance retrospectively to all prior periods presented in the financial statements. The Company adopted this standard on October 1, 2016. The adoption of this standard did not have any effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

In May 2014, the FASB and the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) issued a converged standard on revenue recognition from contracts with customers, ASU 2014-09 (Topic 606 and IFRS 15). This standard will supersede nearly all existing revenue recognition guidance. ASU 2014-09 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017. The adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material impact for any period presented.

 

In November 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2015-17 “Income Taxes: Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes (“ASU 2015-17”). ASU 2015-17 eliminates the requirement to bifurcate deferred taxes between current and non-current on the balance sheet and requires that deferred tax liabilities and assets be classified as noncurrent on the balance sheet. ASU 2015-17 is effective for public entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, and for interim periods within those fiscal years. The amendments for ASU-2015-17 can be applied retrospectively or prospectively and early adoption is permitted. The adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material impact for any period presented.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-02, Leases (“ASU 2016-02”). The guidance would require lessees to recognize most leases on their balance sheets as lease liabilities with corresponding right –of use assets. The guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2018. We are currently evaluating the impact this guidance will have on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASC 2016-09, “ Compensation – Stock Compensation (Topic 718) – Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting ” (“ASU 2016-09”). These amendments are intended to simplify several aspects of the accounting for share-based payment transactions, including the income tax consequences, classification of awards as either equity or liabilities, and classification on the statement of cash flows. These amendments are effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2016. Early adoption is permitted. Entities have the option to apply the amendments on either a prospective basis or a modified retrospective basis. We are currently evaluating the impact this guidance will have on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

13

 

 

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230), Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (“ASU 2016-15”). ASU 2016-15 reduces the existing diversity in practice in financial reporting across all industries by clarifying certain existing principles in ASC 230, Statement of Cash Flows, (“ASC 230”) including providing additional guidance on how and what an entity should consider in determining the classification of certain cash flows. In addition, in November 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230), Restricted Cash (“ASU 2016-18”). ASU 2016-18 clarifies certain existing principles in ASC 230, including providing additional guidance related to transfers between cash and restricted cash and how entities present, in their statement of cash flows, the cash receipts and cash payments that directly affect the restricted cash accounts. These amendments are effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2017. Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of ASU 2016-15 and ASU 2016-18 will modify the Company’s current disclosures and reclassifications within the consolidated statement of cash flows but is not expected to have a material effect on the our consolidated financial statements.

 

In May 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2017-09, “Compensation–Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Scope of Modification Accounting,” clarifying when a change to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award must be accounted for as a modification. The new guidance requires modification accounting if the fair value, vesting condition or the classification of the award is not the same immediately before and after a change to the terms and conditions of the award. The new guidance is effective for the Company on a prospective basis beginning on October 1, 2018, with early adoption permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact this guidance will have on its financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Other than noted above, we do not expect the adoption of recently issued accounting pronouncements to have a significant impact on our results of operations, financial position or cash flow.

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risks.

 

We are exposed to a variety of market risks, including interest rate risk, foreign currency exchange risk and equity price risk.

 

Interest Rate Risk

 

We invest a major portion of our cash surplus in bank deposits in the United States and, to a lesser extent, Australia. Since the bank deposits typically carry fixed interest rates, financial income over the holding period is not sensitive to changes in interest rates, but only the fair value of these instruments. However, our interest gains from future deposits could decline in the future as a result of changes in the financial markets. In any event, given the historic low levels of interest rates, we estimate that a decline in the interest rates we are currently receiving will not result in a material adverse effect to our business.

 

Foreign Currency Exchange Risk

 

A significant portion of our expenditures, including clinical research expenses relate to our operations in Australia and a portion of our consultancy expenses are incurred in Euros. The cost of those expenses, as expressed in US dollars, is influenced by the exchange rate of these currencies against the US Dollar. If the US dollar declines in value in relation to these currencies, it will become more expensive for us to fund our operations; however, we estimate that a decline in the US Dollar will not result in a material adverse effect to our business because, to limit this risk, the Company holds minimal cash reserves in currencies other than the US Dollar.

 

14

 

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to provide reasonable assurance that material information required to be disclosed in our periodic reports filed under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms and to provide reasonable assurance that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, our chief executive officer and our principal financial officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

We carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rule 13(a)15(e) under the Exchange Act. Based on this evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective, as of June 30, 2017.

 

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

During the quarter ended June 30, 2017, there were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting identified in management’s evaluation pursuant to Rules 13a15(d) or 15d15(d) of the Exchange Act during the period covered by this Form 10-Q that materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings.

 

We know of no material pending legal proceedings, other than ordinary routine litigation incidental to our business, to which our company or our subsidiary is a party or of which any of their property is subject. There are no proceedings in which any of our directors, officers or affiliates, or any registered or beneficial stockholder holding more than 5% of our shares, is an adverse party or has a material interest adverse to our or our subsidiary’s interest.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

In addition to the other information set forth in this Form 10-Q, you should carefully consider the factors discussed in “Item 1A – Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2016 filed with the SEC on December 14, 2016. These risks could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. The risks described in our Form 10-K have not changed materially; however, they are not the only risks we face. Our operations could also be affected by additional factors that are not presently known to us or by factors that we currently consider immaterial to our business.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

 

During the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, we have not sold any equity securities that were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933 that were not previously reported in a Current Report on Form 8-K.

 

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.

 

None.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information.

 

None.

 

15

 

 

Item 6. Exhibits.

 

Exhibit
Number

Description
(3) Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws
3.1 Articles of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to an exhibit to our Registration Statement on Form SB-2 filed on January 13, 2005)
3.2 Bylaws (incorporated by reference to an exhibit to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed on September 28, 2007)
3.3 Articles of Merger filed with the Secretary of State of Nevada on January 10, 2007 and which is effective January 25, 2007 (incorporated by reference to an exhibit to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 25, 2007)
3.4 Certificate of Amendment to the Articles of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to an exhibit to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed on March 30, 2015)
3.5 Certificate of Change to the Articles of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to an exhibit to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 6, 2015)
(4) Instruments defining rights of security holders, including indentures
4.1 Specimen Stock Certificate (incorporated by reference to an exhibit to our Registration Statement on Form SB-2 filed on January 13, 2005)
(31) Rule 13a-14(a)/15(d)-14(a)Certifications
31.1* Certification of Christopher Missling, PhD.
31.2* Certification of Sandra Boenisch
(32) Section 1350 Certifications
32.1* Certification of Christopher Missling, PhD and Sandra Boenisch.
(101) XBRL
101.INS* XBRL INSTANCE DOCUMENT
101.SCH* XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION SCHEMA
101.CAL* XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION CALCULATION LINKBASE
101.DEF* XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION DEFINITION LINKBASE
101.LAB* XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION LABEL LINKBASE
101.PRE* XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION PRESENTATION LINKBASE

 

* Filed herewith.

 

16

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

ANAVEX LIFE SCIENCES CORP.

   
/s/Christopher Missling, PhD  
   
Christopher Missling, PhD  
Chief Executive Officer  
(Principal Executive Officer)  
Date: August 7, 2017  
   
/s/Sandra Boenisch  
   
Sandra Boenisch, CPA, CGA  
Principal Financial Officer  
(Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)  
Date: August 7, 2017  

 

17

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