Annual Report (10-k)

Date : 04/17/2017 @ 5:23PM
Source : Edgar (US Regulatory)
Stock : Players Network (the) (QB) (PNTV)
Quote : 0.053985  0.0 (0.00%) @ 2:05AM

Annual Report (10-k)

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

[X] ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016

 

Commission file number: 000-29363

 

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

Nevada 88-0343702

(State or other jurisdiction

of incorporation organization)

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

1771 E. Flamingo Road, #201-A

Las Vegas, NV 89119

(Address of principal executive offices including zip code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number: (702) 840-3270

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

Common Stock, Par Value $0.001

(Title of class)

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on corporate web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (section 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (section 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.

[  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer [  ] Accelerated filer [  ]
Non-accelerated filer [  ] Smaller reporting company [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).

Yes [  ] No [X]

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, as of June 30, 2016, was approximately $1,677,244 based on a share value of $0.0047 per share. All executive officers and directors of the registrant have been deemed, solely for the purpose of the foregoing calculation, to be “affiliates” of the registrant.

 

As of April 14, 2017, there were 547,394,239 shares of the issuer’s common stock issued and outstanding.

 

 

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  Page
PART I  
Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements 3
Item 1. Business 4
Item 1A. Risk Factors 9
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 16
Item 2. Properties 16
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 16
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 16
PART II  
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 17
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 18
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 19
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 31
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 31
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 31
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 31
Item 9B. Other Information 32
PART III  
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 33
Item 11. Executive Compensation 36
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 38
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 39
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services 39
PART IV  
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules 40
SIGNATURES 44

 

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SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains “forward-looking statements” about our business, financial condition and prospects based on our current expectations, assumptions, estimates, and projections about us and our industry. All statements other than statements of historical fact are “forward-looking statements”, including, but not limited to, any projections of earnings, revenue or other financial items; any statements of the plans, strategies and objections of management for future operations; any statements concerning proposed new services or developments; any statements regarding future economic conditions or performance; any statements or belief; and any statements of assumptions underlying any of the foregoing.

 

Forward-looking statements may include the words “may,” “could,” “estimate,” “intend,” “continue,” “believe,” “expect” or “anticipate” or other similar words. These forward-looking statements present our estimates and assumptions only as of the date of this report. Unless otherwise required by law, we do not intend, and undertake no obligation, to update any forward-looking statement.

 

Although we believe that the expectations reflected in any of our forward-looking statements are reasonable, actual results could differ materially from those projected or assumed in any of our forward-looking statements. Our future financial condition and results of operations, as well as any forward-looking statements, are subject to change and inherent risks and uncertainties. The factors impacting these risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to:

 

  increased competitive pressures from existing competitors and new entrants;
  general economic and business conditions, and trends in the travel and entertainment industries;
  uncertainties inherent in our efforts to renew or enter into agreements on acceptable terms with our significant hotel/casino customers;
  the regulatory and competitive environment of the industry in which we operate;
  the potential impact that any negative publicity, lawsuits, or boycotts by opponents of gaming or other gaming related activities distributed by us could have on the willingness of hotel/casino industry participants to deliver such content to guests;
  the potential for increased government regulation and enforcement actions, and the potential for changes in laws that would restrict or otherwise inhibit our ability to make gaming related programming content available over our network systems;
  increases in interest rates or our cost of borrowing or a default under any material debt agreements;
  deterioration in general or regional economic conditions;
  loss of customers or sales weakness;
  competitive threats posed by rapid technological changes;
  uncertainties inherent in our ability to execute upgrades of video systems, including uncertainties associated with operational, economic and other factors;
  the ability of vendors to deliver required equipment, software and services;
  inability to achieve future sales levels or other operating results;
  the unavailability of funds for capital expenditures; and
  operational inefficiencies in distribution or other systems.

 

For a detailed description of these and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statement, please see “Risk Factors” in this document.

 

In this report, references to “PLAYERS NETWORK”, “PNTV”, “the Company”, “we,” “us,” and “our” refer to PLAYERS NETWORK, a Nevada corporation.

 

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PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

Overview

 

Players Network was incorporated in the State of Nevada in March of 1993. Players Network is a vertically integrated company that is engaged in the development of digital networks, and is also actively pursuing the cultivation and processing of medical marijuana in North Las Vegas pursuant to two medical marijuana establishments (MME) licenses we were granted by the city of North Las Vegas for cultivation and production. The Company holds an 84.4% interest in Green Leaf Farms Holdings, LLC, which is a holding company formed to house our medical marijuana and recreational marijuana businesses. We distribute broadband video and other social media content over a wide variety of internet enabled devices and cable television channels. The Company has launched its proprietary scalable NexGenTV technology platform. The platform is designed to deliver video content and develop digital social communities, including “Weed TV” on the media side of the business.

 

Media Platform

 

NexGenTV, our scalable Digital Technology Platform, allows Players Network to distribute content for brands, businesses and celebrities, and provide them with an unlimited amount of lifestyle category content and the tools to launch their own “Branded Channel, Social Community and Marketplace Destination”. NexGenTV’s scalability can create hundreds of niche digital networks that can be viewed worldwide on any smart TV, computer, tablet or mobile device by millions of people simultaneously. The Platform allows advertisers and marketing partners the ability to capture their target market through rich content such as professionally produced, branded television segments; user-generated videos; blogs; editorials; tweets; photos; special offers; events and custom-designed contests.

 

Our business model incorporates elements of traditional proven media features, such as advertising and transactional delivery methods, but also offers professional production, marketing and distribution services to build and monetize its branded channel destination, in which we expect to retain a continuous revenue stream with our partners. Channel partners have the option to manage their own Branded New Media Channel, or use our professional services team of television producers, writers, graphic designers and technologists to keep their channel updated, and their content fresh and relevant.

 

NexGen TV is the new proprietary enterprise platform which allows PNTV to provide brands, businesses, celebrities and professionals with the tools to launch their own network. NexGenTV’s scalability enables PNTV to create hundreds of niche channel destinations (networks) that can be viewed worldwide on any media device (smart TV, computer, tablet or mobile device).

 

Our business model is to generate revenues for our proprietary channels as well as from clients. Proprietary channels, such as WeedTV.com generate revenues through advertising, cross selling with other companies and premium membership subscriptions. Clients pay us to develop platforms to connect with their existing customers, as well as attract new ones. Weed TV is the Company’s first new channel offering that will operate on the new platform and provide its audience the ability to connect to industry insiders and businesses through unique, high-quality marketing, content production and content management systems.

 

Weed TV launched on April 20, 2014, and was the Company’s third network to be launched. Weed TV is a Lifestyle Channel Destination powered by PNTV’s NexGenTV(SM) enterprise platform. Weed TV is a source of informational entertainment, products and services for people who relate to the marijuana lifestyle and social community. Weed TV content is available at www.weedtv.com

 

We plan for Weed TV to incorporate additional features and adapt new technology that the other networks don’t have, including a directory of businesses that cater to the marijuana business, such as dispensaries, smoke shops, doctors, financial institutions, manufactures and more. These businesses will have a free basic listing and the ability to upgrade for an extra fee of approximately $500 per month, where they can build their own media channel using the ‘NexGenTV” Platform. We estimate this market is in excess of approximately 70,000 businesses and will continue to grow as more states legalize MME businesses. Our goal in 2017 is to begin to capture this market in an effort to increase our revenues.

 

We plan to use both Weed TV’s platform and original branded programming and events as a means to develop additional revenue streams, in addition to providing marketing and membership benefits of our social media platform. These revenue streams would be generated by branded entertainment, sponsorships for events, media placement, third party commissions for video and banner advertisements, merchandise and production sales and services.

 

Our enterprise platform is highly scalable and can efficiently deploy, manage and distribute videos with integrated revenue-generating tools that go beyond traditional advertising. On our platform, the viewer of a video is brought into a web environment encompassing the lifestyle represented within the video content where they may be presented with membership, merchandising, couponing, subscription, loyalty programs, contest and other marketing opportunities, including the integration of live events. The platform also integrates branded sponsorships and a game-like virtual economy supported by our Cost Per Action (“CPA”) advertising network.

 

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Our next-generation media network operates across all distribution platforms from TV screens to mobile devices, gaming consoles, computers and tablets. We have positioned ourselves to provide companies an affordable, turnkey, integrated solution. We have not yet generated revenues from our Platform, but plan to market our services to companies in 2017.

 

Through the cross-promotional integration of sponsored live events, contests and media creation and distribution, our platform can deliver a targeted audience that can be monetized in multiple ways. The platform is an engine that can grow as audience and page views increase. The platform also provides a self-perpetuating aggregation juncture where businesses can connect socially with their audience/customer.

 

The ability to monetize video in so many ways, coupled with an efficient, easy-to-use technical and administrative back-end dashboard is a powerful feature of our platform. It allows the creation of unlimited, new channel destinations using our scalable content management system (“CMS”) framework, with cost-competitive operations. Importantly, it enables administrative and editorial level employees to manage content without the expense of having a full-time technical engineering staff in-house.

 

Premium members must be industry insiders and/or experts in their lifestyle category. For example, with regard to the cannabis business, insiders are leaders in the movement, business owners, advocates, etc. who offer our members deals on transactions connected to their sphere of influence. Deals may include being invited to a special VIP event, line passes, two-for-one offers, pay-per-view video discounts offered within the businesses’ products and services, etc.

 

Green Leaf Farms Holdings Overview

 

Green Leaf Farms Holdings, LLC (“GLFH”, “Green Leaf”) was selected and granted two Medical Marijuana Establishments (MME) licenses by the State of Nevada; one for cultivation, and one for production of extracts.

 

The Cannabis Industry is one of the fastest growing markets in the America, and Nevada is uniquely positioned to become one of, if not the largest market in the country. It is projected that by the end of 2017 there will be 43,000 Nevada State issued medical marijuana cardholders. Of equal importance, is the fact that Nevada law offers reciprocity to Out-of-State medical cannabis cardholders. With nearly one million medical marijuana cardholders residing in states adjacent to Nevada, and more than 52 million annual visitors to Nevada, the market for medical marijuana is substantial, and with the recent passage of recreational marijuana laws that are expected to be implemented in the summer of 2017, Nevada is expected to generate $1.8 billion in revenue from cannabis in 2018. As large as the medical marijuana market is, it is dwarfed by the potential adult recreational marijuana market.

 

Products & Services

 

Green Leaf expects to provide the following products and services:

 

  Premium organic medical cannabis sold wholesale to licensed retailers
  If legalized, recreational marijuana cannabis products sold wholesale to distributors and retailers
  Extraction products such as oils and waxes (as distinguished from cultivation grow house atmospheres) derived from in-house cannabis production
  Value-added products (e.g., salves, tinctures, oils) processed from in-house cannabis production
  Edibles produced in an on-site commercial kitchen from in-house cannabis production
  Processing and extraction services for licensed medical cannabis cultivators in Nevada
  High quality cannabis genetics in the form of vegetative cuttings for sale to licensed medical cannabis cultivators in Nevada
  Support for international Cannabis medical research, genetic development, labeling, and legalization

 

Future Outlook

 

Green Leaf plans to focus on developing high quality products and to employ a strong branding strategy to sell its custom cannabis strains. The quality and consistency of our branded products would help build consumer loyalty. The growing facility, with modular construction would allow us to scale efficiency from both a cost and operational standpoint.

 

Market Opportunity for Media Platform

 

The Company believes it has an opportunity to capitalize on its early adoption of its technology and digital platforms. The digital revolution has rapidly changed the way consumers access television content. Instead of scheduled programming, video can now be viewed “On Demand” through digital cable television and satellite networks, broadband internet, and by downloading content to mobile and wireless devices such as smart phones and tablets.

 

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Each new network is expected to become an integrated channel destination that will include VOD television and a social community to complete and complement a vertical distribution and marketing strategy. Each network will command a new audience and advertisement tied to the amount of monthly viewers, thus ultimately increasing Players Network’s advertising revenues.

 

Social media websites have continued to explode during the past few years, however many people have not heard of the hundreds of upcoming niche social networks. We plan to integrate all our websites with social elements in order to create communities and increase memberships. Increased membership would lead to increased web traffic and commerce opportunities that target the seventy billion dollar US gaming industry.

 

Distribution

 

We distribute our gaming lifestyle media programming through a variety of media platforms including, VOD, broadband/internet, satellite television, cable television, packaged media, and on our proprietary website. Through our dedicated channels of taped original television series, live pay per view events, mobile and internet content downloading, information segments and interactive content, the channel’s expanded programming will include popular poker programs, reality shows, game shows, documentaries, talk shows and special events surrounding the gaming lifestyle.

 

Broadband/Internet/ Mobile

 

Broadband/internet and mobile is the future, as consumers are tired of paying high cable and satellite bills and younger generations are spending the majority of their time on internet and mobile devices, millions of consumer are cutting their cable and satellite services and accessing their content through less expensive, new media devices connected to the internet.

 

Currently there are over 7 billion interconnected devices that served up 535 billion videos in 2017 and are expected to grow to 14 billion devices by the end of 2018. This shift in consumer habits is breaking down the barriers of entry in the content business and allowing producers and publishers to distribute directly to its targeted audiences through key word searches.

 

The Company is continuously seeking advertiser and sponsorship support with some premium content available to consumers for a fee. As brand awareness grows through advertising and major industry tie-ins, the Company will seek to become an aggregating portal for other gaming sites.

 

We intend to heavily market and cross-promote our website and are actively exploring additional relationships through social media networks. We also believe there is a great opportunity to provide content to, and share content with providers of other gaming, entertainment, and educational websites. We intend to use our website to develop gaming lifestyle communities, then offer the members of these communities live video events, information services, discounts, travel, internet based commerce, etc., as well as instant messaging, chat, comments, reviews and perspectives from consumers on a variety of topical subjects.

 

Content/Programming

 

Players Network’s Real Vegas TV and Vegas on Demand programming brands include, (1) Players Network, which focuses on gaming lifestyle and produces programming about horse racing, sports betting, casino games, poker and much more; (2) Vegas On Demand, which is about Las Vegas lifestyle and covers celebrity, night clubs, poolside experiences, entertainment and more; (3) Sexy Sin City TV, which covers the adult and sexy side of Las Vegas after dark.

 

The development of Players Network’s programming is led by Michael Berk, who is one of Hollywood’s most successful television producers. Michael Berk has created over 500 hours of network television that includes five television series. Mr. Berk is best known for his series “Baywatch”, for which he was the Executive Producer for twelve years. Baywatch is distributed in 144 countries and is in the Guinness Book of World Records as the most watched television show in history.

 

We have a library of 1,600 gambling and gaming lifestyle videos, including several new series of both long and short form content. Some of these series include Players Network originals; Hidden Vegas, Tattoo Tails that include 30 originally produced hours of programming from the World Series of Poker®, which Players Network had the exclusive rights to produce and air live. Players Network produced over 50 videos at the Hooters Hotel and Casino, 28 new gaming instructional videos aimed at slots and video poker players, a series of 23 videos on magic entitled “Hocus Pocus”, The “Best of Vegas” series, “Neon Buzz”, an entertainment report that covered red carpet events and many more. Our growing programming library presents long-term revenue opportunities in advertising, sponsorship, direct sales and product integration, domestic and international program sales, broadband syndication, subscription fees and increased home video sales.

 

Our Weed TV brand recently began developing original content as well as acquiring the rights to other marijuana related programming that includes documentaries, cooking shows, concerts, travel shows, growing shows, medical shows, political shows, financial shows and more. We have produced and aggregated over 350 original short video segments to feature documentaries that are owned or have rebroadcast rights by the Company.

 

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Platform Strategy

 

Our goal is to leverage our enterprise platform to collaborate with industry experts and content producers in selected lifestyle and service fields in an effort to incubate digital business extensions with existing and new businesses by:

 

  Continuing to look for partnerships to build new branded lifestyle categories.
  Creating a brand identity as “the trusted name in gaming entertainment, education, information and services” that addresses the full spectrum of audience demographics within all of our destination channels;
  Building an ever-expanding, valuable library of entertainment, instruction and information content that enables targeted audiences to connect with experts and insiders within any specific channel destination;
  Leveraging our various distribution channels as a mechanism to bring value to our business relationships that attract consumers with the goal of building a strong customer base and community;
  Gaining a broad and diversified audience base through our distribution arrangement with a major Cable provider, as well as other distribution channels, including linear programming via digital cable, internet and broadband, wireless, packaged media, video games, mobile media through cell phones and iPods, radio, publishing, and IPTV.
  Grow the Company’s robust, proprietary database of gaming enthusiasts, and create lifestyle communities by offering deals, discounts, and prizes to our customers, while marketing our strategic partnerships and sponsors;
  Offering advertisers a new content category with creative cross-platform advertising/sponsorship packages at reasonable rates in an environment of unique sexy content surrounded by sizzling attitude that delivers desirable demographics;
  Continue to build technology to include mobile application that complements our strategy and existing media brand and objectives.
  Build a lean management team with proven experience that can move quickly, control costs, rapidly create a broad range of high-quality content, and leverage significant long-term relationships in the media, entertainment and gaming industries enabling the Company to accelerate its market leadership.

 

Competition

 

Although we are unaware of any other company that is aimed exclusively at the MMJ lifestyle market, we face intense competition from a variety of other companies that develop and distribute MMJ lifestyle content, including (i) online broadband MMJ related media companies, (ii) MMJ cultivation and production business in Nevada, (iii) broadband connectivity companies, and (iv) other telecommunications companies. In addition, our services compete for a viewer’s time and entertainment resources with other forms of entertainment. For Weed TV, there are other Internet based content channels however they have an entirely different business model and are not focused on being a branding and marketing services destination that supports MME businesses.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We have a library of over 1,350 gambling and gaming lifestyle videos and 120 marijuana and weed related videos. We own the intellectual property rights in the programming and content that we produce. Moreover, the slogans, “WeedTV.com”, “Everybody wants to be a player” and “The only game in town” are registered trademarks of the Company with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (the “PTO”). “Players Network” is also a registered trademark with the PTO.

 

Governmental Approval and Regulation

 

Players Network does not believe that any governmental approvals are required to sell its media products or services. The Communications Act of 1934, as amended by the Cable Communications Policy Act of 1984, the Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition Act of 1992 and the Telecommunications Act of 1996, governs the distribution of video programming by cable, satellite or over-the-air technology, through regulation by the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”). However, because Players Network’s video distribution systems do not use any public rights of way, they are not classified as cable systems and are subject to minimal regulation. Thus, the FCC does not directly regulate the programming provided by the Company.

 

Although the FCC generally does not directly regulate the services provided by Players Network, the regulation of video distribution and communications services is subject to the political process and has been in constant flux over the past decade. Further material changes in the law and regulatory requirements must be anticipated and there can be no assurance that Players Network’s business will not be adversely affected by future legislation or new regulations.

 

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Research and Development

 

Players Network is constantly utilizing the latest technology to enhance our delivery platforms and the way we communicate with our customers. Although research and development costs are incorporated into our costs of operations on each project as it is developed, Players Network understands the importance of utilizing the latest available technology and constantly seeks to improve their delivery methods in today’s fast changing society. Part of the Company’s latest development efforts includes the implementation of social media marketing platforms to build communication and retention around our customers.

 

Seasonality

 

The amount of revenue realized by the Company each month is only affected slightly by the season for a variety of factors, that mainly include summer break, and holidays, when internet use increases.

 

Employees

 

We currently have one full-time employee: our chief executive officer, Mark Bradley, who is responsible for all material policy-making decisions and currently supports and operates our production and post-production operations. Management will hire additional employees on an as needed basis. None of our employees are subject to any collective bargaining agreement or labor union contract, nor has the Company been subjected to any strikes or employment disruptions in its history. We are using, and intend to continue to use the services of independent consultants and contractors to perform various professional services when and as they are deemed necessary. We believe that the use of third-party service providers may enhance our ability to contain general and administrative expenses.

 

In addition to full-time employees, the Company has several outside consultants to cover needed support such as business affairs, programming and technology design and deployment supported by independent contractors on an as needed basis.

 

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS.

 

An investment in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below and the other information in this prospectus before investing in our common stock. If any of the following risks occur, our business, operating results and financial condition could be seriously harmed. Please note that throughout this prospectus, the words “we”, “our” or “us” refer to the Company and its subsidiary not to the selling stockholders.

 

In addition to the other information in this Annual Report, the following risk factors, among others, should be considered carefully in evaluating the Company and its business.

 

Risks Related To Our Company

 

We have had a history of losses, we expect losses in the future, and there can be no assurance that we will become profitable in the future.

 

The Company was incorporated under the laws of the State of Nevada on March 16, 1993. Since inception, we have experienced operating losses on an on-going basis. For our fiscal year ended December 31, 2016, we incurred net losses of $1,701,810. As of such date, we had an accumulated deficit of $30,639,417. We expect our losses to continue for the foreseeable future. These continuing losses may be greater than current levels. If our revenues do not increase substantially or if our expenses exceed our expectations, we may never become profitable. Even if we do achieve profitability, we may not sustain profitability on a quarterly or annual basis in the future.

 

Our auditor has given us a “going concern” qualification, which questions our ability to continue as a going concern without additional financing.

 

Our independent certified public accountant has added an emphasis paragraph to its report on our financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2016 regarding our ability to continue as a going concern. Key to this determination is our recurring net losses, an accumulated deficit, and a working capital deficiency. Management plans to try to increase sales and improve operating results through the expansion of the distribution channels of our programming with a view to increasing advertising and sponsorship revenues. Management believes that funds generated from operations will not be sufficient to cover cash needs in the foreseeable future, and we will continue to rely on expected increased revenues and private equity to cover our cash needs, although there can be no assurance in this regard. In the event sales do not materialize at the expected rates, management would seek additional financing or would conserve cash by further reducing expenses. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in achieving these objectives, becoming profitable or continuing our business without either a temporary interruption or a permanent cessation.

 

We need additional capital in the future to finance our planned growth, which we may not be able to raise or it may only be available on terms unfavorable to us or our stockholders, which may result in our inability to fund our working capital requirements and harm our operational results.

 

We have and expect to continue to have substantial capital expenditure and working capital needs. We do not now have funds sufficient to fund our operations at their current level for the next 12 months. We need to raise additional cash to fund our operations and implement our business plan. We are maintaining an on-going effort to locate sources of additional funding, without which we will not be able to remain a viable entity. If we are able to obtain the financing required to remain in business, eventually achieving operating profits will require substantially increasing revenues or drastically reducing expenses from their current levels or both. If we are able to obtain the required financing to remain in business, future operating results depend upon a number of factors that are outside of our control. The expected operating losses, coupled with a lack of liquidity, raise a substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. If we raise additional funds through the issuance of equity or convertible debt securities, the percentage ownership of our stockholders would be reduced, and these newly issued securities might have rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of existing stockholders. For more information about our capital needs and abilities, see “MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OR PLAN OF OPERATION - OVERVIEW AND OUTLOOK - Liquidity and Capital Resources” herein.

 

At this stage of our business operations, even with our good faith efforts, potential investors have a possibility of losing their investment.

 

Because the nature of our business is expected to change as a result of shifts in market conditions, competition, and the development of new and improved technology, management forecasts are not necessarily indicative of future operations and should not be relied upon as an indication of future performance. While management believes its estimates of projected occurrences and events are within the timetable of its business plan, our actual results may differ substantially from those that are currently anticipated.

 

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If we are unable to retain the services of Messrs. Bradley or Berk, or if we are unable to successfully recruit qualified managerial and sales personnel having experience in business, we may not be able to continue our operations.

 

Our success depends to a significant extent upon the continued service of Mr. Mark Bradley, our Chief Executive Officer and Mr. Michael Berk, our President of Programming. Loss of the services of Messrs. Bradley or Berk could have a material adverse effect on our growth, revenues, and prospective business. In order to successfully implement and manage our business plan, we will be dependent upon (among other things) successfully recruiting qualified managerial and sales personnel having experience in business. Competition for qualified individuals is intense. There can be no assurance that we will be able to find, attract and retain existing employees or that we will be able to find, attract and retain qualified personnel on acceptable terms.

 

Our current management resources may not be sufficient for the future, and we have no assurance that we can attract additional qualified personnel.

 

There can be no assurance that the current level of management is sufficient to perform all responsibilities necessary or beneficial for management to perform. Our success in attracting additional qualified personnel will depend on many factors, including our ability to provide them with competitive compensation arrangements, equity participation and other benefits. There is no assurance that (if we need to) we will be successful in attracting highly qualified individuals in key management positions.

 

Limitations on claims against our officers and directors, and our obligation to indemnify them, could prevent our recovery for losses caused by them.

 

The corporation law of Nevada allows a Nevada corporation to limit the liability of its directors to the corporation and its stockholders to a certain extent, and our Articles of Incorporation have eliminated our directors’ and officers’ personal liability for damages for breaches of fiduciary duty but do not eliminate or limit the liability of a director officer for (a) acts or omissions which involve intentional misconduct, fraud or a knowing violation of the law, or (b) the payment of dividends in violation of applicable law. The corporation law of Nevada allows a Nevada corporation to indemnify each director, officer, agent and/or employee to the extent that certain standards are met. Further, we may purchase and maintain insurance on behalf of any such persons whether or not we have the power to indemnify such person against the liability insured against. Consequently, because of the actions or omissions of officers, directors, agents and employees, we could incur substantial losses and be prevented from recovering such losses from such persons. Further, the Commission maintains that indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act is against the public policy expressed in the Securities Act, and is therefore unenforceable.

 

Officers and Directors own a large percentage of our outstanding stock, and cumulative voting is not available to stockholders.

 

Our current Officers and Directors currently own (directly or indirectly) approximately 20.1% of our outstanding common stock and 100% of our outstanding Series A and Series C Preferred Stock. Each share of common stock is entitled to one vote on stockholder matters, each share of Series A Preferred Stock is entitled to 25 votes and each share of Series C Preferred Stock is entitled to 50 votes on stockholder matters. Cumulative voting is not provided for in the election of directors. Accordingly, the holder or holders of a majority of our outstanding shares of voting stock may elect all of our directors. Management’s large percentage ownership of our outstanding common stock helps enable them to maintain their positions as such and thus control of our business and affairs.

 

We may experience rapid growth, and in such case we will need to manage this growth effectively.

 

We believe that, given the right business opportunities, we may expand our operations rapidly and significantly. If rapid growth were to occur, it could place a significant strain on our management, operational and financial resources. To manage any significant growth of our operations, we will be required to undertake the following successfully:

 

  Manage relationships with various strategic partners and other third parties;
  Hire and retain skilled personnel necessary to support our business;
  Train and manage a growing employee base; and
  Continually develop our financial and information management systems.

 

If we fail to make adequate allowances for the costs and risks associated with this expansion or if our systems, procedures or controls are not adequate to support our operations, our business could be harmed. Our inability to manage growth effectively could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

  10  
     

 

Risks Related To Our Cannabis Business

 

Our business is dependent on state laws pertaining to the cannabis industry.

 

As of the date of this filing, twenty-eight states and the District of Columbia allow its citizens to use medical cannabis. Additionally, Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington, and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis for adult recreational use, and additional recreational measures are expected to be pursued by other states in the future. Continued development of the cannabis industry is dependent upon continued legislative authorization of cannabis at the state level. Any number of factors could slow or halt progress in this area. Further, progress in the cannabis industry, while encouraging, is not assured. While there may be ample public support for legislative action, numerous factors impact the legislative process. Any one of these factors could slow or halt use of cannabis, which would negatively impact our business.

 

Cannabis remains illegal under federal law and a change in federal enforcement practices could significantly and negatively affect our cannabis cultivation and production business.

 

Despite the development of a cannabis industry legal under state laws, state laws legalizing medicinal and adult cannabis use are in conflict with the Federal Controlled Substances Act, which classifies cannabis as a Schedule-I controlled substance and makes cannabis use and possession illegal on a national level. The United States Supreme Court has ruled that it is the Federal government that has the right to regulate and criminalize cannabis, even for medical purposes, and thus Federal law criminalizing the use of cannabis preempts state laws that legalize its use. However, the Obama Administration has effectively stated that it is not an efficient use of resources to direct Federal law enforcement agencies to prosecute those lawfully abiding by state-designated laws allowing the use and distribution of medical and recreational cannabis. Yet, there is no guarantee that the Trump Administration will not change its stated policy regarding the low-priority enforcement of Federal laws in states where cannabis has been legalized. Any such change in the Federal government’s enforcement of Federal laws could cause significant financial damage to us and our shareholders.

 

As the possession and use of cannabis is illegal under the federal controlled substances act, we may be deemed to be aiding and abetting illegal activities through the services that we provide to users. As a result, we may be subject to enforcement actions by law enforcement authorities, which would materially and adversely affect our business.

 

Under Federal law, and more specifically the Federal Controlled Substances Act, the possession, use, cultivation, and transfer of cannabis is illegal. Our new business plan provides cultivation and production services to customers that are engaged in the business of possession, use, and/or transfer of cannabis. As a result, law enforcement authorities, in their attempt to regulate the illegal use of cannabis, may seek to bring an action or actions against us, including, but not limited, to a claim of aiding and abetting another’s criminal activities. The Federal aiding and abetting statute provides that anyone who “commits an offense against the United States or aids, abets, counsels, commands, induces or procures its commission, is punishable as a principal.” 18 U.S.C. §2(a). As a result of such an action, we may be forced to cease operations and our investors could lose their entire investment. Such an action would have a material negative effect on our business and operations.

 

Laws and regulations affecting the cannabis and marijuana industries are constantly changing, which could detrimentally affect our business, and we cannot predict the impact that future regulations may have on us.

 

Local, state and federal cannabis laws and regulations are constantly changing and they are subject to evolving interpretations, which could require us to incur substantial costs associated with compliance or to alter one or more of our service offerings. In addition, violations of these laws, or allegations of such violations, could disrupt our business and result in a material adverse effect on our revenues, profitability, and financial condition. We cannot predict the nature of any future laws, regulations, interpretations or applications, nor can we determine what effect additional governmental regulations or administrative policies and procedures, when and if promulgated, could have on our business. Any change in law or interpretation could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Expansion by well-established cultivation and production companies into the cannabis industry could prevent us from realizing anticipated growth in customers and revenues.

 

Established dispensary companies may expand their businesses into cannabis cultivation and production. If they decided to expand into cultivation and production, this could hurt the growth of our business and cause our revenues to be lower than we expect.

 

  11  
     

 

Due to our involvement in the cannabis industry, we may have a difficult time obtaining the various insurances that are desired to operate our business, which may expose us to additional risk and financial liabilities.

 

Insurance that is otherwise readily available, such as workers compensation, general liability, and directors and officers insurance, is more difficult for us to find, and more expensive, because we are service providers to companies in the cannabis industry. There are no guarantees that we will be able to find such insurances in the future, or that the cost will be affordable to us. If we are forced to go without such insurances, it may prevent us from entering into certain business sectors, may inhibit our growth, and may expose us to additional risk and financial liabilities.

 

Participants in the cannabis industry have difficulty accessing the service of banks, which may make it difficult for us to operate.

 

Despite recent rules issued by the United States Department of the Treasury mitigating the risk to banks that do business with cannabis companies permitted under state law, as well as recent guidance from the United States Department of Justice, banks remain wary to accept funds from businesses in the cannabis industry. Since the use of cannabis remains illegal under Federal law, there remains a compelling argument that banks may be in violation of Federal law when accepting for deposit, funds derived from the sale or distribution of cannabis. Consequently, businesses involved in the cannabis industry continue to have trouble establishing banking relationships. An inability to open bank accounts may make it difficult for us, or some of our customers, to do business.

 

Risks Related To Our Media Business

 

Our business is speculative (among other reasons) because our revenues are derived from the acceptance of our programming and the timely expansion to new media distribution, which is difficult to predict, and our failure to develop appealing programming would probably materially adversely affect us.

 

Our programming is the key to our success. It represents the catalyst for generating our revenues, and is subject to a number of uncertainties. Our success depends on the quality of our programming and the quality of other programming released into marketplace at or near the same time as ours, the availability of alternative forms of entertainment and leisure time activities, general economic conditions and other tangible and intangible factors, all of which can change and cannot be predicted with certainty. There can be no assurance that our current or future programming will appeal to consumer or persons who would pay to broadcast it. Any failure to develop appealing programming would materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

There are various risks associated with our proprietary rights.

 

No patent protection . We have no proprietary technology, and accordingly, have no patents. We intend to rely on a combination of copyright and trade secret protection and nondisclosure agreements to establish and protect our proprietary rights. Despite our precautions, it may be possible for a third party to copy or otherwise obtain and use our proprietary information, products or technology without authorization, to imitate our programming, or to develop similar or superior programming or ideas independently. Imitation of our programming, the creation of similar or superior programming, or the infringement of our intellectual property rights could diminish the value of our programming or otherwise adversely affect our potential for revenue. Policing unauthorized use of our intellectual property will be difficult and expensive. In addition, effective copyright and trade secret protection may be unavailable or limited in certain foreign countries. We cannot provide any assurances that the steps we take will prevent misappropriation of our technology or that our confidentiality or other protective agreements will be enforceable.

 

Enforcing our proprietary rights may require litigation . Litigation may be necessary in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights, to protect our trade secrets, to protect our copyrights, to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others, or to defend against claims of infringement or invalidity. Any such litigation could result in substantial costs and diversion of resources and could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results or financial condition.

 

Others may assert infringement claims against us . One of the risks of our business is the possibility of claims that our productions infringe on the intellectual property rights of third parties with respect to previously developed content. In addition, our technology and software may be subject to patent, copyright or other intellectual property claims of third parties. We could receive in the future claims of infringement of other parties’ proprietary rights. There can be no assurance that infringement claims will not be asserted or prosecuted against us, or that any assertions or prosecutions will not materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations. Irrespective of the validity or the successful assertion of such claims, we would incur significant costs and diversion of resources with respect to the defense thereof, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. If any claims or actions are asserted against us, we may seek to obtain a license under a third party’s intellectual property rights. We cannot provide any assurances, however, that under such circumstances a license would be available on reasonable terms or at all.

 

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We may be adversely affected by changing consumer preferences

 

Gambling and new media appears to have become more accepted by and popular with many more persons in recent years. However, the gambling industry is subject to shifting consumer preferences and perceptions. A dramatic shift in consumer acceptance or interest in gaming could materially adversely affect us. We are also dependent on consumers becoming acclimated to using new media by watching video over the internet and on VOD television platforms.

 

We will rely on a number of third parties, and such reliance exposes us to a number of risks.

 

Our operations will depend on a number of third parties. We will have limited control over these third parties. We will probably not have many long-term agreements with many of them. We rely upon a number of third parties to carry our programming, and we will need to expand in the future the number of third parties doing this on our behalf. There can be no assurance that existing such agreements will not be terminated or that they will be renewed in the future on terms acceptable to us, or that we will be able to enter into additional such agreements. Our inability to preserve and expand the channels for distributing our programming would likely materially adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. We also will rely on a variety of technology that we will license from third parties. Our loss of or inability to maintain or obtain upgrades to any of these technology licenses could result in delays. These delays could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition, until equivalent technology could be identified, licensed or developed and integrated. Moreover, we occasionally use third parties in connection with our production work and work on our Web site. In addition, we do not own a gateway onto the Internet. Instead, we now and presumably always will rely on a network operating center to connect our Web site to the Internet. Overall, our inability to maintain satisfactory relationships with the requisite third parties on acceptable commercial terms, or the failure of such third parties to maintain the quality of services they provide at a satisfactory standard, could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

We could be materially adversely affected by future regulatory changes applicable to our business.

 

We do not believe that any governmental approvals are required to sell our products or services, and that we are not currently subject to significant regulation by any government agency in the United States, other than regulations applicable to businesses generally. However, a number of laws and regulations may be adopted with respect to our business in the future. Such legislation could dampen or increase the cost of our business. Such a development could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Competition in our industry is moderate. We are very small and have a limited operating history although compared to the vast majority of our competitors we are more experienced.

 

We intend to compete with major and independent providers of content to the Broadband and VOD television the majority of our anticipated competitors have substantially greater financial and other resources than we do. In addition, larger competitors may be able to absorb the burden of any changes in federal, state and local laws and regulations more easily than we can, which would adversely affect our competitive position. These competitors may be able to pay more for technology upgrades and marketing. In addition, some of our competitors have been operating in our core areas for a much longer time than we have and have demonstrated the ability to operate through industry cycles.

 

Risks Related To Our Common Stock

 

We have both the obligation and the ability to issue additional shares of our common stock, and the issuance of such additional shares of common and preferred stock may depress the price of our common stock.

 

We have both the ability as well as outstanding obligations to issue additional shares of common stock in the future. These include the following:

 

  Our Amended and Restated 2004 Non-Qualified Stock Option Plan allows us to issue up to 25,000,000 shares of common stock and options. We currently have 15,549,728 shares of our common stock available for issuance under our Amended and Restated 2004 Non-Qualified Stock Option Plan;
  There are 22,000,000 shares of common stock issuable pursuant to common stock options and warrants outstanding as of the date of this Annual Report;
  There are 2,000,000 shares of common stock reserved for issuance upon conversion of 2,000,000 shares of outstanding Series A Preferred Stock;
  There are 3,217,804 shares of common stock reserved for issuance upon conversion of convertible note payable held by WHC Capital.
  There are 43,538,813 shares of common stock reserved for issuance upon conversion of another convertible note payable held by WHC Capital.

 

  13  
     

 

The options described above will permit the holders to purchase shares of common stock at specified prices. These purchase prices may be less than the then current market price of our common stock. Any shares of common stock issued pursuant to these options would further dilute the percentage ownership of existing stockholders. The terms on which we could obtain additional capital during the life of these options may be adversely affected because of such potential dilution. Finally, we may issue additional shares in the future other than as listed above. There are no preemptive rights in connection with our common stock. Thus, the percentage ownership of existing stockholders may be diluted if we issue additional shares in the future. For grants of options, our Board of Directors will determine the timing and size of the grants and the consideration or services required. Our Board of Directors intends to use its reasonable business judgment to fulfill its fiduciary obligations to our then existing stockholders in connection with any such grant. Nonetheless, future issuances of additional shares pursuant to options granted could cause immediate and substantial dilution to the net tangible book value of shares of common stock issued and outstanding immediately before such transaction. Any future decrease in the net tangible book value of such issued and outstanding shares could materially and adversely affect the market value of the shares.

 

We may issue additional stock without shareholder consent.

 

Our board of directors has authority, without action or vote of the shareholders, to issue all or part of our authorized but unissued shares. Additional shares may be issued in connection with future financing, acquisitions, employee stock plans, or otherwise. Any such issuance will dilute the percentage ownership of existing shareholders. The Board, from the authorized capital of 25,000,000 preferred shares, has authorized and designated 2,000,000 shares of Series A and 12,000,0000 shares of Series C preferred stock, of which 2,000,000 shares and 12,000,000 shares are issued and outstanding, respectively. The previously designated Series B preferred stock was cancelled on July 17, 2015. The board of directors can issue preferred stock in one or more series and fix the terms of such stock without shareholder approval. Preferred stock may include the right to vote as a series on particular matters, preferences as to dividends and liquidation, conversion and redemption rights and sinking fund provisions. The issuance of preferred stock could adversely affect the rights of the holders of common stock and reduce the value of the common stock. In addition, specific rights granted to holders of preferred stock could discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change in control of our company, even if doing so would benefit our shareholders. Such issuance could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for you and other shareholders to elect directors of your choosing and to cause us to take other corporate actions you desire.

 

Offers or availability for sale of a substantial number of shares of our common stock may cause the price of our common stock to decline.

 

If our stockholders sell substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market, or upon the expiration of any statutory holding period under Rule 144, or issued upon the exercise of outstanding options or warrants, it could create a circumstance commonly referred to as an “overhang” and in anticipation of which the market price of our common stock could fall. The existence of an overhang, whether or not sales have occurred or are occurring, also could hinder our ability to raise additional financing through the sale of equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and price that we deem reasonable or appropriate.

 

The trading price of our common stock may entail additional regulatory requirements, which may negatively affect such trading price.

 

The trading price of our common stock has been and may continue to be below $5.00 per share. As a result of this price level, trading in our common stock is subject to the requirements of certain rules promulgated under the Exchange Act. These rules require additional disclosure by broker-dealers in connection with any trades generally involving any non-NASDAQ equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. Such rules require the delivery, before any penny stock transaction, of a disclosure schedule explaining the penny stock market and the risks associated therewith, and impose various sales practice requirements on broker-dealers who sell penny stocks to persons other than established customers and accredited investors (generally institutions). For these types of transactions, the broker-dealer must determine the suitability of the penny stock for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written consent to the transaction before sale. The additional burdens imposed upon broker-dealers by such requirements may discourage broker-dealers from effecting transactions in our common stock. As a consequence, the market liquidity of our common stock could be severely affected or limited by these regulatory requirements.

 

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Because our board of directors does not intend to pay dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future, stockholders may have to sell their shares of our common stock to realize a return on their investment in the company.

 

Holders of our common stock are entitled to receive dividends when, as and if declared by our Board of Directors out of funds legally available. To date, we have paid no dividends. Our Board of Directors does not intend to declare any dividends in the foreseeable future, but instead intends to retain all earnings, if any, for use in our business operations. Accordingly, a return on an investment in shares of our common stock may be realized only through a sale of such shares, if at all.

 

We have outstanding convertible debt, which, if repaid will require a significant amount of capital, or if converted into our common stock could have a material adverse effect on our stock price.

 

As of April 14, 2017, we had four convertible notes outstanding with a cumulative outstanding principal balance of $300,000. Repayment of the notes must be done at a premium to the then-outstanding balance, resulting in the need for approximately $535,000 in liquid capital. If, rather than repay these notes, we allow them to convert into our common stock, which conversions would be done at a discount to the market price of our common stock, all of which could be sold into the open market at the time of conversion. The potential dilutive effects of these conversions at various conversion prices below our most recent market price of $0.034 per share is as follows:

 

    100%   75%   50%   25%
    $0.034   $0.0255   $0.017   $0.0085
                 
Potential dilutive shares   8,823,529   11,764,706   17,647,059   35,294,118

 

The issuance and sale of common stock upon conversion of the convertible notes may depress the market price of our common stock.

 

As sequential conversions of the convertible notes and sales of such converted shares take place, the price of our common stock may decline, and as a result, the holder of the convertible notes will be entitled to receive an increasing number of shares in connection with its conversions, which shares could then be sold in the market, triggering further price declines and conversions for even larger numbers of shares, to the detriment of our investors. The shares of common stock which the convertible notes are convertible into may be sold without restriction pursuant to Rule 144. As a result, the sale of these shares may adversely affect the market price, if any, of our common stock.

 

In addition, the common stock issuable upon conversion of the convertible notes may represent overhang that may also adversely affect the market price of our common stock. Overhang occurs when there is a greater supply of a company’s stock in the market than there is demand for that stock. When this happens the price of the company’s stock will decrease, and any additional shares which shareholders attempt to sell in the market will only further decrease the share price. The various Convertible Notes will be convertible into shares of our common stock at conversion terms as depicted in the table above, and such discounts to market provide the holders with the ability to sell their common stock at or below market and still make a profit. In the event of such overhang, the note holder will have an incentive to sell their common stock as quickly as possible. If the share volume of our common stock (which to date has been very limited) cannot absorb the discounted shares, then the value of our common stock will likely decrease.

 

The issuance of common stock upon conversion of the convertible notes will cause immediate and substantial dilution.

 

The issuance of common stock upon conversion of the convertible notes will result in immediate and substantial dilution to the interests of other stockholders since the holder of the convertible notes may ultimately receive and sell the full amount of shares issuable in connection with the conversion of such convertible notes. Although the convertible notes s may not be converted if such conversion would cause the holder thereof to own more than 4.99% of our outstanding common stock (subject to 61 days written notice of such holder’s intent to waive such restriction), this restriction does not prevent the holder of the Convertible Notes from converting some of its holdings, selling those shares, and then converting the rest of its holdings, while still staying below the 4.99% limit. In this way, the holder of the Convertible Notes could sell more than this limit while never actually holding more shares than this limit allows. If the holder of the Convertible Notes chooses to do this, it will cause substantial dilution to the then holders of our common stock.

 

  15  
     

 

The continuously adjustable conversion price feature of our convertible notes could require us to issue a substantially greater number of shares, which may adversely affect the market price of our common stock and cause dilution to our existing stockholders.

 

Our existing stockholders will experience substantial dilution of their investment upon conversion of the convertible notes. The convertible notes are convertible into shares of common stock at conversion prices as noted in the above table. As a result, the number of shares issuable could prove to be significantly greater in the event of a decrease in the trading price of our common stock, which decrease would cause substantial dilution to our existing stockholders. As sequential conversions and sales take place, the price of our common stock may decline, and if so, the holder of the convertible notes would be entitled to receive an increasing number of shares, which could then be sold, triggering further price declines and conversions for even larger numbers of shares, which would cause additional dilution to our existing stockholders and would likely cause the value of our common stock to decline.

 

The continuously adjustable conversion price feature of our Convertible Notes may encourage the holder of the Convertible Notes to sell short our common stock, which could have a depressive effect on the price of our common stock.

 

The Convertible Notes are convertible into shares of our common stock at conversion prices as noted in the above table. The significant downward pressure on the price of our common stock as the holder of the convertible notes converts and sells material amounts of our common stock could encourage investors to short sell our common stock. This could place further downward pressure on the price of our common stock. In addition, not only the sale of shares issued upon conversion of the convertible notes, but also the mere perception that these sales could occur, may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

 

Our common stock is thinly traded, so you may be unable to sell at or near ask prices or at all if you need to sell your shares to raise money or otherwise desire to liquidate your shares.

 

Our common stock has historically been sporadically or “thinly-traded” on the OTCQB, meaning that the number of persons interested in purchasing our common stock at or near ask prices at any given time may be relatively small or nonexistent. This situation is attributable to a number of factors, including the fact that we are a small company which is relatively unknown to stock analysts, stock brokers, institutional investors and others in the investment community that generate or influence sales volume, and that even if we came to the attention of such persons, they tend to be risk-averse and would be reluctant to follow an unproven company such as ours or purchase or recommend the purchase of our shares until such time as we became more seasoned and viable.

 

As a consequence, there may be periods of several days or more when trading activity in our shares is minimal or non-existent, as compared to a mature issuer which has a large and steady volume of trading activity that will generally support continuous sales without an adverse effect on share price. It is possible that a broader or more active public trading market for our common stock will not develop or be sustained, or that current trading levels will continue.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.

 

Not applicable to a smaller reporting company.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

Our executive offices are located at 1771 E. Flamingo Road, #201-A, Las Vegas, Nevada 89119. Our office space consists of approximately 2,800 square feet leased pursuant to a 3-year operating lease that expired on August 31, 2016, and is now on a month-to-month basis at a monthly payment of $3,191.

 

We also leased a commercial building that originated on April 17, 2016 for our medical marijuana production and cultivation business in North Las Vegas. The 5-year operating lease expires on April 16, 2021 and is renewable for another 5 year term, required a $50,000 security deposit and includes an option to purchase the building for $3.8 million during the third, fourth and fifth years of the lease. The lease provides for increases in future minimum annual rental payments based on defined annual increases beginning with monthly payments of $26,786 and culminating in a monthly payment of $30,148 in 2021.

 

These properties are in good condition, well maintained and adequate for Players Network’s current and immediately foreseeable operating needs. Players Network does not have any policies regarding investments in real estate, securities or other forms of property.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

Players Network filed a civil suit in the Eighth Judicial District Court in Clark County, Nevada on January 2, 2014, and served the suit on January 23, 2014, listed as case number A-13-693908-B against Defendants, Comcast Corporation and Advanced Information Systems Inc. We have currently completed the Discovery process, and summary judgment pleadings are being prepared by both parties. Additional information and details will be forthcoming as permitted by public disclosure. Mr. Barney C. Ales and his firm based in Las Vegas, Nevada have been retained as the Company’s Special Counsel, for the litigation and ultimate trial of this matter.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Mine safety disclosures are not applicable.

 

  16  
     

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

(a) Market Information

 

The Company’s Common Stock is currently quoted on the OTCQB tier of OTC Markets under the symbol “PNTV”. The following table sets forth the high and low bid prices for each quarter within the last two fiscal years. The source of these quotations is the OTCQB Trade Activity Report. The quotations reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, markdown or commission, and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

    COMMON STOCK  
    MARKET PRICE  
    HIGH     LOW  
FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016:                
Fourth Quarter   $ 0.0295     $ 0.0089  
Third Quarter   $ 0.0141     $ 0.0023  
Second Quarter   $ 0.0050     $ 0.0022  
First Quarter   $ 0.0041     $ 0.0016  
FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2015                
Fourth Quarter   $ 0.0029     $ 0.0013  
Third Quarter   $ 0.0053     $ 0.0012  
Second Quarter   $ 0.0239     $ 0.0022  
First Quarter   $ 0.0268     $ 0.0081  

 

(b) Holders of Common Stock

 

As of April 14, 2017, there were approximately 321 holders of record of the Company's Common Stock. As of April 14, 2017, the closing price of the Company's shares of common stock was $0.04 per share. ClearTrust, LLC (telephone: (813) 235-4490; facsimile: (813) 388-4549) is the registrar and transfer agent for our common stock.

 

(c) Dividends

 

Players Network has never declared or paid dividends on its Common Stock. Players Network intends to follow a policy of retaining earnings, if any, to finance the growth of the business and does not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. The declaration and payment of future dividends on the Common Stock will be at sole discretion of the Board of Directors and will depend on Players Network’s profitability and financial condition, capital requirements, statutory and contractual restrictions, future prospects and other factors deemed relevant.

 

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(d) Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

The following table sets forth information regarding our existing compensation plans and individual compensation arrangements pursuant to which our equity securities are authorized for issuance to employees or non-employees (such as directors, consultants and advisors) in exchange for consideration in the form of services:

 

                Number of
                securities
                remaining
                available for
                future issuance
    Number           under equity
    of securities           compensation
    to be issued     Weighted-average     plans
    upon exercise     exercise price     (excluding
    of outstanding     of outstanding     securities
    options, warrants     options, warrants     reflected in
    and rights     and rights     column (a)
Plan Category   (a)     (b)     (c)
Equity Compensation Plans approved by security holders     -0-     $ -0-     -0-
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders (1)     13,350,000       0.06     -0-
Total:     13,350,000     $ 0.06     -0-

 

(1) Options to purchase 3 million shares of common stock at $0.08 per share over a two year period, and options to purchase 5 million shares of common stock at $0.01 per share over a one month period, which are now expired, were issued on June 1, 2016 pursuant to a debt financing. As of December 31, 2016, the Company had options outstanding exercisable for 13,350,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at a weighted average exercise price of $0.06 per share that were issued under the Company’s Amended and Restated 2004 Non-Qualified Stock Option Plan, which allows for the issuance of a total of 25,000,000 non-qualified stock options.

 

(e) Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

The following sales of equity securities by the Company occurred during the three month period ended December 31, 2016:

 

Common Stock

 

Common Stock Sales

 

On October 14, 2016, the Company sold 1,500,000 shares of its common stock to an accredited investor in exchange for proceeds of $12,000.

 

Exercise of Warrants

 

On August 5, 2016, the Company issued 9,000,000 shares of its common stock pursuant to the exercise of an equal number warrants in exchange for proceeds of $45,000 that were used to repay the corresponding promissory note that was issued with the initial investment.

 

Common Stock Issuances for Debt Conversions

 

On November 3, 2016, the Company issued 12,182,508 shares of common stock pursuant to the conversion of $86,709 of outstanding principal on the Fourth Vista Note.

 

On October 24, 2016, the Company issued 1,461,187 shares of common stock pursuant to the conversion of $10,000 of outstanding principal on the WHC Notes settlement in lieu of cash.

 

The foregoing securities issued upon conversion of the Notes are restricted securities as defined in Rule 144 promulgated under the Securities Act of 1933. The issuances of the Notes were exempt from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933 pursuant to Rule 506 of Regulation D promulgated thereunder. The purchasers were accredited and sophisticated investors, familiar with our operations, and there was no solicitation.

 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Not applicable.

 

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ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

 

Overview and Outlook

 

Players Network was incorporated in the State of Nevada in March of 1993. Players Network is a vertically integrated company that is engaged in the development of digital networks, and is also actively pursuing the cultivation and processing of medical marijuana in North Las Vegas pursuant to two medical marijuana establishments (MME) licenses we were granted by the city of North Las Vegas for cultivation and production. The Company holds an 84.4% interest in Green Leaf Farms Holdings, LLC, which is a holding company formed to house our medical marijuana and recreational marijuana businesses. We distribute broadband video and other social media content over a wide variety of internet enabled devices and cable television channels. The Company has launched its proprietary scalable NexGenTV technology platform. The platform is designed to deliver video content and develop digital social communities, including “Vegas On Demand TV”, “Real Vegas TV” and “Weed TV” on the media side of the business.

 

NexGenTV, our scalable Digital Technology Platform, allows Players Network to distribute content for brands, businesses and celebrities, and provide them with an unlimited amount of lifestyle category content and the tools to launch their own “Branded Channel, Social Community and Marketplace Destination”. NexGenTV’s scalability can create hundreds of niche digital networks that can be viewed worldwide on any smart TV, computer, tablet or mobile device by millions of people simultaneously. The Platform allows advertisers and marketing partners the ability to capture their target market through rich content such as professionally produced, branded television segments; user-generated videos; blogs; editorials; tweets; photos; special offers; events and custom-designed contests.

 

Our business model incorporates elements of traditional proven media features, such as advertising and transactional delivery methods, but also offers professional production, marketing and distribution services to build and monetize its branded channel destination, in which we expect to retain a continuous revenue stream with our partners. Channel partners have the option to manage their own Branded New Media Channel, or use our professional services team of television producers, writers, graphic designers and technologists to keep their channel updated, and their content fresh and relevant.

 

Vegas On Demand TV, Real Vegas TV and Weed TV are the Company’s first three channel offerings that provide their audience the ability to connect to industry insiders and businesses through unique, high-quality marketing, content production and content management system. In the Las Vegas market, Vegas On Demand captures the excitement, sex appeal, entertainment, and the non-stop adrenaline rush of the Las Vegas gaming lifestyle. Our content goes beyond poker, casino action, sports betting, and racing, to lifestyle programs about entertainment and fine living that attract young and sophisticated viewers that comprise the major digital media demographic. Whenever possible, our content will incorporate an expert, insider or celebrity within the Vegas community in order to enhance promotional merchandising to prospective customers.

 

Weed TV launched on April 20, 2014, and was the Company’s third network to be launched. Weed TV is a Lifestyle Channel Destination powered by PNTV’s NexGenTV(SM) enterprise platform. Weed TV is a source of informational entertainment, products and services for people who relate to the marijuana lifestyle and social community. Weed TV content is available at www.weedtv.com

 

We plan for Weed TV to have other features by the middle of 2016 and adapt new technology that the other networks don’t have, including a directory of businesses that cater to the marijuana business, such as dispensaries, smoke shops, doctors, financial institutions, manufactures and more. These businesses will have a free basic listing and the ability to upgrade for an extra fee of approximately $500 per month, where they can build their own media channel using the ‘NexGenTV” Platform. We estimate this market is in excess of approximately 70,000 businesses and will continue to grow as more states legalize MME businesses. Our goal in 2017 is to begin to capture this market in an effort to increase our revenues.

 

We plan to use both Weed TV’s platform and original branded programming and events as a means to develop additional revenue streams, in addition to providing marketing and membership benefits of our social media platform. These revenue streams would be generated by branded entertainment, sponsorships for events, media placement, third party commissions for video and banner advertisements, merchandise and production sales and services.

 

Our enterprise platform is highly scalable and can efficiently deploy, manage and distribute videos with integrated revenue-generating tools that go beyond traditional advertising. On our platform, the viewer of a video is brought into a web environment encompassing the lifestyle represented within the video content where they may be presented with membership, merchandising, couponing, subscription, loyalty programs, contest and other marketing opportunities, including the integration of live events. The platform also integrates branded sponsorships, and a game-like virtual economy supported by our Cost Per Action (“CPA”) advertising network.

 

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Our next-generation media network operates across all distribution platforms from TV screens to mobile devices, gaming consoles, computers and tablets. We have positioned ourselves to provide companies an affordable, turnkey, integrated solution. We have not yet generated revenues from our Platform, but plan to market our services to companies in 2017.

 

Through the cross-promotional integration of sponsored live events, contests and media creation and distribution, our platform can deliver a targeted audience that can be monetized in multiple ways. The platform is an engine that can grow as audience and page views increase. The platform also provides a self-perpetuating aggregation juncture where Las Vegas businesses and “insiders” can connect socially with their audience/customer.

 

The ability to monetize video in so many ways, coupled with an efficient, easy-to-use technical and administrative back-end dashboard is a powerful feature of our platform. It allows the creation of unlimited, new channel destinations using our scalable content management system (“CMS”) framework, with cost-competitive operations. Importantly, it enables administrative and editorial level employees to manage content without the expense of having a full-time technical engineering staff in-house.

 

Premium members must be industry insiders and/or experts in their lifestyle category. For example, with regard to Vegas On Demand, insiders are designed to be the who’s-who of Vegas: entertainers, nightclub promoters, casino hosts, famous chefs, etc. who offer our members deals on transactions connected to their sphere of influence. Deals may include being invited to a special VIP event, line passes, two-for-one offers, pay-per-view video discounts, etc.

 

Green Leaf Farms Holdings Overview

 

Green Leaf Farms Holdings, LLC (“GLFH”, “Green Leaf”) was selected and granted two Medical Marijuana Establishments (MME) licenses by the State of Nevada; one for cultivation, and one for production of extracts.

 

The Cannabis Industry is one of the fastest growing markets in the America, and Nevada is uniquely positioned to become one of, if not the largest market in the country. It is projected that by the end of 2017 there will be 43,000 Nevada State issued medical marijuana cardholders. Of equal importance, is the fact that Nevada law offers reciprocity to Out-of-State medical cannabis cardholders. With nearly one million medical marijuana cardholders residing in states adjacent to Nevada, and more than 52 million annual visitors to Nevada, the market for medical marijuana is substantial, and with the recent passage of recreational marijuana laws that are expected to be implemented in the summer of 2017, Nevada is expected to generate $1.8 billion in revenue from cannabis in 2018. As large as the medical marijuana market is, it is dwarfed by the potential adult recreational marijuana market.

 

Products & Services

 

Green Leaf expects to provide the following products and services:

 

  Premium organic medical cannabis sold wholesale to licensed retailers
  If legalized, recreational marijuana cannabis products sold wholesale to distributors and retailers
  Extraction products such as oils and waxes (as distinguished from cultivation grow house atmospheres) derived from in-house cannabis production
  Value-added products (e.g., salves, tinctures, oils) processed from in-house cannabis production
  Edibles produced in an on-site commercial kitchen from in-house cannabis production
  Processing and extraction services for licensed medical cannabis cultivators in Nevada
  High quality cannabis genetics in the form of vegetative cuttings for sale to licensed medical cannabis cultivators in Nevada
  Support for international Cannabis medical research, genetic development, labeling, and legalization

 

Future Outlook

 

Green Leaf plans to focus on developing high quality products and to employ a strong branding strategy to sell its custom cannabis strains. The quality and consistency of our branded products would help build consumer loyalty. The growing facility, with modular construction would allow us to scale efficiency from both a cost and operational standpoint.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Segment Reporting

 

Under FASB ASC 280-10-50, the Company operates as a single segment and will evaluate additional segment disclosure requirements as it expands its operations.

 

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Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amount of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Under FASB ASC 820-10-05, the Financial Accounting Standards Board establishes a framework for measuring fair value in generally accepted accounting principles and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. This Statement reaffirms that fair value is the relevant measurement attribute. The adoption of this standard did not have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements as reflected herein. The carrying amounts of cash, accounts payable and accrued expenses reported on the balance sheets are estimated by management to approximate fair value primarily due to the short term nature of the instruments. In addition, the Company had debt instruments that required fair value measurement on a recurring basis.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

PNTV maintains cash balances in non-interest-bearing transaction accounts, which do not currently exceed federally insured limits. For the purpose of the statements of cash flows, all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less are considered to be cash equivalents. There were no cash equivalents on hand at December 31, 2016 and 2015.

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

We generate the majority of our revenues and corresponding accounts receivable from video production services on a project basis and subscriptions for video content. We evaluate the collectability of our accounts receivable considering a combination of factors. In circumstances where we are aware of a specific customer’s inability to meet its financial obligations to us, we record a specific reserve for bad debts against amounts due in order to reduce the net recognized receivable to the amount we reasonably believe will be collected. For all other customers, we recognize reserves for bad debts based on past write-off experience and the length of time the receivables are past due. We had no debts expense during the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively.

 

Cost Method of Accounting for Investments

 

Investee companies not accounted for under the consolidation or the equity method of accounting are accounted for under the cost method of accounting. Under this method, the Company’s share of the earnings or losses of such Investee companies is not included in the Balance Sheet or Statement of Operations. However, impairment charges are recognized in the Statement of Operations. If circumstances suggest that the value of the Investee Company has subsequently recovered, such recovery is not recorded. Our investments which are accounted for on the cost method of accounting have been completely impaired previously, and no impairment expense was recognized during the years ended December 31, 2016 or 2015.

 

Deferred Television Costs

 

Deferred television costs included direct production and development costs stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value based on anticipated revenue. Production overhead is not included as the Company outsources its production costs to third party vendors. Capitalized television production costs for each pilot episode are to be expensed as revenues are recognized upon delivery and acceptance of the completed pilot episodes using the individual-film-forecast-computation method for each television show produced. The Company recognized $95,000 of revenues on November 1, 2012 with the completion of the first of three pilot episodes; and accordingly, recognized $75,617 of expenses related to the development of the pilot. The remaining $135,000 of revenues, and corresponding $116,454 of deferred television costs, were deferred and were recognized upon completion in 2016.

 

Deferred television costs consist of the following at December 31, 2016 and 2015:

 

    December 31,
2016
    December 31,
2015
 
Development and pre-production costs   $              -     $ -  
In-production     -       68,264  
Post production     -       48,190  
Total deferred television costs   $ -     $ 116,454  

 

Due to practical limitations applicable to monetizing our developed content over On-Demand networks, the Company has not considered collectability of advertising or television license revenues to be reasonably assured, and accordingly, the Company has expensed production costs related to the development of our On-Demand and internet-based content as incurred.

 

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Fixed Assets

 

Fixed assets are stated at the lower of cost or estimated net recoverable amount. The cost of property, plant and equipment is depreciated using the straight-line method based on the lesser of the estimated useful lives of the assets or the lease term based on the following life expectancy:

 

Software 3 years
Office equipment and website development costs 5 years
Furniture and fixtures 7 years

 

Repairs and maintenance expenditures are charged to operations as incurred. Major improvements and replacements, which have extend the useful life of an asset, are capitalized and depreciated over the remaining estimated useful life of the asset. When assets are retired or sold, the cost and related accumulated depreciation and amortization are eliminated and any resulting gain or loss is reflected in operations.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

Long-lived assets held and used by the Company are reviewed for possible impairment whenever events or circumstances indicate the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable or is impaired. Recoverability is assessed using undiscounted cash flows based upon historical results and current projections of earnings before interest and taxes. Impairment is measured using discounted cash flows of future operating results based upon a rate that corresponds to the cost of capital. Impairments are recognized in operating results to the extent that carrying value exceeds discounted cash flows of future operations. The Company did not recognize any impairment losses on the disposal of fixed assets during the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015.

 

Construction in Progress

 

The Company is constructing a grow house in its leased facility, which is scheduled to be operational during the second quarter of 2017, at which time depreciation will commence. As of December 31, 2016, the Company incurred and capitalized in Construction in Progress $239,220. The estimated cost to be incurred in 2016 and 2017 to complete construction of the grow house is approximately $1.7 million. The construction will be completed in phases and the portion of the $1.7 million incurred after the facility is initially operational will be capitalized separately as separate leasehold improvements, while the costs incurred to get the facility operational will begin to be depreciated upon commencement of operations.

 

Deferred Rent Obligation

 

The Company has entered into operating lease agreements for its corporate office which contains provisions for future rent increases. In accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, the Company records monthly rent expense equal to the total of the payments due over the lease term, divided by the number of months of the lease terms. The difference between rent expense recorded and the amount paid is credited or charged to “Deferred rent obligation,” which is reflected as a separate line item in the accompanying Balance Sheets.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue from its internet television platform from internally generated products and from partnered merchants when the following criteria are met: persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; delivery has occurred; the selling price is fixed or determinable; and collectability is reasonably assured. These criteria are met when the customers purchase a product or access a web-based video, the product or web-based video has been electronically delivered to the purchaser and payment has been received. At that time, the Company’s obligations to the customer is substantially complete. The Company records the net amount it retains from the sale of items from its internet television platform after paying any agreed upon percentage of the purchase price to the featured advertising merchant excluding any applicable taxes. Revenue is recorded on a net basis because the Company is acting as an agent of the partnered merchant in the transaction. Provisions for discounts and rebates to customers, estimated returns and allowances, and other adjustments are provided for in the same period the related sales are recorded. The Company defers any revenue for which the product has not been delivered or is subject to refund until such time that the Company and the customer jointly determine that the product has been delivered or no refund will be required.

 

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Network revenue consists of monthly network broadcast subscription revenue, which is recognized over the period in which the subscription service is available. Broadcast television advertising revenue is recognized when advertisements are aired. Video production revenue is recognized as digital video film is completed and accepted by the customer and collection is reasonably assured.

 

Revenue from the distribution of domestic television series is recognized as earned using the following criteria:

 

  Persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists;
  The show/episode is complete, and in accordance with the terms of the arrangement, has been delivered or is available for immediate and unconditional delivery;
  The license period has begun and the customer can begin its exploitation, exhibition or sale;
  The price to the customer is fixed and determinable; and
  Collectability is reasonably assured.

 

Due to practical limitations applicable to operating relationships with On-Demand networks, the Company has not considered collectability of advertising or television license revenues to be reasonably assured, and accordingly, the Company has not recognize such revenue unless payment has been received.

 

Audio/Video content licensing revenues were recognized when the underlying royalties from the sales of the related products were earned. The Company recognized minimum revenue guarantees, if any, ratably over the term of the license or as earned royalties based on actual sales of the related products, if greater.

 

Deferred revenues consist of the following at December 31, 2016 and 2015:

 

  December 31,
2016
  December 31,
2015
                          
Deferred revenues on television pilot episodes $ -   $ 135,000

 

Deferred Rent Obligation

 

The Company has entered into operating lease agreements for its corporate office and GLFH’s warehouse which contains provisions for future rent increases. In accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, the Company records monthly rent expense equal to the total of the payments due over the lease term, divided by the number of months of the lease terms. The difference between rent expense recorded and the amount paid is credited or charged to “Deferred rent obligation,” which is reflected as a separate line item in the accompanying Balance Sheets.

 

Derivative Liability

 

The Company evaluates its convertible instruments, options, warrants or other contracts to determine if those contracts or embedded components of those contracts qualify as derivatives to be separately accounted for under ASC Topic 815, “Derivatives and Hedging.” The result of this accounting treatment is that the fair value of the derivative is marked-to-market each balance sheet date and recorded as a liability. In the event that the fair value is recorded as a liability, the change in fair value is recorded in the statement of operations as other income (expense). Upon conversion or exercise of a derivative instrument, the instrument is marked to fair value at the conversion date and then that fair value is reclassified to equity. Equity instruments that are initially classified as equity that become subject to reclassification under ASC Topic 815 are reclassified to liabilities at the fair value of the instrument on the reclassification date. We analyzed the derivative financial instruments (the Convertible Note and tainted Warrant), in accordance with ASC 815. The objective is to provide guidance for determining whether an equity-linked financial instrument is indexed to an entity’s own stock. This determination is needed for a scope exception which would enable a derivative instrument to be accounted for under the accrual method. The classification of a non-derivative instrument that falls within the scope of ASC 815-40-05 “Accounting for Derivative Financial Instruments Indexed to, and Potentially Settled in, a Company’s Own Stock” also hinges on whether the instrument is indexed to an entity’s own stock. A non-derivative instrument that is not indexed to an entity’s own stock cannot be classified as equity and must be accounted for as a liability. There is a two-step approach in determining whether an instrument or embedded feature is indexed to an entity’s own stock. First, the instrument’s contingent exercise provisions, if any, must be evaluated, followed by an evaluation of the instrument’s settlement provisions. The Company utilized multinomial lattice models that value the derivative liability within the notes based on a probability weighted discounted cash flow model. The Company utilized the fair value standard set forth by the Financial Accounting Standards Board, defined as the amount at which the assets (or liability) could be bought (or incurred) or sold (or settled) in a current transaction between willing parties, that is, other than in a forced or liquidation sale.

 

Advertising Costs

 

The Company expenses the cost of advertising and promotions as incurred. Advertising and promotions expense was $11,571 and $16,097 for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively.

 

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Website Development Costs

 

The Company accounts for website development costs in accordance with ASC 350-50, “Accounting for Website Development Costs” (“ASC 350-50”), wherein website development costs are segregated into three activities:

 

  1) Initial stage (planning), whereby the related costs are expensed.
  2) Development (web application, infrastructure, graphics), whereby the related costs are capitalized and amortized once the website is ready for use. Costs for development content of the website may be expensed or capitalized depending on the circumstances of the expenditures.
  3) Post-implementation (after site is up and running: security, training, admin), whereby the related costs are expensed as incurred. Upgrades are usually expensed, unless they add additional functionality.

 

The Company had no capitalized website development costs during the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015 related to its internet television platforms pursuant to the development stage.

 

Basic and Diluted Loss Per Share

 

The basic net loss per common share is computed by dividing the net loss by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. Diluted net loss per common share is computed by dividing the net loss adjusted on an “as if converted” basis, by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding plus potential dilutive securities. For 2016 and 2015, potential dilutive securities had an anti-dilutive effect and were not included in the calculation of diluted net loss per common share.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

Under FASB ASC 718-10-30-2, all share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, to be recognized in the income statement based on their fair values. Pro forma disclosure is no longer an alternative. Stock and stock options issued for services and compensation totaled $431,500 and $460,191 for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively.

 

Income Taxes

 

PNTV recognizes deferred tax assets and liabilities based on differences between the financial reporting and tax basis of assets and liabilities using the enacted tax rates and laws that are expected to be in effect when the differences are expected to be recovered. PNTV provides a valuation allowance for deferred tax assets for which it does not consider realization of such assets to be more likely than not.

 

Uncertain Tax Positions

 

In accordance with ASC 740, “Income Taxes” (“ASC 740”), the Company recognizes the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be capable of withstanding examination by the taxing authorities based on the technical merits of the position. These standards prescribe a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. These standards also provide guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure, and transition.

 

Various taxing authorities periodically audit the Company’s income tax returns. These audits include questions regarding the Company’s tax filing positions, including the timing and amount of deductions and the allocation of income to various tax jurisdictions. In evaluating the exposures connected with these various tax filing positions, including state and local taxes, the Company records allowances for probable exposures. A number of years may elapse before a particular matter, for which an allowance has been established, is audited and fully resolved. The Company has not yet undergone an examination by any taxing authorities.

 

The assessment of the Company’s tax position relies on the judgment of management to estimate the exposures associated with the Company’s various filing positions.

 

Various taxing authorities periodically audit the Company’s income tax returns. These audits include questions regarding the Company’s tax filing positions, including the timing and amount of deductions and the allocation of income to various tax jurisdictions. In evaluating the exposures connected with these various tax filing positions, including state and local taxes, the Company records allowances for probable exposures. A number of years may elapse before a particular matter, for which an allowance has been established, is audited and fully resolved. The Company has not yet undergone an examination by any taxing authorities.

 

The assessment of the Company’s tax position relies on the judgment of management to estimate the exposures associated with the Company’s various filing positions.

 

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Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In January 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2017-04, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) . ASU 2017-04 simplifies the subsequent measurement of goodwill by removing the second step of the two-step impairment test. The amendment requires an entity to perform its annual, or interim goodwill impairment test by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount. An impairment charge should be recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value; however, the loss recognized should not exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit. An entity still has the option to perform the qualitative assessment for a reporting unit to determine if the quantitative impairment test is necessary. The amendment should be applied on a prospective basis. ASU 2017-04 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. The Company intends to early adopt the ASU in 2017.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-01, Business Combinations (Topic 805): Clarifying the Definition of a Business , which clarifies the definition of a business to assist entities with evaluating whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions (or disposals) of assets or businesses. The standard will be effective for the Company in the first quarter of 2018. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adopting this ASU on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In December 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-20, Technical Corrections and Improvements to Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers . ASU 2016-20 amended guidance regarding accounting for Revenue from Contracts with Customers , which requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. When effective, this standard will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). The standard also requires more detailed disclosures and provides additional guidance for transactions that were not comprehensively addressed in GAAP. This guidance is required to be adopted by us in the first quarter of fiscal 2019 by either recasting all years presented in our financial statements or by recording the impact of adoption as an adjustment to retained earnings at the beginning of the year of adoption. We are currently evaluating the impact this guidance will have on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-17, Consolidation (Topic 810): Interests Held through Related Parties that are under Common Control . The amendments in this Update improve GAAP involving situations consisting of common control, wherein a single decision maker focuses on the economics to which it is exposed when determining whether it is the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity (“VIE”) before potentially evaluating which party is most closely associated with the VIE. ASU 2016-17 is effective for public entities for fiscal periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. If an entity early adopts the amendments in an interim period, any adjustments should be reflected as of the beginning of the fiscal year that includes that interim period. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adopting this ASU on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-16, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory , which reduces the complexity in the accounting standards by allowing the recognition of current and deferred income taxes for an intra-entity asset transfer, other than inventory, when the transfer occurs. Historically, recognition of the income tax consequence was not recognized until the asset was sold to an outside party. This amendment should be applied on a modified retrospective basis through a cumulative-effect adjustment directly to retained earnings as of the beginning of the period of adoption. ASU 2016-16 is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim reporting periods within those annual reporting periods. Early adoption is permitted for all entities as of the beginning of an annual reporting period for which financial statements (interim or annual) have not been issued or made available for issuance. That is, earlier adoption should be in the first interim period if an entity issues interim financial statements. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adopting this ASU on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In August, 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (a consensus of the Emerging Issues Task Force). Effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities, the amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. If an entity early adopts the amendments in an interim period, any adjustments should be reflected as of the beginning of the fiscal year that includes that interim period. An entity that elects early adoption must adopt all of the amendments in the same period. The Company is evaluating the impact of this ASU on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In June, 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments. For public business entities that are U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filers, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other public business entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities, including not-for-profit entities and employee benefit plans within the scope of Topics 960 through 965 on plan accounting, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021. All entities may adopt the amendments in this Update earlier as of the fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company is evaluating the impact of this ASU on the Company’s financial statements.

 

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In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09, Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting (Topic 718) (“ASU 2016-09”) . The provisions of the update amend ASC Topic 718, Compensation – Stock Compensation, and includes provisions intended to simplify various aspects related to how share-based payments are accounted for and presented in the financial statements, including accounting for the income tax consequences, estimates of forfeitures and classification of excess tax benefits on the statement of cash flows. For public business entities, this update is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods. The Company is evaluating the impact of this ASU on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In March, 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-08, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Principal versus Agent Considerations (Reporting Revenue Gross versus Net). The amendments in this Update affect the guidance in Accounting Standards Update 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) , which is not yet effective. The effective date and transition requirements for the amendments in this Update are the same as the effective date and transition requirements of Update 2014-09. Accounting Standards Update No. 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Deferral of the Effective Date , defers the effective date of Update 2014-09 by one year. The Company is evaluating the impact of this ASU on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In March, 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-07, Investments—Equity Method and Joint Ventures (Topic 323): Simplifying the Transition to the Equity Method of Accounting. Effective for all entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2016. The amendments should be applied prospectively upon their effective date to increases in the level of ownership interest or degree of influence that result in the adoption of the equity method. Earlier application is permitted. The Company is evaluating the impact of this ASU on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In March, 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-04, Liabilities—Extinguishments of Liabilities (Subtopic 405-20): Recognition of Breakage for Certain Prepaid Stored-Value Products (a consensus of the Emerging Issues Task Force). Effective for public business entities, certain not-for-profit entities, and certain employee benefit plans for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities, effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. Earlier application is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. The Company is evaluating the impact of this ASU on the Company’s financial statements.

 

No other new accounting pronouncements, issued or effective during the year ended December 31, 2016, have had or are expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

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Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2016 and December 31, 2015:

 

    For the Years Ended        
    December 31,     Increase /  
    2016     2015     (Decrease)  
Revenues   $ 135,234     $ 764     $ 134,470  
                         
Direct Operating Costs     145,324       57,705       87,619  
General and Administrative     1,078,409       819,658       258,751  
Officer Salaries     175,673       228,330       (52,657 )
Depreciation and Amortization     24,084       30,143       (6,059 )
                         
Total Operating Expenses     1,423,490       1,135,836       287,654  
                         
Net Operating (Loss)     (1,288,256 )     (1,135,072 )     153,184  
                         
Total other Income (Expense)     (475,552 )     (983,413 )     (507,861 )
                         
Net Loss   $ (1,763,808 )   $ (2,118,485 )   $ (354,677 )

 

Revenues:

 

During the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, we received revenues from the sale of in-home media, advertising fees and the recognition of deferred revenues on content development. Aggregate revenues for the year ended December 31, 2016 were $135,234, compared to revenues of $764 in the year ended December 31, 2015, an increase in revenues of $87,619, or 17,601%. Our revenues increased primarily due to the recognition of a total of $135,000 from the recognition of deferred revenues on pilot videos and a series of webisodes.

 

Direct Operating Costs:

 

Direct operating costs were $145,324 for the year ended December 31, 2016, compared to $57,705 for the year ended December 31, 2015, an increase of $87,619, or 152%. Our direct operating costs increased primarily due to the recognition of $116,454 of deferred television costs related to the completion of our pilot videos and a series of webisodes, as diminished by our decreased website development and content development costs as we no longer needed to develop our new media channel, Weed.tv media channel, which was launched during April of 2014, and just focused on maintaining our media channels and trying to market our services.

 

General and Administrative:

 

General and administrative expenses were $1,078,409 for the year ended December 31, 2016, compared to $819,658 for the year ended December 31, 2015, an increase of $258,751, or 32%. General and administrative expense increased primarily due to rent expenses and associated overhead on our new facility that is being developed in our subsidiary for our cannabis production and cultivation endeavors incurred during the year ended December 31, 2016, compared to the year ended December 31, 2015.

 

Officer Salaries:

 

Officer salaries expense totaled $175,673 for the year ended December 31, 2016, compared to $228,330 for the year ended December 31, 2015, a decrease of $52,657, or 23%. The decrease in officer salaries was primarily due to non-cash, stock based compensation bonuses issued to our board members during the year ended December 31, 2015, consisting of 3 million shares of common stock with a fair value of $49,200 that were not present during the comparative year ended December 31, 2016.

 

Depreciation and Amortization:

 

Depreciation and amortization expense was $24,084 for the year ended December 31, 2016, compared to $30,143 for the year ended December 31, 2015, a decrease of $6,059, or 20%. The decrease in depreciation and amortization was primarily due to some of our office equipment reaching the end of their depreciable lives. We expect depreciation and amortization to increase in 2017, as we place fixed asset additions in service and our construction in process is completed.

 

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Net Operating Loss:

 

Net operating loss for the year ended December 31, 2016 was $1,288,256, or ($0.00) per share compared to a net operating loss of $1,135,072, or ($0.00) per share for the year ended December 31, 2015, an increase of $153,184, or 13%. Net operating loss increased primarily due to increased rent expenses and associated overhead on our new facility that is being developed in our subsidiary for our cannabis production and cultivation endeavors recognized in 2016 that wasn’t incurred in 2015.

 

Other Income (Expense):

 

Other income (expense) was $(475,552) for the year ended December 31, 2016 compared to $(983,413) for the year ended December 31, 2015, a decrease of $507,861, or 52%. Other income (expense) decreased on a net basis primarily due to the loss on disposal of fixed assets of $12,854 during the year ended December 31, 2015 that wasn’t incurred in 2016, the increased gain on debt extinguishments of $154,333 with our gain of $165,615 for the year ended December 31, 2016, compared to the gain of $11,282 during the comparative year ended December 31, 2015, and the decreased interest expense of $559,102 with interest expense of $409,648 during the year ended December 31, 2016, compared to interest expense of $968,750 during the year ended December 31, 2015, as diminished by the increased loss from the change in derivative liability of $231,519 during the year ended December 31, 2016, compared to the $13,091 change in derivative liability for the year ended December 31, 2015. These changes were primarily due to our aggressive attempts to settle convertible debts in substitute of more favorable financing opportunities to build out our operations.

 

Net Loss:

 

The net loss for the year ended December 31, 2016 was $1,763,808, or ($0.00) per share, compared to a net loss of $2,118,485, or ($0.01) per share, for the year ended December 31, 2015, a decreased net loss of $354,677, or 17%. Net loss decreased primarily due to decreased other expenses from our settlements of convertible debts in substitute of more favorable financing opportunities to build out our operations, as diminished by increased rent and overhead costs on our new facility that we intend to use to carry out our cannabis production and cultivation operations in Nevada.

 

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

 

The following table summarizes total assets, accumulated deficit, stockholders’ equity and working capital at December 31, 2016 compared to December 31, 2015.

 

    December 31,
2016
    December 31,
2015
    Increase /(Decrease)  
Total Assets   $ 498,617     $ 158,207     $ 340,410  
                         
Total Liabilities   $ 1,401,644     $ 2,247,086     $ (845,442 )
                         
Accumulated (Deficit)   $ (30,639,417 )   $ (28,937,607 )   $ 1,701,810  
                         
Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)   $ (903,027 )   $ (2,088,879 )   $ (1,185,852 )
                         
Working Capital (Deficit)   $ (1,131,646 )   $ (2,130,007 )   $ (998,361 )

 

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Sources and Uses of Cash

 

Our principal source of operating capital has been provided from debt financing, including in a reduced capacity, convertible debt financing, private sales of our common stock, and revenues from operations. At December 31, 2016, we had a negative working capital position of $(1,131,646). As we continue the shift in our business focus and attempt to expand operational activities, we expect to continue to experience net negative cash flows from operations in amounts not now determinable, and will be required to obtain additional financing to fund operations through debt borrowings and common stock offerings to the extent necessary to provide working capital. We have and expect to continue to have substantial capital expenditure and working capital needs. We do not now have funds sufficient to fund our operations at their current level for the next twelve months. We need to raise additional cash to fund our operations and implement our business plan. We expect that the additional financing will (if available) take the form of debt financing, although we may be able to obtain additional equity financing in lieu thereof. We are maintaining an on-going effort to locate sources of additional funding, without which we will not be able to remain a viable entity. If we are able to obtain the financing required to remain in business, eventually achieving operating profits will require substantially increasing revenues or drastically reducing expenses from their current levels, or both. If we are able to obtain the required financing to remain in business, future operating results depend upon a number of factors that are outside of our control.

 

Debt Instruments, Guarantees, and Related Covenants

 

Advances Received

 

On June 29, 2016, the Company received proceeds of $82,000 in anticipation of a partnership with an investment group that intended to partner with Green Leaf Farms Holdings to develop its MME businesses. The terms of the partnership agreement have not yet been finalized and it is likely that the advance will be repaid.

 

Debt financing

 

On November 21, 2016, the Company entered into a letter agreement with SK L-43, LLC (“SK L-43”) providing for the making of loans by the SK L-43 to the Company, at SK L-43’s option (i) in the aggregate principal amount of $925,000, and (ii) in the amounts of $1,500,000 each on or before each of April 1, 2017 and May 1, 2017. Advances under the letter agreement are unsecured; bear interest at a rate of 5% per annum, payable on December 31 st of each year; mature two years from the making of the applicable Advance; and are subject to acceleration upon customary events of default set forth in the promissory notes. To date, SK L-43 has advanced to the Company the following loans:

 

$125,000 – November 02, 2016

$267,000 – November 21, 2016

$267,000 – December 02, 2016

$266,000 – December 19, 2016

 

Pursuant to the advances above, SK L-43 was issued warrants to purchase up to 92,500,002 shares of the Company’s common stock as additional consideration for making the loans at various exercise prices of $0.03 and $0.06 per share. For each additional loan of $1,500,000 each on or before each of April 1, 2017 and May 1, 2017, SK L-43 will also be entitled to additional warrants to purchase 42,857,142 shares of the Company’s common stock.

 

On August 15, 2016, the Company entered into a definitive funding agreement with RxMM Health Limited (“RxMM”) in which a convertible note was issued for a total gross investment of $2,500,000. In consideration of such investment, RxMM will receive 50,000,000 callable warrants as a fee per the milestone schedule below, and will be entitled to 20% of all adjusted gross revenue and 20% of the gross income generated by the Company through any of its medical marijuana holdings or its media platform, of which shall reduce the principal until this debenture is either paid back or converted into equity.

 

Debenture Funding Milestone    Warrants and Exercise Price Details
     
$400,000   10 million shares exercisable at $0.05 per share over 2 years
$400,001 - $800,000   15 million shares exercisable at $0.06 per share over 2 years
$800,001 - $1,600,000   15 million shares exercisable at $0.07 per share over 2 years
$1,600,001 - $2,500,000   10 million shares exercisable at $0.08 per share over 2 years

 

The warrants are callable if the stock averages 200% of the warrant strike price for any thirty (30) day trading period. The convertible debenture, bearing interest at 5% per annum, will mature 24 months after the full investment is realized, and is convertible into common stock at a 25% discount to the preceding 30 day average closing stock price. The Company is required at all times to have authorized and reserved the number of shares that is actually issuable upon full conversion of the note. The Company has received a total of $200,000 of payments on the funding agreement over various dates between August 15, 2016 and August 19, 2016.

 

On July 28, 2016, the Company received proceeds of $35,000 in exchange for an unsecured convertible promissory note, bearing interest at eight percent (8%), which matures on July 28, 2017. The principal and interest is convertible into shares of common stock at the discretion of the note holder at a price equal to seventy eight percent (78%) of the average of the closing traded prices during the ten (10) trading days prior to the conversion request date.

 

On June 24, 2016, the Company received proceeds of $30,000 in exchange for an unsecured convertible promissory note, bearing interest at eight percent (8%), which matures on June 24, 2017. The principal and interest is convertible into shares of common stock at the discretion of the note holder at a price equal to seventy eight percent (78%) of the average of the closing traded prices during the ten (10) trading days prior to the conversion request date.

 

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Convertible Debenture Repayment and Settlements

 

On September 22, 2016, the Company entered into a payoff agreement to pay WHC Capital, LLC a total of $100,000 in five installments ranging between $15,000 and $25,000 payable from October 21, 2016 through February 21, 2017 in satisfaction of a total of $114,002 of principal and unpaid interest on two convertible notes originally entered into with WHC on August 24, 2015 and August 19, 2014. As of December 31, 2016, the Company had paid a total of $30,000 on the settlement, as specified in the agreement.

 

On August 12, 2016, the Company entered into a settlement agreement to pay Vis Vires a total of $70,000 in four installments of $17,500 payable from August 6, 2016 through November 3, 2016 in satisfaction of the $64,000 of principal and all unpaid interest on the convertible note originally entered into with Vis Vires on May 1, 2015. The settlement was satisfied in full as of November 22, 2016.

 

On January 21, 2016, the Company entered into a settlement agreement with Tangiers Investment Group. Pursuant to the agreement, the Company is obligated to repay a total of $80,000 in various monthly installments of between $6,000 and $20,000 from February 8, 2016 through June 26, 2016 in satisfaction of a total of approximately $85,820, consisting of $75,500 of principal and $10,320 of interest on the First and Second Tangiers Notes. The settlement was satisfied in full as of August 30, 2016.

 

On January 4, 2016, the Company entered into a settlement agreement with JSJ Investments. Pursuant to the agreement, the Company was obligated to repay a total of $70,000 in six monthly installments of approximately $11,667 from January 21, 2016 through June 21, 2016 in satisfaction of a total of approximately $82,564, consisting of $75,000 of principal and $7,564 of interest on the First JSJ Note. The settlement was satisfied in full as of June 21, 2016.

 

Common Stock Sales

 

On October 14, 2016, the Company sold 1,500,000 shares of its common stock to an accredited investor in exchange for proceeds of $12,000.

 

On September 15, 2016, the Company sold 16,750,000 shares of its common stock to an accredited investor in exchange for proceeds of $117,250.

 

We have utilized these funds to repay $80,890 of previously issued convertible debentures, $203,810 of negotiated settlements on previously outstanding convertible debentures and $251,304 on the build out of our cannabis production and cultivation facility, and comply with our regulatory reporting requirements. Although our revenues are expected to grow as we expand our operations, our revenues are not expected to exceed our investment and operating costs in the next twelve months, and we do not have funds sufficient to fund our operations at their current level for the next twelve months. Our prospects must be considered in light of the risks, expenses and difficulties frequently encountered by companies in their early stage of operations. To address these risks, we must, among other things, seek growth opportunities through investment and acquisitions in our industry, effectively monitor and manage our claims for payments that are owed to us, implement and successfully execute our business strategy, respond to competitive developments, and attract, retain and motivate qualified personnel. We cannot assure that we will be successful in addressing such risks, and the failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our business prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

 

To conserve on the Company’s capital requirements, the Company has issued shares in lieu of cash payments to outside consultants, and the Company expects to continue this practice. In the year ended December 31, 2016, the Company granted a total of 37,900,000 shares of common stock and 6,250,000 shares of preferred stock valued at an aggregate of $431,500 in lieu of cash payments to employees and outside consultants, compared to the issuance of a total of 30,200,000 shares of common stock and 5,750,000 shares of preferred stock valued at an aggregate of $401,840 in lieu of cash payments to employees and outside consultants during the year ended December 31, 2015. The Company is not now in a position to determine an approximate number of shares that the Company may issue for the preceding purpose in the remainder of 2017.

 

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Satisfaction of Our Cash Obligations for the Next 12 Months

 

As of December 31, 2016, our cash on hand was $145,119. We believe we cannot satisfy our cash requirements for the next twelve months with our current cash on hand. Our operations are subject to attaining adequate financing. We cannot assure investors that adequate financing will be available. In the absence of such financing, we may be unable to proceed with our operations.

 

We anticipate that our operational, and general & administrative expenses for the next 12 months will total approximately $2,500,000, of which we expect a portion will be satisfied with the issuance of stock based compensation in lieu of cash. We anticipate the purchase of a significant amount of equipment necessary to implement our medical marijuana operations. Should we be able to commence operations pursuant to our plans to enter into the medical marijuana business, we will also need to either, purchase or lease, a warehouse facility to produce marijuana pursuant to the license we were awarded by the City of North Las Vegas. We also would expect a significant addition to the number of employees. We have not yet begun to develop a facility to commence our medical marijuana operations, and are not now in a position to determine an approximate amount that would be necessary. The foregoing represents our best estimate of our cash needs based on current planning and business conditions. The exact allocation, purposes and timing of any monies raised in subsequent private financings may vary significantly depending upon the exact amount of funds raised and our progress with the execution of our planned operations. Our plan for satisfying our cash requirements for the next twelve months, in addition to our revenues from our Enterprise Technology Platform, is through convertible debt financing, the sale of shares of our common stock, third party financing, and/or traditional debt financing. We may continue to pay for services with shares of common stock in lieu of cash if financing is unavailable.

 

In the event we are not successful in obtaining financing, we may not be able to proceed with our business plan for the commercialization of our products and further research and development of new products. We anticipate that we will incur operating losses in the foreseeable future. Therefore, our auditors have raised substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

Off- Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as of December 31, 2016.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not Required

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

The information required by this Item is incorporated by reference to the financial statements beginning on page F-1.

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

None

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures.

 

We carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, who are one in the same, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as defined in Rules 13a – 15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (“Exchange Act”) as of the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K. Based upon that evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, who are one in the same, concluded that, as of the end of the period covered in this report, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed in reports filed under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the required time periods and is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, who are one in the same, does not expect that our disclosure controls or internal controls will prevent all error and all fraud. Although our disclosure controls and procedures were designed to provide reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, who is one in the same, has determined that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective at doing so, a control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute assurance that the objectives of the system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented if there exists in an individual a desire to do so. There can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions.

 

Furthermore, smaller reporting companies may face additional limitations. Smaller reporting companies often employ fewer individuals and find it difficult to properly segregate duties. Often, one or two individuals control every aspect of the Company’s operation and are in a position to override any system of internal control. Additionally, smaller reporting companies may utilize general accounting software packages that lack a rigorous set of software controls.

 

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Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting.

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rule 13a- 15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act, as amended. Management, with the participation of the Chief Executive Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2016. In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth by the committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control – Integrated Framework (2013 Framework). A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. We have identified the following material weaknesses:

 

  1. As of December 31, 2016, we did not maintain effective controls over the control environment. Specifically we have not developed and effectively communicated to our employees its accounting policies and procedures. This has resulted in inconsistent practices. Further, the Board of Directors does not currently have any independent members and no director qualifies as an audit committee financial expert as defined in Item 407(d)(5)(ii) of Regulation S-K. Since these entity level programs have a pervasive effect across the organization, management has determined that these circumstances constitute a material weakness.
     
  2. As of December 31, 2016, we did not maintain effective controls over financial statement disclosure. Specifically, controls were not designed and in place to ensure that all disclosures required were originally addressed in our financial statements. Accordingly, management has determined that this control deficiency constitutes a material weakness.

 

Because of these material weaknesses, management has concluded that the Company did not maintain effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2016 based on the criteria established in “Internal Control-Integrated Framework” issued by the COSO.

 

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

There have been no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended December 31, 2016, that materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Independent Registered Accountant’s Internal Control Attestation

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of the Company’s registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by the Company’s registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission that permit the Company to provide only management’s report in this annual report.

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

 

None

 

  32  
     

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

The following table sets forth the names and positions of our executive officers and directors. Directors will be elected at our annual meeting of stockholders and serve for one year or until their successors are elected and qualify. Officers are elected by the Board and their terms of office are, except to the extent governed by employment contract, at the discretion of the Board.

 

Name   Age   Position   Director Since
Mark Bradley   54   Chief Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and Chairman   1993
Michael Berk   70   President of Programming and Director   2000
Brett Pojunis   37   Director   2016

 

Mark Bradley founded the Company and has been its Chief Executive Officer and a director since 1993, and became its principal financial officer in 2004. Mr. Bradley was a staff producer/director at United Artists where he produced original programming and television commercials. In 1985 he created the Real Estate Broadcast Network that was the first 24-hour real estate channel. In 1993 he founded Players Network. Mr. Bradley is a graduate of the Producers Program at the University of California Los Angeles. Under his direction, Players Network became the first user of a digital broadcast system for television programming and the first private label gaming network. Mr. Bradley pioneered, developed and executive produced the production of Players Network’s unique gaming-centric programming. Mr. Bradley graduated from the UCLA producer’s program and became a producer/director at United Artists, where he produced original programming, television commercials, multi-camera music videos, live-to-tape sports and a variety show and was studio manager and postproduction supervisor with United Cable Television in Los Angeles. In this capacity he engaged in the production, packaging and syndication of television and film productions for such media venues as HBO, Nickelodeon, Prime Ticket and MTV. As an independent producer/director, Mr. Bradley created and promoted live pay-per-view events, negotiated entertainment programming distribution deals, budgeted and packaged TV programming. In 1985, Mr. Bradley created the Real Estate Broadcast Network, which was credited as being the first 24-hour real estate channel. As a founder and Chief Executive Officer of the Company, Mr. Bradley has extensive media production expertise as well as deep knowledge and relationships in the Las Vegas, Nevada entertainment industry. Mr. Bradley’s experience with the Company from its founding also offers the Board insight to the evolution of the Company, including from execution, cultural, operational, and competitive and industry points of view.

 

Michael Berk has been a director since 2000 and was appointed as the Company’s president of programming on March 22, 2005. He created and Executive Produced “Baywatch,” the most popular series in television history, and is currently producing a large-budget “Baywatch” feature film for DreamWorks. Mr. Berk wrote and produced the first three-hour movie ever made for television, “The Incredible Journey of Dr. Meg Laurel,” the highest-rated movie of the year, averaging a 42 share over three hours, “The Ordeal of Dr. Mudd,” another three-hour movie that received two Emmy Awards, “The Haunting Passion,” winner of the Venice Film Festival Award and “The Last Song,” recipient of the Edgar Allan Poe Award for Mystery Writing. Mr. Berk is also a significant figure in the Las Vegas community. He was a founding Board Member and President of the highly acclaimed “CineVegas” Film Festival, now in its sixth year at the Palms Hotel, and was recognized with the prestigious Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce Community Achievement Award in the category of Entertainment. He also received the Nevada Film Office/Las Vegas Film Critics Society Silver Spike Award for his contributions to the film and television industry in Nevada. Mr. Berk maintains offices both in Hollywood and in Las Vegas. Mr. Berk’s extensive experience and contacts in the media and entertainment industry provides the Company and the Board a unique perspective on this industry and insight into the Company’s business.

 

Brett Pojunis has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Company since March of 2016. Mr. Pojunis has served as the Chairman of the Libertarian Party of Nevada since November 2013 and previously served as Secretary. From December 2011 through June 2014, Mr. Pojunis served on the Libertarian National Committee in multiple positions. Mr. Pojuis has worked in Libertarian politics since 2010 in multiple capacities including activism, event production, fundraising, technology and working on candidate campaigns during 2012 and 2014. From 2007 through 2010, Mr. Pojunis was Co-Founder and CEO of Dealguys Network, Inc., a financial media holding company focused on developing exclusive communities within the financial industry. Mr. Pojunis has been involved in finance and the public markets since 1999 as a consultant to many start-up companies including high-tech Internet to traditional brick and mortar companies. Mr. Pojunis served in the US ARMY and was awarded the Outstanding American award twice, the second time with honorable mention. Mr. Pojunis studied Environmental Liberal Arts at Green Mountain College and Entrepreneurship classes at the Simon School of Business at the University of Rochester. Mr. Pojunis also attended elective International Business and Finance classes at Rochester Institute of Technology.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships among directors, executive officers or persons nominated or chosen by Players Network to become directors or executive officers.

 

  33  
     

 

Limitation of Liability of Directors

 

Pursuant to the Nevada General Corporation Law, our Articles of Incorporation exclude personal liability for our Directors for monetary damages based upon any violation of their fiduciary duties as Directors, except as to liability for any breach of the duty of loyalty, acts or omissions not in good faith or which involve intentional misconduct or a knowing violation of law, or any transaction from which a Director receives an improper personal benefit. This exclusion of liability does not limit any right which a Director may have to be indemnified and does not affect any Director’s liability under federal or applicable state securities laws. We have agreed to indemnify our directors against expenses, judgments, and amounts paid in settlement in connection with any claim against a Director if he acted in good faith and in a manner he believed to be in our best interests.

 

Election of Directors and Officers

 

Directors are elected to serve until the next annual meeting of stockholders and until their successors have been elected and qualified. Officers are appointed to serve until the meeting of the Board of Directors following the next annual meeting of stockholders and until their successors have been elected and qualified.

 

No Executive Officer or Director of the Corporation has been the subject of any Order, Judgment, or Decree of any Court of competent jurisdiction, or any regulatory agency permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting him from acting as an investment advisor, underwriter, broker or dealer in the securities industry; or, as an affiliated person, director or employee of an investment company, bank, savings and loan association; also, an insurance company or from engaging in, or continuing any conduct or practice in connection with any such activity or in connection with the purchase or sale of any securities.

 

No Executive Officer or Director of the Corporation has been convicted in any criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations) or is the subject of a criminal proceeding, which is currently pending.

 

No Executive Officer or Director of the Corporation is the subject of any pending legal proceedings.

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

 

Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), requires our executive officers and directors, and persons who beneficially own more than ten percent of our common stock, to file initial reports of ownership and reports of changes in ownership with the SEC. Executive officers, directors and greater than ten percent beneficial owners are required by SEC regulations to furnish us with copies of all Section 16(a) forms they file. To our knowledge, we believe that during 2016 our Directors and executive officers did not comply with all Section 16(a) filing requirements. Specifically, Mr. Bradley, Mr. Berk and Mr. Pojunis failed to file Form 4’s with respect to the issuance of common shares in 2016.

 

To the Company’s knowledge, the following is a list of individuals that have not filed, or filed late, a report reflecting a change in ownership as required pursuant to Section 16(a) of the Securities Act of 1934:

 

Name of Individual   Number of Late Reports     Number of Transactions that Were Not Timely Reported  
             
Mark Bradley     2       2  
                 
Michael Berk     1       1  
                 
Brett Pojunis     1       1  

 

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Audit Committee

 

We do not have an Audit Committee, our board of directors acted as the Company’s Audit Committee during 2016, recommending a firm of independent certified public accountants to audit the annual financial statements; reviewing the independent auditors’ independence, the financial statements and their audit report; and reviewing management’s administration of the system of internal accounting controls. The Company does not currently have a written audit committee charter or similar document.

 

Our board of directors has determined that if we were required to have a financial expert and/or an audit committee, Brett Pojunis, a Director, would be considered an “audit committee financial expert,” as defined by applicable Commission rules and regulations. Based on the definition of “independent” applicable to audit committee members of Nasdaq-traded companies, our board of directors has further determined that Mr. Pojunis is considered to be “independent.”

 

Code of Ethics

 

A code of ethics relates to written standards that are reasonably designed to deter wrongdoing and to promote:

 

  Honest and ethical conduct, including the ethical handling of actual or apparent conflicts of interest between personal and professional relationships;
  Full, fair, accurate, timely and understandable disclosure in reports and documents that are filed with, or submitted to, the Commission and in other public communications made by an issuer;
  Compliance with applicable governmental laws, rules and regulations;
  The prompt internal reporting of violations of the code to an appropriate person or persons identified in the code; and
  Accountability for adherence to the code.

 

On April 7, 2004, the Company adopted a Code of Ethics that applies to the Company’s principal executive officer, principal financial officer and principal accounting officer. Anyone can obtain a copy of the Code of Ethics by contacting the Company at the following address: 1771 E. Flamingo Road, Suite # 201-A, Las Vegas, NV 89119, attention: Chief Executive Officer, telephone: (702) 734-3457. The first such copy will be provided without charge. The Company will post any amendments to the Code of Ethics, as well as any waivers that are required to be disclosed by the rules of either the Securities and Exchange Commission or the National Association of Dealers.

 

Nominating Committee

 

We do not have a Nominating Committee or Nominating Committee Charter. Our board of directors performed some of the functions associated with a Nominating Committee. We have elected not to have a Nominating Committee in that we are continuously updating our operations and have limited resources with which to establish additional committees of our board of directors.

 

We do not have a policy regarding the consideration of any director candidates that may be recommended by our stockholders, including the minimum qualifications for director candidates, nor have our officers and directors established a process for identifying and evaluating director nominees. In the event that we receive a stockholder recommendation for a director nominee, all current members of our Board will participate in the consideration of director nominees.

 

Compensation Committee

 

At this time, Mr. Pojunis is the only member of the committee and has performed in his role by reviewing our employment agreements with Mr. Bradley and Mr. Berk. The board of directors intends to add additional members to the compensation committee and expects it to consist of solely of independent members. Until more members are appointed to the compensation committee, our entire board of directors will review all forms of compensation provided to any new executive officers, directors, consultants and employees, including stock compensation and options.

 

  35  
     

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

The following table sets forth certain information relating to all compensation of our named executive officers for services rendered in all capacities to the Company during the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015:

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

Name and                                    
Principal               Stock     Option              
Position   Year     Salary     Awards     Awards     All Other     Total  
(a)   (b)     (c)     (e) (1)     (f) (1)     Compensation     Compensation  
Mark Bradley,     2016     $ 54,923     $ 309,000     $ -0-     $ -0-     $ 363,923  
Chief Executive Officer     2015     $ 161,880     $ 41,850     $ -0-     $ -0-     $ 203,730  
                                                 
Michael Berk,     2016     $ -0-     $ 15,000     $ -0-     $ -0-     $ 15,000  
President of Programming     2015     $ -0-     $ 24,600     $ -0-     $ -0-     $ 24,600  

 

  (1) The amounts in columns (e) and (f) reflect the dollar amount recognized for financial statement reporting purposes for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, in accordance with FASB ASC 718-10 of awards of stock and stock options. Assumptions used in the calculation of this amount are included in the footnotes to our audited financial statements for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016, included in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Employment Agreements

 

Mark Bradley, Chief Executive Officer

 

On July 17, 2015, the Company entered into an employment agreement with Mr. Bradley (the “New Employment Agreement”), effective July 1, 2015. The New Employment Agreement replaces Mr. Bradley’s 2010 Employment Agreement, which was set to expire on September 1, 2015, and which was terminated on July 17, 2015, effective July 1, 2015, pursuant to a mutual agreement of the parties.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the New Employment Agreement, Mr. Bradley will serve as the Company’s CEO and Chairman. The New Employment Agreement has a term of five years and six months, commencing July 1, 2015. The Company agreed to pay Mr. Bradley an annual base salary of $175,000 or such greater amount as may be determined by the Board of Directors of the Company (the “Board”) in connection with a performance review to be performed at least once annually. In the event that the Board determines that the Company cannot afford to pay Mr. Bradley any portion of his base salary, Mr. Bradley may, at his sole option, elect one of the following:

 

  (a) Defer receipt of his base salary until such time as the Company has the funds to pay him. In the event that Mr. Bradley elects this option, the unpaid salary shall be paid with no interest.
     
  (b) Elect to convert all, or a portion of the unpaid salary into Series C Preferred Stock at an exchange rate equal to the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the date immediately preceding each election.

 

The Company will also pay Mr. Bradley an annual bonus, subject to meeting mutually agreed upon annual performance criteria mutually established by the Company and Mr. Bradley.

 

In the event that Mr. Bradley’s employment is terminated by the Company for any reason (other than as a result of the termination for cause or by death) or terminated by Mr. Bradley as a result of a material breach of the New Employment Agreement by the Company (any of the foregoing, an “Involuntary Termination”), Mr. Bradley shall be entitled to continue to receive his base salary and all benefits for the remainder of the term of the New Employment Agreement as if it had not been terminated. In addition, Mr. Bradley shall receive from the Company, on the effective date of the Involuntary Termination, a lump sum amount equal to two times Mr. Bradley’s then current base salary. In addition, all stock options that Mr. Bradley would be eligible though the natural term of the New Employment Agreement will immediately become fully vested. In the event Mr. Bradley or his family is ineligible under the terms of any insurance to continue to be covered, the Company shall provide Mr. Bradley and his family with substantially equivalent coverage through other sources or will provide Mr. Bradley with a lump sum payment equal to the agreed upon value of the continuation of such insurance coverage to which Mr. Bradley is entitled under the New Employment Agreement.

 

In the event of Mr. Bradley’s death during the term of the New Employment Agreement, the Company will pay to Mr. Bradley’s designated beneficiary 100% of Mr. Bradley’s then current base salary for a period of 12 months following Mr. Bradley’s death.

 

  36  
     

 

The Company has the right to terminate the New Employment Agreement and Mr. Bradley’s employment for Cause (as hereinafter defined) upon written notice to Mr. Bradley. The term “Cause” means Mr. Bradley must have (i) been willful, gross or persistent in his inattention to his duties or Mr. Bradley committed acts which constitute willful or gross misconduct and, after written notice of the same has been given to Mr. Bradley and he has been given an opportunity to cure the same within 30 days after such notice; or (ii) committed fraud against the Company. If Mr. Bradley’s employment is terminated for Cause and Mr. Bradley does not consent to such termination, such termination shall not be considered effective and Mr. Bradley’s rights under the New Employment Agreement shall continue until the existence of Cause has been determined by an independent arbitrator appointed by the American Arbitration Association and either party’s rights to petition a court of law for a decision in the matter have been exhausted.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the New Employment Agreement, Mr. Bradley is subject to a nondisclosure provision that continues for a period of one year following his termination of employment. He is also subject to a noncompete agreement during the term of his employment with the Company.

 

Michael Berk, President of Programming

 

On January 1, 2005, we entered into a five-year employment agreement with Mr. Michael Berk, our President of Programming pursuant to which we agreed to pay Mr. Berk an annual salary of $150,000 plus 10% of all royalties that we receive from sources directly resulting from his efforts. Mr. Berk took an unpaid leave of absence from July 1, 2009 through October 1, 2010, at which time we replaced Mr. Berk’s expired employment agreement. We extended Mr. Berk’s employment under a replacement employment agreement which provides that Mr. Berk is entitled to receive an annual salary of $150,000, with an additional monthly automobile allowance of $700. On October 1, 2010, the employment agreement was renewed for a five (5) year period through August 31, 2015, with amendments to include a monthly automobile allowance of $700. Mr. Berk agreed to suspend the accrual of all compensation effective March 1, 2013 due to a lack of available resources.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year End

 

The following table sets forth information with respect to the value of all unexercised options previously awarded to the Named Executive Officers at the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016.

 

Name
(a)
 

Number of

Securities

Underlying

Unexercised

Options (#)

Exercisable

(b) (1)

    Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options (#)
Unexercisable
(c)
    Option
Exercise
Price ($)
(e)
    Option
Expiration
Date
(f)
  Number
of Shares
or Units
of Stock
That
Have Not
Vested (#)
(f)
    Market
Value of
Shares or
Units of
Stock
That
Have Not
Vested ($)
(g)
 
Mark Bradley     8,000,000       -0-     $ 0.04     February 20, 2018     -0-       -0-  
                                             
Michael Berk     -0-       -0-     $ -0-     N/A     -0-       -0-  

 

  (1) All outstanding options were fully vested on the date of grant.

 

Termination of Employment; Severance Agreements

 

Mr. Bradley and Mr. Berk are each parties to employment agreements with the Company that provide for severance benefits in the event their employment is terminated by the Company (other than as a result of death or for cause) or by the employee as a result of a material breach by the Company of the employment agreement. In the event of such termination, the employee will be entitled to his base salary and all benefits for the remainder of the term of the employment agreement plus a lump sum cash payment in an amount equal to two times his then current base salary and annual bonus (without regard to the performance requirements associated with such bonus). In addition, all outstanding stock options will be immediately vested. If the employee or his family is ineligible under the terms of any insurance to continue to be covered, the Company will either provide substantially equivalent coverage or pay the employee a lump sum payment equal to the value of the continuation of such insurance coverage.

 

  37  
     

 

Director Compensation

 

The table below summarizes the compensation paid, or accrued to non-employee directors for the year ended December 31, 2016.

 

    Fees Earned   Stock     Option     All Other        
    or Paid   Awards     Awards     Compensation     Total  
Name   in Cash   ($)     ($)     ($)     ($)  
(a)   (b)   (c) (1)     (d)     (g)     (h)  
Brett Pojunis   $40,500   $ 15,000     $ -0-       -0-     $ 55,500  

 

  (1) On September 2, 2016, the Company granted Brett Pojunis 3,000,000 shares of common stock, respectively, in exchange for services rendered as a director.

 

The amounts in columns (c) and (d) reflect the fair value dollar amount recognized for financial statement reporting purposes for the year ended December 31, 2016, in accordance with FASB ASC 718-10-30-2 of awards of stock and stock options and thus include amounts from awards granted in and prior to 2016. Assumptions used in the calculation of this amount are included in the footnotes to our audited financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2016 included in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS.

 

The following table presents information, to the best of our knowledge, about the beneficial ownership of our common stock on March 31, 2017, held by those persons known to beneficially own more than 5% of our capital stock and by our directors and executive officers.

 

Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission and does not necessarily indicate beneficial ownership for any other purpose. Under these rules, beneficial ownership includes those shares of common stock over which the stockholder has sole or shared voting or investment power. It also includes (unless footnoted) shares of common stock that the stockholder has a right to acquire within 60 days after March 31, 2017 through the exercise of any option, warrant or other right. The percentage ownership of the outstanding common stock, however, is based on the assumption, expressly required by the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission, that only the person or entity whose ownership is being reported has converted options or warrants into shares of our common stock. Unless otherwise indicated, the address of each listed stockholder is c/o Players Network, 1771 E. Flamingo Road, #201-A, Las Vegas, NV 89119.

 

          Series A     Series C
    Common Stock     Preferred Stock (9)     Preferred Stock (10)
Name of Beneficial Owner (1)   Number of Shares     % of Class (2)     Number of Shares     % of Class (3)     Number of Shares     % of Class (4)     Total Voting Power (8)  
Officers and Directors:                                                        
Mark Bradley, CEO and Director (5)     92,776,652       16.3 %     1,000,000       50 %     12,000,000       100 %     58.1 %
Michael Berk, President of Programming and Director (6)(7)     10,880,527       2.0 %     1,000,000       50 %     -       -       3.0 %
Brett Pojunis, Director     10,800,000       2.0 %     -       -       -       -       *  
Directors and Officers as a Group (3 persons)     114,457,179       20.1 %     2,000,000       100 %     12,000,000       100 %     62.0 %
5% Holders:                                                        

SK L-43, LLC (11)(12)

    92,500,002       14.5 %     -       -       -       -       -  

 

* less than 1%

 

(1) Except as indicated in the footnotes to this table and pursuant to applicable community property laws, the persons named in the table have sole voting and investment power with respect to all shares of Common Stock, Series A Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock owned by such person.

(2) Percentage of beneficial ownership is based upon 547,394,239 shares of Common Stock outstanding as of March 31, 2017. For each named person, this percentage includes Common Stock that the person has the right to acquire either currently or within 60 days of March 31, 2017, including through the exercise of an option; however, such Common Stock is not deemed outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage owned by any other person.

(3) Percentage of beneficial ownership is based upon 2,000,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock outstanding as of March 31, 2017.

(4) Percentage of beneficial ownership is based upon 12,000,000 shares of Series C Preferred Stock outstanding as of March 31, 2017.

(5) Includes stock options and warrants to purchase 8,000,000 shares of Common Stock exercisable within 60 days of March 31, 2017 and 25,000 shares held for the benefit of Mr. Bradley’s minor daughter.

(6) Includes 38,000 shares held by MJB Productions, which is 100% owned by Mr. Berk.

(7) Excludes (i) 125,000 shares held by Mr. Berk’s ex-wife, and (ii) 125,000 shares by Mr. Berk’s adult son.

(8) Information based on Schedule 13D filed with the SEC on October 19, 2011, Form 4 filed on October 10, 2011 and October 11, 2011 and the Company’s shareholder reports.

(9) Series A Preferred Stock carries preferential voting power of 25:1. Both Mr. Bradley and Mr. Berk hold 1 million shares of Series A Preferred Stock, and carry 25 million additional votes each.

(10) Series C Preferred Stock carries preferential voting power of 50:1. Mr. Bradley holds 12 million shares of Series C Preferred Stock that carry 60 million additional votes.

(11) Consists of warrants to purchase 92,500,002 shares of Common Stock exercisable at prices ranging from $0.03 to $0.06 per share.

(12) Sk L-43, LLC is principally owned by Bruce Seyburn and Neil Fetter.

 

  38  
     

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE.

 

Director Independence

 

Our Common Stock is currently quoted on the OTCQB. As such, we are not currently subject to corporate governance standards of listed companies, which require, among other things, that the majority of the board of directors be independent. We are not currently subject to corporate governance standards defining the independence of our directors, and we have chosen to define an “independent” director in accordance with the NASDAQ Global Market’s requirements for independent directors. Our Board of Directors has determined that Mr. Pojunis is “independent” in accordance with the NASDAQ Global Market’s requirements.

 

Our Board of Directors will review at least annually the independence of each director. During these reviews, our Board of Directors will consider transactions and relationships between each director (and his or her immediate family and affiliates) and us and our management to determine whether any such transactions or relationships are inconsistent with a determination that the director was independent. The Board of Directors will conduct its annual review of director independence and to determine if any transactions or relationships exist that would disqualify any of the individuals who then served as a director under the rules of the NASDAQ Stock Market, or require disclosure under SEC rules.

 

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES.

 

The following table shows the fees paid or accrued for the audit and other services provided by our independent auditors for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively.

 

    For the Years Ended  
    December 31,  
    2016     2015  
Audit fees:   $ 34,000     $ 34,500  
Audit-related fees:     -       -  
Tax fees:     -       -  
All other fees:     -       -  
Total fees paid or accrued to our principal accountant   $ 34,000     $ 34,500  

 

Audit Fees — This category includes the audit of our annual financial statements, review of financial statements included in our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and services that are normally provided by the independent registered public accounting firm in connection with engagements for those fiscal years. This category also includes advice on audit and accounting matters that arose during, or as a result of, the audit or the review of interim financial statements.

 

Audit-Related Fees — This category consists of assurance and related services by the independent registered public accounting firm that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements and are not reported above under “Audit Fees.”

 

Tax Fees — This category consists of professional services rendered by our independent registered public accounting firm for tax compliance and tax advice.

 

All Other Fees — This category consists of fees for other miscellaneous items.

 

We do not have an Audit Committee. Our board of directors acted as the Company’s Audit Committee during fiscal 2016, recommending a firm of independent certified public accountants to audit the annual financial statements; reviewing the independent auditors’ independence, the financial statements and their audit report; and reviewing management’s administration of the system of internal accounting controls.

 

Pre-Approval Policies and Procedure for Audit and Permitted Non-Audit Services

 

The Company has not adopted any written pre-approval policies or procedures as described in paragraph (c)(7)(i) of Rule 2.01 of Regulation S-X. All audit and permissible non-audit services in 2016 and 2015 were pre-approved by the Board of Directors.

 

  39  
     

 

PART IV

 

ITEM 15.   EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES.
     
3.1   March 26, 1998 – Articles of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.(A)(1) of the Form 10-SB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on February 7, 2000)
     
3.2   March 26, 1998 – Bylaws of the Company (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.(A)(2) of the Form 10-SB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on February 7, 2000)
     
3.3   June 9, 1994 – Certificate of Amendment of Articles of Incorporation adopting name change to Players Network filed with the Nevada Secretary of State (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 5.1 of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on September 13, 2004)
     
3.4   June 4, 2007 – Certificate of Amendment of Articles of Incorporation Increasing the Authorized Stock filed with the Nevada Secretary of State (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of the Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on June 8, 2007)
     
3.5   May 6, 2013 – Certificate of Amendment of Articles of Incorporation Increasing the Authorized Stock filed with the Nevada Secretary of State (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.5 of the Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on May 13, 2013)
     
3.6   July 8, 2014 - Articles of Incorporation for Green Leaf Farms Holdings, Inc. filed with the Nevada Secretary of State (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 of the Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on November 18, 2014)
     
3.7   July 18, 2014 - Articles of Organization for Green Leaf Medical, LLC. filed with the Nevada Secretary of State (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.3 of the Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on November 18, 2014)
     
4.1   August 31, 2004 – 2004 Non-Qualified Stock Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on September 13, 2004)
     
4.2   November 29, 2006 – 2006 Non-Qualified Attorneys & Accountants Stock Compensation Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on January 18, 2007)
     
4.3   July 24, 2007 – Certificate of Designation for Series A Preferred Stock filed with the Nevada Secretary of State (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on July 26, 2007)
     
4.4   July 22, 2009 – Amended and Restated 2004 Non-Qualified Stock Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on July 22, 2009)
     
4.5   December 16, 2013 – Amended and Restated 2004 Non-Qualified Stock Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on December 17, 2013)
     
4.6   November 21, 2016 – Form of Warrant Agreement (Initial Warrant) under letter agreement between Players Network and SK L-43, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on November 30, 2016)
     
4.7   November 21, 2016 – Form of Warrant Agreement (Additional Warrant) under letter agreement between Players Network and SK L-43, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 of the Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on November 30, 2016)
     
10.1   June 24, 2016 – Convertible Promissory Note (Steve Howard) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on August 23, 2016)
     
10.2   June 1, 2016 – Settlement Agreement Promissory Note (Ziad Gappy) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on August 23, 2016)

 

  40  
     

 

10.3   August 12, 2016 – Settlement Agreement & Release by and between Vis Vires Group, Inc. and Players Network (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on August 23, 2016)
     
10.4   August 15, 2016 – Definitive Funding Agreement by and between RxMM Health Limited and Players Network (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on August 23, 2016)
     
10.5   August 15, 2016 – 5% Convertible Debenture by and between RxMM Health Limited and Players Network (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on August 23, 2016)
     
10.6   August 15, 2016 – Stock Purchase Warrant Agreement by and between RxMM Health Limited and Players Network (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on August 23, 2016)
     
10.7   January 29, 2016 – Joint Construction & Development Agreement by and between mCig, Inc. and Green Leaf Farms Holdings, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on May 27, 2016)
     
10.8   March 4, 2016 – Lease Agreement by and between Belmont NLV, LLC and Green Leaf Farms Holdings, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on May 27, 2016)
     
10.9   January 6, 2016 – Stock Subscription Agreement by and between NF Associates, LLC and Players Network (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on May 27, 2016)
     
10.10   March 2, 2016 – Stock Subscription Agreement by and between SCP Investors, LLC and Players Network (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 of the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on May 27, 2016)
     
10.11   March 8, 2016 – Promissory Note (SCP Investors, LLC) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 of the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on May 27, 2016)
     
10.12   January 4, 2016 – Settlement Agreement and Release by and between JSJ Investments, Inc. and Players Network (JSJ Settlement) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 of the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on May 27, 2016)
     
10.13   December 28, 2015 – Debt Settlement Agreement by and between TJC Trading, LLC and Players Network (TJC Settlement) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.7 of the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on May 27, 2016)
     
10.14   January 21, 2016 – Payoff Agreement by and between Tangiers Investment Group, LLC and Players Network (TIG Settlement) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.8 of the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on May 27, 2016)
     
10.15   November 21, 2016 – Letter Agreement between Players Network and SK L-43, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on November 30, 2016)
     
10.16   November 21, 2016 – Form of Promissory Note under letter agreement between Players Network and SK L-43, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Players Network on November 30, 2016)
     
21.1*   Subsidiaries
     
31.1*   Certification of Mark Bradley, Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act

 

  41  
     

 

31.2*   Certification of Mark Bradley, Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act
     
32.1*   Certification of Mark Bradley, Principal Executive Officer and Principal Accounting Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act
     
101.INS*   XBRL Instance Document
     
101.SCH*   XBRL Schema Document
     
101.CAL*   XBRL Calculation Linkbase Document
     
101.DEF*   XBRL Definition Linkbase Document
     
101.LAB*   XBRL Labels Linkbase Document
     
101.PRE*   XBRL Presentation Linkbase Document

 

* Filed herewith

 

  42  
     

 

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm   F-1
     
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2016 and 2015   F-2
     
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2016 and 2015   F-3
     
Consolidated Statement of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit) for the Years Ended December 31, 2016 and 2015   F-4
     
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flow for the Years Ended December 31, 2016 and 2015   F-5
     
Notes to Financial Statements   F-6

 

  43  
     

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and

Stockholders of Players Network

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Players Network as of December 31, 2016 and 2015 and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ equity (deficit), and cash flows for the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2016. Players Network’s management is responsible for these consolidated financial statements. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Players Network as of December 31, 2016 and 2015, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2016, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company has recurring losses and insufficient working capital, which raises substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans regarding those matters also are described in Note 2. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

/s/ M&K CPAS, PLLC

 

www.mkacpas.com

Houston, Texas

April 17, 2017

 

  F- 1  
     

 

PLAYERS NETWORK

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

    December 31,
2016
    December 31,
2015
 
Assets                
                 
Current assets:                
Cash   $ 145,119     $ -  
Deferred television costs     -       116,454  
Other current assets     85,150       625  
Total current assets     230,269       117,079  
                 
Fixed assets, net     29,128       41,128  
Construction in progress     239,220       -  
                 
Total Assets   $ 498,617     $ 158,207  
                 
Liabilities and Stockholders’ (Deficit)                
                 
Current liabilities:                
Checks drawn in excess of available funds   $ -     $ 2,154  
Accounts payable     298,861       344,407  
Accrued expenses     293,418       332,235  
Deferred revenues     -       135,000  
Deferred rent obligations     15,656       2,148  
Settlements payable     70,000       -  
Convertible debentures, net of discounts of $241,634 and $287,802 at December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively     58,366       384,138  
Short term debt, net of discounts of $60 and $-0- at December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively     142,940       8,500  
Derivative liabilities     482,674       1,038,504  
Total current liabilities     1,361,915       2,247,086  
                 
Long term debt, net of discounts of $885,271 and $-0- at December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively     39,729       -  
Total Liabilities     1,401,644       2,247,086  
                 
Stockholders’ (Deficit):                
Series A convertible preferred stock, $0.001 par value, 2,000,000 shares authorized; 2,000,000 shares issued and outstanding     2,000       2,000  
Series C convertible preferred stock, $0.001 par value, 12,000,000 shares authorized; 12,000,000 and 5,750,000 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively     12,000       5,750  
Common stock, $0.001 par value, 600,000,000 shares authorized; 524,394,239 and 351,827,400 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively     524,394       351,827  
Additional paid-in capital     29,463,343       26,703,900  
Subscriptions payable, consisting of 1,000,000 and -0- shares at December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively     11,400       -  
Accumulated (deficit)     (30,639,417 )     (28,937,607 )
      (626,280 )     (1,874,130 )
Noncontrolling Interest     (276,747 )     (214,749 )
Total Stockholders’ (Deficit)     (903,027 )     (2,088,879 )
                 
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ (Deficit)   $ 498,617     $ 158,207  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

  F- 2  
     

 

PLAYERS NETWORK

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

    For the Years Ended  
    December 31,  
    2016     2015  
             
Revenue:   $ 135,234     $ 764  
                 
Expenses:                
Direct operating costs     145,324       57,705  
General and administrative     1,078,409       819,658  
Officer salaries     175,673       228,330  
Depreciation and amortization     24,084       30,143  
Total operating expenses     1,423,490       1,135,836  
                 
Operating loss     (1,288,256 )     (1,135,072 )
                 
Other income (expense):                
Loss on disposal of fixed assets     -       (12,854 )
Gain on debt extinguishment, net     165,615       11,282  
Interest expense     (409,648 )     (968,750 )
Change in derivative liabilities     (231,519 )     (13,091 )
Total other income (expense)     (475,552 )     (983,413 )
                 
Net loss   $ (1,763,808 )   $ (2,118,485 )
Less: Net loss attributable to the noncontrolling interest     61,998       29,520  
Net loss attributable to Players Network   $ (1,701,810 )   $ (2,088,965 )
               
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding - basic and fully diluted     428,311,253       265,226,745  
                 
Net loss per share - basic and fully diluted   $ (0.00 )   $ (0.01 )

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

  F- 3  
     

 

PLAYERS NETWORK

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

                                                                            Total  
    Series A     Series B     Series C                 Additional                       Stockholders’  
    Preferred Stock     Preferred Stock     Preferred Stock     Common Stock     Paid-in     Subscriptions     Accumulated     Noncontrolling     Equity  
    Shares     Amount     Shares     Amount     Shares     Amount     Shares     Amount     Capital     Payable     (Deficit)     Interest     (Deficit)  
                                                                               
Balance, December 31, 2014   2,000,000     $ 2,000       4,349,339     $ 4,349       -     $ -       179,271,304     $ 179,271     $ 25,041,295     $ 19,238     $ (26,848,642 )   $ (185,229 )   $ (1,787,718 )
                                                                                                         
Shares issued for cash     -       -       -       -       -       -       10,300,000       10,300       (1,300 )     -       -       -       9,000  
                                                                                                         
Shares issued for services     -       -       -       -       -       -       19,700,000       19,700       133,540       -       -       -       153,240  
                                                                                                         
Shares issued for services, related parties     -       -       -       -       5,750,000       5,750       10,500,000       10,500       232,350       -       -       -       248,600  
                                                                                                         
Shares issued for conversion of debts     -       -       -       -       -       -       127,050,022       127,050       323,921       (19,238 )     -       -       431,733  
                                                                                                         
Shares issued on forbearance agreement     -       -       -       -       -       -       656,735       657       9,851       -       -       -       10,508  
                                                                                                         
Shares exchanged pursuant to settlement agreement     -       -       (4,349,339 )     (4,349 )     -       -       4,349,339       4,349       47,843       -       -       -       47,843  
                                                                                                         
Adjustments to derivative liability due to debt conversions     -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       916,400       -       -       -       916,400  
                                                                                                         
Net loss for the year ended December 31, 2015                                                                                     (2,088,965 )     (29,520 )     (2,118,485 )
                                                                                                         
Balance, December 31, 2015